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M.Tech.

Structural Engineering
2014-2015

SYLLABUS
SCHEME OF TEACHING AND EXAMINATION

Department of Civil Engineering

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING


VISION OF THE COLLEGE
NIE will be a globally acknowledged institution providing value based technological and
educational services through best-in-class people and infrastructure.
VISION OF THE DEPARTMENT
The department will be an internationally recognized centre for value based learning,
research and consultancy services in civil engineering.
MISSION OF THE DEPARTMENT

Consistently imparting value based education through competent faculty and


facilities.
Engaging in research and development activities including collaborative and
sponsored endeavors.
Actively contributing to societal needs by providing quality consultancy services with
special emphasis on sustainable development.
GRADUATES ATTRIBUTES

1.
Scholarship of knowledge
Acquire in depth knowledge of specific discipline or professional area, including wider and
global perspective, with an ability to discriminate, evaluate, analyse and synthesize existing
and new knowledge and integration of the same for enhancement of knowledge.
2.
Critical thinking
Analyze complex engineering problems critically; apply independent judgment for
synthesizing information to make intellectual and/or creative advances for conducting
research in a wider theoretical, practical and policy context.
3.
Problem solving
Think laterally and originally, conceptualize and solve engineering problems, evaluate a wide
range of potential solutions for those problems and arrive at feasible, optimal solutions after
considering public health and safety, cultural, societal and environmental factors in the core
areas of expertise.
4.
Research skill
Extract information pertinent to unfamiliar problems through literature survey and
experiments, apply appropriate research methodologies, techniques and tools, design, conduct
experiments, analyze and interpret data, demonstrate higher order skill and view things in a
broader perspective, contribute
individually/in group to the development of
scientific/technological knowledge in one or more domains of engineering.
5.
Usage of modern tools
Create, select, learn and apply appropriate techniques, resources, and modern engineering and
IT tools, including prediction and modeling to complex engineering activities with an
understanding of the limitations.
6.
Collaborative and multidisciplinary work
Possess knowledge and understanding of group dynamic, recognize opportunities and
contribute positively ton collaborative- multidisciplinary scientific research, demonstrate a
2

capacity a capacity for self-management and teamwork, decision making based on openmindedness, objectivity and rational analysis in order to achieve common goals and further
the learning of themselves as well as others.
7.
Project management and finance
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering and management principles and
apply the same to ones own work, as a member and leader in a team, manage projects
efficiently in respective disciplines and multidisciplinary environments after consideration of
economical; and financial factors.
8.
Communication
Communicate with the engineering community, and with society at large, regarding complex
engineering activities confidently and effectively such as, being able to comprehend and
write effective reports and design documentation by adhering to appropriate standards, make
effective presentations, and give and receive clear instructions.
9.
Life long learning
Recognize the need for, and have the preparation and ability to engage in life long learning
independently, with a high level of enthusiasm and commitment to improve knowledge and
competence continuously.
10.
Ethical practices and social responsibility
Acquire professional and intellectual integrity, professional code of conduct, ethics of
research and scholarship, consideration of the impact of research outcomes on professional
practices and an understanding of responsibility to contribute to the community for
sustainable development of society.
11.
Independent and reflective learning
Observe and examine critically the outcomes of ones actions and make corrective measures
subsequently, and learn from mistakes without depending on external feedback.

Programme Educational Objectives


Civil Engineering graduates are expected to attain the following program educational
objectives (PEOs) 3-5 years after Post-Graduation. Our Post Graduates will be professionals
who will be able to
Deliver competent services in the field of Structural Engg., with a knowledge of the
principles of engineering and the theories of science that underlie them;
Continue their professional development, nurture research attitude, and life-long
learning with scientific temperament;
Exercise leadership quality and professional integrity, with a commitment to the
societal needs and sustainable development.

PROGRAMME OUTCOMES for PG (Structures)


Post Graduates from the Dept of Civil Engineering will be able to:
1. Acquire in-depth knowledge in structural Engineering with an understanding to
evaluate, analyze, synthesize and integrate the fundamental and contemporary
knowledge.
2. Synthesize the acquired knowledge to critically analyze complex Structural
Engineering problems and capable of carrying out research in chosen field of interest.
3. Conceptualize and solve Structural Engineering problems to arrive at feasible and
optimal solutions through a multidimensional thinking process.
4. Have an inclination for research and abilities to design and plan research programmes.
5. Use the modern tools to explore its techniques and capabilities to model complex
Structural Engineering systems.
6. Carryout collaborative- multidisciplinary scientific research with an understanding of
group dynamics team work and decision making to achieve the objectives in a rational
approach.
7. Apply the principles of engineering, management and financial to carryout structural
engineering and multidisciplinary projects.
8. Prepare reports, technical papers with an effective documentation and presentation of
ideas and research outcomes.
9. Engage in independent and lifelong learning in the context of rapid technological
advances.
10. Practice professional ethics and integrity while discharging the responsibilities in the
society.
11. Engage in independent and reflective learning as a corrective measure to learn from
ones mistakes.

SCHEME OF STUDY
M.Tech. Structures (2014 2015)

I SEMESTER- M.Tech. (Structural Engineering)

Scheme of Teaching and Examination


(Autonomous Scheme)
Subject
Code

Subject

AMA0401

Sl.No

Teaching Hrs/
Week

Credits

Applied Engineering Mathematics

MSE0501

Advanced Mechanics of Solids

MSE0502

Design of Concrete Structures

MSE0503

Theory of Elasticity & Plasticity

MSE0509

MSE0514

Analysis & Design of Sub


Structures (Elective I)
Fire Resistance of Structures
(Elective - II)
Total Credits

29

35

Teaching Hrs /Week

II SEMESTER- M.Tech. (Structural Engineering)

Scheme of Teaching and Examination


(Autonomous Scheme)
Teaching Hrs/
Week
L
T
P

Sl.No

Subject
Code

MSE0504

Structural Dynamics

MSE0505

Design of Steel Structures

MSE0506

MSE0401

Finite Element Analysis


Analysis and Design of Shell
Structures

(Elective III)

(Elective IV)

5
6

...
...

Subject

Total Credits
Teaching Hrs /Week

Credits

29
34

III SEMESTER- M.Tech (Structural Engineering)

Scheme of Teaching and Examination


(Autonomous Scheme)
Teaching Hrs/
Week
L
T
P

Sl.No

Subject
Code

MSE0402

Industrial Training

MSE0403

Design Studio

--

--

--

MSE0801

Major Project Phase 1

MSE0201

Seminar

--

Subject

--Total Credits

Credits

2
14

*Students has to do either Industrial Training or Design Studio

IV SEMESTER- M.Tech. (Structural Engineering)

Scheme of Teaching and Examination


(Autonomous Scheme)
Sl.No

Subject Code

MSE2801

Subject
Major Project Phase 2

Teaching Hrs/
Week
Credits
L
T
P
_
0
0
28
Total Credits
28

ELECTIVE COURSES

Sl.No

Subject Code

Subject

Teaching Hrs/
Week
L

Credits

MSE0507

Repair , Rehabilitation and


maintenance of Structures

MSE0508

Design of Bridges

MSE0509

Analysis & Design of Sub


Structures

MSE0510

Plastic Analysis

MSE0511

Earthquake Resistant Design


of Structures

MSE0512

Structural Optimization

MSE0513

Safety of Structures

MSE0514

Fire Resistance of Structures

MSE0515

Design of Storage Structures

3
4
5

Core Courses

38

Elective Courses

20

Seminars
/Industrial
Training/ Design
Studio

06

Major Project

36

TOTAL

5
5
5

100

SYLLABUS
I Semester

I Semester M.Tech [4-0-0]


(Common to Hydraulics, Structures, Power Systems, CAID)
Applied Mathematics
Sub Code
Hrs/Week
SEE Hrs

: AEM0401
: 04
: 03

Total : 52 hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. : 100 Marks

COURSE OUTCOMES
1. Obtain the externals of functions expressed in the form of integrals and solve standard
variational problems.
2. Solve linear homogeneous partial differential equations with constant coefficients.
3. Obtain the numerical solution of a partial differential equation.
4. Optimize the function under some constraints by different methods.
5. Establish the homomorphism between vector spaces using Linear transform and
obtain orthonormal basis for a vector space using inner product space.
6. Evaluate complex line integrals.

Objective: Mathematics course content is designed to cater to the needs of several subjects at
the PG level.
Unit-I:

Calculus of Variation

Variation of a function and a functional. Extremal of a functional, variation problems, Eulers


equation, Standard variational problems including geodesics, minimal surface of revolution,
(SLE:hanging chain problem), Brachistochrone problems, Isoperimetric problems.
Functionals of second order derivatives
- 9Hrs
Partial Differential Equations - I
Unit-II:
Solution of linear homogeneous PDE with constant and variable coefficients.(SLE : Cauchys
type partial differential equation)
- 9 Hrs
Partial Differential Equations - II
Unit III:
Numerical solution of PDE Parabolic, Elliptic (SLE: Hyperbolic) equations.

- 8 Hrs

Unit-IV:
Linear Programming
Standard form of LPP, Graphical method. Simplex method, (SLE: Degeneracy in simplex
method), Big-M method, Duality.
- 9Hrs
Unit-V:
Linear Algebra
Vectors & vector spaces. Inner product, Length/Norm. Orthogonality, orthogonal projections,
orthogonal bases, Gram-Schmidt process. Least square problems.
Linear transformations, Kernel, Range. Matrix of linear transformation, Inverse linear
transformation (SLE: Applications).
- 9 Hrs

10

Unit-VI:

Complex Integration

Basic concepts of analytical functions, Complex line integral, Cauchys theorem, Cauchys
integral formula. Laurent series expansion (SLE: Problems on Laurent series expansion),
poles and residues, Cauchys residues theorem.
- 8 Hrs
Books for Reference::
1. Higher Engineering Mathematics Dr. B.S. Grewal, 40th edition, Khanna publication.
2. Advance Engineering Mathematics H. K. Dass, 17th edition, Chand publication.
3. Higher Engineering Mathematics Dr. B.V. Ramana, 5th edition, Tata Mc Graw-Hill.
4. Linear Algebra Larson & Falvo (Cengage learning),6th edition

11

I SEMESTER- M.Tech. (Structural Engg.)


ADVANCED MECHANICS OF SOLIDS (4:2:0)
Sub Code : MSE0501
Hrs/week : 4+2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
On Completion of this course the students will be able to:
1. Apply basic concepts of structural behavior to solve beam problems;
2. Analyze curved beams, beams on elastic foundations and plates under bending;
3. Comprehend the concepts of fractures mechanics.
Unit I:
Bending of beams
Introduction, Stresses and deflection of straight beams subjected to unsymmetrical bending,
Definition of shear centre, Shear centre for unsymmetrical sections, Shear stresses in thin
walled sections, bending of curved beams (Winkler-Bach formula),
Self learning Exercise: Deflection of curved beams.
12 Hrs
Unit II:
Beams on Elastic Foundation
Introduction, Winklers, Vlasov, Filenenko-Borodich and Pasternak models for representing
elastic foundation, Differential equation of elastic line for straight and curved beam
according to Winklers hypothesis, solutions for beams of infinite length, semi-infinite length
and finite length subjected to various loading conditions.
Self learning Exercise: Winklers hypothesis & finite length
12 Hrs
Unit III:
Stress Concentration and Fracture Mechanics
Introduction, Stress concentration in members under tension, bending and torsion, Contact
stresses, Determination of stresses for point and line contacts, Stress intensity factor, Fracture
toughness, Fracture modes,
Self learning Exercise: Strain-energy release rate.
13 Hrs
Unit IV:
Bending of Plates
Introduction, Stress resultants, Strain-displacement relations, Equilibrium equations for small
displacement theory, Boundary conditions, Strain energy of plate, Solution for circular plates,
Naviers , Levys, Rayleigh-Ritz and Galerkins solutions for rectangular plates.
Self learning Exercise: Galerkins solutions for rectangular plates
15 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. Srinath LS, Advanced mechanics of solids - Tata Mc Graw Hill Education, 2009.
2. Arthur P Boresi, Richard J Schmidt and Omar M Sidebottom, Advanced mechanics
of materials 6th Edition, John Wiley and Sons Inc. - 2009

REFERENCE BOOKS

1. Fred B Seely and James O Smith, Advanced mechanics of materials 2nd Edition,
John Wiley and Sons Inc.- 2001
12

DESIGN OF CONCRETE STRUCTURES (3:2:2)


Sub Code : MSE0502
Hrs/week : 3+2+2
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Design continuous beams applying redistribution of moments and design slabs by
yield line analysis
2. Understand tall structural systems
3. Design prestressed concrete members
Unit -I:
Design of Continuous Beams with Redistribution of Moments
Introduction, Analysis parameters, Live load arrangements, Redistribution of moment
Reinforcement requirements, Typical continuous beam details, Flexure design considerations,
Simplified analysis for uniform loads, Moment and shear coefficients for continuous
beams.
Self learning Exercise: Moment and shear coefficients for continuous beams.
8 Hrs
Unit -II:
Yield Line Analysis of Slabs
Yield lines, ultimate moment along a yield line, internal virtual work due to an ultimate
moment, virtual work due to an applied load. Effect of top corner steel in a square slab.
Self learning Exercise: Effect of top corner steel in a square slab.
12 Hrs
Unit -III:
Structural Systems for Tall Buildings
Introduction, Subsystems and Components, Floor Systems, Vertical Framing Systems,
Lateral Resisting Frame Systems, Moment Resisting Frames, Braced Frames, Shear Walls, ,
Loadings to be considered, Framed Tube Systems.
Self learning Exercise: Framed Tube Systems.
6 Hrs
Unit -IV:
Design of Prestressed Concrete
Review of concepts of mechanics of PSC, flexural strength, Limit state design criteria.
Simplified procedures as per codes, strain compatibility method, Basic concepts in selection
of cross section for bending, stress distribution in end block, Design of anchorage zone
reinforcement, Design of prestressed concrete tanks, Pipes
Self learning Exercise, Design of prestressed concrete tanks, Pipes
16 Hrs
Students will conduct following experiments in laboratory
1.
2.
3.
4.

Flexural test on RC beams


Shear test on RC beams
Load test on RC slabs
NDT on RC members

13

TEXT BOOK

1. Dr. H. J. Shah, Reinforced Concrete, Vol-1 and Vol-2, Charotar, 8th Edition 2009 and
6th Edition 2012 respectively.
2. T.Y. Lin and N.H. Burns Design of Prestressed concrete Structures - John Wiley
1981.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1.

P.C Varghese Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design -. Prentice Hall of India 2004.

2.

N. Krishna Raju Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design -, 2nd edition, CBS Publishers
and Distributors.- 2009.

3.

Krishna Raju N., Prestressed concrete, Tata McGraw Hill Company, New Delhi 1998

4.

Rajagopalan, N, Prestressed Concrete, Alpha Science, 2002.

5.

IS456, IS1343, SP16, SP34

14

THEORY OF ELASTICITY & PLASITICITY (4:2:0)


Sub Code : MSE0503
Hrs/week : 4+2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Solve plane stress and plane strain problems two dimensional problems in rectangular
coordinates
2. Analyze two dimensional problems in polar co-ordiantes, axis symiteric problems; three
dimensional problems
3. Apply basic principles of plasticity & theories of failures to solve engineering problems

Unit I:
Introduction
Definition of stress and strain at a point, components of stress and strain at a point in Cartesian
and polar co-ordinates, constitutive relations, equilibrium equations, compatibility equations and
boundary conditions in 2- D and 3-D cases.
Self learning Exercise: Boundary conditions in 3-D cases
6 Hrs
Unit II:
Plane stress and plane strain
Airy's stress function approach to 2-D problems of elasticity, simple problems of bending of
beams. Solution of axisymmetric problems, stress concentration due to the presence of a circular
hole in plates. Elementary problems of elasticity in three dimensions, stretching of a prismatical
bar by its own weight, twist of circular shafts, torsion of noncircular sections, membrane
analogy, Propagation of waves in solid media.
Self learning Exercise: Propagation of waves in solid media
10 Hrs
Unit III:
Two-dimensional problems in rectangular coordinates
Solution by Polynominals End Effects, Saint Venants Principle Determination of
Displacements bending of a Cantilever Loaded at the end Bending of Beam by uniform
load.
Self learning Exercise: Bending of Beam by uniform load.
8 Hrs
Unit IV:
Two - Dimensional Problems in Polar Coordinates
General equation in Polar coordinates Stress distribution symmetrical about an axis Pure
bending of curved bars Strain components in polar coordinates Displacements for
symmetrical stress distributions Rotating disks Bending of a curved bar by a force at the
end.
Self learning Exercise: Rotating disks
10 Hrs

15

Unit V:
Analysis of Stress And Strain in Three Dimensions
Introduction Principal stresses Stress Ellipsoid and stress directrix surface
Determination of the principal stress Stress invariants Determination of the maximum
shearing stress.
Self learning Exercise: Stress Ellipsoid and stress directrix surface
10 Hrs
Unit VI:
Plasticity
Stress strain diagram in simple tension, perfectly elastic, Rigid Perfectly plastic, Linear
work hardening, Elastic Perfectly plastic, Elastic Linear work hardening materials,
Failure theories, yield conditions, stress space representation of yield, criteria through
Westergard stress space, Tresca and Von-Mises criteria of yielding.
Self learning Exercise: Tresca and Von-Mises criteria of yielding
8 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. L.S. Srinath Advanced Mechanics of Solids, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Co ltd.,
New Delhi - 1999.
2. Mohammed Ameen Computational Elasticity Narosa Publishing House - 2008

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Dr. P.N.Chandra Mouli Continuum Mechanics Yes D ee Publications - 2014
2. Timoshenko and Goodier Theory of elasticity-, McGraw Hill Book Company, III
Edition, 1983.
3. S.Valliappan Continuum Mechanics fundamentals-, Oxford and IBH - 1981
4. Xi Lu, Theory of Elasticity, John Wiley
5. Chen W.P and Hendry D.J, Plasticity for Structural Engineers, Springer Verlag
2007.

16

SYLLABUS
II Semester

17

II SEMESTER- M.Tech. (Structural Engg.)


STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS (4:2:0)
Sub Code : MSE0504
Hrs/week : 4+2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Comprehend the basic principles of dynamics;


Analyze lumped mass systems for their dynamic behavior;
Analyze continuous systems for their dynamic behavior.

Unit I:
Introduction
Introduction to Dynamical problems in Civil Engineering, Concept of degrees of freedom,
DAlemberts principle, principle of virtual displacement and energy principles.
Self Learning Exercise: Energy principles.
6 Hrs
Unit II:
Single-degree-of-freedom systems
Mathematical models of SDOF system, Free vibration response of damped and undamped
systems, response to harmonic loading, support motion, evaluation of damping, vibration
isolation, transmissibility, response to periodic forces. Numerical methods applied to SDOF,
Direct integration and Duhamel integral, principle of vibration-measuring instruments
seismometer and accelerometer
Self Learning Exercise: Seismometer and accelerometer
15 Hrs
Unit III:
Multi-degree freedom systems
Mathematical models of MDOF systems, free vibration of undamped MDOF systems Natural frequencies and mode shapes orthogonality conditions, free vibration of damped
MDOF systems, modal analysis free and forced vibration with and without damping.
Self Learning Exercise: forced vibration without damping
15 Hrs
Unit VI:
Approximate methods of analysis
Rayleighs method, Stodolas method, Rayleigh-Ritz method, Matrix iterative method
Self Learning Exercise: Matrix iterative method
8 Hrs
Unit V:
Dynamics of Continuous Systems
Vibration of beams, Beams with various boundary conditions. Eigen functions and
orthogonality of functions. Response of beams to dynamic loads. Introduction to wave
propagation in bars.
Self Learning Exercise: Introduction to wave propagation in bars.

8 Hrs
18

TEXT BOOK
1. Mukyopadhyaya, Vibration and Structural Dynamics- Oxford &IBH 1990.
2. Mario Paz, Structural dynamics Theory and Computation- CBS Publishers
2010

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Biggs Structural Dynamics-, McGraw Hill 1964.
2. R.W. Clough & J. Penzien Dynamics of Structures -, McGraw Hill -1993.
3. Anil K. Chopra, Dynamics of Structures - Prentice Hall of India 2007.
4. Timoshenko, S Vibration Problems in Engineering - VanNostrand Co., - 2001
5. William Thompson Theory of Vibration with Applications -, Pearson Education
2008.
3. William Seto, Mechanical Vibrations- McGraw Hill Pub., (Schaum Series) 2008.

19

DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES (4:2:0)


Sub Code : MSE0505
Hrs/week : 4+2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Comprehend the plastic behavior of structural steel;
2. Design microwave towers and transmission towers, Also design steel structures
using light gauge steel;
3. Analyze and design tubular structures Industrial buildings and steel stacks.
Unit I:
Plastic Behaviour of Structural Steel
Introduction, Plastic theory, Plastic hinge concept, Plastic collapse load, conditions of plastic
analysis, Theorem of Plastic collapse, Methods of Plastic analysis, Plastic design of
continuous beams.
Self Learning Exercise: Plastic design of continuous beams.
8 Hrs
Unit II:
Design of Towers
Introduction, Types of towers, Tower configuration, loads, Analysis, Member selection.
Configuration of towers for power transmission.
Self Learning Exercise: Configuration of towers for power transmission
8 Hrs
Unit III:
Design in Light Gauge Steel
Introduction, types of sections, material, local buckling of thin elements stiffened
compression members, multiple stiffened compression elements, compression members,
laterally supported flexural members, laterally unsupported flexural members.
Self Learning Exercise: laterally unsupported flexural members
8 Hrs
Unit IV:
Tubular Structures
Introduction, Classification, Advantages and disadvantages, Behaviour of tubular sections,
minimum thickness, combined stresses, connections, Design of truss elements including
purlins, Design of Space truss.
Self Learning Exercise: Design of Space truss
12 Hrs
Unit V:
Design of Industrial Buildings
Introduction, Selection of roofing and wall material, selection of bay width, structural
framing, purlins, girts and eave strut, plane trusses, floor plates, end bearings, Design of
Gantry girders, concepts of pre-engineered building.
Self Learning Exercise: Concepts of pre-engineered building
10 Hrs

20

Unit VI:
Design of Steel Stacks
Introduction, Proportioning of stack, Codal provisions, Loads on Stacks, Load combinations,
Stresses in Self supporting stacks, Design procedure for self supporting stacks, Guyed steel
stacks, Pull on guy wires, Design procedure for guyed steel stacks.
Self Learning Exercise: Design procedure for guyed steel stacks
6 Hrs
Note: Study of this course should be based on IS800-2007

TEXT BOOK
1. Duggal S.K, Limit State Design of Steel Structures- Tata Mac Graw Hill, New
Delhi 2010.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. N. Subramanian Design of Steel Structures- Oxford - 2008
2. M.L.Gambir Design of Steel Structures PHI Learning 2012
3. Rtamachandra Limit State of Design of Steel Structures Standard Book House - 2012
4. Bureau of Indian Standards, IS800-2007,IS801,IS806,IS1161, IS875,SP6

21

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS (4:0:2)


Sub Code : MSE0506
Hrs/week : 4+0+2
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Use stiffness method to solve trusses, beams & frames;


Use Rayleigh method, Discretize structural elements and choose suitable displacement
models for one, two and three dimensional elements
Apply concept of isoperimetric elements for solving engineering problems and Analyze
beams, trusses, plate, shells axisymmetric problems

Unit I:
Introduction
Basic concepts of elasticity Introduction to matrix approach, stiffness method - General
description of the method, comparison between Finite difference method and finite element
method. Energy concepts, Theorem of minimum potential energy, Principle of virtual work,
Rayleigh Ritz method. Variation method and minimization of Energy approach for
element formulation, Development of strain displacement matrix and stiffness matrix
consistent load vector.
Self Learning Exercise: Variation method and minimization of Energy approach for element
formulation
10 Hrs
Unit II:
Discretization of Structures
Finite elements used for one, two & three dimensional problems Element aspect ratio
mesh refinement vs. higher order elements Numbering of nodes to minimize band width,
sparse storage methods.
Self Learning Exercise: Finite elements used for three dimensional problems
8 Hrs
Unit III:
Displacement Model
Nodal displacement parameters Convergence criterion Compatibility requirements
Geometric invariance Shape function Polynomial form of displacement function
Generalized and Natural coordinates Lagrangian interpolation function shape functions
for one, two & three dimensional elements.
Self Learning Exercise: Shape functions for three dimensional elements.
10 Hrs
Unit IV:
Concept of Isoparimetric Elements
Internal nodes and higher order elements Serendipity and Lagrangian family of Finite
Elements Sub parametric and Super parametric elements Condensation of internal nodes
Jacobian transformation Matrix numerical integration.
Self Learning Exercise: Lagrangian family
8 Hrs

22

Unit V:
Application of Finite Element Method for The Analysis of One & Two Dimensional
Problem
Analysis of simple beams and plane trusses Application to plane stress / strain /
axisymmetric problems using CST & Quadrilateral Elements.
Self Learning Exercise: Axisymmetric problems using CST
8 Hrs
Unit VI:
Application To Plates & Shells
Choice of displacement function (C 0, C1 and C2 type) Techniques for Non linear
Analysis.
Self Learning Exercise: Techniques for Non linear Analysis.
8 Hrs

Students will analyze (linear) the following using standard Finite Element
Software;
1. Masonry Prisms
2. Plain Concrete Beams
3. RCC Beams & Slabs
TEXT BOOKS
1. Rajasekaran. S, Finite Element Analysis in Engineering Design- Wheeler
Publishing 1988.
2. Chandrupatla TR and Belagonda Finite Element Analysis Universities Press
2009

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Krishnamoorthy C S, Finite Element Analysis- Tata McGraw Hill 2005.
2. Bathe K J. Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis- Prentice Hall
1982.
3. Cook R D, Malkan D S & Plesta M.E, Concepts and Application of Finite Element
Analysis - 3rd Edition, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 2007.
4. Shames I H and Dym C J, Energy and Finite Element Methods in Structural
Mechanics- McGraw Hill, New York, 1985
5. Desai C and Abel J F, Introduction to the Finite Element Method- East West Press
Pvt. Ltd., 1972.

23

ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF SHELL STRUCTURES (4:0:0)


Sub Code : MSE0401
Hrs/week : 4+0+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Analyze the problems on different types of shells using membrane theory;


Analyze and design long cylindrical shells using bending theory;
Analyze folded plates using different methods.

Unit I:
General Introduction to Shell Theory
Introduction, definition of terms, types of surfaces, classification of shell surfaces, structural
action of a shell, Stress resultants, selection of shell type, methods of analysis of shells.
Self Learning Exercise: Classification of shell surfaces
6 Hrs
Unit II:
Membrane Theory for Shells of Revolution and Shells of Translation
Introduction, Equilibrium equations, strain-displacement relations, boundary conditions,
Membrane analysis of cylindrical, conical and spherical shells with examples, Membrane
theory for elliptic paraboloid and hyperbolic paraboloid shell surfaces.
Self Learning Exercise: Paraboloid shell surfaces
16 Hrs
Unit III:
Bending Theory of Cylindrical Shells
Introduction, Equilibrium equations, strain-displacement relations, stress-strain relations,
force-displacement relations, differential equation in terms of displacements, solution to
simply supported cylindrical shell, Schorer theory for long cylindrical shell, design of
reinforcement.
Self Learning Exercise: Schorer theory for long cylindrical shell,
16 Hrs
Unit IV:
Folded Plates
Introduction, folded plate behaviour, selection of dimensions of folded plate, methods of
analysis- Whitney method and Simpsons method, design of reinforcements.
Self Learning Exercise: Simpsons method,
14 Hrs

TEXT BOOKS
1. K Chandrashekhara, Analysis of thin concrete shells, New Age International
1995.
2. G S Ramaswamy Design and construction of concrete shell roofs, CBS publishers
and Distributers 2005

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. P C Verghese, Design of reinforced concrete shells and folded plates, PHI 2010.
2. Stephen P Timoshenko and S Woinowsky Krieger, Theory of plates and shells,
McGraw Hill International Edition. 1959.

24

ELECTIVES

25

ELECTIVES
REPAIR REHABILITATION AND MAINTENANCE OF STRUCTURES
(4:2:0)
Sub Code : MSE0507
Hrs/week : 4+2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
On completion of this course the student will be:

Asses existing conditions of buildings;


To suggest repairs and remedies to be adopted for rehabilitation of buildings;
To find causes of leakages and suggest remedial measures of water proofing;

Unit I:
The Challenge of Renovation / Rehabilitation
Terminology, When to Renovate, Beginning a Renovation Project, Typical Structural
Challenges, Role of Building codes in Renovation, Renovation Provisions of Model Building
Codes, Renovate or Rebuild?
Self Learning Exercise: Renovate or Rebuild?
8 Hrs
Unit II:
Investigating Existing Conditions
Why Investigate?, Assessing Building Condition, Material Properties in Steel systems,
Concrete Framing, Load Testing of Concrete Structures, Post-Tensioned Concrete Framing,
Wood Framing, Masonry, Building Envelope.
Self Learning Exercise: Building Envelope.
8 Hrs
Unit III:
Repairing Deteriorated Concrete
Overview, Repairing cracks, Corrosion of Reinforcement and its Effects on concrete,
Patching spalls and Deteriorated Areas, Cathodic Protection and Electrochemical Chloride
Extraction, Corrosion Inhibitors, Other types of Damage to concrete, Materials for concrete
Repair, Durability of Repairs, Systematic Maintenance Program.
Self Learning Exercise: Systematic Maintenance Program.
8 Hrs
Unit IV:
Rehabilitation of Concrete Structures
Method of repair & restoration patch repair, pressure grouting, guniting shotcreting,
jacketing, replacement, fiber wrapping etc. materials construction chemicals, Repair
sequences.
Self Learning Exercise: Repair sequences.
7 Hrs
Unit V:
Renovating Steel-Framed Buildings
Steel: The Venerable Material, Past Design Methods and Allowable Stresses for iron and
steel Beams, Early Iron and Steel Columns, Properties of Early Fasteners, Open- Web Joists,
Strengthening Floors, Reinforced Steel Members by Welding, Reinforced Beams by
Composite Action with Concrete, Strengthening Beams Connections, Composite SteelConcrete Columns, Openings in Existing Steel Beams, Thermal Prestressing of Steel
Structures, Steel Corrosion: Evaluation and Protection.
Self Learning Exercise: Steel Corrosion: Evaluation and Protection.
12Hrs
26

Unit VI:
Renovating Masonry
Evolution of masonry design methods, Evaluation of Masonry structure, cracks in masonry,
Masonry repair, Strengthening Masonry structural elements, Repairing Masonry Arches,
Other Masonry renovation tasks.
Self Learning Exercise: Other Masonry renovation tasks.
9 Hrs

TEXT BOOKS
1. Alexander Newman Structural Renovation of Buildings , McGraw Hill 2009.
2. Raiker R.N, Learn for Failure from Deficiencies in design, Construction &
service R&D Center (SDCPL)

REFERENCE BOOK
1. Allen RTL and Edwards, SC, The Repair of Concrete Structures Blakie and Sons 1993.

27

ANALYSIS & DESIGN OF SUB STRUCTURES (4:2:0)


Sub Code : MSE0509
Hrs/week : 4+2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
Upon completing of this course, the student will be able to,

Proportion the different types of shallow foundation;


Design the deep foundation like pile and caisson;
Decide the safety aspects and economical design of foundation on expansive soils;
Decide the modern techniques to be adopted to improve the engineering properties of
weak ground.

Unit I:
Soil Investigation and Design Parameters
Introduction, Soil investigation - Responsibility of design Engineer, Information required
from soil investigation, Soil test report.
Shallow Foundation
Presumptive Bearing capacity according to BIS, Factors affecting Bearing capacity and
Settlement, Types of shallow foundations, Criteria to fix depth of footing, Foundation
loading, Principles of design of footings, Proportioning of footings for equal settlement,
Design of spread footings, Design of eccentrically loaded spread footings, Combined footings
( Rectangular & Trapezoidal), Design of strap footings, Principles of design of raft
foundation, Common types of raft foundation, Design methods for raft foundation, Variation
of contact pressure under footings, Settlement of foundations.
Self Learning Exercise: Variation of contact pressure under footings,
12 Hrs
Unit II:
Pile Foundation
Introduction, Load transfer in pile foundation, Load carrying capacity of pile based on static
and dynamic methods, penetration tests and pile load tests, Group capacity of piles in
different types of soils, Group efficiency of piles, Negative skin friction, Under reamed piles,
Laterally loaded piles, tension piles and batter piles, Proportioning and design of pile
foundation, Settlement of piles.
Self Learning Exercise: Laterally loaded piles, tension piles and batter piles,
12 Hrs
Unit III:
Foundations on Expansive Soils
Introduction, Identification of expansive soils, Swell potential, swell pressure, effects of
swelling on buildings, preventive measures for expansion soils, modification of expansive
soils, Design & Construction of under reamed pile foundation.
Self Learning Exercise: Construction of under reamed pile foundation.
6 Hrs
Unit IV:
Foundation for Bridges
Introduction, drilled piers, construction of drilled piers, advantages and disadvantages of
drilled piers, design of open caisson, construction of open caisson, Pneumatic caissons,
construction of Pneumatic Caisson, Floating caissons. Different shapes of wells, components
of well foundation, Forces acting on well foundations, Grip length sinking of wells, measures
for rectification of tilts and shifts.
Self Learning Exercise: sinking of wells, measures for rectification of tilts and shifts.
8 Hrs
28

Unit V:
Machine Foundation
Introduction, types of machine foundation, basic definitions, degree freedom of a block
foundations, general criteria for design of machine foundation, free vibration, forced
vibration, vibration analysis of machine foundation, determination of natural frequency,
design criteria for foundations of reciprocating machines, reinforcement and construction
details, vibration isolation and control.
Self Learning Exercise: vibration isolation and control.
10 Hrs
Unit VI:
Ground Improvement Techniques
Introduction, improvement of cohesive soils pre-compression, sand drains, wick drains and
stone columns. Improvement of cohesionless soils vibrofloation, dynamic compaction,
compaction by blasts, compaction piles and soils stabilization.
Self Learning Exercise: soils stabilization.
4 Hrs

TEXT BOOKS
1. P.C. Verghese Foundation Engineering - Phi Learning Pvt. Ltd. 2009.
2. K.C Arora Soil Mechanics and foundation Engineering - Standard Publishers
Distributors 2011.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Swami Saran, Analysis and Design of substructures - Oxford & IBH Pub. Co. Pvt.
Ltd., 1998.
2. Bowles J.E, Foundation Analysis and Design - McGraw-Hill Int. editions, 5th Ed.,
1996.
3. Kasmalkar Foundation Engineering - Pvgp
4. N.N.Som & S.C. Das Theory and Practice of Foundation Design - Phi Learning, 2009.

29

SAFETY OF STRUCTURES (4:2:0)


Sub Code : MSE0513
Hrs/week : 4+2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
On Completion of this course the students will be able to

Understand the concepts involved in structural safety ;


Analyze a structure and compute its inherent safety level;
Design a structure so as to comply with a target safety level.

Unit I:
Concepts of Structural safety, Basic Statistics and Probability theory
Principles of safety in design, Basic statistics- Graphical representation and data reduction
techniques- Histogram, frequency polygon, Measures of central tendency- grouped and
ungrouped data, measures of dispersion, measures of asymmetry. Curve Fitting and
Correlation, Random events-Sample space and events, Venn diagram and event space,
Measures of probability-interpretation, probability axioms, addition rule, multiplication rule,
conditional probability, probability tree diagram, statistical independence, total probability
theorem and Bayes theorem. Probability mass function, probability density function,
Mathematical expectation. Probability Distributions, Discrete distributions- Binomial and
poison distributions, Continuous distributions- Normal, Log normal distributions
Self Learning Exercise: Log normal distributions
15 Hrs
Unit II:
Probability Distributions for Resistance and Loads
Statistics of Properties of concrete, steel. Statistics of strength of bricks and mortar, Selection
of probabilistic model, probabilistic analysis of loads.
Self Learning Exercise: probabilistic analysis of loads.
15Hrs
Unit III:
Reliability Analysis and simulation Techniques
Measures of reliability-factor of safety, safety margin, reliability index, performance function
and limiting state. Reliability Methods-First Order Second Moment Method (FOSM), Point
Estimate Method (PEM), and Advanced First Order Second Moment Method (HasoferLinds method).Simulation Techniques: Monte Carlo simulation- Statistical experiments,
sample size and accuracy, Generation of random numbers- random numbers with standard
uniform distribution, continuous random variables, discrete random variables.
Self Learning Exercise: Discrete random variables.
12 Hrs
Unit IV:
Reliability Based Design
Determination of partial safety factors, safety checking formats LRFD format, CEB format,
processes in reliability based design, provisions of IS codes, Application of Principles to
Dam Design.
Self Learning Exercise: Provisions of IS codes
10 Hrs

30

TEXT BOOK
1.

Ranganathan, R. Structural Reliability Analysis and design- Jaico publishing house,


Mumbai, India 1999.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Ang, A. H. S., and Tang, W. H Probability concepts in engineering planning and
design-. Volume I, John Wiley and sons, Inc, New York. 1984.
2. Ang, A. H. S., and Tang, W. H. Probability concepts in engineering planning and
design- Volume II, John Wiley and sons, Inc, New York. 1984.
3. Thoft-christensen, P., and Baker, M., J., Structural reliability theory and its
applications- Springer-Verlag, Berlin, NewYork. 1982.

31

FIRE RESISTANCE OF STRUCTURES (4:2:0)


Sub Code : MSE0514
Hrs/week : 4+2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Interpret the intentions of code requirements for fire safety.


Understand the concepts of fire severity and fire resistance
Design steel, concrete or timber structures to resist fire exposure

Unit I:
Classification Of Buildings And Types Of Production Processes
Types of construction and classification of buildings, Main building elements, Requirements
of buildings, Combustibility and fire resistance, Fire hazard category of production
processes.
Self Learning Exercise: Fire hazard category of production processes.
8 Hrs
Unit II:
Calculation of Required Fire Resistance Limit of Building Structures
Initial condition for calculating fire resistance of structures, Duration of fire, Temperature of
fire, Main points on the method of investigating temperature regimes of fires, Results of
experimental investigations on fires, Simulation of temperature regimes of fires,
Determination of fire in residential and public buildings, Determination of fire duration of
fire in industrial buildings and warehouses, Standardization of fire resistance of structures.
Self Learning Exercise: Standardization of fire resistance of structures.
8 Hrs
Unit III:
Methods of Testing Structures for Fire Resistance
Problems of testing for fire resistance, Set-up for testing fire resistance, Temperature regime
of the tests, Test pieces of structures, Conditions of loading and supporting of structures,
Measurements.
Self Learning Exercise: Measurements.
8 Hrs
Unit IV:
Fire Resistance of Reinforced Concreter Structures
Main aspects of the calculations for fire resistance,Thermo technical part of the calculation
Boundary conditions, Calculation of temperature in plane structures (one- dimensional
temperature field), Calculation of temperature in bar type structures (Two- dimensional
temperature field), Calculation of depth at which a given temperature is reached, Effect of
moisture in concrete on the heating of structures, Thermo physical properties of concrete at
high temperatures ,Statics part of calculations,Change in the strength of reinforcement steel
with increase of temperature, Change in the strength of concrete in compression with increase
in temperature, Coefficients of thermal expansion of reinforcement bars and concrete, Axially
loaded columns, Statically determinate elements subjected to bending stresses, Explosive
failure of concrete.
Self Learning Exercise: Explosive failure of concrete.
10 Hrs

32

Unit V:
Fire Resistance of Steel Columns
General, Cross sections of steel columns and other design data, Methods of protecting steel
columns from heat, Limiting state of steel columns on heating, Heat insulating capacity of
protection and fire resistance limit``s of columns, Calculation of fire resistance of steel
columns, The effect of the form of the cross-section of steel columns and filling of space
between the column shafts and the protection, on the fire resistance of steel columns,
Different stages of thermal deformation of column bars with different types of fire protection,
Effect of cross-sectional area of the column shaft on fire resistance.
Self Learning Exercise: Effect of cross-sectional area of the column shaft on fire resistance.
10 Hrs
Unit VI:
Protection of Openings of Fire Walls
1. Fire doors-Door specifications in the building standards and regulations
2. Noncombustible doors, Low combustible doors, Doors made of glass-fiber reinforced
plastic
Glass fittings for openings - Specifications of building standards and regulations, Hollow
glass blocks, reinforced glass, hardened glass
Self Learning Exercise: Hollow glass blocks, reinforced glass, hardened glass
8 Hrs
.
TEXT BOOK
1. Andrew H. Buchanan, Structural Design for Fire Safety John Wiley & Sons. Ltd
2001.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. U.S Bendev Etal, Fire Resistance of Buildings- Amerind Publishing Co. Pvt.

Ltd

2. Andrew H. Buchman Structural design for fire safety, comprehensive overview of the
fire resistance of building structures-, John Wiley and sons.- 2001.
3. John A. Purkiss Fire Safety Engineering Design of structures-, Butterworth
Heinemann 2009.

33

DESIGN OF STORAGE STRUCTURES (4:2:0)


Sub Code : MSE0515
Hrs/week : 4 +2+0
SEE Hrs : 3 Hrs

CIE : 50% Marks


SEE : 50% Marks
Max. Marks : 100

COURSE OUTCOME

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Design the bunkers and silos to store various materials;


Design circular and rectangular water tanks resting on the ground.
Design underground water tanks.
Design elevated water tanks with top dome and base Intze tanks with staging.

Unit I:
Design of Bunkers and silos
Introduction, Janssens theory, Airys theory. Design of rectangular & circular bunkers and
silos.
Self Learning Exercise: Circular bunkers and silos.
12 Hrs
Unit II:
Water tanks General
Introduction, Design requirements according to IS 3370, joints in water tanks.
Self Learning Exercise: Joints in water tanks.
6 Hrs
Unit III:
Design of water tanks resting on ground
Design of circular tanks with flexible and rigid joints at base.
Self Learning Exercise: Rigid joints at base.
8 Hrs
Unit IV:
Design of Underground Water Tanks
Introduction, earth pressure on tank walls, uplift pressure on the floor of the tank, design of
rectangular tanks with L/B < 2 and L/B > 2.
Self Learning Exercise: L/B > 2.
10 Hrs
Unit V:
Design of overhead water tanks -1
Design of flat base slab for elevated circular tanks. - Circular tank with domed bottom and
roof.
Self Learning Exercise: Circular tank with domed bottom and roof.
8 Hrs
Unit VI:
Design of overhead water tanks -2
Design of Intze tank. Design of conical shaped tank.
Self Learning Exercise: Design of conical shaped tank.
8 Hrs
TEXT BOOKS
1. H.J. Shah Advanced Reinforced Concrete Structures Vol II, Charator Publishers,
6th edition 2012.
34

2. Bhavikatti S.S. Advanced RCC Design New Age International (P) Ltd. Publishers,
New Delhi 2006.

REFERENCE BOOKS
1. B.C. Punmia, Ashok Kumar Jain & Arun Kumar Jain Comprehensive RCC
Designs Lakshmi Publication.
2. N. Krishna Raju Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design CBS Publishers &
Distributors, New Delhi. 2008.
3. P.C. Varghese Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design PHI Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi. 2007.
4. M.L. Gambhir Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures PHI Pvt. Ltd., New
Delhi. - 2008.
5. Ashok K. Jain Reinforced Concrete, Limit State Design Nem chand & Bros,
Roorkee 2009

35