Untitled April 29, 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Opening quote endangered species works...............................................................................................1 2. ESA increased whooping crane population 10 fold.................................................................................1 3. Kirkland warblers population tripled from esa........................................................................................1 4. shouldn't label a species that hasn't recovered a "failure"........................................................................2 5. shouldn't wait so long to put a species on the list....................................................................................2 6. ESA Mesures of success..........................................................................................................................2 7. Time needed for a species to recover.......................................................................................................2

Opening quote endangered species works April 28, 2010, Journal Sentinel, "Endangered no more", http://www.jsonline.com/news/opinion/92358499.html The Endangered Species Act works, and there is no better example of that than the burgeoning population of gray wolves in northern Wisconsin. ESA increased whooping crane population 10 fold May 2005, The Center for Conservation Incentives, "The Endangered Species Act: Success or Failure", http://www.edf.org/documents/4465_ESA_Success%20or%20Failure.pdf Since the Endangered Species Act was passed in 1973, the population has grown nearly tenfold, to 468 birds. Those in Congress familiar with the history of crane conservation certainly understood in 1973 that ensuring the bird's future would require many more decades of sustained effort. Over the ensuing three decades, that effort has been dramatically successful, though the crane is still endangered and almost certainly will remain so for many years to come. Kirkland warblers population tripled from esa Micheal J. Bean (Direct of the Center for conservative incentives), May 2005, Center for conservative incentives, "The Endangered Species Act: Success or Failure", http://www.edf.org/documents/4465_ESA_Success%20or%20Failure.pdf By the spring of 2004, the sustained effort had boosted Kirtland's warbler numbers to 1,341 singing males, the highest number ever recorded. In 50 years,the population of the warbler has more than tripled, but it remains one of the rarest birds in North America.

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Untitled shouldn't label a species that hasn't recovered a "failure" Micheal J. Bean (Direct of the Center for conservative incentives), May 2005, Center for Conservation Incentives, "The Endangered Species Act: Success or Failure", http://www.edf.org/documents/4465_ESA_Success%20or%20Failure.pdf To label every species that has not yet recovered a "failure" is misleading at best, particularly for species that are clearly progressing toward recovery. It is also important to note that a majority of the U.S. species on the endangered list were put there after 1990. Thus, most species have had less than 15 years of protection under the Endangered Species Act. shouldn't wait so long to put a species on the list Micheal J. Bean (Direct of the Center for conservative incentives), May 2005, Center for Conservation Incentives, "The Endangered Species Act: Success or Failure", http://www.edf.org/documents/4465_ESA_Success%20or%20Failure.pdf For many species, we have waited until they are dangerously close to extinction before giving them the protection of the Endangered Species Act. The lesson of the whooping crane is quite clear: If we wait until only 15 individuals remain before we start conservation efforts, we can be sure that we face decades of work before we have any hope of getting out of the woods. Unfortunately, we have waited even longer to put many species on the endangered species list. In at least a few cases, we have waited until only a single individual remained. ESA Mesures of success date unknown, Center for Biological Diversity, "Mesuring the Success of the Endangered Species Act", http://www.esasuccess.org/reports/northeast/default.html Measures of Success: Preventing extinction: 100% successful Stabilizing and moving species toward recovery: 93% successful Meeting recovery timelines: approximately 82% successful Time needed for a species to recover date not given, Center for biological diversity, "Mesuring the success of the esa", http://www.esasuccess.org/reports/northeast/default.html Time Needed for Recovery: On average, federal recovery plans expected recovery to take 42 years, while species have been listed for an average of only 24 years. Only 11 federal recovery plans expected recovery by 2005. In practice, nine species were downlisted, under review, formally proposed, or completely delisted due to achieving recovery by 2005.

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