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The Data Logger 8040 is a product that provides a wide variety of features

in a data acquisition and control application. It includes 3 I/O-slots Data


Logger 8040 (Half 19 Rack) and 10 I/O-slots Data - Logger 8040(Full 19
Rack). They are remotely controlled by the host computer through a set of
commands and transmitted in a RS-485/RS232 network. The modular design
also provides more flexibility in the system configuration. The following is a
summary of the major Data Logger 8040 system components.
The Data Logger 8040 (Half 19) system architecture includes a SMPS
Card, CPU card with a built-in RS-232/RS-485 communication port, one
built-in RS-422 communication and a Centronics Printer Port and 3 I/O slot
backplane. The Data Logger 8040 (Full 19) system includes all of the
above components, except it has a 10 I/O slot backplane. Details of the
system architecture features and more are covered in Next Chapter.
There are some software utilities available to the Data Logger 8040
systems. The Windows utility software helps you to configure your Data
Logger 8040 Model. One can either configure the data-logger from operator
terminal or through host computer via RS232/RS485 port.

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The following diagram shows the system configurations possible with the Data
Logger 8040.

INPUT
MODULE
16 Ch. Analog
Input Module
16 Ch. Digital
Input Module
16 Ch. Isolated
Analog Input
Module
RS-232
OR
RS-485
CONN

OUTPUT
MODULE
16 Ch. Open
Collector Output
Module
8 Ch. Relay
Output Module
4 Ch. Analog
Output Module
9 PIN D - TYPE

RJ45 CONNECTOR

RS 422 CONN.

Figure 1.2.1:- System Configuration Setup for Data Logger 8040 (Full 19)

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The following diagram shows the system configurations possible with the Data
Logger 8040.

INPUT
MODULE
16 Ch. Analog
Input Module
16 Ch. Digital
Input Module
16 Ch. Isolated
Analog Input
Module
RS-232
OR
RS-485
CONN

OUTPUT
MODULE
16 Ch. Open
Collector Output
Module
8 Ch. Relay
Output Module
4 Ch. Analog
Output Module
9 PIN D - TYPE

RJ45 CONNECTOR

RS 422 CONN.

Figure 1.2.2:- System Configuration Setup for Data Logger 8040 (Half 19)

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You should always make safety your first priority in any system application.
Chapter 2 provides several guidelines that will help provide a safer, more
reliable system.
The main controller is the heart of Data - Logger 8040 system. Make sure you
take time to understand the various features and setup requirements.
It is important to understand how your I/O modules can be configured.
Before you begin to link your applications in your host computer with the
Data - Logger 8040 systems, it is very helpful to understand how the
Windows utility software helps you configure your Data - Logger 8040.
The Data - Logger 8040 system allows you to develop your applications in
DOS or Windows. It provides an RTU command set with standard Modbus
protocol.

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Environment Specification
The following table lists the environmental specifications that generally apply
to the Data Logger 8040 system (Main Controller and I/O modules).
Specification
Storage Temperature
Ambient
Operating
Temperature
Ambient Humidity
Atmosphere

Rating
0 to 55C
0 to 55C
5 to 90% Non-Condensing
Non corrosive gases

Equipment will operate below 30% humidity. However, static electricity


problems occur much more frequently at lower humidity levels. Make sure you
take adequate precautions before you touch any input/output point of the
equipment. Consider using ground straps, antistatic floor coverings, etc. if you
use the equipment in low humidity environments.

Power Requirement
Although the Data Logger 8040 systems are designed for standard
industrial 230 V AC, 50Hz5% power supply, they accept any power unit
that supplies within the range of 90 to 260 VAC.

The Data - logger 8040 system can be installed on a panel.

Figure 2.2.1:- Panel Mounting Details for Data Logger 8040 (Half 19)

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Figure 2.2.2:- Panel Mounting Details for Data Logger 8040 (Full 19)

Figure 2.3.1:- Side View of Data Logger 8040

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Figure 2.3.2:- Dimension Details of Data Logger 8040 (Half 19)

Figure 2.3.3:- Dimension Details of Data Logger 8040 (Full 19)

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Figure 2.3.4:- Front view of Operator terminal Unit.

Figure 2.3.5:- Panel cut out of Operator terminal Unit.

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Figure 2.3.4:- Rear view and Side view of Operator terminal Unit.

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This section provides basic information on wiring the power supply and I/O
units, and on connecting the network.

Power Supply Unit Wiring


Be sure that the power supply voltage remains within the allowed fluctuation
range of between 90 to 260 VAC. Terminals L, N and E are for power supply
wiring.
Note: The wire(s) used should be at least 2mm2.

Non Isolated Analog Input Modules Wiring


The system uses 50 pin D type Male connector for the interface between
Input module and field devices. The following information must be
considered when connecting electrical devices to Input modules.
1. Always use a continuous length of wire, do not combine wires to attain
needed length
2. Use the shortest possible wire length
3. Use the wire trays for routing where possible.
4. Avoid running wires near high energy wiring
5. Avoid running input wiring in close proximity to output wiring where
possible
6. Avoid creating sharp bends in the wires
Note: A Prefab 1 is to 1 cable is provided for connection from 50 pin D type
connector to the Extension Connector. Wiring to be done as shown in fig 2.4
.1.

Figure 2.4.1:- 50 Pin D - Type Connector Details

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Isolated Analog Input Modules Wiring


The system uses 50 pin D type Male connector for the interface between
Input module and field devices. The following information must be
considered when connecting electrical devices to Input modules.
1. Always use a continuous length of wire, do not combine wires to attain
needed length
2. Use the shortest possible wire length
3. Use the wire trays for routing where possible.
4. Avoid running wires near high energy wiring
5. Avoid running input wiring in close proximity to output wiring where
possible
6. Avoid creating sharp bends in the wires
Note: A Prefab 1 is to 1 cable is provided for connection from 50 pin D type
connector to the Extension Connector. Wiring to be done as shown in fig
2.4.2.

Figure 2.4.2:- 50 Pin D - Type Connector Details

Note(Non-Isolated & Isolated) :


1) For current input(0-20mA or 4-20mA connect 250 between High (+) and Low (-)
terminals.
2) For Voltage & TC input connect input between High (+) and Low (-) terminals.
3) For RTD (3wire) input connect input between High (+) , Low (-) & Common I .

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Relay Output Module Wiring


The system uses 25 pin D type Female connector for the interface between
Relay module and field devices. The Relay Output Module has eight relays
Any output can be mapped to any channel for the alarm configuration or for
fault or on-off through PC as shown in the flow chart of relay configuration..
The following information must be considered when connecting electrical
devices to Relay modules.
1. Always use a continuous length of wire, do not combine wires to attain
needed length
2. Use the shortest possible wire length
3. Use the wire trays for routing where possible.
4. Avoid running wires near high energy wiring
5. Avoid running input wiring in close proximity to output wiring where
possible
6. Avoid creating sharp bends in the wires
Note: A Prefab 1 is to 1 cable is provided for connection from 25 pin D type
connector to the field devices. Wiring to be done as shown in fig 2.4.3.

Figure 2.4.3:- 25 Pin D Type Connector Details for Relay Card

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Open Collector Output Module Wiring


The system uses 25 pin D type Female connector for the interface between
Open Collector Output module and field devices. The Open Collector Output
Module has sixteen Open Collector Outputs. Any output can be mapped to
any channel for the alarm configuration or for fault or on-off through PC as
shown in the flow chart of relay configuration. The following information
must be considered when connecting electrical devices to Output Collector
modules.
1. Always use a continuous length of wire, do not combine wires to attain
needed length
2. Use the shortest possible wire length
3. Use the wire trays for routing where possible.
4. Avoid running wires near high energy wiring
5. Avoid running input wiring in close proximity to output wiring where
possible
6. Avoid creating sharp bends in the wires
Note:A Prefab 1 is to 1 cable is provided for connection from 25 pin D type
connector to the field devices. Wiring to be done as shown in fig 2.4.3.

Figure 2.4.3:- 25 Pin

D Type Connector Details for Relay Card

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Digital Output Module Wiring


The system uses 25 pin D type Female connector. The Digital Output
Module can be used in either one of the two modes.
16 Channel Open Collector
Fault Channel Indication
In Fault Channel Indication
If the LED is OFF, then the channel is healthy.
If the LED is ON, then the channel is faulty.
If the LED is blinking, then the channel is skip.
The following information must be considered when connecting electrical
devices to Relay modules.
1. Always use a continuous length of wire, do not combine wires to attain
needed length
2. Use the shortest possible wire length
3. Use the wire trays for routing where possible.
4. Avoid running wires near high energy wiring
5. Avoid running input wiring in close proximity to output wiring where
possible
6. Avoid creating sharp bends in the wires
Note: A Prefab 1 is to 1 cable is provided for connection from 25 pin D type
connector to the field devices.

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RS 485 Port (J1)


There is a DB9 port in the Data Logger 8040 system. The port is designed
to link the RS-485 through a cable to a network in a system. The pin
assignment of the port is as follows:

Figure 2.4.4:- RS 485 Connection Details

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RS 232 Port (J1)


The RS-232 port is designed for field configuration and diagnostics. The Data
Logger 8040 is used as Data Communication Equipment (DCE). Users may
connect a notebook PC to the RS-232 port to configure or troubleshoot your
system in the field. Further, the Data Logger 8040 system can also be
configured as the slave of the host computer through this port connection.
The pin assignment of the port is as follows:

Figure 2.4.5:- RS 232 Connection Details

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Parallel Printer Port Wiring


The Parallel Printer port is used for printing data form the Data Logger
8040. The system uses a 25 pin D Type female connector for interface
between the printer and the CPU card. The printer port can also be used for
Data Logging when an external trigger is given. The pin description for the
printer port is given below.

Figure 2.4.6:- Centronics Parallel Port Printer Connection Details


For Data Logging first select Triggering YES, and then short pin no. 10
to pin no. 18. Here it should be noted that the printer is disconnected from
the printer port.

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The Data Logger 8040 series is a data acquisition and control system,
which can control, monitor and acquire data through multichannel I/O
modules. Encased in rugged industrial housing, the system provides
intelligent signal conditioning, analog I/O, digital I/O, RS-232 and RS485 communication. The system communicates with the controlling host
over a multi-drop RS-485 network.

The Data Logger 8040 system consists of two major parts: the system
architecture and I/O modules. The system kernel includes a SMPS Card,
CPU card with a built-in RS-232/RS-485 communication port RS-422
port and a Centronics Printer Port and 3 I/O Slot backplane/ 10 I/O
Slot backplane. It also offers the following major features:

The CPUs Basic Functions


The CPU is the heart of the system and has the following basic functions:

Data acquisition and control for all I/O modules in the system
Communication software and command set
Alarm monitoring
Management of the EEPROM device that holds the system parameters
Data transformation
Diagnosis
Data-logging
Printing

3 Way Isolation & Watchdog Timer


Electrical noise can enter a system in many different ways. It may enter
through an I/O module, a power supply connection or the communication
ground connection. The Data Logger system provides isolation between
analog ground and System ground. Isolation is also provided between the
Serial Communication Port and the System ground. The 3-way isolation
design prevents ground loops and reduces the effect of electrical noise to the
system. It also offers better surge protection to prevent dangerous voltages or
spikes from harming your system. The system also provides a Watchdog
timer to monitor the micro controller. It will automatically reset the micro
controller in Data Logger system if the software is affected due to spikes
and brown outs.

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Remote Software Configuration & Calibration


The Data Logger system merely issues a command from the host computer,
you can change an analog input module to accept several ranges of voltage
input, current input, thermocouple input or RTD input. All the parameters
including speed, parity, HI and LO alarm, ZERO and SPAN setting, Decimal
position and calibration parameters setting may be set remotely. Remote
configuration can be done by using either the provided menu-based software
or the command sets configuration and calibration commands. By storing
configuration and calibration parameters in a nonvolatile EEPROM, the
systems are able to retain these parameters in case of power failure.

Connectivity & Programming


The Data Logger 8040 systems can connect to and communicate with all
computers and terminals. They use either RS-232 or RS-485 transmission
standards and communicate with MODBUS RTU format commands.
However, users can only select and use one communication port at any time.
All communications to and from the system are performed in MODBUS
RTU, which means that the Data Logger systems can be programmed in
virtually any high-level language.

Flexible Communication Connection


The Data Loggers built-in RS-232/485 conversion capability enables users
to freely choose either RS-232 port or RS-485 port to connect with host PC.

A Single System Setup through the RS 232 Port


If users would like to use a PC to locally control and monitor a simple
application, the Data Logger 8040 system provides up to 48 points or 160
points and front-end wiring through the RS-232 port to the host computer.

A Distributed I/O Setup through the RS 485 Network


Up to 32 Data Logger 8040 systems may be connected to an RS-485 multidrop network extendable up to 100 by using RS-485 repeaters, extending the
maximum communication distance to 2,000 ft. The host computer is
connected to the RS-485 network from one of its COM ports through the RS232/RS-485 converter. Only two wires are needed for the RS-485 network:
DATA+ and DATA-. Inexpensive shielded twisted-pair wiring is employed.

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Processor
CPU

XAG49, 16 Bit Micro Controller


8 KB Volatile RAM
RAM
512 KB NVRAM (Battery Backed)
64 KB
ROM
3 Slots (Half 19)
I/O Capacity
10 Slots (Full 19)
Watchdog Timer Yes
Real Time Clock Yes

Communication
RS 485/RS 232
Optional RS 232
RS 422
Wiring
Speed
Max.
Communication
Distance
Network Expansion

1
1
1
RS 485, Twisted Cable
RS 232, Straight Cable
RS 422, Twisted Cable
4800 to 19200 bps
2000ft. for RS 485
60ft. for RS 232

Up to 99 Data Logger 8040


systems per host
Transient Suppression on RS
Protection
485 Communication lines.
MODBUS RTU (Command
Protocol
Response)
Asynchronous Data 1 start bit, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit,
no parity (1 start, 8-N-1)
Format
CRC
Communication
Error Check

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Basic Function Block Diagram

Figure 3.4.1:- Block Diagram of Data Logger 8040

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Analog input modules use an A/D converter to convert sensor voltage, current,
thermocouple or RTD signals into digital data. The digital data is then translated
into engineering units.

Thermocouple Inputs
Types
CJC Error
Resolution
Accuracy
Temperature range
Input Impedance
Lead resistance effect
Cold junction compensation
Open thermocouple indication

: J, K, T, E, B, S, R
: 2C maximum 0 to 55C
: 1C
: (0.1%of Full Scale + 1 digit) without CJC Error
: See table by type
: > 2M
: Less than 55 micro volts/100
: 0 to +55C
: Open displayed

RTD Inputs
Types
Resolution
Accuracy
Temperature range
3 Wire compensation
Open RTD indication

: PT100
: 0.1C
: (0.1%of Full Scale + 1 digit)
: -200 TO 850
: Using Hardware Technique
: Open displayed

Voltage & Current Input


Type
Temperature range
Accuracy

: 0 to 5V,1 to 5V, 4 to 20mA & 0 to 20 mA


: -19000 to 19000
: (0.1%of Full Scale + 1 digit)

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Operating Range :
I/P No.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Type
E
J
K
T
B
R
S
N
Ni- 120
RTD
0 to 20 mA
4 to 20 mA
0 to 5V
1 to 5V

Range
-200C to +1000C
-200C to +760C
-200C to +1350C
-200C to +400C
+450C to 1750C
0C to +1750C
0C to +1750C
230C to +1270C
-700C to +2790C
-200C TO 850C
-19000 to +19000
-19000 to +19000
-19000 to +19000
-19000 to +19000

Resolution
1C
1C
1C
1C
1C
1C
1C
1C
1C
0.1C
1 COUNT
1 COUNT
1 COUNT
1 COUNT

Table: 4.2.1

The Data Logger 8040 signal conditioner card is a 16-bit, universal


input module that features programmable input ranges on all channels.
This module is an extremely cost-effective solution for industrial
measurement and monitoring applications. Its opto-isolated inputs
provide 1,000 VDC of isolation between the analog input and the module,
protecting the module and peripherals from damage due to high input line
voltage.
It accepts voltage inputs (1V, 5V) and current input (20 mA, requires 250
ohms resistor), thermocouple input (J, K, T, R, S, E, B). The module
provides data to the host computer in engineering units (V, C, F or mA).
The signal conditioner module also has an ambient sensor to measure
ambient temperature. The ambient sensor also provides the CJC
compensation.

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The Data Logger is having an internal architecture with 16 channels per


multiplexer card-signal conditioners and hence calibration for each card is
separate, but common for all channels on the same card. Inputs are divided
into three groups i.e. T/C, Linear and RTD. For each group one channel needs
to be calibrated. So, the user needs to calibrate any one channel of every card,
for each group. The signal conditioner consists of various blocks, first block
is multiplexer to select the channel, and then the signal is given to
instrumentation amplifier. After instrumentation amplifier signal is fed to the
another multiplexer for the selection of the group of particular input type &
then it is fed to the gain of 25 (which is common for all inputs) & offset to
make it unipolar signal. By calibrating preferably E type T/C all other
type of thermocouple of this group are calibrated, as same gain is used. For
PT-100, there is a current source, which is used to pump the current into
RTD. Then comes the lead wire cancellation circuit and then same block of
instrumentation amplifier and gain circuit is used. The user needs to calibrate
only E type t/c for T/C, 0-5 Vdc for Linear & pt-100 to calibrate all the
available input types in this Data Logger.

CALIBRATION METHOD :
The data of the channel being observed will be updated after every unskipped
channel is scanned. So, to see the effect of reading change instantly, first of
all select the channel you want to calibrate and skip rest of the channels of
Data Logger.
Now Press
key of the operator terminal & then go in to Calibration Mode
as mentioned earlier. Now user can set the particular channel, which he wants
to calibrate. Only unskipped channels are allowed for calibration so user has
to unskip the channel, which he wants to calibrate for particular Input Type.
If, by mistake user selects the skipped channel, LCD shows the error message
Calibration Not Allowed. Select the channel, which one wants to calibrate.
Now if Input Type of selected channel is T/C type, one can do the
calibration in any type of T/C input but for better accuracy it is advisable to
calibrate in E type of thermocouple. Now pressing
and
key user can
select the calibration parameter like AMB. Calibration, ZERO calibration,
SPAN calibration. Now select the particular calibration parameter & feed
with in the range preferably near min value of range for ZERO & near max.
value of range for SPAN( Please check the range of particular input type
before doing the calibration) through reliable calibrated source. For ambient
calibration user need to check the ambient temperature of the room where
Data Logger is kept. While calibrating to match given input use numerical
keypad or
& thekeys. First calibrate ZERO and then SPAN and repeat

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the above procedure until zero value & span value both does not show any
error in reading.

Now if input type is PT-100 then only zero scale & span scale of the
input needs to be calibrated. Feed the zero scale value & calibrate by
using numerical keypad or
and
key.
For linear input like 0-20mA, 4-20mA user has to feed 250 - 0.1%
resistance to convert it into voltage source. One needs to check zero scale
& span scale value for calibration of input type. Value less than zero scale
& more than span scale is not acceptable for any type of input. If the user
feeds a value, which is not in the range, LCD of the Operator Terminal
will display Not Acceptable. So it will not allow to calibrate the
channel. The Data Logger will not allow to do the calibration, if there is
no input feed to the channel, which is selected for calibration. The LCD
will show the message Calibration not Allowed. User must feed the
particular value of zero scale & span scale while doing the calibration.
Calibration mode is also password protected so unauthorized person is not
allow to do the calibration. Password for calibration mode is same as
password for program mode/ configuration mode.

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There are two modes of operation for the data logger viz. RUN mode,
PROGRAM MENU mode. The selection of Program Menu mode
is by
key in Operator terminal. Password is provided to avoid unauthorized
changing of programmed /configuration data. Factory settable password
is 22.
Any modification of data can be done only in program mode & configuration
mode. The data could be scan rate, date, time, print rate, control set points, alarm
limits and skip/unskip status of a channel etc
The user can not modify any data in run mode but can verify the data. The run
has two sub modes viz. Auto mode and Manual mode. Normally data logger
is kept in auto mode, where all unskipped channels data is displayed
sequentially at the programmed scan rate. In case user wants to continuously
monitor data of a single channel, it is possible in manual mode. Although
the selected channel is only displayed, internal scanning of other channels is
continued as usual.
The operation of the Operator terminal along with Data Logger can be
summarized in the flow chart given on the next page. The Keyboard of the
Operator Terminal is as shown below.

masibus
POWER

RXD

TXD

AL1

AL2

AL3

AL4

FAULT

MAN

RUN

PRG

CAL

VFY

AUTO
MAN

SKIP

I/P
TYPE

PRN

DATA
LOGGING

Figure 5.1.1:- Membrane Drawing of Operator Terminal

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The various keys and operating modes are described below:


The Keyboard on the Operator Terminal consists of four sets of Keys:
1) Numeric Keys
2) Arrow Keys
3) Program Keys
4) Function Keys

1) Numeric Keys
The Numeric Keys are used for entering values of Process Variable, Alarm Values
etc.

2) Arrow Keys
The Arrow Keys are used for navigating into the different menus and their submenus. The Arrow Keys are also used for increment and decrement operations as
well as for Shift Left and Shift Right operations.

3) Program Keys
The Program Keys consist of mainly three keys, The Run/Program Mode Key, The
Escape Key and The Enter Key.
The Run/Program Key is used to switch between the Run Mode and the Program
Mode.
The Escape Key is used to come out of any Menu or its Sub-menu.
The Enter Key is used to acknowledge the data entered for Process Value, Alarm
Value, and Password etc.

4) Function Keys
There are five Function Keys present on the data-logger Operator Terminal to
enable the user to directly perform the defined functions. The five Function Keys are
The Auto/Man Key, The Skip Key, The Input Key, The Print Key and The Head
PRN Key.
The Auto/Man Key is used to switch between Manual Mode and Auto Mode of
the instrument
The Skip Key is used to Skip a particular channel directly.
The Input Key is used to configure the input type for a particular channel.

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The Print Key is used to print the complete information of the selected channels.
The Head PRN Key is used to log the data of the channel selected.

External Dimensions: 192(W)* 96 (H) * 45(D)


DC Power Supply: Rated Supply Voltage
Power Supply capacity
Power Connector

: 24Vdc
: 10W or less
: 2 terminal Strip

Normal Operating Conditions: Ambient Temperature


Relative Humidity

: 0 to 55C
: 0 to 90%

MODULE SPECIFICATIONS
Display: 16 x 2 Large Character LCD Display
An LCD screen with Back-Light
Keypad: 24 Keys with Membrane Keypad
9 12 Numeric Keys :- Used for inputting Numerical Value
9 4 Arrow
Keys :- Used to select the required numerical value
input field when there is more than one on
the screen
9 3 Menu
Keys :- Used to Select/Entering/Escaping Menu
items.
9 5 Function Keys:- Used for various functional operation
Mode & Alarm LED : Power ON LED to indicate unit is in ON condition.
4 Alarm LEDs for alarm indication & 1 Fault LED for Fault indication in the
system.
5 Mode LEDs used while programming/ calibrating/verifying various parameters.

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Storage Memory: In-built 2K Bytes EEPROM to store various parameters


Communication:

Communication Interface
Baud Rate
Connector
Protocol

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: RS 422 4 wire full duplex communication


: fixed 19200
: Straight RJ 45 PCB mounted
: MODBUS RTU

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Data - Logger
Run Mode

Program Menu

Manual Mode

Program Mode

Auto Mode

Configuration
Mode

Calibration
Mode

Vfy. Program
Mode

Vfy. Conf. Mode

Status Mode

Set Alm - 1

Input Type

Select
Channel

Set Alm - 1

Input Type

Card
Information

Set Alm - 2

Zero Scale

Zero

Set Alm - 2

Zero Scale

Computer
Status

Set Alm - 3

Span Scale

Span

Set Alm - 3

Span Scale

Printer
Status

Set Alm - 4

DP
Position

Set Alm - 4

DP
Position

Memory
Status

Skip/Unskip

Triggering

Skip/Unskip

Set Point
Type

Version No.

Print Data

Log
Parameter

Print Data

Log
Parameter

Data-Logging
Ch

Sr. No.

Unit Data

Baud Rate

Unit Data

Baud Rate

Print Time

Password

Print Time

Password

Scan Time

Hysterisis

Scan Time

Hysterisis

Data-Logging
Ch

Sr. No.

RS 232
Logging Time

Logging Time

RS
232/
RS 485485
SEL
RS
232/RS

RS 232/ RS 485 SEL

RS 485
Relay Conf.

Today's
Time
Today's
Date

Hr: Min: Sec

Relay Conf.

Today's
Date

Date: Month: Year

Print on alarm

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Today's
Time

Print on alarm

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Relay Conf.

Al
High

Print

Yes

Unit

Log Parameter

No

Data -Logging
Channel

VH

Reset
Hold
Overlap

Yes

No

Low
Baud Rate
VL
H-VH
L-VL
H-L
VH-VL

19200
9600
4800
2400

PC

Volt

cm
WC

KPa

cm

mV

mm
Hg

Bar

mSec

Amp

cm
Hg

mBar

Sec

mA

IHg

M3/Hr

Mi

Ohm

mm
H2O

LPM

Hour

Meg
Ohm

IH2O

LPS

Hz

Watt

Kg/
cm2g

LPH

RPM

KW

Kg/
cm2

cc/
min

RPH

MW

Kg/
cm2a

GPM

RPM

Deg C

psi

GPS

PPM

Deg F

psi(a)

mm

uS

mm
WC

psi(g)

meter

Ph

FAULT

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

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In Run Mode the Data Logger can be operated either in Auto Mode or in Manual
Mode.
Auto Mode : The Data Logger is usually kept in Auto Mode of Operation. The values
of all the unskipped channels are displayed sequentially at the set SCAN Time on the
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) of the Operator Terminal. During this mode of operation,
the RUN led is ON. However, the MANUAL led is in OFF condition. In Auto Mode, the
user can view the CH. PR VAL ALM, Time :- or Date:- parameter on the
second line of the LCD using the or key.
Manual Mode : The mode of operation of the Data Logger can be changed to Manual
Mode by pressing the AUTO
button. On pressing the same, the MAN led will glow.
MAN
One can go out of Manual Mode by pressing the same key again.
AUTO

MAN
As soon as the
key is pressed, the display will stop at the currently displayed
channel. To view the data of any other channel, one can make use of the numeric key
pad provided on the Operator Terminal or can make use of the
or
keys.

As for example on pressing the

AUTO
MAN

key, the LCD of the Operator Terminal displays

1
CH32

15:47

mV
21/07

The cursor on the LCD will be blinking on the displayed channel. Enter the new channel
no using the numeric keypad or using the
or
keys. Suppose the new channel no
entered is 38, then the display will show

1
CH45

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

15:47

C
21/07

- 32 -

The Program Menu is entered by pressing the


menu.
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)

key. There are six modes in the Program

Status Mode
Vfy. Configuration Mode.
Vfy. Program Mode
Calibration Mode
Configuration Mode
Program Mode

Same key can be pressed again to go back to RUN Mode.

1) STATUS MODE
To enter Status Mode, press the
key. The Status Mode had sub menus as shown in the
flow diagram. The sub menu can be entered by pressing the
key. The different
submenus of the Status Mode can be accessed by using the
and
keys. Once a
particular sub menu is selected, press
key. The Status Mode in brief gives
information about the complete Data Acquisition System like card information (type of
card & slot No. for eg Slot No.3 Relay Card), status of computer and printer connected
to the Data Logger and also status of memory and version no. of the software.

2) VFY. CONFIGURATION MODE :


To enter Vfy. Configuration Mode, use
key after pressing the
key. The Vfy.
Configuration Mode has sub menus as shown in the flow diagram. The sub menu can be
entered by pressing the
key. The different submenus of the Vfy. Configuration Mode
can be accessed by using the
and
keys. Once a particular sub menu is selected,
press
key. This will display the current settings of the selected parameter. In this
mode one can only view the parameters set but cannot modify them.

3) VFY. PROGRAM MODE :


To enter Vfy. Program Mode, use
key after pressing the key. The Vfy Program
Mode has sub menus as shown in the flow diagram. The sub menu can be entered by
pressing the key. The different sub menus of the Vfy. Program Mode can be accessed
by using the and
keys. Once a particular sub menu is selected, press the
key.
This will display the current settings of the selected parameter. In this mode one can only
view the parameters set but cannot modify them.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 33 -

4) CALIBRATION MODE :
To enter Calibration Mode, press twice the
key after pressing the
key. The
Calibration Mode has sub menus as shown in the flow diagram. The sub menu can be
entered by pressing the key. The LCD will display
1
Select Channel
The cursor will be on the Channel No. Once the desired channel is entered by pressing
the numeric keypad or the and keys, press the
key. The LCD will display
K
I/P

Amb
Cal.

34.5
Value

The cursor will be on the Amb. The Amb value can be changed using the numeric
keypad or the or
keys. Once the ambient is set, press
key. The LCD will
display ACCEPTABLE. Now using the
key, go to Zero parameter.. The LCD will
display
K
I/P

Zero
Cal.

0
Value

The cursor will be on the Zero. Press the


key. The Zero value can be changed using
the numeric keypad or the
or
keys. Once the Zero is set, press the
key.
The LCD will display ACCEPTABLE. Now using the
key, go to Span parameter.
The LCD will display
K
I/P

Span
Cal.

1200
Value

The cursor will be on the Span. Press the


key. The Span value can be changed using
the numeric keypad or the
or
keys. Once the Span is set, press the
key.
The LCD will display ACCEPTABLE. Once the Calibration is set, press the
key to
come out of the sub menu. Pressing the same key once again will come back to the
Calibration Mode Menu. Press the key to come back to RUN Mode.
The Ambient parameter will not be displayed during calibration when the Input Type is
RTD or Linear.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 34 -

5) CONFIGURATION MODE :
To enter Configuration Mode, press
key after pressing the key. The Configuration
Mode has sub menus as shown in the flow diagram. The sub menu can be entered by
pressing the
key. The different sub menus of the Configuration Mode can be
accessed by using the and
keys. Once a particular sub menu is selected, press the
key. This will display the current settings of the selected parameter. The selected
parameter can be modified using the numeric key pad or the
and
keys. Once the
parameters are modified, press
key. The LCD will display ACCEPTABLE.
Press the
key to come out of the selected sub menu. Pressing the same key again, one
comes back to the Configuration Mode Menu.

For example to modify the INPUT TYPE parameter for CH. No. 32, go to the
Configuration Mode Menu. Then press the
key to enter the sub menu. Press the same
key again to enter INPUT TYPE parameter. The LCD will display
32
CH

0 5V
Input Type

The cursor will be on the channel no. The channel no. can be changed using the numeric
key pad or the or keys.

Press the
key to change the parameter. The cursor will now be on the Parameter
value. Change the Parameter value using and keys. The LCD will now display

1
CH

RTD
Input Type

Now press the


key. The LCD will display ACCEPTABLE. Press the
key
to come out of the INPUT TYPE sub menu. Pressing the same key once again will come
back to the Configuration Mode Menu. Press the key to come back to RUN Mode.

The same procedure can be followed to change different parameters like Zero Scale,
Span Scale and DP Position of the Configuration Mode shown in the flow diagram.

Input Type:
The Input type for each channel is set as per user requirement. For Linear type of
Input, the maximum range that can be set is 19000.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 35 -

Zero Scale:
This parameter can be set only when Input type is linear. The Zero Scale is set
depending on the Input Type of the particular channel as per user requirement.

Span Scale:
This parameter can be set only when Input type is linear. The Span Scale is set
depending on the Input Type of the particular channel as per user requirement.

DP Position:
This parameter can be set only when Input type is linear. The DP Position can be
set between 0 to 4 for a particular channel depending upon the user requirement.

Triggering:
This parameter can be set as YES/NO as per user requirement. This parameter is
basically used for Data Logging. It should be ensured that when triggering
mode is set to YES, the Centronics printer cable should be removed form the
parallel port of the CPU card.

Log Parameter:
Data Logging can be configured in any one of the three ways as per user
requirement. They are Reset, Hold and Overlap.

Sr. No:
This parameter is used to assign the Sr. No. to the Instrument for Serial
Communication using RS 232/RS 422.

Baud Rate:
The Baud Rate can be set as per user requirement. The Baud Rates that can be set
are 19200, 9600 and 4800.

Password:
Password is set for entering into Program Mode, Configuration Mode and
Calibration Mode. The value of Password can be set between 0 to 65535. Factory
set password is 22. User can also change the password. User can avoid the
password protection by making it zero.

Hysteresis:
The Hysteresis parameter is set for alarm limits. This parameter is can be set
individually for all channels. The Hysteresis value is set between 0.1% to 9.9%
of the complete range.

RS 232/RS 485:
In this one can configure the serial communication to be RS 232 or RS 485
depending on the requirement. Select RS 232 or RS 485 using the up/down (
or

)arrows and confirm the selection using enter

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

key.

- 36 -

Todays Time:
The current time can be set in the Data Logger by going into the Configuration
Mode. Press
key to go into sub menu. Using the
key go to todays Time.
Press
again to enter the Todays Time Parameter. The LCD will display
13 : 25 : 30
Hour Min Sec
The cursor position will be on Hour parameter. Set the required hour using the
the or thekeys. Then press
key. The LCD will show ACCEPTABLE.
Repeat the same procedure to change the Min and Sec parameter. Once the
Todays Time Parameter is set, press the
Key to come out of the Todays
Time sub menu. Pressing the same key once again will come back to the
Configuration Mode Menu. Press the
key to come back to RUN Mode.

Todays Date:
The current date can be set in the Data Logger by going into the Configuration
Mode. Press
key to go into sub menu. Using
key go to Todays Date.
Press the again to enter the Todays Date Parameter. The LCD will display
14 : 2 : 3
Date Month Year
The cursor position will be on Date parameter. Set the required date using the
the or he keys. Then press
key. The LCD will show ACCEPTABLE.
Repeat the same procedure to change the Month and Year parameter. Once the
Todays Date Parameter is set, press
key to come out of the Todays Date sub
menu. Pressing the same key once again will come back to the Configuration
Mode Menu. Press the key to come back to RUN Mode.

Print on Alarm:
In this one can configure datalogger to print on alarm for the channel selected in
print data section of program mode. Datalogger prints the data on alarm in that
particular channel. Select Yes or No using the up/down (
or
)arrows and
confirm the selection using enter

key.

6) PROGRAM MODE :
The Program Mode has sub menus as shown in the flow diagram. The sub menu can be
entered by pressing the
key. The different sub menus of the Program Mode can be
accessed by using the
and
keys. Once a particular sub menu is selected, press the
the key. This will display the current settings of the selected parameter. The selected
parameter can be modified using the numeric key pad or the
and
keys. Once the
parameters are modified, press
key. The LCD will display ACCEPTABLE.
Press the
key to come out of the selected sub menu. Pressing the same key again, one
comes back to the Program Mode Menu.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 37 -

For example to modify the SET ALM 2 parameter for CH. No. 32, go to the Program
Mode Menu by pressing the key. Then press the
key to enter the sub menu. Now
press the
key to go to SET ALM 2 parameter. Now press the
key. The LCD will
display
1
CH.

4000
Set Alm 2

The cursor will be on the channel no. The channel no. can be changed using the numeric
key pad or the
or
keys.

Set the channel no to 32 and press the


key to change the parameter. The cursor will
now be on the Parameter value. Change the Parameter value using the numeric keypad or
thr and
keys. The LCD will now display

32
CH.

5000
Set Alm 2

Now press the


key. The LCD will display ACCEPTABLE. Press
the
key to come out of the SET ALM 2 sub menu. Pressing the same key once again
will come back to the Program Mode Menu. Press the
key to come back to RUN
Mode.

The same procedure can be followed to change different parameters of the Program
Mode shown in the flow diagram.

SET ALM 1/SET ALM 2/SET ALM 3/SET ALM 4:


The SET ALM 1, SET ALM 2, SET ALM 3 & SET ALM 4 are
configured to set the alarm limits of the process value for a particular channel
depending upon the Input Type configured.

Skip/Unskip:
This parameter is used for skipping unwanted channels. If input is not connected
to some channel, that can be skipped so that it wont generate alarms and also not
come in display and printing sequence. A skipped channel can also be unskipped.

Print Data:
If this parameter is set then printer will print the data along with current time and
date if channel is unskip. Printing is done at the set Print Time.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 38 -

Data Logging:
If this parameter is set then data logging of the particular unskipped channel will
be carried out at the set Logging Time. Do not change this parameter during
logging otherwise memory will be reset and start new data logging as per the
changes made.

Unit Data:
This parameter is used to set the unit for the Process Value of the Input Type
selected for the particular channel.

Print Time:
The Print Time value can be set between 0 to 99 Minutes. Printing of data of all
the unskipped channels will be carried out at the set time interval.

Scan Time:
The Scan Time value can be set between 0 to 99 Seconds. Scanning of all the
unskipped channels will be carried out at the set time interval.

Logging Time:
The Logging Time value can be set between 0 to 99 Minutes. Logging of data of
all the unskipped channels will be carried out at the set time interval.

Relay Configuration:
The Relay configuration is enabled when a relay card is present in the Data
Logger. To enter Relay configuration press
key. The LCD will display
01
RL

45
CH

NO
Sel

High
Conf.

The first term RL on the lower line of the LCD display represents Relay no. The
Relay no can be changed by using the
and
keys. Once the desired Relay
is set, press the
key. The cursor will shift to CH which represents the Channel
no. Any relay can be configured for any channel. The new channel no. can be
entered by using the
and
keys. Once the desired Channel is set, press the
the key. The cursor will shift to Sel. The user can select YES or NO using the the
and
keys. Once the selection is done, press the
key. The LCD will
display ACCEPTABLE. Now press
key to shift to Conf. The user can set
any type of logic (as shown in flowchart) using the
and
keys. Once the
desired logic is set press
key. The LCD will display ACCEPTABLE.
Press
key to come out of Relay Configuration. In Relay configuration the
the key can also be used to switch between RL, CH, Sel and Conf.

Note:
The
key is used to undo the numeric parameters in all the modes of operation of the
Data Logger except the RUN Mode.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 39 -

Figure 5.6.1:- Front View Dimension Details

Figure 5.6.2:- Clamp Dimension Details

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 40 -

Figure 5.6.3:- Back View Details


Figure 5.6.4:- Panel Cut Out Details for Operator Terminal

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 41 -

MODBUS protocol defines a message structure that controllers will recognize


and use, regardless of the type of networks over which they communicate. It
describes the process a controller uses to request access to another device, how it
will respond to requests from the other devices, and how errors will be detected
and reported. It establishes a common format for the layout and contents of
message fields. During communications on a MODBUS network, the protocol
determines how each controller will know its device address, recognize a
message addressed to it, determine the kind of action to be taken, and extract any
data or other information contained in the message. If a reply is required, the
controller will construct the reply message and send it using MODBUS protocol.
On other networks, messages containing MODBUS protocol are imbedded into
the frame or packet structure that is used on the network.

The QueryResponse Cycle

Figure 6.2.1:- MasterSlave QueryResponse Cycle

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 42 -

Communication Interface
Communication method

Based on EIA RS-485 & RS 232


Half-duplex
communication
stop synchronous.

Communication Speed

4800/9600/19200 bps selectable by key.

Parity
Communication Protocol

None.
Modbus RTU.

Connectable number of
unit

Max.32 unit per host computer when RS


485 selected

Communication
detection

CRC check

error

start

The Serial Transmission Modes


RTU Mode
When controllers are setup to communicate on a MODBUS network using RTU
(Remote Terminal Unit) mode, each 8bit byte in a message contains two 4bit
hexadecimal characters. The main advantage of this mode is that its greater
character density allows better data throughput than ASCII for the same baud
rate. Each message must be transmitted in a continuous stream.
The format for each byte in RTU mode is:
Coding System:
8bit binary, hexadecimal 09, AF
Two hexadecimal characters contained in each
8bit field of the message
Bits per Byte:
1 start bit
8 data bits, least significant bit sent first
1 bit for even/odd parity; no bit for no parity
1 Stop bit if parity is used; 2 bits if no parity
Error Check Field:
Cyclical Redundancy Check (CRC)

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 43 -

How Numerical Values are expressed


Unless specified otherwise, numerical values (such as addresses, codes, or data)
are expressed as decimal values in the text of this section. They are expressed as
hexadecimal values in the message fields of the figures,
Data Addresses in MODBUS Messages
All data addresses in MODBUS messages are referenced to zero. The first
occurrence of a data item is addressed as item number zero. For example: The
coil known as coil 1 in a programmable controller is addressed as coil 0000 in
the data address field of a MODBUS message. Coil 127 decimal is addressed as
coil 007E hex (126 decimal). Holding register 40001 is addressed as register
0000 in the data address field of the message. The function code field already
specifies a holding register operation. Therefore the 4XXXX reference is
implicit. Holding register 40108 is addressed as register 006B hex (107 decimal).
Function Codes Used by Data Logger
Function code

Action

01

Read Coil Status

03

Read Holding Registers

05

Force Single Coil

06

Preset Single Register

16

Preset Multiple Register

07

Read Exception Status

17

Report Slave ID

Table 1: Function Codes and action

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 44 -

01 Read Coil Status


Description
Read the ON/OFF status of discrete outputs (0X references, coils) in the slave.
Broadcast is not supported.
Query
The query message specifies the starting coil and quantity of coils to be read.
Coils are addressed starting at zero: coils 116 are addressed as 015. Here is an
example of a request to read coils 2056 from slave device 17:

Figure 6.3.1:- Read Coil Status Query


Response
The coil status in the response message is packed as one coil per bit of the data
field. Status is indicated as: 1 = ON; 0 = OFF. The LSB of the first data byte
contains the coil addressed in the query. The other coils follow toward the high
order end of this byte, and from low order to high order in subsequent bytes. If
the returned coil quantity is not a multiple of eight, the remaining bits in the final
data byte will be padded with zeros (toward the high order end of the byte). The
Byte Count field specifies the quantity of complete bytes of data. Here is an
example of a response to the query (in fig 5):

Figure 6.3.2:- Read Coil Status Response

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 45 -

The status of coils 2720 is shown as the byte value CD hex, or binary 1100
1101. Coil 27 is the MSB of this byte, and coil 20 is the LSB. Left to right, the
status of coils 27 through 20 is: ONONOFFOFFONONOFFON. By
convention, bits within a byte are shown with the MSB to the left, and the LSB to
the right. Thus the coils in the first byte are 27 through 20, from left to right.
The next byte has coils 35 through 28, left to right. As the bits are transmitted
serially, they flow from LSB to MSB: 20 . . . 27, 28 . . . 35, and so on. In the last
data byte, the status of coils 5652 is shown as the byte value 1B hex, or binary
0001 1011. Coil 56 is in the fourth bit position from the left, and coil 52 is the
LSB of this byte. The status of coils 56 through 52 is: ONONOFFONON.
Note how the three remaining bits (toward the high order end) are zerofilled.

03 Read Holding Registers


Description
Read the binary contents of holding registers (4X references) in the slave.
Broadcast is not supported.
Query
The query message specifies the starting register and quantity of registers to be
read. Registers are addressed starting at zero: registers 116 are addressed as 0
15. Here is an example of a request to read registers 4010840110 from slave
device 17:

Figure 6.3.3:- Read Holding Registers Query


Response
The register data in the response message are packed as two bytes per register,
with the binary contents right justified within each byte. For each register, the
first byte contains the high order bits and the second contains the low order bits.
The response is returned when the data is completely assembled. Here is an
example of a response to the query (in fig 7):
The contents of register 40108 are shown as the two byte values of 02 2B hex, or
555 decimal. The contents of registers 4010940110 are 00 00 and 00 64 hex, or
0 and 100 decimal.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 46 -

Figure 6.3.4:- Read Holding Registers Response

05 Force Single Coil


Description
Force a single coil (0X reference) to either ON or OFF. When broadcast, the
function forces the same coil reference in all attached slaves.

Query
The query message specifies the coil reference to be forced. Coils are addressed
starting at zero: coil 1 is addressed as 0. The requested ON/OFF state is specified
by a constant in the query data field. A value of FF 00 hex requests the coil to be
ON. A value of 00 00 requests it to be OFF. All other values are illegal and will
not affect the coil. Here is an example of a request to force coil 173 ON in slave
device 17:

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 47 -

Figure 6.3.5:- Force Single Coil Query


Response
The normal response is an echo of the query, returned after the coil state has been
forced. Here is an example of a response to the query:

Figure 6.3.6:- Force Single Coil Response

06 Preset Single Register


Description
Presets a value into a single holding register (4X reference). When broadcast the
function presets the same register reference in all attached slaves.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 48 -

Query
The query message specifies the register reference to be preset. Registers are
addressed starting at zero: register 1 is addressed as 0. The requested preset value
is specified in the query data field. M84 and 484 controllers use a 10bit binary
value, with the six high order bits set to zeros. All other controllers use 16bit
values. Here is an example of a request to preset register 40002 to 00 03 hex in
slave device 17:

Figure 6.3.7:- Preset Single Register Query


Response
The normal response is an echo of the query, returned after the register contents
have been preset. Here is an example of a response to the query :

Figure 6.3.8:- Preset Single Register Response

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 49 -

16 Preset Multiple Registers


Description: Presets values into a sequence of holding registers (4X references).
When broadcast, the function presets the same register references in all attached
slaves.
Query: The query message specifies the register references to be preset.
Registers are addressed starting at zero: register 1 is addressed as 0. The
requested preset values are specified in the query data field. All other controllers
use 16bit values. Data is packed as two bytes per register. Here is an example of
a request to preset two registers starting at 40002 to 00 0A and 01 02 hex, in
slave device 17:

Figure 6.3.9:- write multiple Registers Query


Response: The normal response returns the slave address, function code, starting
address, and quantity of registers preset. Here is an example of a response to the
query shown above.

Figure 6.3.10:- write multiple Registers Response

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 50 -

07 Read Exception Status


Description: Reads the contents of eight Exception Status coils within the slave
controller. Certain coils have predefined assignments in the various controllers.
Other coils can be programmed by the user to hold information about the
controllers status, for example, machine ON/OFF, heads retracted, safeties
satisfied, error conditions exist, or other userdefined flags. Broadcast is not
supported. The function provides a simple method for accessing this information;
because the Exception Coil references are known (no coil reference is needed in
the function).
Query
Here is an example of a request to read the exception status in slave device 17:

Figure 6.3.11:- Read Exception Status Query


Response
The normal response contains the status of the eight Exception Status coils. The
coils are packed into one data byte, with one bit per coil. The status of the lowest
coil reference is contained in the least significant bit of the byte. Here is an
example of a response to the query on the next page:

Figure 6.3.12:- Read Exception Status Response


In this example, the coil data is 6D hex (0110 1101 binary). Left to right, the
coils are: OFFONONOFFONONOFFON. The status is shown from the
highest to the lowest addressed coil.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

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17 (11 Hex) Report Slave ID


Description
Returns a description of the type of controller present at the slave address, the
current status of the slave Run indicator, and other information specific to the
slave device. Broadcast is not supported.
Query
Here is an example of a request to report the ID and status of slave device 17:

Figure 6.3.13:- Report Slave ID Query


Response
The format of a normal response is shown below. The data contents are specific
to each type of controller. They are listed on the following pages.

Figure 6.3.14:- Report Slave ID Response

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 52 -

Except for broadcast messages, when a master device sends a query to a slave
device it expects a normal response. One of four possible events can occur from
the masters query: If the slave device receives the query without a
communication error, and can handle the query normally, it returns a normal
response. If the slave does not receive the query due to a communication error,
no response is returned. The master program will eventually process a timeout
condition for the query. If the slave receives the query, but detects a
communication error (parity, LRC, or CRC), no response is returned. The master
program will eventually process a timeout condition for the query. If the slave
receives the query without a communication error, but cannot handle it (for
example, if the request is to read a non-existent coil or register), the slave will
return an exception response informing the master of the nature of the error. The
exception response message has two fields that differentiate it from a normal
response:
Function Code Field: In a normal response, the slave echoes the function code
of the original query in the function code field of the response. All function codes
have a mostsignificant bit (MSB) of 0 (their values are all below 80
hexadecimal). In an exception response, the slave sets the MSB of the function
code to 1. This makes the function code value in an exception response exactly
80 hexadecimal higher than the value would be for a normal response. With the
function codes MSB set the masters application program can recognize the
exception response and can examine the data field for the exception code.
Data Field: In a normal response, the slave may return data or statistics in the
data field (any information that was requested in the query). In an exception
response, the slave returns an exception code in the data field. This defines the
slave condition that caused the exception.

Figure 6.4.1:- Master Query and Slave Exception Response

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 53 -

In this example, the master addresses a query to slave device 10 (0A hex). The
function code (01) is for a Read Coil Status operation. It requests the status of the
coil at address 1245 (04A1 hex). Note that only that one coil is to be read, as
specified by the number of coils field (0001). If the coil address is non-existent
in the slave device, the slave will return the exception response with the
exception code shown (02). This specifies an illegal data address for the slave.

Exception Codes
Code Name Meaning
01) ILLEGAL FUNCTION:
The function code received in the query is not an allowable action for the slave.
If a Poll Program Complete command was issued, this code indicates that no
program function preceded it.
02) ILLEGAL DATA ADDRESS:
The data address received in the query is not an allowable address for the slave.
03) ILLEGAL DATA VALUE:
A value contained in the query data field is not an allowable value for the slave.
04) SLAVE DEVICE FAILURE:
An unrecoverable error occurred while the slave was attempting to perform the
requested action.
05) ACKNOWLEDGE:
The slave has accepted the request and is processing it, but a long duration of
time will be required to do so. This response is returned to prevent a timeout
error from occurring in the master. The master can next issue a Poll Program
Complete message to determine if processing is completed.
06) SLAVE DEVICE BUSY:
The slave is engaged in processing a longduration program command. The
master should retransmit the message later when the slave is free.
07) NEGATIVE ACKNOWLEDGES:
The slave cannot perform the program function received in the query. This code
is returned for an unsuccessful programming request using function code 13 or
14 decimal. The master should request diagnostic or error information from the
slave.
08) MEMORY PARITY ERROR:
The slave attempted to read extended memory, but detected a parity error in the
memory. The master can retry the request, but service may be required on the
slave device.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 54 -

Data Logger 8040/Operator Terminal does not Switch ON.


Check the Mains Cord.
Check fuse, if blown off replace it
Check Power ON switch/ Power ON Indication LED.
Check the S.M.P.S. O/P voltages of the Unit and the Operator Terminal

Printing is not proper unknown characters printed/ unit isnt printing.


Check for the loose connection of printer cable connector.
Check the printer cable
Check the printer settings.
Replace CPU card.

Communication Problem between the Unit and Host PC/Operator Terminal


Check the cabling.
Check the serial No.
Check the RS-485 to RS232 converter.
Check the serial port of the computer & baud rate settings, etc.
Check RJ 45 connections between the Data Logger 8040 and the Operator
Terminal.
Replace the CPU

Certain keys on the Operator Terminal not working.


Check for Communication between the Unit and the Operator Terminal.
Ensure that the unit is in program mode.
If a particular row is failed, one of the lines of lay board matrix may be
having problem.

Date/time other parameter changes when unit is restarted.


Check the NVRAM on the CPU card. If not ok, replace the same.

Calibration of the unit is doubted to have drifted.


Calibrate the unit as explained in the manual. Select the proper method
according to your data - logger input type.

Reading indicated by data - logger is unstable


Check the process input.
Ensure the perfect EARTHING to the unit & Neutral should not be floating.
Shielded cables should used for input. Shield should be EARTHED near the
unit only.
Check any of the RTDs is not getting EARTHED or having weak insulation
with respect to earth. If so, remove that RTD and check the cabling.
Check the lead resistance of all the three arms of RTDs. All the three leads
should have same lead resistance. If no, change the cables.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 55 -

In linear type input the unit shows false reading or OVER or UNDER.
Check for the polarity of the I/P connections.
Check that the 250 resistor is connected across the I/P terminals, if the I/P
type is 4 20 mA.
Check the current I/P coming from the field, it may be below 4 or over 20
mA.
Check for the proper range programmed in that channel.

In thermocouple type input the reading indicated has got some error.
Check for the proper I/p type selected.
Ensure that the compensating cables used are of proper type and connected in
proper direction.
Check the calibration of the unit.

All inputs coming from the field must be shielded and shield should earthen near the
Data Logger only.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 56 -

MODBUS Protocol detail used in Data logger 8040


General Query Frame
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Device Address
Function Code
Type
Channel No
No of registers Low byte
No of registers High byte
Byte Count
Hi Data
Low Data
CRC byte Lo
CRC byte Hi

Table: M.1

Types are as followed:


00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

PV (Process Value)
IP (Input Type)
SET ALARM - 4
SET ALARM 3
SET ALARM 2
SET ALARM -1
ZERO
SPAN
HYSTRESIS
DP
UNIT
Common Parameter
Ambient
spare
Open Sensor Indication
Channel legend
Header Legend
Set Alarm - 1
Set Alarm - 2
Set Alarm - 3
Set Alarm - 4

Table: M.2

If function (Type as above) is 11 (Common


Parameter) Then it will be followed by subFunction code which is Ch. no for other
Function code
11.00
11.01
11.02
11.03
11.04
11.05
11.06
11.07
11.08
11.09
11.10
11.11
11.12
11.13
11.14
11.15
11.16
11.17
11.18

SCAN TIME
PRINT TIME
LOGGING TIME
SET POINT
RELAY TYPE
SLAVE ID
BAUD RATE
PASSWORD
SET Point, Open Sensor,
Alarm Latch, Relay Control
PRINTER
TIME - SEC
TIME MIN
TIME - HOUR
DATE - DAY
DATE - MONTH
DATE - YEAR
CARD INFORMATION
RECORD POINT
RELAY CONFIGURATION

Table: M.3

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 57 -

Write Report Slave ID:


1.

Write Slave Id
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x11, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x11, RegLo, RegHi, 0xff, Card1, Card2, Card10, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Card Types:
1
2
3
4
5
6

Relay Output cards


Analog Input cards
Analog Output cards
Digital Input cards
Digital Output cards
Fault Output cards

0x81
0x7f
0x83
0x84
0x82
0x80

Write Input Values:


2.

Write Process Value


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x00, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x00, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

3.

Write Input Type


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x01, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x01, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

4.

Write Set Alarm 4


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x02, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x02, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 58 -

5.

Write Set Alarm 3


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x03, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x03, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

6.

Write Set Alarm 2


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x04, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x04, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

7.

Write Set Alarm 1


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x05, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x05, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

8.

Write Zero Value


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x06, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x06, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

9.

Write Span Value


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x07, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x07, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

10.

Write Hyst
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x08, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x08, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

11.

Write DP position
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x09, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x09, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

12.

Write Unit
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x10, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x10, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 59 -

Write Common Parameters


13.

Write Scan Time


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x00, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x00, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

14.

Write Print Time


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x01, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x01, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

15.

Write Logging Time


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x02, 0x00, 0x02, 0x04, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x02, 0x00, 0x02, CRCLo, CRCHi}

16.

Write Set Point


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, CRCLo, CRCHi}

17.

Write Relay
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x04, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x0B, 0x04, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

18.

Write Device ID
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x05, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x05, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

19.

Write Baud Rate


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x06, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x06, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 60 -

20.

Write Password
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x07, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x07, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

21.

Write Relay, Alarm, open Sensor, Set point


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x08, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x08, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

22.

Write Printer
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x09, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x09, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

23.

Write Current Time (Second)


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0A, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0A, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

24.

Write Current Time (Minute)


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0B, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0B, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

25.

Write Current Time (Hour)


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0C, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0C, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

26.

Write Current Date


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0D, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0D, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

27.

Write Current Month


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0E, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0E, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 61 -

28.

Write Current Year


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0F, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, HiData, LoData, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x10, 0x0B, 0x0F, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}

Write Status Values:


29.

Write Skip / Unskip Status


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x00, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x00, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}

30.

Write Print Status


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x01, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x01, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}

31.

Write Logging Status


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x02, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x02, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}

32.

Write Relay Status


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x05, RelayNo, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x05, RelayNo, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}

Read Input Values:


33.

Read Process Value


Query: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x00, ChNo, 0x00, 0x10, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Query for common Parameter: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x00, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo,
CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, CRCLo, CRCHi}

Note: Same sequence for other input values. Only change


function code and type similar to write commands.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 62 -

Sr.No Parameter
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41

Skip status
Print Ch. status
Log Ch. Status
Open Sensor
Alarm 1 status
Alarm 2 status
Alarm 3 status
Alarm 4 status
Process Value
Input Type
Set Alarm 4
Set Alarm 3
Set Alarm 2
Set Alarm 1
Zero
Span
Hysteresis
DP
Unit
Scan Time
Print Time
Log Time(R)
Log Time(W)
Logging Status
Log Mode
Slave ID
Baudrate
Password
Alarm Configuration
Sec
Min
Hour
Date
Month
Year
Open Sensor Modbus
[Alarm status]
Ambient
Open Sensor Indication
Alarm 1 Status
Alarm 2 Status
Alarm 3 Status
Alarm 4 Status

Absolute
address
00001
00257
00513
00769
01025
01281
01537
01793
40001
40257
40513
40769
41025
41281
41537
41793
42049
42305
42561
42817
42818
42819
44353
42820
42821
42822
42823
42824
42825
42827
42828
42829
42830
42831
42832
42835

Type
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer

43073
43585
44353
44609
44865
45121

Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer
Integer

Minimum
value
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Maximum
value
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

13

Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1

Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1
Table: 4.2.1

0.1%
0
0
1sec
----0
0
0
0
1
0
0
*
0
0
0
1
1
1
0

9.9%
4
58
99sec
----59
59
1
2
99
2
65535
*
59
59
23
31
12
99
1

Access
Type
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
R
R
R
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W

Table: M.4

Table: M.4

----0
0
0
0
0

----1
1
1
1
1

R/W
R/W
R
R
R
R

Table: M.4

Note: All above address are starting address for that particular group. End address will be starting address + 160.
for e.g. starting add [channel 1]for open sensor indication is 43585, end add. [160th channel] is 43585 + 160 =
43745. And from 43746 to 44353 will be reserved address for modbus.
* 42825 register description.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 63 -

42825 register.
15
X

14
x

13
x

12
x

11
x

10
x

9
x

8
x

7
x

6
x

5
x

4
x

3
x

2
x

Set point configuration.


42825.1 0
00 - H-VH
01 - L- H
10 - VL L.
11 - VL L H VH.
Open Sensor PV value upscale / down scale
42825. 8
0 - Down scale.
1 Upscale.
Alarm Latch value
42825. 12
0 - Alarm Latch No.
1 - Alarm Latch Yes.
Relay control value
42825. 14
0 Normal relay off.
1 Normal Relay On.
Bit 42825.2,3,4,5,6,7,9,10,11,13,15 are reserved for future use.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 64 -

1
x

0
x

Fetch History Data


Start

Transfer from RUN mode to LOG mode


{sltrsdata}

Fetch Data (Read first / next Record, and size of record)


{trsdata}

Data Increment (Next 32 bytes of record)


{ditrsdata}

Fetch Data (Read 32 bytes of channel data)


{trsdata}
Until Size of Record

Record Increment (Go To next record position)


{ritrsdata}

Until Last Record (last


record gets error response)

Transfer from LOG mode to RUN mode


{sttrsdata}

End

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 65 -

Run mode to Log mode:


Query: sltrsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x05, 0x00, 0xff, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Response: { DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x20, 0x00, 0xff, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Fetch Data:
trsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x10, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response for First Record (37 bytes):
{ DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x20, 0x65, 0x66, 0x00, 0x01, 0x12, Logtime-Hour, Logtime-Minute,
Logtime-Second, LogDate-Date, LogDate-Month LogDate-Year, Ch1-Lo,Ch1-Hi, Ch8Lo,Ch8Hi, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Response for Other Records (32 bytes):
{ DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x20, Ch9-Lo,Ch9-Hi, Ch22-Lo,Ch22-Hi, CRCLo, CRCHi }
{ DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x20, Ch9-Lo,Ch9-Hi, Ch22-Lo,Ch22-Hi, CRCLo, CRCHi }
{ DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x20, Ch9-Lo,Ch9-Hi, Ch22-Lo,Ch22-Hi, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Data Increment:
ditrsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x06, 0x00, 0xff, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Data Decrement:
ddtrsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x06, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Record Increment:
ritrsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x07, 0x00, 0xff, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Record Decremtnt:
rdtrsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x07, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Goto First Record:
frtrsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x08, 0x00, 0xff, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Goto Last Record:
ertrsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x08, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }
Log mode to Run mode:
sttrsdata[8] = { DeviceNo, 0x05, 0x05, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, CRCLo, CRCHi }

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 66 -

Calibration:
Write Zero Calibration:
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x06, 0x0D, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x06, 0x0D, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Write Span Calibration:
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x06, 0x0E, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x06, 0x0E, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Write Ambient Calibracin:
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x06, 0x0C, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x06, 0x0C, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Read Zero Calibration:
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x0D, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x0D, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Read Span Calibration:
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x0E, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x0E, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}
Read Ambient Calibration:
Query: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x0C, ChNo, 0x00, 0x01, CR CLo, CR CHi}
Response: {DeviceNo, 0x03, 0x0C, ChNo, HiData, LoData, CRCLo, CRCHi}

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

- 67 -

Appendix B.

Alarm status in open condition.

Set point Type :- H-VH


Open Sensor
Parameter
Setting (Alarm
Status)
Down Scale
Up Scale

Modbus Open
Sensor
Parameter
Setting (PV
status)
Down Scale
Up Scale
Down Scale
Up Scale

Set point Type :- VL-L


Open Sensor
Parameter
Setting (Alarm
Status)
Down Scale
Up Scale

Modbus Open
Sensor
Parameter
Setting (PV
status)
Down Scale
Up Scale
Down Scale
Up Scale

Set point Type :- L-H


Open Sensor
Parameter
Setting (Alarm
Status)
Down Scale
Up Scale

Modbus Open
Sensor
Parameter
Setting (PV
status)
Down Scale
Up Scale
Down Scale
Up Scale

Set point Type :- VL-L,HVH


Open Sensor
Parameter
Setting (Alarm
Status)
Down Scale
Up Scale

Modbus Open
Sensor
Parameter
Setting (PV
status)
Down Scale
Up Scale
Down Scale
Up Scale

INPUT :- OPEN
On
Modbus
PV
Value

ON
Modbus
AL-1
Status

On
Modbus
AL-2
Status

In OTU
PV
Value
Display

In OTU Channel
Status Display

-200
850
-200
850

OFF
OFF
ON
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON

OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN

------------VHigh
VHigh

INPUT :- OPEN
On
Modbus
PV
Value

ON
Modbus
AL-1
Status

On
Modbus
AL-2
Status

In OTU
PV
Value
Display

In OTU Channel
Status Display

-200
850
-200
850

ON
ON
OFF
OFF

ON
ON
OFF
OFF

OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN

V Low
V Low
-------------

INPUT :- OPEN
On
Modbus
PV
Value

ON
Modbus
AL-1
Status

On
Modbus
AL-2
Status

In OTU
PV
Value
Display

In OTU Channel
Status Display

-200
850
-200
850

ON
ON
OFF
OFF

OFF
OFF
ON
ON

OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN

Low
Low
High
High

INPUT :- OPEN
On
Modbus
PV
Value

ON
Modbus
AL-1
Status

On
Modbus
AL-2
Status

IN
Modbus
AL-3
Status

IN
Modbus
AL-4
Status

In OTU
PV
Value
Display

In OTU
Channel
Status
Display

-200
850
-200
850

ON
ON
OFF
OFF

ON
ON
OFF
OFF

OFF
OFF
ON
ON

OFF
OFF
ON
ON

OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN

V Low
V Low
VHigh
VHigh

Note: When I/P is open then Open sensor status will be always ON.

M81/om/101, Issue # 01A-801992

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