You are on page 1of 223

www.brainology.

us

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment, and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

THE BRAINOLOGY CURRICULUM


GUIDE TO IMPLEMENTATION

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

THE BRAINOLOGY CURRICULUM:


TEACHING A GROWTH MINDSET
What are Mindsets?
Mindsets are the beliefs that people hold about their attributes. When people believe that their
attributessuch as intelligenceare unchangeable, they hold a Fixed Mindset. When they believe
that these attributes can be developed through learning, they hold a Growth Mindset.
Decades of research by Dr. Carol Dweck and colleagues show that when people understand that
they can develop their intelligence through learning, they are motivated to seek challenge, value
learning, invest effort, and persist through difficultyand they achieve more highly. Furthermore,
the Growth Mindset can be taught.

What is Brainology?
Brainology is a research-based method for teaching students a Growth Mindset, along with the
tools to put it into practice. The Brainology curriculum combines online, interactive animation
with classroom-based activities to teach students how the brain changes with learning, and how
they can use brain-based study strategies to accelerate their progress.

How do I get started?


The Brainology Implementation Guide will walk you through the process. It is organized in 3
sections, as follows:
Get Ready! provides an overview of the purpose and structure of the Brainology
Curriculum.
Get Set! provides recommendations and tools for planning, and technical instructions on
how to implement the program.
Go! provides step-by-step guidance on teaching Brainology in the classroom. The Go!
Guide is chunked into an Introductory Unit and four Units of classroom activities and
reproducibles for use with students.
On the next page, you will find a summary of materials in each section.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

SUMMARY OF MATERIALS
In these Guides you will find the following materials:

I.

GET READY! CURRICULUM OVERVIEW.......................... 5-12


a. Why Teach Brainology? .................................................................. 8
b. The Growth Mindset: An Overview ................................................ 9
c. Brainology: Developing a Growth Mindset ........................... 10-11
d. Brainology Curriculum Overview ............................................... 12

II.

GET SET! PLANNING AND SETUP ................................... 13-24


a. Plan Your Implementation ........................................................ 16-18
b. Technical Setup Using the Brainology Website ................. 19-24

III. GO! LESSON & MATERIAL GUIDES ............................. 25-195


a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

Intro Unit ................................................................................... 29-57


Unit 1: Brain Basics .................................................................. 59-86
Unit 2: Brain Behavior ............................................................ 87-119
Unit 3: Brain Building .......................................................... 121-151
Unit 4: Brain Boosters .......................................................... 153-195

IV. UNIT ASSESSMENTS AND RE-TEACHING GUIDES .......197-223


a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

Intro Unit ............................................................................... 201-205


Unit 1: Brain Basics .............................................................. 206-209
Unit 2: Brain Behavior .......................................................... 210-214
Unit 3: Brain Building .......................................................... 215-219
Unit 4: Brain Boosters .......................................................... 220-223

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment, and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

GET READY!
PART I. CURRICULUM OVERVIEW:
RESEARCH FOUNDATION & PLANNING
GUIDE FOR TEACHERS

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

GET READY!
Curriculum Overview
Table of Contents:
I.

Why Teach Brainology? Mindsets and Student Agency ......... 8

II.

The Growth Mindset: An Overview ............................................ 9

III. Brainology: Developing a Growth Mindset.10


IV. Cultivate a Growth Mindset Through Process Praise ............. 11
V.

Brainology Curriculum Overview ........................................... 12

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

WHY TEACH BRAINOLOGY?


WHAT DO STUDENTS NEED TO BE SUCCESSFUL?
Mindsets and Student Agency
What do students need to succeed? We know
that they need good curriculum and
instruction, including appropriate levels of
challenge and support. But even before that,
they need to be ready to learnto have the
attitudes, skills, and habits of effective
learners.
The Raikes and Lumina Foundations
commissioned the UChicago Consortium on
Chicago Student Research (CCSR) to
conduct a research literature review to
determine what adolescents need to become
learners. CCSR determined that there are
several critical factors that together
contribute to building student agencythe
belief that they can achieve and that they
have the knowledge and strategies needed to do so.
The best ways to improve students perseverance and strengthen their academic behaviors is through
academic mindsets and learning strategies. This is the central point emerging from our review. CCSR
Review: Farrington, Roderick, et. al, 2012.
Highlights from the CCSR Report:

We can positively change student mindsets in a


real world setting, which impacts real performance
in academics and more broadly.
Mindset interventions reduce the achievement
gap. (REL 2012)
Focusing on study skills without the mindset
component is ineffective.
Embedding mindset cultivation in a school-wide
context and as a part of school culture is most
supportive to learners.

Notably, across the empirical


literature, ones beliefs about
intelligence and attributions for
academic success or failure are more
strongly associated with school
performance than is ones actual
measured ability (i.e., test scores). Farrington, Roderick, et. al, 2012

Among these critical academic mindsets, the Growth Mindset plays a central role in helping students to
forge a sense of self-efficacy. At Mindset Works, we have developed the Brainology program to help
teachers and schools cultivate a growth mindset and improve the learning strategies of their students.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

THE GROWTH MINDSET: AN OVERVIEW


Mindset is a powerful yet simple idea discovered by Professor Carol S. Dweck of Stanford and her
colleagues in decades of research on motivation, achievement, and success. Mindsets are beliefs individuals
hold about their most basic qualities and abilities. In a Growth Mindset, people believe they can develop
their brain, abilities, and talents. This view creates a love for learning, a drive for growth and a resilience
that is essential for great accomplishments. On the contrary, people with a Fixed Mindset believe that basic
qualities such as intelligence and abilities are fixed, and can't be developed. They also believe that talent
alone creates success, and see effort as a sign of weakness rather than as an effective strategy needed to
reach one's full potential.
The following diagram shows how people with different views of intelligence respond in different
situations:

Decades of research show that when people understand that they can develop their intelligence through
learning, they are motivated to seek challenge, value learning, invest effort, and persist through
difficultyand they achieve more highly. Moreover, the Growth Mindset can be taught.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

BRAINOLOGY: DEVELOPING A GROWTH MINDSET


Brainology is designed to help students to develop a Growth Mindset and, as a result, to reach a higher
level of academic achievement. Students with a growth mindset think of their intelligence as something
that they can develop through learning and study rather than as something fixed. Cultivating a growth
mindset can help increase students sense of self-efficacy and their motivation to learn.
Brainology is based on decades of research by leading experts in the area of motivation. Psychologists
Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D. and Lisa Sorich Blackwell, Ph.D. discovered that developing a Growth Mindset
helps students to value learning, invest effort, and improve their academic performance. (See Blackwell,
Trzesniewski, & Dweck, 2007.) They developed the Brainology program to help students cultivate a
Growth Mindset by teaching them the powerful combination of the malleable brain lesson and effective
study skills.
Brainology helps students develop a growth mindset by teaching them how the brain functions, learns,
and remembers, and how it changes physically when we exercise it through study and learning. In addition,
the program teaches a practical set of skills for tackling academic challenges by showing students how to
apply what they have learned about the brain to their schoolwork.
The Brainology program has been implemented in hundreds of schools with great results. When students
realize that they control their learning, they are motivated to apply effort and take an active role in learning.
Teachers note positive changes in students' behavior (becoming engaged in class, reflecting, asking
questions, doing homework), as well as in the higher student achievement that results from more motivated
students with higher expectations of themselves.
Brainology is a blended learning curriculum that includes an interactive multimedia online program and
classroom activities. In an introduction plus four 30-minute units, students follow animated teenaged
characters Chris and Dahlia as they tackle various problems in their most difficult subjects. They visit the
lab of eccentric brain scientist Dr. Cerebrus and learn about the basic structure and function of the brain:
how thinking occurs, how learning and memory work, how to develop and change the brain, and how to
improve their study habits and skills in light of this knowledge. They gain experience in visualizing and
applying these ideas through interactive activities and exercises. Throughout the program they reflect on
their challenges and their learning through an e-Journal, and they engage in classroom activities to connect,
reinforce, and practice what they learn in the context of their own experience. This curriculum helps students
understand that they have great, untapped potential and that the development of their mental ability is
largely within their own control, and provides them with study habits and skills that they can use to achieve
highly.
Through this Curriculum Guide for Teachers, we will help you support your students by providing
information and strategies that you can use to reinforce their growth mindset development.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

10

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

CULTIVATE A GROWTH MINDSET THROUGH


PROCESS PRAISE
Focus on leading your students' mindset shift
There's a lot you can do every day, in every interaction with your students, to reinforce the growth
mindsets they are developing. For example, the type of praise a student receives profoundly influences his
or her mindset. Research has shown that praising students for their intelligence after they succeed on a
task can set them up to hold a fixed mindset. They seek to protect themselves by avoiding challenge; and
when they do encounter failure, their motivation and performance plummet. On the other hand, when
students are praised for their effort and strategy, they get excited about challenges and stay resilient in the
face of failure. So it is important that you reinforce the growth mindset with process praise.
How? Here is an excerpt from an article Prof. Dweck wrote for Educational Leadership:
Praising students for their intelligence, then, hands them not motivation and resilience but a fixed mindset with all its vulnerability. In contrast, effort or process praise (praise for engagement, perseverance,
strategies, improvement, and the like) fosters hardy motivation. It tells students what they've done to be
successful and what they need to do to be successful again in the future. Process praise sounds like this:
You really studied for your English test, and your improvement shows it. You read the material
over several times, outlined it, and tested yourself on it. That really worked!
I like the way you tried all kinds of strategies on that math problem until you finally got it.
It was a long, hard assignment, but you stuck to it and got it done. You stayed at your desk, kept
up your concentration, and kept working. That's great!
I like that you took on that challenging project for your science class. It will take a lot of work
doing the research, designing the machine, buying the parts, and building it. You're going to learn
a lot of great things.
What about a student who gets an A without trying? I would say, All right, that was too easy for you.
Let's do something more challenging that you can learn from. We don't want to make something done
quickly and easily the basis for our admiration.
What about a student who works hard and doesn't do well? I would say, I liked the effort you put in.
Let's work together some more and figure out what you don't understand. Process praise keeps students
focused, not on something called ability that they may or may not have and that magically creates success
or failure, but on processes they can all engage in to learn. Carol Dweck, 2007
In addition, keeping a consistent and visible growth mindset orientation in your classroom can be a key
component of reinforcing what your students learn in the Brainology program. Here are a few more
suggestions for integrating Brainology terminology and activities into your classroom:

Are your students losing focus on the lesson? Ask them if they are "using all their channels"!
Are your students struggling with a difficult challenge? Remind them that their neurons are
growing most when things seem most difficult.
Do your students have projects to complete? Have them use the Brainology Study Guide and
Study Plan!

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

11

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Ready

BRAINOLOGY CURRICULUM OVERVIEW


Structure of the Online Curriculum:
The Brainology online curriculum is composed of a ~10 minute introduction and four ~30 minute units
(depending on how much time the students spend on optional activities such as reading Chris & Dahlias
e-journal entries and entering their own). We recommend doing no more than one of these four main units
each week so that children have time to reflect, integrate takeaways into their own lives, and incorporate
the offline materials.

The Introduction to Brainology presents the curriculum and its purpose, the characters that will
guide the students throughout the program, and the tools available (e.g., the e-Journal, Map, Brain
Book and Help). Users also create an inventory of their personal challenges so they can more easily
relate the Brainology lessons to their lives.

Unit 1: Brain Basics introduces the basics of brain structure and function. This unit also explains
what is required to maintain readiness to learn and how attention and concentration are supported.
This unit teaches students the physical aspect of thinking and learning, which underlie a growth
mindset.

In Unit 2: Brain Behavior, students learn that the brain functions by sending chemical messages
through a network of nerve cells, and that these cells are responsible for thought. This insight
provides a foundation for understanding how learning changes the brain. They also learn how
emotions can influence the brain and are taught strategies for managing their negative emotions and
enhancing their positive ones.

In Unit 3: Brain Building, students discover how learning changes the brain through the growth of
connections in neural networks with repeated use, the key to the growth mindset. Students learn that
intelligence can be developed through mental exercise, and they are introduced to activities that
promote learning.

Unit 4: Brain Boosters extends the concept of the malleable brain to understand the processes of
memory. The unit introduces a variety of study strategies to capitalize on the way the brain works
and learns to deepen and reinforce the students understanding of the growth mindset, and to guide
the student to the study skills resources

Ground yourself in Mindset theory


While it is possible to spend a lifetime investigating the psychology of motivation and achievement, you
don't have to in order to be very successful with Brainology. Some background in the theory is needed,
however. If you have the time, the inclination, and the opportunity, we recommend that you read Dr.
Dweck's book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success.
If this isn't the right moment for you to read the book, we suggest reading these three articles (which are all
freely available on the internet):
Even Geniuses Work Hard
The Power (and Peril) of Praising Your Kids
Boosting Achievement with Messages that Motivate

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

12

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment, and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

GET SET!
PART II. PLANNING & SETUP:
SCHEDULING & TECHNICAL GUIDE
FOR TEACHERS

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

13

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

14

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

GET SET!
Planning & Setup Guide
Table of Contents:
I.

Plan Your Implementation


a. Identify and prepare the implementation team........................................ 16
b. Plan the implementation schedule ........................................................16-17
c. Brainology Planning Calendar ................................................................. 18

II.

Technical Setup - Using the Brainology website


a. Creating and managing your own account ..........................................19-20
i. Joining a school account ................................................................... 19
ii. Changing your password .............................................................19-20
iii. Resetting your password .................................................................. 20
b. Set up for your classroom(s) ..................................................................20-22
i. Creating and managing student groups and access codes ............ 20
ii. Viewing or changing student groups and group access codes ...... 21
iii. Creating and managing student accounts....................................... 21
iv. Resetting a student password ........................................................... 22
c. Tracking your students progress .........................................................22-23
i. Viewing your list of students ............................................................ 22
ii. Viewing your available licenses ....................................................... 23
iii. Viewing your students' data ............................................................. 23
d. Tips for the Computer Lab......................................................................... 24

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

15

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

PLANNING YOUR BRAINOLOGY IMPLEMENTATION


This section of the Guide covers the activities required to carry out a successful Brainology
implementation. The material in the Get Ready! section should have provided a general overview of the
goals, content, and operation of the program. The next step is to review what needs to happen and make
detailed plans.
A well-known maxim holds that failing to plan is planning to fail. A little preparation goes a long way
towards ensuring a successful implementation of Brainology.

Identify and prepare the implementation team


The critical first step is to identify who will be leading the implementation. If you are a teacher who has
brought Brainology to your classroom on your own initiative, look in the mirror. If you are an
administrator, an instructional coach, a counselor, or other educational leader who has brought Brainology
to a group of classrooms, you need to decide whether or not you will be part of the day-to-day
implementation. If not, identify who will be responsible for leadership, coaching, and coordination.
Whoever is responsible for leading the implementation should start by sharing this guide with the rest of
the team. We recommend spending some time with the team to review the process and plans and ensure
that everyone is becoming well-prepared.
If you're not leading the implementation, coordinate with whoever is to be sure you're fully aware of the
schedule.

Plan the implementation schedule


The key features of a best-practices implementation of Brainology are these:
The online units are presented at least a week apart.
All of the classroom activities are completed.
As a result, you should plan to spend about fifteen hours over at least six weeks on Brainology.
There is considerable flexibility in the implementation process:
With a little extra reinforcement along the way, the online units can be spaced two or even three
weeks apart.
Many of the additional classroom activities can be spread out over two or three days if you prefer
not to devote a complete period to them.
The online Brainology units can be paused and resumed, so those can each be split over a couple
of days, too, if necessary.
Some of the classroom activities can be assigned as homework.
Your implementation can occur in one classroom, or can be part of a school-wide implementation. In the
case of school-wide implementation, consider how the computer lab sessions will be spaced out and whether
the lab sessions could occur in a content area class, while the classroom-setting lessons occur in another
setting (like an Advisory or Homeroom).
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

16

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

You should feel comfortable planning the schedule to coordinate with your own circumstances (length of
class periods, holidays, testing schedules, availability of computer lab time, etc.). We strongly recommend
that you take the time to plan specific dates for Brainology even if you expect to have to adjust them
later.

Scheduling Options
Brainology is a blended learning curriculum that requires a total of about 15 hours of classroom time to
teach, including about 2.5 hours of online activities, in 20 sessions over 5-20 weeks. It can accommodate
different schedules, as follows:

Length of Class Period: The optimal length of a class period for Brainology is 45 minutes, which
permits ample time for each activity to be completed within one session. It can also work within
shorter (30 minute) or longer (60 minute) periods.

Number of Sessions per Week: Brainology can be taught in 1-4 sessions per week.

Number of Weeks to Complete: Depending on the length of class periods and number of sessions
per week, Brainology can take from 5-20 weeks to complete.

Here is a sample implementation schedule:

Sample 10-week, 20-session implementation schedule with 40 min. per session


Week

Unit

Day

Activity

Day

Activity

Intro

Tuesday

Activity I-1 (offline)

Thursday

Activity I-2 (online)

Intro

Tuesday

Activity I-3 (offline)

Thursday

Activity I-4 (offline)

Unit 1

Tuesday

Activity 1-1 (offline)

Thursday

Activity 1-2 (online)

Unit 1

Tuesday

Activity 1-3 (offline)

Thursday

Activity 1-4 (offline)

Unit 2

Tuesday

Activity 2-1 (offline)

Thursday

Activity 2-2 (online)

Unit 2

Tuesday

Activity 2-3 (offline)

Thursday

Activity 2-4 (offline)

Unit 3

Tuesday

Activity 3-1 (offline)

Thursday

Activity 3-2 (online)

Unit 3

Tuesday

Activity 3-3 (offline)

Thursday

Activity 3-4 (offline)

Unit 4

Tuesday

Activity 4-1 (offline)

Thursday

Activity 4-2 (online)

10

Unit 4

Tuesday

Activity 4-3 (offline)

Thursday

Activity 4-4 (offline)

Each unit also contains alternative activities to accommodate learners with different needs and skills.
On the next page you will find a blank Brainology Planning Calendar. You can also find an automated
planning tool online at https://www.mindsetworks.com/teacherschedule.aspx. It may be helpful to include
the calendar in your lesson plans and fill in the dates for when you plan to complete the activities.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

17

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

BRAINOLOGY PLANNING CALENDAR


Unit

Activity #

Activity

I-1

Connect It: Mindset Assessment Profile (MAP) and Reflection

I-2

Check It: Online Brainology Intro and Formative Assessment

I-3

Practice It: You Can Grow Your Intelligence

I-4

Apply It: Values Lesson and Reflection

1-1

Connect It: Information Search and Scan or Inventory

1-2

Check It: Online Brainology Unit 1 and Formative Assessment

1-3

Practice It: Effective Effort

1-4

Apply It: Johns History Test

2-1

Connect It: Overcoming Challenges

2-2

Check It: Online Brainology Unit 2 and Formative Assessment

2-3

Practice It: Scan or Inventory and Emotions & Learning Handout

2-4

Apply It: Alicias Presentation

3-1

Connect It: The Two Mindsets Part 1 and Reflection

3-2

Check It: Online Brainology Unit 3 and Formative Assessment

3-3

Practice It: Mindset Scan and Reflection

3-4

Apply It: Scientific Research Brief

4-1

Connect It: The Two Mindsets Part 2

4-2

Check It: Online Brainology Unit 4 and Formative Assessment

4-3

Practice It: Brain Study Plan or Learning Strategies Scan

4-4

Apply It: Class Motto

Date

Intro

1
Brain
Basics

2
Brain
Behavior

3
Brain
Building

4
Brain
Boosters

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

18

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

TECHNICAL SETUP - USING THE BRAINOLOGY WEBSITE


The Brainology curriculum is centered on the online instructional units for students. As a teacher, you
have visibility into your students' progress and interaction with the online curriculum. You also have access
to administrative tools to manage student accounts (and your own). This section provides step-by-step
instructions for those interactions with the website, organized approximately in the order you will need
them as you proceed through your implementation.

Creating and managing your own account


Joining a school account
If you dont already have a user name and password, and your school has already purchased Brainology,
your local administrator has an Educator Registration Code that you will need to register. If you're having
any difficulty identifying your local administrator or any uncertainty about the Educator Registration Code,
feel free to contact Brainology support at support@mindsetworks.com or 888-344-6463. Once you have the
Educator Registration code, follow these steps:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on the words Sign Up near the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Sign Up page, under the heading Already have a registration
code? enter your Educator Registration Code, select the I am an educator option, and click the
Sign Up! button.
On the Educator Registration page:
select a username and password
enter your personal details
check the box to indicate you have reviewed the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy
click the Sign Up! button
You now have full access to the online Brainology units, the supporting materials, and the rest of
the administrative controls.
Changing your password
If you wish to change the password you use to log in to the Brainology website, follow these steps:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on the words Log In at the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Log In page, under the heading Already a User?, enter your
Brainology login username and password and click on the Log In button.
Click on the words My Brainology at the top of the page.
In the left hand column of the Getting Started page, click on the words My Account.
In the third section, Manage Your Personal Information & Account, click on the words Change
my password to log in.
On the password update page, enter your old password, enter your new password, reenter your new
password for confirmation, and click the Submit button.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

19

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

Please note that your password is securely encrypted and cannot be retrieved by anyone. If you should
forget it, follow the instructions for resetting your password.
Resetting your password
If you know your Brainology login username and have access to the e-mail account you used when you
registered on the Brainology website, follow these steps to reset your password:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on Log In at the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Log In page, under the Log In button, click on the words Forgot
password.
Enter your Brainology login username and the e-mail address you used to register on the
Brainology website, and click the Submit button.
Use the password that the system e-mails to you to log in to the Brainology website.
Change your password to one of your own choosing immediately, following the instructions for
changing your password.

Set up for your classroom(s)


Creating and managing student groups and group registration codes
The Brainology administrative system organizes students by groups. Typically, a teacher will create one
group for each class of students with which he or she is working on Brainology. Students create their own
Brainology login usernames and passwords using a code created and supplied by the teacher that is
associated with the group they are in.
To create student groups and their associated registration codes, follow the steps below. Note that there is
no procedural difference between creating your first group and creating additional groups.
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on Log In at the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Log In page, under the heading Already a User?, enter your
Brainology login username and password and click on the Log In button.
Click on the words My Brainology at the top of the page.
In the left hand column of the Getting Started page, click on the words My Account.
In the first section, Create & Manage Student Accounts and View Student Usage, click on the
words Create student group & student registration code (needed to register students).
Follow the directions on the Create a Student Group & Student Registration Code page. Enter a
descriptive name for the Student Group and Student Registration Code for that group to use to create
their Brainology login accounts, and click the Create Group button.
Record the Student Registration Code you create, as you will need to give it to your students.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

20

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

Viewing or changing student groups and student registration codes


To see the student groups that you have created and their associated student registration codes, or to change
the name of a group or its associated registration code, follow these steps:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on Log In at the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Log In page, under the heading Already a User? Then enter your
Brainology login username and password and click on the Log In button.
Click on the words My Brainology at the top of the page.
In the left hand column of the Getting Started page, click on the words My Account.
In the first section, Create & Manage Student Accounts and View Student Usage, click on the
words View my student group names & student registration codes for students to register.
If you want to change a student group name or its associated registration code, follow these steps:
Click on the word Edit on the right hand end of the row with the student group you want to
adjust.
Change the group name or its access code (or both).
Click on the word Update to confirm your changes, or on the word Cancel to cancel them.
Creating and managing student accounts
Students create their own Brainology login usernames and passwords with the registration code you
created above. If you need to have accounts created in advance for a large group of students, please contact
Brainology support at support@mindsetworks.com or 888-344-6463.
Instructions for Students: You will need an access code from your teacher to create your Brainology
account. Once you have that code, follow these steps:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
If you are logged into the website, click Log Out, in the upper-right corner of the webpage.
In the upper right hand corner of the homepage, click on Sign Up, under the heading Already
have a registration code?, enter the access code your teacher gave you, select the I am a student
option, and click the Sign Up! button.
On the first Student Registration page choose your age from the drop-down and click the Submit
button.
On the second Student Registration page,
enter your personal details (first name, last initial, grade, and location)
enter a username and password of your choice (just letters and/or numbers, no spaces)
(optional) if you would like to use the Brainology e-mail features and
you are younger than 13, enter your parent's e-mail address
you are 13 or older, enter your own e-mail address
review, and check the box to indicate you have reviewed, the Terms of Service and Privacy
Policy
if you are 13 or older, check the box to certify your age
and click the SUBMIT button
You now have full access to the online Brainology units!

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

21

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

Resetting a student password


Like Brainology login password for adults, student passwords are securely encrypted and cannot be
retrieved by anyone. If a student should forget his or her password, follow these steps to reset it:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on Log In at the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Log In page, under the heading Already a User? Then enter your
Brainology login username and password and click on the Log In button.
Click on the words My Brainology at the top of the page. In the left hand column of the Getting
Started page, click on the words My Account.
In the first section, Create & Manage Student Accounts and View Student Usage, click on the
words View my students, change their passwords or view student usage data.
Find the student whose password you wish to reset in the list.
In the row with that student's name, click on the words Change Password.
Enter a new password in the password box.
Click on the word Update to confirm the new password, or on the word Cancel to cancel the
change.

Tracking your students progress


Viewing your list of students
To see a list of the students who have registered with access codes you have created, follow these steps:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on Log In at the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Log In page, under the heading Already a User? enter your
Brainology login username and password and click on the Log in button.
Click on the words My Brainology at the top of the page.
In the left hand column of the Getting Started page, click on the words My Account.
In the first section, Create & Manage Student Accounts and View Student Usage, click on the
words View my students, change their passwords, or view student usage data.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

22

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

Viewing your available licenses


The licenses your school has purchased are held in a pool associated with the organizational access you
your local administrator provided to you. Each time a student uses an access code you created to create a
student account, a license is removed from the pool. To see how many licenses are available to you, follow
these steps:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on Log In at the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Log In page, under the heading Already a User? Then enter your
Brainology login username and password and click on the Log In button.
Click on the words My Brainology at the top of the page.
In the left hand column of the Getting Started page, click on the words My Account.
In the second section, Manage Student Licenses, click on the words View available student
licenses.
Viewing your students data
To see how far your students have progressed through the online Brainology units, see their responses to
the brief mindset assessment survey incorporated within the online Brainology units, or see their e-journal
entries, follow these steps:
Go to the Brainology website homepage, http://www.mindsetworks.com.
Click on Log In at the upper right corner of the page.
In the left hand column of the Log In page, under the heading Already a User? Then enter your
Brainology login username and password and click on the Log In button.
Click on the words My Brainology at the top of the page.
In the left hand column of the Getting Started page, click on the words My Account.
In the first section, Create & Manage Student Accounts and View Student Usage, click on the
words View student e-journal entries and other usage data.
On the User Usage Summary page, select the student you wish to review from the drop-down
box.
You can select additional students, sequentially, without leaving that page. Just select each student
you wish to review from the drop-down box. If you would like a consolidated report with all the
data for all of your students, please email Brainology support at support@mindsetworks.com or
call us at 888-344-6463.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

23

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Get Set

Brainology Tips for the Computer Lab


Logistics for the Online Program
Headsets/earphones: Remember to bring them; students might bring their own with prior notice.
Make 3x5 cards for each student with his/her name, Brainology user name, and password. You can use these cards
to call on students later during discussions/sharing out. (Students always forget their user names and passwords!)
To Launch Brainology, students must sign up, set up an account, click My Brainology, then Launch
Brainology.
Pause! When students go to the restroom or pencil sharpener, make sure they dont leave the program running.
Online Program Navigation

The map on the left tells you where kids are. Click it to
check on students who are behind or going ahead farther
than you want.

Save and Exit button is important to click when


finished to make sure the students can pick up where they
left off.

Be available for the miscellaneous tech support that the


students will need! Walk around a lot the first two online
days to monitor and help.

Online Brainology Computer Lab Information


Fill this in before you go to the lab and take it with you!

My Educator Registration Code:


Get this from your local administrator

My Student Group Registration Code:


You create this yourself at My Brainology

My Brainology User Name:


You create this yourself at Sign Up Now

Brainology is located at: http://www.mindsetworks.com. Contact Brainology support at


support@mindsetworks.com or 888-344-6463.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

24

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

www.brainology.us

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment, and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

GO!
PART III.
LESSON AND MATERIAL GUIDES
FOR TEACHERS

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

25

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

26

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

PART III. LESSONS & MATERIAL GUIDE FOR TEACHERS


Overview: This section of the Implementation Guide contains detailed information about the
content of each unit of the Brainology Online Curriculum, as follows:

The Introduction to Brainology presents the curriculum and its purpose, the characters that will
guide the students throughout the program and the tools available (e.g. the e-Journal, Map, Brain
Book and Help). Users also create an inventory of their personal challenges so they can more easily
relate the Brainology lessons to their lives.

Unit 1: Brain Basics introduces the basics of brain structure and function. This unit also explains
what is required to maintain readiness to learn and how attention and concentration are supported.
This unit teaches students the physical aspect of thinking and learning, which underlie a growth
mindset.

In Unit 2: Brain Behavior, students learn that the brain functions by sending chemical messages
through a network of nerve cells, and that these cells are responsible for thought. This insight
provides a foundation for understanding how learning changes the brain. Students also learn how
emotions can influence the brain and are taught strategies for managing their negative emotions.

In Unit 3: Brain Building, students discover how learning changes the brain through the growth of
connections in neural networks with repeated use, the key to the growth mindset. Students learn that
intelligence can be developed through mental exercise, and they are introduced to activities that
promote learning.

Unit 4: Brain Boosters extends the concept of the malleable brain to understand the processes of
memory. The unit introduces a variety of study strategies to capitalize on the way the brain works
and learns to deepen and reinforce the students understanding of the growth mindset, and to guide
the student to the study skills resources.

Differentiating Instruction: Throughout the next five Go! Curriculum Guides, many lessons
have been modified so that you can differentiate and scaffold your instruction for the unique
needs of your students. Several lessons have two options: Option A is intended for On-Level or
Advanced Learners, and Option B is intended for Below-Level Learners (based on a 7th grade
level).
Whenever you see the
icon, look for tips to differentiate your instruction for process,
product, or content, and ways to scaffold the material for all learners.
Process refers to how a student comes to understand the material.
Product refers to the work product in which the student demonstrates mastery.
Content refers to adjusting the material based on prior knowledge of the student.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

27

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Organization: Each unit of the Teachers Guide contains the following sections:
I. Overview and Goals provides a description of the instructional goal of the unit, the key
challenge in student motivation, recommended readings, and key content contained in the
unit.
II. Lesson Plans has suggestions for teacher practice, and an explanation of the researchbased principals underlying these recommendations, and a sample outline of lessons for that
unit.
III. Reproducibles and Handouts contains instructions and printable materials for
classroom activities that support the learning of the key concepts in that unit of Brainology.
These activities are organized as follows:
Connect It activities are intended to be used before the introduction of a new unit of Brainology.
In these activities, students activate their prior knowledge and/or prior learning in the Brainology
program to heighten their readiness to learn and interest in the content of the upcoming unit. These
activities connect to students lives, to their experiences with other texts or learning, and to other
lessons in this program.
Check It quizzes are provided for the purpose of using as a formative assessment. The teacher can
allow the student to fill in the Check It while they complete the online lesson, to keep them focused
on a goal. They may also be used to diagnose the extent to which students have grasped the
information in each unit. If the Check It shows that students have gaps in their understanding and
need further practice, the teacher can differentiate and remediate using the Additional Activities
provided.
Practice It activities are provided for the purpose of deep practice. In these lessons, students have
the opportunity to interact with the information at an instructional level towards the goal of
increasing understanding of the content and learning to use their knowledge independently.
Apply It activities can be used to enhance metacognition by allowing students to apply their new
knowledge in a variety of ways. These scenarios can also be used to assess the depth of student
understanding in relation to the content in Brainology.
Additional Activities are included at the end of each unit. While not a part of the core curriculum,
they are meant to deepen students understanding of the key concepts. The Additional Activities
provide opportunities to express this understanding through a wider variety of learning modalities,
and to apply them to their own learning.

Supplies: Please review the lesson plans prior to instruction to be sure you have the necessary
materials.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

28

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit
Table of Contents:
I.

Overview and Goals


A. Introductory Unit: An Overview ................................................. 30
B. The Growth Mindset .................................................................... 31
C. Brainology : Developing a Growth Mindset ................................ 32

II.

Lesson Plans
A. Activity 1: Mindset Assessment Profile (MAP) and Reflection .. 34
B. Activity 2: Check It Formative Assessment ....................... 35-36
C. Activity 3: You Can Grow Your Intelligence

a. Option A: Plain Text Version .................................................................. 37


b. Option B: Interactive Text Version ........................................................ 38
D. Activity 4: What Are Your Values? ........................................... 39

III. Reproducibles and Handouts


A. Activity 1: Mindset Assessment Profile (MAP) & Reflection 42-44
B. Activity 2: Check It Formative Assessment ............................. 45
C. Activity 3: You Can Grow Your Intelligence Article ............ 46-48
a. Option A: Plain Text Version ............................................................ 49-50
b. Option B: Interactive Text Version .................................................. 51-55
D. Activity 4: What Are Your Values?
a. Option A: Advanced Version .................................................................. 56
b. Option B: Basic Version .......................................................................... 57

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

29

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

INTRODUCTORY UNIT: AN OVERVIEW


Unit Goal

Students complete a Mindset Assessment Profile which will explore their


beliefs and attitudes about learning, effort, and challenge. The MAP is
used as a pre- and post-program activity, with the expectation that once
students finish the Brainology program, they will have moved toward a
growth mindset. In this unit, students are also introduced to the
Brainology online program and resources, and to the concept of a growth
mindset through reading and reflecting on an article which presents
evidence of malleable intelligence.

Activities
Activity
#
Intro-1

Intro-2

Intro-3

Intro-4

Key Concepts

Activity
Connect It Complete both:
Mindset Assessment Profile (MAP) survey
Brainology Reflection Questions 1-6
Check It Complete both, together:
Online Brainology Introduction
Formative Assessment
Practice It - You Can Grow Your Intelligence - Choose one:
o Option A. Plain Text Version or
o Option B. Interactive Text Version
Apply It Values Lesson & Reflection Choose one:
o Option A. Advanced Version or
o Option B. Basic Version

Lesson Plan

Handout

p. 34

pp. 42-44

pp. 35-36

p. 45

pp. 37-38

pp. 46-55

p. 39

pp. 56-57

Mindsets are those implicit beliefs we all hold about our most basic abilities
and intelligence. People with a fixed mindset believe their ability and
intelligence are largely fixed and outside of their control, whereas people
with a growth mindset believe that their intelligence and ability can be
developed through their own efforts. Having a growth mindset helps people
be motivated to push themselves to reach their true potential.

Suggested Teacher Reading


Dweck, Carol (2010). Mindsets and Equitable Education. Principal Leadership, pp. 26-29.
http://www.principals.org/Content.aspx?topic=61219

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

30

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

THE GROWTH MINDSET


Discovered by Professor Carol S. Dweck of Stanford in decades of research on motivation, achievement,
and success, Mindsets are beliefs individuals hold about their most basic qualities and abilities. In a
Growth Mindset, people believe they can develop their intelligence, abilities, and talents. This view creates
a love for learning, a drive for growth, and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishments. On the
contrary, people with a Fixed Mindset believe that basic qualities such as intelligence and abilities are
fixed, and can't be developed. They also believe that talent alone creates success, and see effort as a sign of
weakness rather than as an effective strategy needed to reach one's full potential. The following diagram
shows how people with different views of intelligence respond in different situations.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

31

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

BRAINOLOGY: DEVELOPING A GROWTH MINDSET


Brainology is designed to help students to develop a Growth Mindset and, as a result, to reach a
higher level of academic achievement. Students with a growth mindset think of their intelligence as
something that they can develop through learning and study rather than as something fixed.
Cultivating a growth mindset can help increase students sense of self-efficacy and motivation to learn.
Brainology is based on decades of research by leading experts in the area of motivation. Psychologists
Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D. and Lisa Blackwell, Ph.D. discovered that developing a Growth Mindset
helps students to value learning, invest effort, and improve their academic performance. (See
Blackwell, Trzesniewski, & Dweck, 2007.) They developed the Brainology program to help students
cultivate a Growth Mindset by teaching them the powerful combination of basic brain science and
study skills.
Brainology helps students develop a growth mindset by teaching them how the brain functions, learns,
and remembers, and how it changes physically when we exercise it through study and learning. In
addition, the program teaches a practical set of skills for tackling academic challenges by discovering
how to apply what they have learned about the brain to their schoolwork.
The Brainology program has been implemented in hundreds of schools with great results. When
students realize that they control their learning, they are motivated to apply effort and take an active
role in learning. Teachers note positive changes in students' behavior (becoming engaged in class,
reflecting, asking questions, doing homework), as well as in the higher student achievement that results
from more motivated students with higher expectations of themselves.
Brainology is designed as a blended learning curriculum combining a challenge-based, interactive
multimedia online program and classroom activities. In the online program, consisting of an
introduction plus four 30-minute units, students follow animated teenaged characters Chris and Dahlia
as they tackle various problems in their most difficult subjects. They visit the lab of eccentric brain
scientist Dr. Cerebrus and learn about the basic structure and function of the brain: how thinking
occurs, how learning and memory work, how to develop and change the brain, and how to improve
their study habits and skills in light of this knowledge. They gain experience in visualizing and
applying these ideas through interactive activities and exercises. Throughout the program they reflect
on their challenges and their learning through an e-Journal. The classroom activities contained in this
guide provide opportunities to reinforce, apply, and practice what students learn in the online
component in the context of their own experience. The goal is for them to understand that they have
great, untapped potential and that the development of their mental ability is largely within their own
control, and to provide them with study habits and skills that will help them take action.
Through this Curriculum Guide for Teachers we hope to help you support your students by providing
information and strategies that you can use to reinforce their growth mindset development.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

32

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit:
Lesson Plans

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

33

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit Activity 1, Connect It: Mindset Assessment Profile (MAP) and
Reflection
Description: Survey for getting a quick assessment of the students mindsets
Objective: Students will complete the MAP and reflection to get a baseline on what sort of
mindset they currently hold about learning.
Timeline: Before beginning Brainology 30 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
This is a tool to get a quick assessment of your students mindsetstheir beliefs about
the malleability of intelligence, the relative importance of learning and perfect
performance, and their attitudes toward effort and mistakes. Its important that students
not feel labeled by this tool. The MAP categories just represent the way they are
thinking and feeling about these questions at the present time. They can change these
beliefs, and they may feel differently on different days.
You can use this assessment tool in a number of ways:
o Individual assessment, scored by the teacher
o Individual assessment, scored by the student
o Individual assessment, scored by a peer
Once students have completed the
Differentiating Instruction:
assessment, you can follow up with a
Process
class discussion. Here are some
A teacher could ask students to process
questions that you might explore:
these questions in several different ways.
o Are there some subjects where you
The class could do an Ink-Pair-Share
dont feel confident that you can
where students first write, then discuss with
learn and do well?
a partner, then participate in a class
o How do you think it feels to get a
discussion. The teacher could have students
bad grade if you believe that you
write about the questions and hold 1:1 miniconferences with some or all students. Last,
cant do any better?
students could be put in groups to make a
o Can you think of a time when you
poster answering each question with the
learned to do something really
teacher choosing which groups get which
hard? How did you learn it?
questions.
o What would you be willing to work
hard to achieve if you knew it was
possible?
o If you knew that you could develop your intelligence through effort, what goals
would you set for yourself?
When students finish the MAP, ask them to complete the reflection. Keep the MAPs
and the reflections so that you can keep track of how your students were thinking when
they began the program. At the conclusion of the Brainology program, re-administer
the MAP to measure the areas where students grew their mindset!
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

34

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit Activity 2, Check It: Online Lesson with Formative Assessment
Description: Brainology Program Introductory Unit Formative Assessment
Objective: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concepts presented in the
Introductory Unit online lesson.
Timeline: Complete with Brainology Introduction Online Lesson - 30 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Distribute the Check It questions to the students.
Have students work silently and independently, completing the online lesson while
filling out the Check It.
See the next page for the ANSWER KEY.
When gaps are identified in student understanding, work with them individually to
reteach the concepts, or encourage them to go through the online lessons again for a
deeper understanding. Feel free to re-test if appropriate.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

35

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit Activity 2, Check It: Formative Assessment ANSWER KEY


(1) Explain, draw or represent what you think youll be learning in the Brainology
program.
This is a free response question, but most students should write or draw a representation of
learning about the brain and how it works. The metaphor in the online lesson is that Brainology is
an instruction manual for your brain.
(2) What makes the brain grow stronger? Explain or draw a picture to represent your
answer.
Learning new things makes the brain grow stronger.
(3) Name the four levels of Brainology.
1. Brain Basics
2. Brain Behavior
3. Brain Building
4. Brain Boosters
(4) Which level do you think youll like the best? Why?
This is a free response question. Accept all reasonable answers.
(5) What are three different activities you can do in the e-Journal?
Accept any three:

Read about Chris challenges


Read about Dahlias challenges
Read Chris reflections
Read Dahlias reflections
List my challenges
Write and review my own challenges

(6) What is one reason you might use the Brain Book?
The Brain Book can be used for any of the following:

Researching the brain and its functions


Finding learning strategies
Learning about how to remember things better
Finding out how emotions are connected to learning
Figuring out how to learn new things more effectively

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

36

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit Activity 3, Practice It: You Can Grow Your Intelligence
Description: An introductory article about brain science with a follow up activity
Objective: Students will learn about the concept of expandable intelligence.
Timeline: Approximately 30 min
Instructions: There are 2 versions of the article: Option A (Plain Text Version) and Option
B (Interactive Text Version). Choose the one most appropriate for your learners.
Instructions for Option A (Plain Text Version):
To activate students prior knowledge, ask them to generate research questions about
intelligence. Record the research questions on chart paper. (Some examples are below.)
o
o
o
o

What is intelligence?
Do all humans have equal intelligence? How do we know?
What are the most intelligent animals on Earth?
What are the best ways to measure intelligence? How do we know?

Ask students if they would like to learn how to grow their intelligence, and explain that the
class will be reading research today about how to grow their intelligence.
Students will draw 6 pictures to help the students brains add this new information to their
long-term memories.
Pass out copies of the worksheet and discuss non-linguistic representations of concepts
(drawings) as a way to process and remember a new idea. You can connect the idea to the
saying, a picture is worth a thousand words and remind students that the brain has an
amazing ability to remember pictures.
Read the first section as a class and model the drawing and the response to the first one.
Ask students to read silently the next section and complete the second drawing.
Have students check for understanding with a partner using these frames:
o I made a connection to the article when I read because
o The article explores my research question when it talks about
o The article raises a new question for me, which is because

Students finish the article and record


one research question from the class
list about which they would like to
independently research (for homework
or in a lab setting).
Students can report back their findings
to the class individually, with partners,
or in small groups. Use this
opportunity to differentiate for all
levels of learners.
www.mindsetworks.com

Differentiating Instruction: Option A


Content & Process
This lesson contains content intended for OnLevel and Advanced Learners. The text is
chunked by use of the graphic organizer. Much
of the lesson requires the student to read the text
independently, but discuss ideas as a class. There
are scaffolding suggestions as well as extension
opportunities.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

37

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit Activity 3, Practice It: You Can Grow Your Intelligence, cont.
Instructions for Option B (Interactive Text Version):
To activate students prior knowledge, ask them to generate research questions about
intelligence. Record the research questions on chart paper. (Some examples are below.)
o
o
o
o
o
o

What is intelligence?
Do all humans have equal intelligence? How do we know?
What is animal intelligence measured as compared to human intelligence?
What are the most intelligent animals on Earth?
What are the best ways to measure intelligence? How do we know?
What are some people more intelligent than others?

Ask students if they would like to learn how to grow their intelligence, and explain that the
class will be learning today how to grow their intelligence.
Pass out the copies of the Interactive Text and read as a class as the students complete the
prompts and thought bubbles.
Have students record one research question from the class list that they would like to
search for information about as independent practice (for homework or in a lab setting).
Students can report back their findings to the class individually, with partners, or in small
groups. Use this opportunity to differentiate for all levels of learners.

Differentiating Instruction: Option B


Content & Process
This lesson contains content intended for BelowLevel Learners. The text is chunked throughout
the article with built-in processing boxes and
language response frames. The process is best
delivered in a whole class setting with some
read-alouds by the teacher, some by student
volunteers, and some independent reading.
The additional research component can be
modeled by the teacher using a projector or smart
phone and a simple Internet search. Show the
students how people do information searches on
one of the class research questions.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

38

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit Activity 4, Apply It: What Are Your Values?


Description: Brainology Unit 1 Academic Mindset Exercise
Objective: Students will identify their values and write a brief essay to affirm their
belonging in an academic learning community.
Timeline: After beginning Unit 1 online lesson 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Ask students to help you define the word values. Possible definition:
o Values: Important and lasting beliefs or ideals shared by the members of a culture
about what is good or bad and desirable or undesirable.
Pass out copies of the Values word cloud Option A or Option B. Tell students to circle
between 5-10 values that are most important to them in life.
Give the students the following writing prompt:
o Writing Situation: People from many backgrounds bring a host of different values,
beliefs, and ideals to our world. Today, your teacher wants to hear a little bit about
what is really important to you.
o Writing Directions: Write a brief response (1-2 paragraphs) explaining which
value words you chose as most important to you. Describe what these values are
and explain about why these values are important to you. How do these values help
you and make your life better?
Collect the responses, read them, and write feedback for the students that helps them
connect their personal values to the academic mindset of I belong in this learning
community. Here are some suggestions for feedback when students share something
positive:
o Thank you for sharing!
o Its exciting to find this out about you.
o I hope that you will be able to bring this
value to our work this year.
o I really connect with this value because
o I see how strongly you feel about this!
o It would be great to find out how many of
your classmates feel a similar way about
this.
o We are lucky to have someone with these
values in our classroom and learning
environment.
o Thank you, this helps me get to know you
a little better.
o I would love to discuss this more with you
sometime.

www.mindsetworks.com

Differentiating Instruction: Option A


Content & Process
This lesson can be differentiated by
content by selecting the best word cloud
for your learners. Review both and make
a choice. To differentiate for process, the
teacher can assign various types of
writing, such as paragraphs, a traditional
essay, a free-write, a poster or piece of
art, an online poster, blog, or webpage
like Glogster or Google Sites.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

39

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

40

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Introductory Unit:
Reproducibles and Handouts

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

41

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Brainology Intro Unit Activity 1, Connect It: MAP


MINDSET ASSESSMENT PROFILE TOOL
This is NOT a test! It is an opinion survey. It asks your opinion about things to do with
school and being a student. It is very important that you give your own opinion, not what
someone else thinks. Read each statement. Decide how much you agree or disagree with
the statement and circle your answer.
Do you Agree or Disagree?

Disagree Disagree Disagree Agree


A Lot

Agree

A Little A Little

Agree

Profile

A Lot

Number

1. No matter how much intelligence


you have, you can always change it
a good amount.

2. You can learn new things, but you


cannot really change your basic
amount of intelligence.

3. I like school work best when


it makes me think hard.

4. I like school work best when I can


do it really well without too much
trouble.

5. I like school work that I'll learn


from even if I make a lot of mistakes.

6. I like school work best when I can


do it perfectly without any mistakes.

7. When something is hard, it just


makes me want to work more on it,
not less.

8. To tell the truth, when I work hard


at my schoolwork, it makes me feel
like I'm not very smart.

MINDSET ASSESSMENT PROFILE NUMBER

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

42

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Creating Your Mindset Assessment Profile


1. First, determine your Profile Number for each question.

For questions with odd numbers (1, 3, 5, 7), write the number of your answer into the boxes in the right
column.
For questions with even numbers (2, 4, 6, 8), use the table below to fill in the gray boxes in the right column.
If you chose this answer:

Then write this number in the gray box on the right (Profile
Number).

Disagree A Lot (1)

Disagree (2)

Disagree A Little (3)

Agree A Little (4)

Agree (5)

Agree A Lot (6)

2. Now, add up all your Profile numbers.

Add up all the numbers in the Profile column on the right, and write the total in the last box in the bottom right
corner.

3. What does your Mindset Profile Number mean?

Find the group that includes your number in the chart below and circle it.
Now, read what it says about your MAP group.
If your profile
number falls
into this
range:

Then your MAP (Mindset


Assessment Profile) group is:

People in this MAP group usually believe the


following things:

8-12

F5

13-16

F4

You strongly believe that your intelligence is fixedit


doesnt change much. If you cant perform perfectly you
would rather not do something. You think smart kids
dont have to work hard.

17-20

F3

21-24

F2

25-28

F1

29-32

G1

33-36

G2

37-40

G3

41-44

G4

45-48

G5

www.mindsetworks.com

You lean toward thinking that your intelligence doesnt


change much. You prefer not to make mistakes if you
can help it and you also dont really like to put in a lot of
work. You may think that learning should be easy.
You havent really decided for sure whether you can
change your intelligence. You care about your grades
and you also want to learn, but you dont really want to
have to work too hard for it.
You believe that your intelligence is something that you
can increase. You care about learning and youre willing
to work hard. You do want to do well, but you think its
more important to learn than to always score well.
You really feel sure that you can increase your
intelligence by learning and you like a challenge. You
believe that the best way to learn is to work hard, and
you dont mind making mistakes while you do it.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

43

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Brainology Intro Unit Activity 1, Connect It: MAP Reflection

Name____________________________________________Class__________________
MAP Reflection
1. Do you think the description under your MAP group matches the way you think and feel
about your school work? Which parts are true for you and which are not?

2. Now that you have taken the MAP, what do you think we will be learning about while we
do the Brainology program?

3. What if we told you that Brainology might teach us how to be excited about challenges,
how to learn from mistakes, and how to increase your intelligence. What do you think
about that?

4. Would you like to learn how to increase your intelligence? Why or why not?

5. Can you think of a time when you learned to do something really hard? How did you learn
it?

6. If you knew that you could develop your intelligence through effort, what goals would you
set for yourself?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

44

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Brainology Intro Unit Activity 2, Check It

Check It!
1) Explain, draw or represent what you think youll be learning in the
Brainology program.

2) What makes the brain grow stronger? Explain or draw a picture to represent
your answer.

3) Name the four levels of Brainology.

4) Which level do you think youll


like the best? Why?

1. ____________________________
2. ____________________________
3. ____________________________
4. ____________________________

5) What are three different activities


you can do in the e-Journal?

6) What is one reason you might use


the Brain Book?

1. ______________________________
2. ______________________________
3. ______________________________

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

45

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Brainology Intro Unit Activity 3, Practice It: Reading for Activity Options A and B

You Can Grow Your Intelligence


New Research Shows the Brain Can Be Developed Like a Muscle
Many people think of the brain as a mystery. They dont know much about intelligence
and how it works. When they do think about what intelligence is, many people believe that a
person is born either smart, average, or dumband stays that way for life.
But new research shows that the brain is more like a muscleit changes and gets stronger
when you use it. And scientists have been able to show just how the brain grows and gets
stronger when you learn.
Everyone knows that when you lift
weights, your muscles get bigger and you
get stronger. A person who cant lift 20
pounds when they start exercising can get
strong enough to lift 100 pounds after
working out for a long time. Thats because
the muscles become larger and stronger with
exercise. And when you stop exercising, the
muscles shrink and you get weaker. Thats
why people say Use it or lose it!

Fotosearch

A section of the cerebral cortex

Inside the cortex of the brain are billions


of tiny nerve cells, called neurons. The nerve
cells have branches connecting them to
other cells in a complicated network.
Communication between these brain cells is
what allows us to think and solve problems.

2010 Mindset Works

But most people dont know that when


they practice and learn new things, parts of
their brain change and get larger a lot like
muscles do when they exercise.

HEALTH & SCIENCE News You Can Use

www.mindsetworks.com

Axon

Dendrites

Fotosearch

A typical nerve cell

When you learn new things, these tiny


connections in the brain actually multiply and
get stronger. The more that you challenge
your mind to learn, the more your brain cells
grow. Then, things that you once found very
hard or even impossible to dolike speaking
a foreign language or doing algebra
seem to become easy. The result is a
stronger, smarter brain.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

46

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

How Do We Know the Brain Can Grow


Stronger?
Scientists started thinking that the
human brain could develop and change when
they studied animals brains. They found out
that animals who lived in a challenging
environment, with other animals and toys to
play with, were different from animals who
lived alone in bare cages.
While the animals who lived alone just ate
and slept all the time, the ones who lived
with different toys and other animals were
always active. They spent a lot of time
figuring out how to use the toys and how to
get along with the other animals.

Effect of an Enriched Environment

Even old animals got smarter and


developed more connections in their brains
when they got the chance to play with new
toys and other animals. When scientists put
very old animals in the cage with younger
animals and new toys to explore,
their brains also grew by about
10%!

Childrens Brain Growth


Another thing that got scientists thinking
about the brain growing and changing was
babies. Everyone knows that babies are
born without being able to talk or understand
language. But somehow, almost all babies
learn to speak their parents language in the
first few years of life. How do they do this?

The Key to Growing the Brain: Practice!

Nerves in brain
of animal living
in bare cage

Brain of animal
living with
other animals
and toys
2010 Mindset Works

These animals had more connections


between the nerve cells in their brains. The
connections were bigger and stronger, too.
In fact, their whole brains were about 10%
heavier than the brains of the animals who
lived alone without toys.
The animals who were exercising their
brains by playing with toys and each other
were also smarterthey were better at
solving problems and learning new things.

From the first day they are born, babies


are hearing people around them talkall
day, every day, to the baby and to each
other. They have to try to make sense of
these strange sounds and figure out what
they mean. In a way, babies are exercising
their brains by listening hard.
Later, when they need to tell their parents
what they want, they start practicing talking
themselves. At first, they just make goo-goo
sounds. Then, words start coming. And by
the time they are three years old, most can
say whole sentences almost perfectly.
Once children learn a language, they
dont forget it.
The childs brain has
changedit has actually gotten smarter.
This can happen because learning causes
permanent changes in the brain. The
babies brain cells get larger and grow
new connections between them. These
new, stronger connections make the
childs brain stronger and smarter, just like a
weightlifters big muscles make them strong.

HEALTH & SCIENCE News You Can Use

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

47

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Growth of neuron connections in a child


from birth to 6 years old

At birth

At age 6
2010 Mindset Works

The Real Truth About Smart and


Dumb
No one thinks babies are stupid because
they cant talk. They just havent learned
how to yet. But some people will call a
person dumb if they cant solve math
problems, or spell a word right, or read fast
even though all these things are learned with
practice.
At first, no one can read or solve
equations. But with practice, they can learn
to do it. And the more a person learns, the
easier it gets to learn new thingsbecause
their brain muscles have gotten stronger!

They dont realize that any of the other


students could learn to do as well if they
exercised and practiced reading as much.
Remember, all of those other students
learned to speak at least one whole language
alreadysomething that grownups find
very hard to do. They just need to
build up their reading muscles too.

What Can You Do to Get Smarter?


Just like a weightlifter or a basketball
player, to be a brain athlete, you have to
exercise and practice. By practicing, you
make your brain stronger. You also learn
skills that let you use your brain in a smarter
wayjust like a basketball player learns new
moves.
But many people miss out on the chance
to grow a stronger brain because they think
they cant do it, or that its too hard. It does
take work, just like becoming stronger
physically or becoming a better ball player
does. Sometimes it even hurts! But when
you feel yourself get better and stronger,
all the work is worth it!

The students everyone thinks as the


smartest may not have been born any
different from anyone else. But before they
started school, they may have started to
practice reading. They had already started
to build up their reading muscles. Then, in
the classroom, everyone said, Thats the
smartest student in the class.

HEALTH & SCIENCE News You Can Use

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

48

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Brainology Intro Unit Activity 3, Practice It: Plain Text Version - Option A

You Can Grow Your Intelligence


Directions: 1) Read each numbered section. 2) Draw a picture that represents the main ideas in that part
of the article. 3) Fill in the sentence frames to explain how your picture represents the idea.

This picture of a _________________________ represents the main


idea because ______________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________.
My picture represents the branches (dendrites) growing between brain
cells because ______________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________.
My picture represents the difference between animals who had toys and
stimulation and those animals that did not because _______________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

49

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

The way babies learn to speak is represented in my picture because


_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________.

Everyone has a brain that can be exercised, and what I drew shows
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________.

Summary: Things that I learned from this article are _______________


_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
and are represented by my picture because_______________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

50

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Brainology Intro Unit Activity 3, Practice It: Interactive Text Version - Option B

You Can Grow Your Intelligence


New Research Shows the Brain Can Be Developed Like a Muscle
Many people think of the brain as a
mystery. They dont know much
about intelligence and how it works.
When they do think about what
intelligence is, many people
believe that a person is born smart,
average, or dumband stays
that way for life.

What do YOU think??

GUESS WHAT?
New research shows that the brain is more like a
muscleit changes and gets stronger when you use it!

Everyone knows that when


you lift weights regularly,
your muscles get bigger and
you get stronger.

But what happens to your muscles


when you STOP lifting weights?

I think that when you stop lifting


weights.

Thats why people say, "Use it or lose it!"


www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

51

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Most people dont know that when they practice and learn new things, part of their brain
changes, grows, and gets stronger and larger, a lot like muscles do when they exercise.
Scientists have actually been able to show just how the brain grows and gets stronger when you
learn.
So here is an analogy: Muscle is to exercise as the brain is to _________________.

In other words Muscles will grow with exercise and the brain will grow with_______.

Heres the secret:


Inside the cortex of the brain are billions of tiny nerve cells called neurons. The nerve cells have
branches connecting them to each other in a complicated network. Communication between
these brain cells is what allows us to think and solve problems.
When you learn new things, these tiny connections in the brain actually multiply and get
stronger.

The more that you challenge your mind to learn, the more neuron connections
you make in your brain.
If you continue to strengthen these connections, things that you once found very hard to do
like remembering information for a test or doing algebraseem to become easy. The result is
a stronger, smarter brain.

Use the information you have just read to complete the organizer below

IF

THEN

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

52

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

The Secret. continued


Scientists started thinking that the human brain could develop and change when they studied
animals brains. They found out that animals who lived in a challenging environment, with
other animals and toys to play with, were different from animals who lived alone in bare
cages.

Brain of animal living in bare cage


(non-stimulating environment)

Brain of animal living with other animals and toys


(stimulating environment)

2002-2013 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved

While the animals that lived alone just ate and slept all the time, the ones that lived with different
toys and other animals spent a lot more time figuring out how to use the toys and how to get
along with other animals.
The animals who lived in the stimulating environment had more connections between nerve
cells in their brains. The connections were bigger and stronger, too. In fact, their whole brains
were about 10% heavier than the brains of the animals who lived alone without toys. The
animals who were exercising their brains by playing with toys and each other were also
smarterthey were better at solving problems and learning new things.
Even old animals got smarter and developed more connections in their brains when they got a
chance to play with new toys and other animals. When scientists put very old animals in cages
with younger animals and new toys to explore, their brains grew by about 10%.

Hmm... it is interesting to me that

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

53

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Childrens Brain Growth


Another thing that got scientists thinking about the brain growing and changing was babies.
Everyone knows that babies are born without being able to talk or understand language. But
somehow, almost all babies learn to speak their parents' language in the first few years of life.
How do they do this?
Neuron connections in a child from birth to 6 years old

At birth

At age 6

2002-2013 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved

Do you think this child developed strong language


skills by the age of six? Why or why not?

How do you think this child grew all of those


neuron connections and pathways?

The Real Truth about Smart and Dumb


No one thinks babies are stupid because they can't talk. They just haven't learned how to yet.
But some people will call a person dumb if they can't solve math problems, or
spell a word right, or read fasteven though all these things are learned with
practice. At first, no one can read or solve equations. But with practice, they can
learn to do it. And the more a person learns, the easier it gets to learn new
thingsbecause their brain muscles have gotten stronger!
What Can YOU Do to Get Smarter?
Just like a weightlifter or a basketball player, you have to exercise and practice to make your
brain grow stronger. By practicing, you also learn skills that let you use your brain in a smarter
wayjust like a basketball player learns new moves.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

54

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Why doesnt EVERYBODY do this?


Many people miss out on the chance to grow a stronger brain because
they think they can't do it
they think it's too hard
they think its too much work

Can you relate?


Reflection: Remember a time when you worked extremely hard on something that was at first
difficult, but after practice and effort you were able to succeed.

At first, I couldnt.

In order to get better, I

How did you feel when you were successful?

www.mindsetworks.com

Finally, I was able to

Was it worth the effort? Explain.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

55

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Brainology Intro Unit Activity 4, Apply It: What Are Your Values? Option A

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

56

Brainology Guide to Implementation: Intro Unit

Brainology Intro Unit Activity 4, Apply It: What Are Your Values? Option B

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

57

Unit 1: Brain Basics

www.brainology.us

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

UNIT 1: BRAIN BASICS


LESSONS AND MATERIAL GUIDE
FOR TEACHERS

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

59

Unit 1: Brain Basics

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

60

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1: Brain Basics


Table of Contents:
I.

Overview and Goals


A. Unit 1: An Overview ............................................................................................. 62
B. Online Lesson Summary ............................................................. 63
C. Building, Reinforcing and Maintaining the Growth Mindset ...... 64

II.

Lesson Plans
A. Activity 1: Information Search and ............................................ 66
a. Option A: Brain Health Scan or ......................................... 66
b. Option B: Food and Sleep Brain Inventory ............................................ 67
B. Activity 2: Check It Formative Assessment ......................... 68-69
C. Activity 3: Effective Effort Rubric, Option A or B ................ 70-71
D. Activity 4: Johns History Test ................................................... 72
E. Additional Activities:
a. Using Your Brain: Take an Active Approach ..................... 73

III. Reproducibles and Handouts


A. Activity 1: Information Search and ............................................ 76
a. Option A: Brain Health Scan or .................................... 77-79
b. Option B: Food and Sleep Brain Inventory ........................ 80
B. Activity 2: Check It Formative Assessment .............................. 81
C. Activity 3: Effective Effort .................................................... 82-83
D. Activity 4: Johns History Test ................................................... 84
E. Additional Activities:
a. Using Your Brain: Take an Active Approach ................ 85-86
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

61

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

UNIT 1: AN OVERVIEW
Unit Goal

Students learn the basics of brain structure and function, particularly


what is required to maintain readiness to learn and how attention and
concentration are supported. This unit prepares students both for
higher-level understanding of thinking and learning processes that
underlie a growth mindset, and for more advanced study strategies.

Activities
Activity
#
1-1

1-2

1-3
1-4

Activity
Connect It Complete two:
Information Search and
o Option A: Brain Health Scan or
o Option B: Food and Sleep Brain Inventory
Check It Complete both, together:
Online Brainology Unit 1
Formative Assessment
Practice It Effective Effort Choose one:
o Option A: Advanced Version or
o Option B: Basic Version
Apply It Johns History Test

Key Concepts

Lesson Plan

Handout

pp. 66-67

pp. 76-80

pp. 68-69

p. 81

pp. 70-71

pp. 82-83

p. 72

p. 84

The brain is a physical organ that needs to be healthy to work well. It


receives information through your 5 sensory pathways. Students can
increase their ability to concentrate on learning by eating good food,
getting enough sleep and exercise, and using their senses to focus
effectively on what they are learning.

Suggested Teacher Reading:


Dweck, Carol (2008). Boosting Achievement With Messages That Motivate. Education Canada,
6-10. 47(2). www.cea-ace.ca/media/en/Boosting_Achievement_Spring07.pdf

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

62

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

UNIT 1: BRAIN BASICS


Unit 1: Online Lesson Summary

The brain needs certain things in order to function well. Some examples are sleep,
exercise, and foods like eggs, nuts, fish, fruits, and vegetables that contain important
chemicals.
The brain is the bodys control center: it gets information from all your senses, and is in
charge of all of the bodys voluntary and involuntary movement.
Different areas of the brain take in information from different senses and do different
things. The Frontal Lobe handles emotions, reasoning, planning, movement, creativity,
judgment, problem solving, and planning. The Parietal Lobe controls the sense of touch,
pain, taste, pressure, and temperature. The Occipital Lobe is responsible for vision and
recognizing objects. The Temporal Lobe processes sound, memory, and language. Learning
about the functions of the brain can help people learn more effectively.
Your senses serve as different pathways to the brain: using more than one sense to learn
about something lets you use more of your brain and aids learning and memory.
Using two or more complementary modes of learning one thing can help focus your
attention and increase learning. For example, seeing a picture while hearing an explanation
is a very effective way to learn.
In contrast, getting information about competing things through different senses can
interfere with learning. For example, playing music and watching a cartoon while trying to
read may distract you and reduce your learning capacity.
In other words, we can ask ourselves: are my different senses pulling me in the same
direction, or in all different directions?
Active learning approaches are best, because they help to keep your attention focused on
the subject, and increase understanding of the subject.

What promotes self-efficacy?

Self-efficacy is the feeling that you have the power to achieve or do something through your own
efforts. Young people usually do not feel in controlof their environment, of the standards they
must meet, of their success or achievement level. By helping students understand how to use their
brains in a more effective way, you can help your students to feel more in control of what they
can achieve.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

63

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1: Building, Reinforcing and Maintaining the Growth Mindset


Providing Student Feedback:

Use opportunities in class to praise students for using all the different parts of their brains through
varied learning strategies. Some examples include:

Drawing a diagram to help you see your work is a great problem-solving strategy!
Good job helping each other out with that problem; it really helps to talk things out!
I can see that you are working hard to use all the parts of your brain.
I notice you are using complementary pathways to learn that information. Great strategy!
I see you are reading and then summarizing the text in your own words. That will help
your brain learn the information better!

Remind students that they need to think about whether they have given their brains everything
they need to learn well. Suggest that they be their own brain scientist and use a checklist to make
sure they are giving their brains all the help they need:

Have you eaten a good breakfast/lunch today?


Did you get enough sleep last night?
Did you keep your attention on this when you were trying to learn it?
Were there other distractions in your environment when you were trying to learn?
Did you use more than one sense to learn this material?
Did you find an active way to practice this material?

By helping your students to understand how their brains work and how they can use this
knowledge to learn more effectively, you are laying the groundwork for them to develop a sense
of self-efficacy and a growth mindset!
Concrete Strategies:

The use of different learning strategies can also be facilitated in classroom learning. Some
examples include:
After reading part of the math text book, or a math problem, ask students to rephrase the
main ideas of the text, or explain the main points of the problem to another student.
Students can design their own cartoon strips to rephrase key parts of a lesson, re-tell a
story problem or sequence problem-solving steps.
Students can use other senses and abilities when they work in small groups to
cooperatively solve problems.
When students present their solutions to problems at the board, ask them to describe what
they thought and what strategies they used as they solved the problem. For example, was
it like a problem they had seen before? Did drawing a figure help them sort through what
to do? Did they use formulas that they knew from the text? Did they recognize that the
problem involved more than one concept? Did they discuss with someone?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

64

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1:
Lesson Plans

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

65

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1 Activity 1, Connect It: Information Search and Brain Health Scan or Food
and Sleep Brain Inventory
Description: This activity is a self-assessment. There are two options provided. Please
choose the handout that is most appropriate for your learners.
Objective: Students will activate prior knowledge and actively gather information about
topics related to Level 1: Brain Basics. They will also connect prior knowledge to new
knowledge and increase metacognition by completing a self-assessment of their brain
health. They will use the Brain Scan to target an area in which to improve throughout the
unit.
Timeline: Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Information Search:
Pass out a Unit 1 Brain Basics: Connect It activity sheet to each student.
Each sheet contains 8 boxes.
Instruct students to move around the classroom to find a classmate who can help to
answer a question on the sheet.
Adaptations: You can also have students do this activity in pairs or small groups where
moving around the classroom is not possible, or as individuals to assess their level of
prior knowledge.
Option A: Brain Health Scan:
Allow students to complete the Brain Scan and rate their own brain habits. This should
be kept in a notebook.
Students will score their brain health
on page 2, and use the feedback to set
Differentiating Instruction: Option A
goals for improving their brain health
Content & Product
on page 3.
This lesson contains content intended for
On-Level and Advanced Learners. The
Check back at the end of the unit to
task is self-reflective and asks students to
see if the students are making
process feedback about their habits and
improvements.
write a plan for improvement.
*Optional Additional Extensions:
Possible lesson scaffolds are to allow
o Ask students to record the number of
students to make pictorial posters to
hours of sleep they get every night, then
demonstrate the what, when, who, and
graph the results over a two-week
how of their goal as written on page 3
period.
of the Brain Scan and/or to have a class
o Periodically redistribute this inventory so
discussion to process the feedback.
that students can compare their habits
over the course of the program.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

66

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1 Activity 1, Connect It: Information Search and Brain Health Scan or Food
and Sleep Brain Inventory, cont.
Option B: Food and Sleep Brain Inventory:
Allow students to complete the Food and Sleep Brain Inventory and rate their own food
and sleep habits. This should be kept in a notebook.
Discuss how students choices for food and sleep affect brain performance.
Check back at the end of the unit to see if the students are making better choices.
Important Note: Some students may suffer from eating disorders, have limited access to
food, religious or medical dietary restrictions, or other issues, and may feel uncomfortable
sharing information on their eating habits with others. It is recommended that you assure
them that they can keep this information private.

Differentiating Instruction: Option B


Content
This lesson contains content intended for
Below-Level Learners. The students will
benefit from the teacher chunking the
handout in sections with some discussion
and check-ins in between.
Ask students what the Brainology
program taught them that they can apply
to the reflective questions.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

67

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1 Activity 2, Check It: Online Lesson with Formative Assessment


Description: Brainology Program Unit 1 Formative Assessment
Objective: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concepts presented in Unit 1.
Timeline: Complete with Brainology Unit 1 Online Lesson - 30 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Distribute the Check It questions to the students.
Have students work silently and independently, completing the online lesson while
filling out the Check It.
See the next page for the ANSWER KEY.
When gaps are identified in student understanding, work with them individually to
reteach the concepts, or encourage them to go through the online lessons again for a
deeper understanding. Feel free to re-test if appropriate.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

68

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1 Check It: Formative Assessment ANSWER KEY


Brain Basics
(1) Explain 4 things that the brain does (the functions that it performs). Be specific! In other
words, do NOT just say, think!
The brain:
Receives and interprets the information from all of your sensessight, hearing, touch,
smell, and taste.
Is in charge of all your voluntary activity, which includes all the things you do by choice,
such as move or speak.
Lets you talk to others by taking thoughts and feelings and connecting them to words and
sounds.
Lets you throw a ball into a basket or jump rope by calculating exactly where the ball or
the rope will land, without your even knowing that its happening.
Is in charge of involuntary movement.
Controls basic functions, like breathing, heartbeat, reflexes, and balance.
(Midbrain) controls body temperature and sleep cycles.
(Forebrain) controls most of our behavior.
Interprets the sense of touch. (Translates our touch sensations and identifies the objects we
touch.)
(Frontal lobe) allows us to make decisions, understand other peoples behavior, make
choices and think about the future.
(Occipital lobe) is where the brain translates visual input.
(Temporal lobe) takes in sound that is received as electrical input and processes it into
language.
(2) Name 3 brain power foods that help you think.
Eggs, nuts, and fish (Tuna and pecans were also mentioned specifically)
(3) Describe 3 things the Brainology program said that you can do to help you concentrate
and learn new information when you study:
Take care of your brains physical needs (i.e. get plenty of sleep, and eat healthy foods,
especially, brain power foods; eggs, nuts, and fish).
Turn off distractions that clog your brain channels (vision, hearing, touch, smell and taste).
Stimulation, such as music and television, competes for your attention, making learning a slower,
more difficult process. With no distractions, your brain can focus on what you are trying to learn.
Always try to use all your information channels (senses) to learn any one thing. Suggestions
include: drawing pictures of something youre reading about, writing out a math problem, and
talking out problems with someone.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

69

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1 Activity 3, Practice It: Effective Effort


Description: Brainology Program Unit 1 Practice Activity
Objective: Students will use meta-cognition to reflect on their process and their level of
effective effort based on the Effective Effort Rubric.
Timeline: Approximately 25-30 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to students that the focus of today will be discussing how to apply effective
effort (i.e., how to go beyond working hard to working smart).
Introduce the brief discussion topic: It seems effortless to perform many of our
favorite activities and to learn some of our favorite things: playing games,
remembering basketball stats, playing video games or learning new apps, learning new
dance moves, etc. However, the things that seem easy to us actually are more complex
tasks that require lots of work and effort. Ask:
o What is your favorite thing to do? (or one of your favorites)
o Recall when you first did the activity. How did you learn to do it? What did you do
to get better? Did you make mistakes before you got it right? Do you think you
learned from mistakes?
Dr. Carol Dweck is a psychologist who is fascinated with why some people are
successful and why some fail. Here is what she discovered after decades of research:
o When people believe they failed because they are not smart or talented, they stop
trying to learn and continue to fail.
o When people believe that they failed because of not working hard enough, they
work harder and learn and eventually become successful.
Ask students if they have found this to be true in their own lives. Do they try harder
and practice more if they think that effort and practice will make them successful?
Ask the class: How does a persons attitude affect his/her success?
o

Ask them to complete this


response frame: I think that a
persons attitude
o Use an interactive strategy to
share responses (think-pair-share;
whip-around; numbered heads
together; random response cards
or craft sticks)

www.mindsetworks.com

Differentiating Instruction: Rubrics


Content
Option A is for Advanced and On-Level
readers (lexile 860); Option B is for
Below-Level readers (lexile 600). There is
an additional cognitive challenge in the
metacognitive reflection that this lesson
requires. Consider that challenge when you
select your rubric options.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

70

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1 Activity 3, Practice It: Effective Effort, cont.


Tell the class: Sometimes we think we tried hard to learn something, but still didnt
learn it. We give up too soon because we do not know how to apply effective effort to
learn or practicehow to work hard AND work smart.
Pass out Effective Effort Rubric Option A or B. This rubric is a tool for thinking about
how well you tried to learn something. When people say try harder, we know it
doesnt work to just stare at something harder. We need to do something differently!
Look at the column on the left. These are the things we can do to learn:
o Take on challenges (dont run away when things get tougher)
o Learn from mistakes (and do things differently next time)
o Accept feedback (dont get upset)
o Practice and use appropriate strategies (give it time)
o Persevere and have focus (dont try to do two or more things at once)
o Ask questions (ask for help)
o Take risks do something!
This rubric is a way for you to think about learning something new (like research
essays, Pre-Algebra, Spanish, Tennis, or music). Think about something you tried to
learn recently that you didnt already know how to do. How much effective effort did
you use? Use this rubric to circle or highlight the boxes that explain pretty well how
you performed.
Turn your rubric over. On the back, write a short paragraph to me, explaining how
much effective effort you put into learning this new thing. Use language from the
rubric in your explanation.
o For example: Perseverance - When I had my coach there next to me giving me
tips, I kept trying to learn to pitch. But when he paid more attention to the other
pitcher, I gave up and asked to play outfield. I think I was mixed in that category
because I took his feedback well, but gave up.

Common Core Connections: While the lesson does not specifically provide instruction in
any of the Common Core Literacy or Math Standards, there is meta-cognitive support in
this lesson for students to reflect on their process as learners. When they are learning to
write a research paper, to solve an equation, or to closely read a complex text, what is their
process? Do they have an effective way to apply effort? This lesson helps students connect
effective efforts to successful learning experiences.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

71

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1 Activity 4, Apply It: Johns History Test


Description: Brainology Program Unit 1 Application of new knowledge
Objective: Students will deepen their understanding of the concepts learned in Unit 1 by
applying this knowledge to a unique situation.
Timeline: After completing Unit 1 online lesson Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Present Johns situation. You may read it to the class, print copies for every student, or
use a document camera to present the situation.
Students can be asked to display their understanding in several ways:
o Role Play: Perform a short skit showing how John can be successful.
o Written response: Write a letter of advice to John telling him what to do.
o Plan of Action: Write out a plan John could follow to do well on his test.
o Create a movie: Use students video devices (iPod, iPhone) to create a short video
to give John advice or role play the scenario with before and after.
o Discussion: Elicit group responses and track them on chart paper.
o Create a cartoon strip: Draw a scene in which John makes brain-based choices.

Differentiating Instruction: Apply It


Product
This lesson provides the teacher with an
opportunity to differentiate instruction by
offering students multiple ways to respond
and show what they have learned. Students
can select the method they want to use from
the list above (i.e. movie, action plan,
cartoon, etc).

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

72

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1 Additional Activities

Using Your Brain: Take an Active Approach


Objective: Students will use a new learning strategy to learn and remember the lobes of the
brain. This will give the students and teachers a common vocabulary with which to talk
about the brain and its functions.
Instructions for the teacher:
Tell the students they will practice a new learning strategy that will help them to learn
new information.
Pass out the Using Your Brain: Take an Active Approach! handouts.
Read through the first page with the students. Model using mnemonics and memory
tricks to remember information.
Have the students complete Your Turn: Take an Active Approach! in pairs or
individually.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

73

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

74

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Unit 1:
Reproducibles and Handouts

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

75

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 1, Connect It: Information Search

INFORMATION SEARCH
Walk around the room and find someone who can answer each question about the brain. Have them write
their initials in the box when they answer.
You MUST get 8 DIFFERENT classmates to answer and initial the questions!

The brain
If you could pinch the
uses_______% of the brain, would it feel pain?
energy from the food
you eat.

Initials:

Initials:

Name 2 POWER
FOODS that keep the
brain healthy.

Initials:

What is the difference


between voluntary and
involuntary?

Initials:

Name one good way to Name 2 ways your brain How much does the brain How many hours of sleep
help yourself pay
can receive information
weigh?
do teenagers need each
attention.
(Hint: 5 senses).
night?

Initials:

Initials:

www.mindsetworks.com

Initials:

Initials:

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

76

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 1, Connect It: Brain Scan, Option A

Scan Your Brain Health


To learn, grow, and perform well, your brain needs to be physically healthy. Answer the
following questions to get feedback on how healthy your brain habits are right now and
how you can improve them.
For each question below, circle the number next to your answer.
1. Sleep: How many hours of sleep did you get last night?
1) 6 or less
2) 7-8
3) 8 or more

2. Nutrition: How many of the following types of food did you eat today?
Fish or lean meat (fish, chicken, or turkey)
Dairy (eggs, milk, cheese, or yogurt)
Fruits & Vegetables (apples, oranges, broccoli, beans, spinach, etc.)
Nuts & Grains (almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pistachios, cashews, whole wheat pasta,
whole grain bread/cereal, bran muffin)
1) None of these food types
2) One of these food types
3) Two of these food types
4) Three or more of these food types

3. Exercise: What kind of exercise did you do today?


1) None
2) Light (for example, walking, housework)
3) Medium (dancing, skateboarding, baseball, hiking, etc.)
4) Heavy (running, swimming, basketball, soccer, etc.)

4. Exercise: How long did you do the exercise above?


1) Less than 10 minutes
2) 10-19 minutes
3) 20-30 minutes
4) More than 30 minutes

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

77

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 1, Connect It: Brain Scan, Option A

Score Your Brain Health


Add up all the numbers that you circled (1, 2, 3, or 4) and look at the feedback chart below.
If your total
points were:

Less than 7

7-11

12 or more

You were in the:

This means:

Fixed Mindset Zone

Your overall brain health for this period was in the Fixed
range. This means that your brain does not have all the
support it needs to grow stronger. Sleep, nutrition, and
exercise all help the brain learn. Look at the feedback below
to see how you can keep your brain healthy and move into
the Growth Zone.

Mixed Mindset Zone

Your overall brain health for this period was in the mixed
range. This means that you are doing some good things for
your brain, but it still does not have all the support it needs
to grow stronger. Sleep, nutrition, and exercise all help the
brain learn. Look at the feedback below to see how you can
keep your brain healthy and move into the Growth Zone.

Growth Mindset Zone

Your overall brain health for this period was in the growth
range. This means that you are doing lots of good things to
make your brain healthy. Even so, there may be ways that
you can do better. Sleep, nutrition, and exercise all help the
brain learn. Look at the feedback below to see how you can
keep your brain healthy.

What can you do about it?

Take a look at your answers to each of the questions. Where


did you circle a 3 or 4? Those were your healthy brain
growth areas! Where did you circle a 1 or a 2? Those are the
places to work on. Look at the categories below to see how
moving yourself into the Growth Zone can help.

Sleep

The recommended amount of sleep is 8 hours or more for young people. When you
sleep, your brain cleans out the junk, locks in new knowledge, and grows new brain
cells. If you are having trouble sleeping, try using square breathing (from
Brainology Level 2see your Study Tips Guide).

Nutrition

Good nutrition makes your brain cells work faster and better. Foods that are best for
brain health are natural foods, like eggs, fish and poultry, low-fat dairy, fruits,
vegetables, and whole grains. Try not to eat lots of sugar, fat, and salt such as found
in processed snacks and fast foodthey are not healthy for your brain.

Exercise

Exercise gets oxygen flowing to your brain and makes you grow more new brain
cells. Doing aerobic exercisewhere your heart rate and breathing go upfor at
least 20 minutes a day is best. This includes activities like dancing, jogging,
swimming, basketball, soccer, or similar sports that get you moving.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

78

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 1, Connect It: Brain Scan, Option A

What will you do to help your brain stay in the Growth Zone?
I will focus on increasing my:

o
o
o

Sleep
Nutrition
Exercise

How will you do this?


What I will do:

When will I do it?

Who will help me?

How will this help me to grow?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

79

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 1: Food and Sleep Brain Inventory, Option B

How is YOUR BRAIN Performing Today?


BRAIN FOOD: List ALL of the food that you ate in the last 24 hours.

Yesterday
Breakfast/ Morning Snacks
Lunch/ Afternoon Snacks
Dinner/Evening or Late
Night Snacks

Today
Breakfast/ Morning Snacks
Lunch/ Afternoon Snacks
Dinner/Evening or Late
Night Snacks
CIRCLE the foods in the list above that are considered BRAIN FOODS.
How many foods are circled? __________
Have you eaten enough BRAIN FOOD for your brain to perform at its best? Yes No
SLEEP: How many hours of sleep did you get last night?
Time you fell asleep last night:
Time you woke up this morning:

Total Hours of sleep last night: _____


Research says that you need 8 to 9 hours of sleep every night to be at your best. Did you
meet this goal?
READINESS TO LEARN: Circle the answer that shows how you feel today.
How awake and alert do you feel today?
How energetic do you feel today?
How focused do you feel today?

Not at All
Not at All
Not at All

Somewhat
Somewhat
Somewhat

Very Alert
Very Energetic
Very Focused

What will I do differently tomorrow? _________________________

_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

80

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 2, Check It

Check It!
1) Explain, draw or represent 4 things that the brain does (the functions that it performs).
Be specific! In other words, do NOT just say, think!

2) Name 3 brain power foods that help your brain perform.

1. ______________________________________________________
2. ______________________________________________________
3. ______________________________________________________
3) Describe or represent 3 things the Brainology program said that you can do to help you
concentrate and learn new information when you study:

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

81

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 3, Practice It: Effective Effort, Option A

Effective Effort Rubric


In each row, circle the one statement that describes you the best. Then pick one or two
areas where you will work on moving into a growth mindset.
Fixed

Mixed

Growth

Taking on
Challenges

You dont really take on challenges


on your own. You feel that
challenges are to be avoided. You
prefer easy work.

You might take on challenges


when you have some previous
experience with success in that
area.

You look forward to the next


challenge and have long range
plans for new challenges. If things
are easy, you find them boring.

Learning from
Mistakes

You see mistakes as failures, as


proof that the task is beyond your
reach. You may hide mistakes or
lie about them.

You can accept mistakes as


temporary setbacks, but you
want to forget about them as
much as possible. You dont use
your mistakes to learn and
improve the next time.

You see mistakes as temporary


setbackssomething to be
overcome. You think about what
you learned from your mistakes
and use it to do better at the task.

Accepting
Feedback and
Criticism

You feel threatened by feedback


and may avoid it all together.
Criticism and constructive
feedback make you feel like giving
up.

You may be motivated by


feedback if it is not too critical or
threatening. It depends on who
is giving the feedback and how
difficult the task is.

You look for feedback and criticism


on your performance so that you
can improve. You apply new
strategies as a result of feedback.

You do not like to practice and


avoid it when you can.

You practice, but a big setback


can make you want to quit. You
are more willing to practice things
you are already considered good
at. You are open to being given
a strategy to meet a challenge,
but you rarely apply your own
strategies unless it is something
you are already good at.

You enjoy practicing and see it as


part of the process of getting good
at something. You may create
your own practice or study plans.
You use many strategies, think of
some of your own strategies, and
ask others about their strategies.

Practice and
Applying
Strategies

You do not have many strategies


for accomplishing the learning
goals or tasks, or the strategies
youre using are not working.

Perseverance
(focus on task)

You have little persistence on


learning goals and tasks. You tend
to give up at the first sign of
difficulty.

You may stick to it and persist if


you get support from others.
Unless others give you strategies
for overcoming obstacles, you
usually stop or give up.

You stick to it and keep working


hard until the task is complete,
even when its difficult.

Asking
Questions

You do not ask questions or do not


know which questions to ask, but
you can usually say you dont get
it if asked.

You might ask questions about a


portion of the task that you feel
you can do. If you perceive it to
be outside of your ability and
skills, you probably wont ask
questions.

You ask lots of specific questions


of yourself and others. You dont
just take things as they appear
you challenge yourself, the
material, the task, and the teacher
to make sure that you understand.

You do not take risks, and if


something is too hard you turn in
blank work or copied work, if
anything at all. You would rather
not learn something than risk
failing at it.

You will take risks if the task is


already familiar to you. If not,
you will resort to copying or
turning in partially completed
work. You may be willing to make
a mistake to learn, but not if you
are doing it in front of others.

You begin tasks confidently and


you are willing risk making errors.
Youd rather try and fail than
never try.

Taking Risks

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

82

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 3, Practice It: Effective Effort, Option B

Effective Effort Rubric


In each row, circle the one statement that describes you the best. Then pick one or two
areas where you will work on moving into a growth mindset.
Fixed

Mixed

Growth

Taking on
Challenges

You dont try hard things.


You only do easy work or
take shortcuts.

You might try something


difficult if someone makes
you, but you would not
choose it on your own.

You will choose something


hard rather than easy if
you have a choice. If
things are easy, you find
them boring.

Learning
from
Mistakes

You want to forget about


mistakes as much as
possible. You may hide
mistakes and find excuses
for them.

You try to avoid making a


mistake a second time.
You dont like to think
about them.

You see mistakes as a


chance to learn. You think
about what you can do
differently next time.

You are so upset by


feedback and criticism
that you feel like giving
up.

Feedback and criticism


make you a little
embarrassed and/or
bummed out. You may
want to stop trying.

You feel OK about


feedback and criticism
because you know that
you can do better next
time.

You do not like to practice


or work hard. You do not
have many strategies for
learning.

You only work as hard as


you have to. You will
practice things you are
already good at.

You enjoy practicing and


you work hard at new
things. You may create
your own study plans.

You give up as soon as


something is hard.

You may stick to it and


keep trying if you get help
from others. If something
is too hard, you might not
try very much.

You stick to it and keep


working hard. If
something is very
difficult, you try harder.

Asking
Questions

You do not ask questions


or ask for help if
something is hard.

You might ask questions


about something that you
think you can do. If its
too hard though, you
might give up.

You ask lots of questions


of yourself and others.
You do whatever it takes
to make sure that you
understand.

Taking Risks

If something is too hard


you turn in blank work or
copied work, if anything
at all. You would rather
not learn something than
fail at it.

You may be willing to try


something hard, but not if
you are doing it in front of
others.

You are willing to risk


making mistakes. Youd
rather try and fail than
never try.

Accepting
Feedback and
Criticism

Practice

Persistence

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

83

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Activity 4, Apply It: Johns History Test

Johns History Test


John is a student at Washington. His favorite class is Physical Education because he loves to be
active.
Since John likes to stay active, he enjoys playing sports after school. On Tuesdays and
Wednesdays, he has to make dinner for himself and his little sister because his mom works late.
John also likes gaming on the internet and finding and downloading interesting new music. He
usually stays on the computer way after everyone else is asleep.
John usually doesnt have time for breakfast because he wakes up late. He often finds himself
doing his homework on the way to school.
John has a big history test on Friday. Today is Monday, and Johns teacher has given him plenty
of notice for the test.
John thinks about and lists what he has done in history class recently:
o Read his text book chapters
o Took notes during class
o Completed homework assignments
John is disappointed with his grade on his last history test and would like to do better this time.

Congratulations!
You have just completed Unit 1 of Brainology and are now an
Apprentice. Dr. Cerebrus has taught you well. You know the Brain Basics
and are qualified to give advice. John needs your help!

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

84

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

Brainology Unit 1 Additional Activity: Using Your Brain: Take an Active Approach!

USING YOUR BRAIN: Take an Active Approach!


Draw a Clockwise Arrow from the Frontal Lobe to the Temporal Lobe. Moving your hand to
actually draw the arrow will help you to remember. This the order in which you will remember
the lobes.

Create an acronym to memorize the 4 lobes of the Cerebral Cortex: Make it something silly and
meaningful to you so you will remember it. For example:
F inally
P eters
O n
T ime !
Function

How I will remember it

Visual/Color

Frontal
Lobe

emotions, reasoning,
planning, movement,
creativity, judgment,
problem solving, and
planning

FRONT of the brain


If you are at the FRONT, you are in
control and have to be able to plan,
reason and solve problems.

I will make this RED


because RED is a power
color. It means in charge
to me.

Parietal
Lobe

The word parietal reminds me of


a scary word like pariah or pirahna.
Those words remind me of feeling
pain.
My favorite stuffed animal growing
up was Ollie the Octopus. He wore
big thick black glasses!

I will draw a hand grasping


the entire parietal lobe to
remind me of touch.

Occipital
Lobe

relating to the senses


such as touch, pain,
taste, pressure, and
temperature
vision, recognizing
objects

Temporal
Lobe

hearing, memory, sound


meaning, and language

The word oral is in Temporal. If I


give an oral report it means I have to
speak out loud. It is also positioned
right behind the ear.

I will draw a bunch of


music notes within the
temporal lobe in order to
remind me of its role.

www.mindsetworks.com

I will make the occipital


lobe into a face wearing
glasses to remind me of
vision.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

85

Unit 1:

Brain Basics

YOUR TURN: Take an Active Approach!


Name: ___________________________________________________
1) Draw a clockwise arrow on the diagram beginning with the Frontal Lobe.
2) Create your own Mnemonic:

______________________

______________________

______________________

______________________

3) Make Silly Connections and Visuals that will help you memorize the function and the
position of the lobes of the cerebral cortex
Function
Frontal
Lobe

Parietal
Lobe

Occipital
Lobe

How I will remember it

Visual/Color

emotions, reasoning,
planning, movement,
creativity, judgment,
problem solving, and
planning
relating to the senses
such as touch, pain, taste,
pressure, and temperature

vision, recognizing
objects

Temporal hearing, memory, sound


meaning, and language
Lobe

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

86

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

www.brainology.us

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

UNIT 2: BRAIN BEHAVIOR


LESSONS AND MATERIAL GUIDE
FOR TEACHERS

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

87

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

88

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2: Brain Behavior


Table of Contents :
Overview and Goals

I.

A. Unit 2: An Overview ......................................................................... 90


B. Online Lesson Summary ................................................................... 91
C. Building, Reinforcing and Maintaining the Growth Mindset ............. 92

II.

Lesson Plans
A. Activity 1: Overcoming Challenges .............................................. 94-95
B. Activity 2: Online Lesson and Formative Assessment ................... 96-98
C. Activity 3: Emotions & Learning Handout and ................................. 99
a. Option A: Stress Symptoms Scan or ......................................... 99
b. Option B: Personal Stress Symptoms Inventory ....................... 99
D. Activity 4: Alicias Presentation ..................................................... 100
E. Additional Activities:
a. Fill in the Blank .................................................................... 101
b. Stress Event Scan .................................................................. 101
c. Synaptic Similes ............................................................. 101-102
d. Neuron Building .................................................................... 103

III.

Reproducibles and Handouts


A. Activity 1: Overcoming Challenges ................................................. 106
B. Activity 2: Online Lesson and Formative Assessment ...................... 107
C. Activity 3: Emotions & Learning Handout ...................................... 108
a. Option A: Stress Symptoms Scan .................................... 109-110
b. Option B: Personal Stress Symptoms Inventory ..................... 111
D. Activity 4: Alicias Presentation ..................................................... 112
E. Additional Activities:
a. Fill in the Blank .................................................................... 113
b. Stress Event Scan ........................................................... 114-115
c. Synaptic Similes ............................................................. 116-117
d. Neuron Building Reflection ............................................. 118-119

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

89

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

UNIT 2: AN OVERVIEW
Unit Goal

Students learn that the brain functions by sending chemical messages


through a network of nerve cells, and that these cells are responsible for
thought. This insight provides a foundation for understanding how
learning changes the brainthe growth mindset. They also learn that
emotions influence the brain and are taught strategies for managing their
negative emotions and enhancing the positive ones.

Activities
Activity #

Activity

Lesson
Plan

Handout

2-1

Connect It Overcoming Challenges

pp. 94-95

p. 106

2-2

Check It Complete both, together:


Online Brainology Unit 2
Formative Assessment

pp. 96-98

p. 107

2-3

Practice It Complete two:


o Option A: Stress Symptoms Scan or
o Option B: Personal Stress Symptoms Inventory and
Emotions & Learning Handout

p. 99

pp. 108-111

2-4

Apply It Alicias Presentation

p. 100

p. 112

Key Concepts

Thinking and feeling are physical processes in the neural network of the
brain. Students whose learning and performance are hampered by test
anxiety and other negative emotions can learn to manage their anxiety
with a little knowledge about how the brain works.

Suggested Teacher Reading


Bronson, Po. (2007). "How Not to Talk to Your Kids: The Inverse Power of
Praise". New York Ma gazine. http://nymag.com/news/features/27840/

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

90

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

UNIT 2: BRAIN BEHAVIOR


Unit 2: Online Lesson Summary
The brain is made up of billions of nerve cells, called neurons, in a network with
trillions of connections.
Neurons communicate with each other through these connections, using chemicals
called neurotransmitters.
The branching parts, called dendrites, receive messages, and the long part, called the
axon, transmits a signal through the neuron.
Thinking is influenced by the emotions, especially anxiety.
When facing any type of threat, the brain sets off a fight-or-flight response--physical
signs of anxiety that interfere with thinking.
Many students have performance anxietystress related to taking tests, giving
presentations, or other performance-oriented situationsthat can interfere with
performance even when they know the material.
A student can lower anxiety by being prepared, thinking positively, and practicing
regular breathing.

What makes students want to learn?


When students are focused on learning as a goal, they are more likely to stick with difficult
things, to seek help when they need it, and to work hard even when they dont have to. However,
because many students are worried about performing poorly in the very areas where they most
need to learn, they may be too afraid of looking dumb to risk trying to learn. Anxiety is often a
product of a fixed mindset, in which every performance is high-stakes. We can help to focus
students on a learning goal by letting them know that learning usually involves making mistakes,
showing ones lack of skill and not doing as well as others who are more expert. Students often
feel that only top students are successful and admired by teachers. Focusing on students growth
and progress, rather than on their performance relative to others, can decrease their fear of
looking dumb. Remind students that everyone blunders when they are learning something. Let
your students know that mistakes are not only okay; they can be useful feedback in the learning
process. Praise students for their effort and progress, and dont overemphasize perfect
performance.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

91

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2: Building, Reinforcing and Maintaining the Growth Mindset


Providing Student Feedback:

In class, encourage students to use new strategies and stay persistent despite difficulties by
praising their process, rather than their ability. Taking on challenges is the only way to learn, and
making mistakes is an important part of learning. Reminding students that learning a new skill is
usually difficult at first will help them persist until they achieve mastery. Knowing that other
people struggle as well helps students overcome their frustration with difficult new applications.
For example,
If you could already do it perfectly, you wouldnt be learning anything.
I dont know anyone who hasnt struggled with this kind of word problem, until they learn how
to do it.
Your skills have really improved in this subject!
You can use this mistake. Think about why it didnt work, and learn from it.
Dont worry about getting it wrongI just want you to understand how to do it.
You know, if you learn how to do this type of problem it will really help you with ________
(describe how a new skill might be applicable in a students life; for example,
understanding percentages and fractions will help you to keep track of sports statistics).
Remember the feeling you felt when you accomplished something hard after a lot of effort.
Strive to achieve that feeling again.

Concrete Strategies:
Students often have performance anxiety, particularly when it comes to test-taking, giving
presentations, or discussing their questions and problems with the class. This anxiety can interfere
with learning and performance much more often than we may recognize. To deal with anxiety
about performance, address stress in class directly to show that it is perfectly normal to feel
anxious when being tested or performing new skills. Suggest that your students try the following
strategies to manage anxiety:
Change thoughts and preconceptions about test taking from negative to positiveinstead
of saying, Im going to fail, say, Im going to do my best. Set positive and realistic
goals.
Focus on the PROCESS, not the OUTCOME. A learning or test-taking strategy (process)
that includes studying as well as ways to relax before and during the test, if students begin
to panic, will ultimately yield a better test score (outcome) without placing emphasis on
the score alone.
Square breathing can really help students if they start to panic during a test, or at any other
time they feel overcome with anxiety. Use a moment of square breathing to relax your
mind during a testtaking time out can help you finish what you need to do and feel good
about it, too.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

92

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2:
Lesson Plans

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

93

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2 Activity 1, Connect It: Overcoming Challenges


Description: Brainology Program Unit 2 Anticipatory Activity
Objective: Students will make connections between their behavior, the lives of famous and
successful people, and the content of Brainology Level 2: Brain Behavior.
Timeline: Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to students that the focus today will be overcoming challenges; they will be
learning in Unit 2 of Brainology more information about how the brain works and how
emotion plays a role in thinking.
Discussion Topic: Think about some of the most famous people who are very
successful at what they do. Lets brainstorm some famous professionals: (take 2 or 3
for each category and move on)
o Who are some famous business people?
o Who are some famous mathematicians?
o Who are some famous scientists?
o Who are some famous musicians?
o Who are some famous athletes?
Tell the class: Many famous and successful people did not seem headed for greatness in
their early lives. Michael Jordan, one of the greatest basketball players of all time, did
not make his high school basketball team (he went home, locked himself in his room,
and cried). Yet he went on to achieve great things in basketball and in his life. People
may face prejudice low expectations and negative judgments by others based on their
identity such as girls cant do math well.
Differentiating Instruction: Connect It
Process
Ask students to look on
www.SchoolTube.com to find videos that
are a great example of overcoming
challenges. Preview the videos and ask
several students to present their video to the
class, briefly connecting it to overcoming a
challenge.
This video featuring Michael Jordan is an
example of what students might suggest:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HkGm
RShkjI

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

94

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2 Activity 1, Connect It: Overcoming Challenges, cont.


Pass out the handout and look at the pictures with the students. Tell them to look for
names and faces they recognize and read the details about their struggles and
challenges.
o Mae Jemison: first African American woman in space. Attended Stanford
University and majored in engineering at 16 years old. Has several doctorates and
honorary doctorates.
o Lionel Messi: Football player for Barcelona and widely known as the best in the
world.
o Albert Einstein: famous mathematician who contributed to the invention of the
atom bomb and the famous theory of relativity.
o Thomas Edison: invented the light bulb, the phonograph and the motion picture
camera.
o Helen Keller: an author, influential political activist, and an actress.
o Walt Disney: made over 50 films, hosted a TV show, envisioned and built
Disneyland.
o Oprah Winfrey: a film actress, TV talk show host, public speaker, writer, business
woman, and holder of honorary doctorates.
Ask the following questions to encourage a thoughtful discussion:
o What obstacles do you think these people experienced early in their lives?
o Do you think that others may have told them they couldnt succeed?
o Do you think that sometimes doubted themselves?
o What do you think they did to overcome those challenges and achieve their goals?
Have the students complete the handout by writing their responses to the reflection
questions.

Differentiating Instruction: Connect It


Process
The discussion questions here might be
delivered in a Think-Pair-Share setting. The
teacher can provide 45 seconds of think time
and a brief partner discussion before opening
up each question to the whole group.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

95

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2 Activity 2, Check It: Formative Assessment


Description: Brainology Program Unit 2 Formative Assessment
Objective: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concepts presented in Unit 2.
Timeline: Complete with Brainology Unit 2 Online Lesson - 30 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Distribute the Check It questions to the students.
Have students work silently and independently, completing the online lesson while
filling out the Check It.
An Answer Key is provided.
When gaps are identified in student understanding, work with them individually to
reteach the concepts, or encourage them to go through the online lessons again for a
deeper understanding. Feel free to re-test if appropriate.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

96

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2 Activity 2, Check It: Formative Assessment ANSWER KEY


(1) Label the parts of the Neuron!

(2) Explain, draw or represent what is happening in your brain when you think.
An electrical pulse goes down the axon of the neuron, and when it reaches the end, it makes the
neuron release chemicals into the synapsethe space between it and the next neuron. These
chemicals are messenger chemicals. They travel through the space between the neurons, and
when they reach the other cell they fit into it like tiny keys in a lock, turning on the message.
Most thoughts are the result of hundreds or thousands of neurons firing at once.
(3) Explain, draw or represent the brains fight or flight response.
When you feel angry, anxious or afraid, your brain causes your body to release chemicals into
your bloodstream that make your heart beat faster, your skin sweat, and your breathing speed up.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

97

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2 Activity 2, Check It: Formative Assessment ANSWER KEY continued


(4) Explain, draw, or represent 3 things that the Brainology program said that you can do
to help yourself feel calm when you feel nervous before taking a test.
Replace negative thoughts with positive ones
Think about stress-inducing situations in a different way. Write down all the thoughts that
worry you, and then write down more positive thoughts to replace each of them. Whenever
you have a negative thought, practice saying the positive thought instead. Replace, What
if I fail? with Im going to give it my best shot.
Develop a strategy that will help you accomplish your goal and focus on executing your
strategy.
Focus your mind on what you need to do, not on the outcome. Think about what you need
to do instead of what might go wrong. Developing and executing a strategy will decrease
your anxious feelings and allow you to concentrate.
Use a breathing technique to physically calm yourself
You can also do square breathing to help calm your body. Breathe in slowly, counting
slowly one to five. Hold your breath for five more counts. Then, slowly breathe out to the
count of five. Wait a count of five before you breathe in again. Repeat this process about
ten times and it should help calm you down.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

98

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2 Activity 3, Practice It: Stress Symptoms Brain Scan or Stress Symptom
Inventory and Emotions & Learning Handout
Description: This activity is a self-assessment. There are two options provided. Please
choose the assessment that is most appropriate for your learners.
Objective: Students will increase metacognition by completing a self-assessment of their
stress symptoms. They will use the Brain Scan to target an area in which to improve
throughout the unit. Students will then learn about four strategies for controlling their
emotions for optimal brain development.
Timeline: Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Allow students to complete Stress Symptoms Brain Scan OR Personal Stress
Symptoms Inventory and rate their own brain habits. This should be kept in a notebook.
If using Option A, students will score their stress symptoms on page 2, and use the
feedback to set goals for improving their stress management.
Pass out the Emotions & Learning handout. Talk with students about the fact that fight
or flight responses to stress are normal. Everyone experiences them to some degree
and we all have slightly different physical responses (sweating, butterflies in the
stomach, fidgeting, etc.). Review these strategies from the online program with the class.
Square-Breathing: The purpose is to calm oneself, become present, and to get oxygen into the
blood. Breathe in for a count of 5, hold, breathe out for a count of 5, hold, repeat.
o Positive Self-Talk: Re-frame the negative, fixed-minded, and unkind things we say to ourselves
into language that is process oriented, positive, and solution-focused.
o Chunking: Break down big problems into smaller chunks. Smaller bites are more manageable.
Take a big issue and think about it one piece at a time.
o Visualization: Picture yourself being successful What does it look like? What does it sound
like? What will you do? Visualization helps your brain experience the event as something you
already did and succeeded at. Every time you do this you will be less nervous later!
o

Check back at the end of the unit to see if


the students are making improvements.

Differentiating Instruction: Connect It


Content & Product
Option A contains content intended for OnLevel and Advanced Learners. The task is
self-reflective and asks students to process
feedback about their habits and write a plan
for improvement. Option B is for BelowLevel Learners. It includes a more hands-on
approach to the reflection. Another scaffold or
differentiation option is to allow some
students to make posters to demonstrate the
strategies they will use to manage stress, as
written on page 2 of the Brain Scan.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

99

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2 Activity 4, Apply It: Alicias Presentation


Description: Brainology Program Unit 2 Application of new knowledge
Objective: Students will deepen their understanding of the concepts learned in Unit 2 by
applying this knowledge to a unique situation.
Timeline: After completing Unit 2 online lesson Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Present Alicias situation. You may read it to the class, print copies for every student,
or use a document camera to present the situation.
Students can be asked to display their understanding in several ways:
o Role Play: Perform a short skit showing how Alicia can be successful.
o Written response: Write a letter of advice to Alicia telling her what to do.
o Plan of Action: Write out a plan Alicia could follow to do well on her performance.
o Create a cartoon strip: Draw a scene in which Alicia makes good brain-based
choices.
o Create a movie: Use students video devices (iPod, iPhone) to create a short video to
give Alicia advice or role play the scenario, including before and after behavior
outcomes.
o Discussion: Elicit group suggestions and track them on chart paper.

Differentiating Instruction: Apply It


Product
This lesson provides the teacher with an
opportunity to differentiate instruction by
offering students multiple ways to respond
and show what they have learned. Students
can select the method they want to use from
the list above (i.e. movie, action plan,
cartoon, etc.).

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

100

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2 Additional Activities


Fill in the Blank
Objective: Students will use new knowledge from the online lessons to complete a fill-in-the-blank
handout and learn new information.
Instructions for the teacher:

Pass out the Fill-in-the-Blank handout and ask the students to complete it.
This could be done as a warm-up or exit ticket activity.

Stress Event Scan


Objective: Students will identify stressful events in their lives and reflect upon how to cope with the
challenges. (This is a different assessment from the Stress Symptoms Scan of Activity 11it assesses
situations, rather than personal emotions and behaviors.)
Instructions for the teacher:

Allow students to complete Stress Events Scan and rate these events. This should be kept in a
notebook.
Students will score their stress events on page 2, and use the feedback to set goals for improving
their coping with stressful situations.
Check back at the end of the unit to see if the students are making improvements.

Synaptic Similes
Objective: Students will use new knowledge from the online lessons to create similes or metaphors for
new vocabulary and reinforce what theyve learned. The purpose of learning the vocabulary is to have a
common language when discussing how intelligence can be improved through effort. For example, You
are working hard to grow new dendrites in your brain!
Instructions for the teacher:

Show the class the picture of a labeled neuron on a document camera or an overhead. Print copies
for each student to keep in their notebooks. Use choral response to safely practice the
pronunciation of the terms.
Pass out the Information Search sheets.
Discuss/Review each part of the neuron and its function. (See answer key on page 102.) The
students can fill in the definitions as you are discussing the terms, or you can assign it as a
research project or group activity.
Explain to the class that the strategy of creating similes and metaphors helps our brains to learn
something new by attaching the new concept to something that is familiar.
Allow students to create their own metaphors or similes.
Share/post in classroom. Use as examples and reference as a sound study strategy.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

101

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Additional Activity continued: Synaptic Similes ANSWER KEY

Vocabulary Word

Our definitions and notes

Simile or Metaphor
(You may write your own!)

Brain

Neuron

Dendrite

Axon

Synaptic buttons

www.mindsetworks.com

The grey matter in your head that helps


you think, feel, and plan.

We have billions of these. We can grow


new ones and strengthen existing ones
with learning and healthy habits. The
amount of effort we put into learning
determines how many neuron
connections we will create in our brain.
Everyone can get smarter.

Its like a computer CPU (Central


Processing Unit) PLUS the hard
drive. The CPU processes
instructions; the hard drive is the
memory.

A neuron is like a muscle in the


body. If I exercise, I can make my
muscles expand and grow. The
amount of effort I put into working
out determines how much stronger
my muscles will grow. Everyone can
get stronger.

We have over 100 trillion of these. This


is what grows on the ends of neurons
(like hairs) they connect to other neurons
to grab information and send it through
the brain. A smart person has a dense
brain because they have grown so many
dendrites.

A dendrite is like a shortcut from one


place to another. It is like sending a
text message or an IM. Your
message is quickly sent and connects
to the person (or people) to whom
you are sending the message.

This is the tube that carries the messages


from neuron to neuron. It connects to the
synaptic buttons which send to the next
set of dendrites. It can be built thicker in
a stronger brain.

The axon is like veins in the body


which carry blood from one place to
another. They have to be healthy
and clear to do their job, just like an
axon.

These are the end of a neuron and send


the chemical messages off to the
dendrites.

The buttons are like a launch pad for


a space ship. They are a necessary
base for sending something from one
place to another.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

102

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Neuron Building: Making a Scientific Model


Objective: The students will deepen understanding of the functions of the brain by building a model of a
neuron, reflecting on their creative process, and connecting to prior learning. This lesson addresses the
following Common Core State Standard: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.7.
Instructions for the teacher:
Collect an assortment of art supplies that might be used for making a model of a brain neuron
(suggestions below)
Show students a model that you have built of a neuron made from found materials. Consider using
at least one material that is different from what is available to the class to encourage students to be
unique.
Discussion: Ask students to help you identify all the parts of YOUR neuron (dendrites, axon, cell
body, nucleus, synaptic buttons). Ask students:
Why they suppose you chose the materials you did for each part
What physical qualities does that art supply have that would make it a good
representation of that neuron part?
Show class the selection of art supplies that they may use.
Direct the class to take 15 minutes to use the materials creatively to build a model of a strong,
healthy brain neuron.
When students are finished ask them to complete the reflection: Option A (Advanced) or Option B
(Basic). Choose one to differentiate for your class.
As students work, provide growth-minded feedback to cultivate a growth mindset:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

What made you choose this material to work with?


Why did you select those colors to work with?
I like the thought and planning you are putting in to this task.
What are you thinking to do next?
Would you be willing to explain your process to the class?
Is your product what you originally planned to make? Why? Why not?
You kept at it and didnt give up, good job!

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

103

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

104

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Unit 2:
Reproducibles and Handouts

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

105

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Activity 1, Connect It: Overcoming Challenges


The people listed here are well known for their success and contributions to society. They share another
common experience though they all experienced enormous struggles, setbacks, and failures. Read on
to learn more about them. Write reflective responses to the questions below.
Details about their struggles and challenges
She says of her time at Stanford: Some
professors would just pretend I wasn't there. I
Mae
would ask a question and a professor would
Jemison
act as if it was the dumbest question he had
ever heard.
Lionel
Messi

Reflection
How were these people
judged?

At age 11 he was cut from his team after being


diagnosed with a growth hormone deficiency,
which made him smaller in stature than most
kids his age.

He wasnt able to speak until he was almost 4


Albert years old and his teachers said he would
Einstein never amount to much. He failed classes in
elementary school.
A teacher told him he was too stupid to learn
Thomas anything and that he should go into a field
Edison where he might succeed by virtue of his
pleasant personality.
Helen
Keller

She was identified as having a learning


disability and did not learn to read or write
until she was 8 years old and to speak when
she was 10.

Walt
Disney

He was fired from a newspaper for lacking


imagination and having no original ideas.
At one point, he owed 6 million dollars to the
bank and his business failed.

What if they had given up?

Oprah She was demoted from her job as a news


Winfrey anchor because she wasnt fit for television.
Is there a high pressure situation in your own life when you also overcame a challenge?
In this situation, what did you do to achieve your goals?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

106

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Activity 2, Check It

Check It!
______________

_____________

______________
(1) Label the parts
of the Neuron!
_____________
______________
(2) Explain, draw or represent what is happening in your brain when you think.

(3) Explain, draw or represent the brains fight or flight response.

(4) Describe or represent 3 things the Brainology program said that you can do to help
yourself feel calm when you feel nervous before taking a test.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

107

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Activity 3, Practice It: Emotions & Learning Handout

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

108

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Activity 3, Practice It: Stress Symptoms Brain Scan, Option A
Scan Your Stress Symptoms
Stress can make it harder for you to learn, grow your brain, and perform your best. Check all the stress symptoms
you experienced to get feedback on your stress level and how you can manage it.

1. Physical symptoms:

o Trouble sleeping, feeling tired


o Aches & pains (headache, stomachache, etc.)
o Loss of appetite or eating too much
o Jittery/nervous (heart racing, short of breath, shaky)
o Other (please describe):____________________________
____________________________

2. Emotional symptoms:

o Sad, lonely, or depressed


o Angry or frustrated
o Worried, nervous, or anxious
o Embarrassed or ashamed
o Bored or distracted
o Other (please describe): ____________________________
____________________________

Reflect
What do you think may be causing your stress symptoms?

What have you done to cope with your stress symptoms?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

109

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Measure Your Stress Symptoms


Count up your checks for both categories and look at the feedback chart below.
If you checked:

Your stress symptom level is:

This means:

None

You are not having any symptoms of stress. This puts


you in the Growth Mindset Zone, where your brain can
focus on learning and you can do your best.

Low

You are having some symptoms of stress. Even one


stress symptom could keep you from focusing and
learning at your highest level. Its hard to be motivated
when youre sad or tired, or to focus when you feel
nervous or angry.

2-3

Medium

4 or more

High

What can you do about it?

You are having several symptoms of stress. Thats a


sign that your brain may be entering the fight or
flight mode. This can keep you from learning your
best and may put you in the Fixed Mindset Zone.
You are having many symptoms of stress. Thats a sign
that your brain is in fight or flight mode. This can
keep you from learning your best and put you in the
Fixed Mindset Zone.
These feelings are commonthe key is to learn how to
deal with them. You can reduce your physical and
emotional stress by doing thought exercises and
physical relaxation techniques, by seeking support from
others, and by tackling the problems that are making
you stressed using Growth Mindset strategies.

What will you do to help your brain stay in the Growth Zone?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

110

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Activity 3, Practice It: Stress Symptom Inventory, Option B

PERSONAL STRESS SYMPTOM INVENTORY


Fight or Flight

Circle the top 5 symptoms that would significantly affect a students performance in school.
Put a star next to the top 5 symptoms that YOU experience when you feel stress.

Feel restless/start fidgeting

Feel sad/depressed

Grind teeth

Feel exhausted/fatigued

Begin crying

Heart beats faster

Begin sweating

Boredom

Heartburn

Sleep or go to bed to escape

Aggression

Muscles tighten up

Withdraw from people

Can't concentrate

Cramps

Increase caffeine use

Cant sleep

Diarrhea

Stomach gets upset

Feel Sick

Tap fingers/feet

Headache

Feel dizzy

Lose appetite

Face feels hot, flushed

Mouth/throat gets dry

Bite nails

Which symptoms are both circled and starred?

Think of the strategies that you learned in Level 2 that you can try when you feel nervous and
finish the quote below:
Next time I feel stressed, I will..............

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

111

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Activity 4, Apply It: Alicias Presentation

Alicias Presentation
Alicia has to give an oral presentation about her research on endangered animals. This is a topic
she is very interested in and she has researched it thoroughly.

The last time Alicia gave her presentation, though, she was also very interested in the topic and
thought she was well prepared. To her surprise, when Alicia stood in front of the classroom, she
froze! Her heart was beating fast, she was shaking, and her throat closed up so she couldnt even
speak.

Alicia couldnt understand why, as soon as she stood in front of the class, she couldnt remember
a thing! She thought she did everything she could to prepare- she read all about endangered
animals, took notes, made drawings, watched videos, and even put her notes on index cards!
What could have happened?

Alicia does not want the same thing to happen this time when she stands in front of the class. She
knows her information really well and is prepared to tell the facts. She took notes, made
drawings, and created index cards, just like she did the first time.

But what can she do to make sure she doesnt freeze up again?

Congratulations!
You have successfully completed Level 2 of Brainology and you are now an
Adept. Dr. Cerebrus has taught you well. You know about brain behavior and
you are now qualified to give advice. Your new knowledge is ready to be
applied. Alicia needs your help!

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

112

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Additional Activity: Fill in the Blank

Word Bank
neurons

trillion

connections

dendrites

1. The brain is made up of nerve cells called ___________, in a network of over


____________ of connections.

Fotosearch

2. Neurons communicate with each other through their __________________, using


chemicals called neurotransmitters.

3. The branching parts, called ____________ receive the message and the long part,
called the axon, transmits a signal through the cell.
?

New information!

Axon

Thinking is affected by emotions especially anxiety.

Fotosearch

When facing any threat our body releases chemicals that make it hard to think (but
easy to fight!).
There are things YOU can do to counteract these physical responses.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

113

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Additional Activity: Stress Events Brain Scan


Stress Event Scan
Stressful situations can make it harder for you to learn, grow your brain, and perform your best. Check all the stress
events you experienced to get feedback on your stress level and how you can manage it.

1. Academic stresses:

o Test coming up or behind on work for class


o No time or good place to study
o Not accepted for a program or team that I wanted
o Other (please describe):

2. Social stresses:

o Fight or argument with someone


o Kids being mean or ignoring me
o No one to help or support me
o Conflicts with teachers or getting in trouble
o Conflicts or problems in my family
o Other (please describe):
Reflect

How do you feel about these events?

What have you done to cope with the challenges?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

114

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Score Your Stress Events


Count up your checks for both categories together and look at the feedback chart below.
If you had:

Your stress level is:

2-3

4 or more

This means:

None

You are not having any stressful events right now. This
frees your mind to stay in the Growth Mindset Zone,
where your brain can focus on learning and perform its
best.

Low

You are having one stress event in your life. Even one
stress situation can keep you from focusing and learning to
your highest levelespecially if it is causing you to feel
unhappy, worried, or angry.

Medium

High

What can you do about it?

You are having several kinds of stress events, and that


may be causing anxiety or other negative feelings. These
can get in the way of learning and put you in the Fixed
Mindset zone.
You are having many stressful events. That may be
causing you to feel anxiety and other negative feelings that
can get in the way of learning and put you in the Fixed
Mindset Zone. You can use Growth Mindset strategies to
overcome the challenges.

These events happen to many peoplethe key is to learn


how to deal with them. When we are worried, lonely or
have fights with other people, our brains send out
chemicals that can make us feel bad physically and
emotionally. You can use Growth Mindset strategies to
solve the challenges, and thought exercises and physical
relaxation techniques to help you stay in the Growth Zone.

What will you do to help your brain stay in the Growth Zone?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

115

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Additional Activity: Synaptic Similes

Name _____________________________________

The Neuron

Neurons in the cerebral


cortex

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

116

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Additional Activity continued: Synaptic Similes

Name _____________________________________

Vocabulary Word

Function

Simile or Metaphor

Brain

Neuron

Dendrite

Axon

Synaptic buttons

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

117

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Additional Activity: Neuron Building Reflection, Option A


Name: _____________________________________________ Class: ___________________
Neuron Building Reflection
1. Explain the process you used to create your neuron. How did you approach the task? When you got
stuck, what did you do?

2. Explain why you chose to use the material(s) that you did. How are those materials a good
representation of a brain neuron?

3. When you look at your neuron, what does it remind you of from the Brainology program? (This
connection doesnt have to be about neurons, but it can be.)

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

118

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

Brainology Unit 2 Additional Activity: Neuron Building Reflection, Option B


Name: _____________________________________________ Class: ___________________
Neuron Building Reflection
Explain the process you used to create your neuron.
First:

I did this because

Next:

I did this because

Lastly:

I did this because

1. Which of the art materials was your favorite one to work with? Why was it?
Use this language frame: The art material I most enjoyed using was ___because ___.

2. How would you explain to another student what a brain neuron is? Write a short explanation of your
brain neuron below.

3. When you look at your neuron model, what does it remind you of from the Brainology program?
(This connection doesnt have to be about neurons, but it can be.)

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

119

Unit 2: Brain Behavior

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

120

www.brainology.us

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

UNIT 3: BRAIN BUILDING


LESSONS AND MATERIAL GUIDE
FOR TEACHERS

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

121

Unit 3: Brain Building

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

122

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3: Brain Building


Table of Contents :
IV. Overview and Goals
A. Unit 3: An Overview ................................................................. 124
B. Online Lesson Summary ........................................................... 125
C. Building, Reinforcing and Maintaining the Growth Mindset .... 126

V.

Lesson Plans
A. Activity 1: The Two Mindsets Part 1 ....................................... 128
B. Activity 2: Online Lesson and Formative Assessment ........ 129-130
C. Activity 3: Mindset A ssessment
a. Option A: Scan Your Mindset ................................................................ 131
b. Option B: Review Your Mindset ............................................................ 132
D. Activity 4: Scientific Research Briefs ................................ 133-136
E. Additional Activities:
a. What Leads to Success? ................................................... 137

VI. Reproducibles and Handouts


A. Activity 1: The Two Mindsets Part 1 ................................. 140-141
B. Activity 2: Online Lesson and Formative Assessment ............... 142
C. Activity 3: Mindset Scan
a. Option A: Scan Your Mindset ........................................................ 143-145
b. Option B: Review Your Mindset .................................................... 146-147
D. Activity 4: Scientific Research Briefs ................................ 148-150
E. Additional Activities:

a. What Leads to Success? ................................................... 151

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

123

Unit 3: Brain Building

UNIT 3: AN OVERVIEW
Unit Goal

Students discover how learning changes the brain through the growth of
connections in neural networks with repeated usethe key to the
growth mindset. Students learn that intelligence can be developed
through mental exercise, and what sorts of activities promote learning.

Activities
Activity
#

Activity

Lesson Plan

Handout

p. 128

pp. 140141

pp. 129130

p. 142

Practice It Mindset Scan and Reflection


o Option A: Scan Your Mindset or
o Option B: Review Your Mindset

p. 131
p. 132

143-145
146-147

Apply It Scientific Research Briefs


o Option A: Independent reading or
o Option B: Shared reading

pp. 133136

pp. 148150

3-1

Connect It The Two Mindsets Part 1 and


Reflection

3-2

Check It Complete both, together:

Online Brainology Unit

Formative Assessment

3-3

3-4

Key Concept

When you learn something new, you develop new connections between
neurons in the brain, and they grow and get stronger and faster when you
practice. Students have difficulty learning, especially in certain subjects,
because they dont put in effective effort and practice over time.

Suggested Teacher Reading


Dweck, Carol (2008). "Transforming Students' Motivation to Learn." School Matters,
National Association of Independent Schools.
http://www.nais.org/publications/ismagazinearticle.cfm?ItemNumber=150509

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

124

Unit 3: Brain Building

UNIT 3: BRAIN BUILDING


Unit 3: Online Lesson Summary

The brain and intelligence are not fixed; they both change when you learn.
The brain grows more new cells and the cells make new connections when you learn.
You get smarter by exercising your brain, much the same way that you get stronger by
exercising your muscles.
How can you exercise the brain?
o You exercise the brain by exploring new information, learning new concepts,
and practicing skills.
o Practice is the key to learning. Only by practicing something over and over again
can you ensure that you grow new connections in the area of your brain
responsible for learning that thing.
o The more connections you make, the easier it gets to make new ones.
Learning actually causes the brain to grow denser (as shown in studies with lab rats) and
areas of the brain to grow larger and more active (in studies with people).
Different environments can influence brain growth; stimulation and active learning are
the keys.
You are never too old to learn and develop your brain!

For the Teacher: Hard Work is Hard!


Lets face it, working hard can behard! What makes it worthwhile is the belief that you
can gain something by doing it. As long as students dont receive a paycheck in school,
learning and developing their ability is their main payoff for hard work! Research shows
that students who believe that effort will make them more successful work more
persistently and do better in school than students who think that success is something that
should come easily. When students have a growth mindset and see their ability as
something they can develop, they are more likely to be willing to work hard and want to
learn. As a teacher, you can reinforce the importance of effort by giving feedback that lets
students know how valuable it is, and by reminding students that when they work hard
they are working out their brains.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

125

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3: Building, Reinforcing, and Maintaining the Growth Mindset


Providing Student feedback:

If it were easy, you wouldnt be learning anything.


When the work is hard, thats how you know youre building your brain!
Every time you practice, youre making the connections in your brain stronger.
Youre good at things you like because you put in the effort to learn them.
You just need to put in more time and thought and youll get this.
If you work as hard at this as you do at (video games, basketball, etc.) youll be doing
great!

Concrete Strategies:

Do reps or sets of types of problems over time: Much like when you exercise in the
gym, you can build up your brain muscles by practicing a skill repeatedly through
multiple problems or tasks. You also build a mental skill more effectively when you vary
the task enough to make more connections. Finally, allowing some breaks between
practicing a skill conditions your brain, as rest breaks between exercises builds strength.
All of these forms of practice help to build long-lasting connections between neurons.
Isolate key skills and practice these: If you are learning a complicated physical skill,
you can practice small parts of the skill by themselves to make your whole performance
stronger. For example, in learning to dance or to play ball, you practice one move over and
over to perfect it and make it automatic. You can do the same for your mental abilities by
picking one skill that you find difficult by practicing it many times.

How can we strengthen the brain and build intelligence ?

A new
Concept
or Skill is
introduced

Students
engage with
(see/ hear/
discuss/
read about)
the new
concept, or
perform the
skill once

Unintelligence

www.mindsetworks.com

Neurons in
the part of
the brain
related to
that concept
or skill are
stimulated

Repeated
practice of
new
concept or
skill;
connection
of new to
existing
knowledge

The
branches of
the neurons
start to
grow and
make new
connections
with lots of
other
neurons

(Learning is occurring; student is becoming smarter)

The
network
of neurons
is more
efficient
and
powerful;
the brain
becomes
denser

Intelligence

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

126

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3:
Lesson Plans

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

127

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Activity 1 Connect It: The Two Mindsets Part 1


Description: This activity is an introduction of the two mindsets and reflection.
Objective: Students will gain an understanding of the two mindsets by analyzing a graphic
organizer and then apply this knowledge to their own experiences.
Timeline: Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Tell the class, Today I have something to show you that is a graphic organizer. The
purpose of this graphic organizer is to help us understand an important concept about
people and what makes them successful. Would you like to learn about how to become
successful at something that you want to master?
Complete the reflection as a model for your students. Show them how you struggled
with something that you had to figure out how to overcome. Model that you did not
have all the answers easily.
Ask students to complete the reflection for something they want to succeed in.
Present the Nigel Holmes graphic on the two Mindsets. Explain that this came from
decades of research where it was discovered that people can choose to respond in one
of two ways whenever they have a challenge (whether that challenge is large or small).
Ask them to think about the reflection they just wrote as the class reviews the two
Mindsets.
Begin with the Fixed Mindset. Review and have students help to read each part to the
class. Next go over the Growth Mindset.
Ask the class to complete the reflection.
Ask students to think about their reflection. Are they approaching their challenge in the
Growth or the Fixed Mindset? Ask them to explain, using language from the graphic
organizer.
Finally ask all students to write a response to this question on the back of their paper:
What is one recent choice you made, that you made in the Fixed Mindset?
What will you do differently next time to make a Growth Mindset choice?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

128

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Activity 2, Check It: Formative Assessment


Description: Brainology Program Unit 3 Formative Assessment
Objective: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concepts presented in Unit 3.
Timeline: At the end of Unit 3 Approximately 30 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Distribute the Check It questions to the students.
Have students work silently and independently, completing the online lesson while
filling out the Check It.
An Answer Key is provided.
When gaps are identified in student understanding, work with them individually to
reteach the concepts, or encourage them to go through the online lessons again for a
deeper understanding. Feel free to re-test if appropriate.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

129

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Check It: Formative Assessment ANSWER KEY


1) What happens to the brain when you learn something new?
Your brain neurons (dendrites) grow and make new and stronger connections with other
cells; your brain grows denser.
2) The study of summer camp rats and couch potato rats showed that:
When a person or animal practices, plays and interacts with information, the brain
grows denser and intelligence is increased.
3) When they studied the brains of cab drivers in London they found that:
The hippocampus of the cabbies was stronger and larger than the hippocampus of
regular people.
4) When they studied adults practicing the sounds of new language they found that:
A PET scan showed that an area of the brain they had never used before became active.

5) You grow new neurons when you are learning a lot of new things.

T
F

6) Babies have more connections in their brains than grownups.

7) If you learn too much, you will use up all of your neurons.
8) A good way to make brain connections strong is to practice.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

130

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Activity 3 Practice It: Mindset Assessment: Scan Your Mindset Option A
Description: Brainology Program Unit 3 Mindset Scan
Objective: Students will increase metacognition by completing a self-assessment of their
mindset and targeting an area in which to improve. There are two options provided. Please
choose the one most appropriate for your learners.
Timeline: At the beginning of Unit 3 Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to the class that this activity will help them give themselves a kind of checkup on strategies, challenges, and mindset for learning. Theyll be able to score
themselves to see where they are now, and how to get into the Growth Zone, through
smart strategies. Explain that they wont be graded on their answers, so dont worry
about trying to look good.
Allow students to complete the Mindset Scan and rate their own mindset. This should
be kept in a notebook.
Students will score their mindset on page 2, and use the feedback to set goals for
improving their mindset on page 3.
Check back at the end of the unit to see if the students are making improvements.

Differentiating Instruction: Option A


Content & Process
This lesson contains content intended for On-Level
and Advanced Learners. The task is self-reflective
and asks students to set growth minded goals.
Some students will benefit from scaffolding in this
lesson. The teacher can show a model of a finished,
thoughtful reflection. Model how to use what is
learned in the program in the goal-setting handout.
The teacher can reflect with the class or in 1:1 miniconferences to review why and how a growth
mindset results in greater learning.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

131

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Activity 3 Practice It: Mindset Assessment: Review Your MindsetOption B


Description: Brainology Program Unit 3 Mindset Scan
Objective: Students will increase metacognition by completing a self-assessment of their
mindset and targeting an area in which to improve. There are two options provided. Please
choose the one most appropriate for your learners.
Timeline: Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to the class that today they will be reflecting on an event in their lives when
they were met with a challenge and struggled. The reflection should be about
something they wanted to do well.
Model for them what that event might be using something from your life.
Ask students to briefly write about the event in the box provided.
After they have written, model the boxes below from your experience. Did you (the
teacher) respond in the growth mindset, or the fixed mindset for each of those
categories?
Ask students to do the same for their own experience individually.
Finally, ask students to write to the reflective question on the second page. Here again,
a model from the teacher will greatly increase the quality of responses you receive. In
your model, explain how a growth minded response would have enhanced your
learning and contributed to your development. Do not focus on a desire to have avoided
failure, but rather model the ability to learn constructively from failure.
Differentiating Instruction: Option B
Content & Process
This lesson contains content intended for BelowLevel Learners. The task is self-reflective and asks
students to think about how they could be more
growth-minded.
Some students will benefit from scaffolding in this
lesson. The teacher can show a model of a finished,
thoughtful reflection
The teacher can reflect with the class or in 1:1 miniconferences to review why and how a growth
mindset results in greater learning.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

132

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Activity 4, Apply It: Scientific Research Briefs - Option A


Description: Brainology Program Unit 3 Application of Learning
Objective: Students will read a research brief on the topic of brain research. Students will
use their brief to answer the essential question. Students will engage in a class discussion
of the material.
Timeline: After completing Unit 3 online lesson Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
First introduce the lesson objectives to the class.
Next, put students in groups of 4 and give each group copies of ONE of the research
briefs. The research briefs range in lexile score and this is an opportunity to
differentiate for your class.
Ask students to read their brief once as a first read (a gist read).
Present the essential question: What does this brain research reveal about human
potential? Then pass out the graphic organizer.
Ask students to read the research brief for a second read. This time, they should
underline or highlight possible facts and/or speculations that would inform the essential
question.
Students share their details with their small group and work together to fill in their
graphic organizer.
The last 10 minutes of class is for a class discussion:
o Ask each group to select one
member to share for their
Differentiating Instruction Option A
group. That student stands
Content & Process
up.
The process in this lesson is intended for On-Level
o Each group has their
and Advanced Learners. Research briefs are written
representative share their
at multiple lexile levels. Teachers can differentiate
by assigning different readings to individual
graphic organizer with the
students or groups/partners. Teachers can model
class.
**Lesson extension: Students make a
poster for sharing/presenting.

www.mindsetworks.com

and deliver some briefs whole-class before


releasing students to work in partners or alone.
Lexile Levels: Babies Brains: 870; Learning
Languages: 890; Clever Cabbies: 1010;
Remarkable Rats: 1070; New Neurons: 1110;
Musical Mastery: 1190

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

133

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Activity 4, Apply It: Scientific Research Briefs - Option B


Description: Brainology Program Unit 3 Application of Learning
Objective: Students will listen to and then read a research brief on the topic of brain
research. Students will use their brief to answer the essential question. Students will
engage in a class discussion of the material.
Timeline: After completing Unit 3 online lesson Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher: Use the research brief, Musical Mastery to model this task for
your class.
Tell the class: A research brief is a short summary of research so that the public can
know important new scientific findings. Today you will read one together, and show
them how to record evidence and how to analyze the evidence.
Do a read-aloud of the text of Musical Mastery
Show the class the model graphic organizer. Explain that the graphic organizer is
designed to help them answer the essential question: What does this research brief
reveal to us about human potential? The essential question will help us to analyze
the evidence presented in the research brief.
Read the Essential Question aloud. Review any vocabulary the students may need help
with (essential, potential, reveal)
Using the provided model graphic organizer, review the first piece of evidence. Ask:
Does this tell us something about human potential? What?
Review the model analysis: Does this analysis explain what the evidence shows us
about human potential? How?
Differentiating Instruction Option B
Repeat for the second piece of
Content & Process
evidence and analysis.

The process in this lesson is intended for BelowLevel Learners. The content of the research briefs
is written at multiple lexile levels. Teachers can
differentiate by assigning different readings to
individual students or groups/partners. Modeling
and explicit directions for scaffolding are included
in this option.
Lexile Levels: Babies Brains: 870; Learning
Languages: 890; Clever Cabbies: 1010;
Remarkable Rats: 1070; New Neurons: 1110;
Musical Mastery: 1190

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

134

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Activity 4, Apply It: Scientific Research Briefs - Option B, cont.


Put students into partners and give each partnership copies of one research brief and a
blank graphic organizer. They are responsible for only one brief. Look at the lexile
levels of the briefs to guide you in differentiating for your class.
Give students 2 minutes to read silently (gist read); then ask them to have one person
read aloud to their partner.
Direct the class back to the Essential Question: What does this brain research reveal
about human potential? Direct them to work in partners to find 2 pieces of evidence
and explain/analyze how that evidence shows us something about human potential. Fill
in their graphic organizer.
When they are complete, ask several students to stand and share their graph organizers
at the white board or document camera.
As a final step, students reflect in the last box of the graphic organizer: Which research
study made the biggest impression on them?
**Lesson extension: Students make a poster for sharing/presenting.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

135

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 4, Apply It: Scientific Research Brief Handout

Name:

Teacher Model

Directions: In the graphic organizer below, explain what your research brief tells us about human potential. Then write two
pieces of evidence that support your claim and explain why. Finally, after hearing from your classmates, write a final response
to the last question.

Essential Question: What

does this brain research reveal about human potential?

The research brief, Musical Mastery, reveals thatAnyone could get better at playing an instrument if

they practice. When we learn something, it changes our brains.

Evidence 1:

Explanation 1:

When people practiced their instruments,

So, if we want to learn to move our fingers

the area of the brain that moves fingers

well (accurately and fast), then we can all

grew larger.

learn to do that by practicing.

Evidence 2:

Explanation 2:

Musicians who listen to a song that they

Movement and sound are connected in our

can play respond by moving their own

brains and so it is likely that other senses

fingers.

are also connected (like smell). We can use


those connections to get better at things.

Which research study made the biggest impression on you? Why?

After hearing everyones share-out, the one about languages made the biggest impression
on me. I want to learn a few languages but it is hard. I guess that its just fuzzy right
now and if I keep at it I can improve and learn by growing that part of my brain.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

136

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3 Additional Activities


What Leads to Success?
Objective: Students will use existing knowledge to review the growth of neurons, and
explain how our emotions and attitudes can affect our learning.
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain that the class will be using the information they learned in Unit 3 to respond to
the questioning and sentence frames in this activity.
Briefly introduce the information about Dwecks research on successful people, as
follows: Dr. Carol Dweck is a psychologist who is fascinated with why some people
are successful and why some people fail. Here is what she discovered after decades of
research:
o When people believe they failed because they are not smart, they stop trying to
learnand continue to fail.
o When people believe the failed because of not working hard enough, they work
harder and learnand eventually become successful.
Ask students if they have found this to be true in their own lives. Do they try harder
and practice more if they think that effort and practice will make them successful?
Ask students to complete the sentence frames. Share out as a class.

Differentiating Instruction
Process & Product
For Advanced and On-Level Learners,
teachers can differentiate by not using the
handout and holding a class discussion
instead. Students could then individually
write an informational paragraph to the
teacher explaining with evidence how/in what
way this is true in their own experience.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

137

Unit 3: Brain Building

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

138

Unit 3: Brain Building

Unit 3:
Reproducibles and Handouts

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

139

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 1, Connect It: The Two Mindsets Part 1

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

140

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 1, Connect It: The Two Mindsets Part 1 Reflection
Name: ________________________________________ Class: _________________________

1. Write about a challenge you have. It may be a relationship with a friend or family member, a class or
subject, or a sport or art form. What is one area where you are not feeling successful, but you would like
to be successful?

2. Now explain what steps you have taken to overcome this challenge. Have those steps worked? Why? If
they havent worked, why do you think they havent?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

141

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 2, Check It

Check It!
1) What happens to the brain when you learn
something new?

2) The study of summer camp rats and


couch potato rats showed that:

3) When they studied the brains of


cab drivers in London they found
that:

4) When they studied adults practicing the sounds of


new language they found that:

True or False?
T

6) Babies have more connections in their brains than grownups.

7) If you learn too much, you will use up all of your neurons.

8) A good way to make brain connections strong is to practice.

5) You grow new neurons when you are learning a lot of new things.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

142

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 3, Practice It: Mindset Scan: Scan Your Mindset Option A

Scan Your Mindset


You can use this scan to learn about how you dealt with challenges over the past week, day, or on a single project
and get tips on ways to improve your learning through changing your mindset. For each question below, circle the
number next to your answer.

1. Challenge Seeking: Did you take on any challenging goals?


1) I did not try to do anything hard.
2) I tried to do hard things because I had to or someone made me.
3) I chose to try something really hard when I didnt have to.
Please give an example:

2. Effort and Practice: How much effort did you put into this?
1) I did not work hard or practice.
2) I worked only as hard as I needed to.
3) I worked hard and did extra practice.
Please give an example:

3. Persistence: What did you do when you failed or struggled with something?
1) I gave up on it right away.
2) I kept trying but not as much as before.
3) I tried harder than before.
Please give an example:

4. Learning from mistakes and feedback: What did you do when you made a mistake or got
criticized?
1) I tried to forget about it or made an excuse for it.
2) I tried to keep from making the mistake again.
3) I thought about what I could have done differently and tried to improve.
Please give an example:

5. Thoughts and feelings: When you had a challenge or setback, how did you feel?
1) I was so upset, worried, or angry that I wanted to give up.
2) I was a little embarrassed or bummed out and felt less motivated.
3) I felt okay because I knew that I could do better next time.
Please give an example:

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

143

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 3, Practice It: Mindset Scan: Scan Your Mindset Option A
Score Your Mindset
Add up all the numbers that you circled (1, 2, or 3) and look at the feedback chart below.
If your total
points were:

Less than 7

8-13

14 or more

You were in the:

This means:

Fixed Mindset Zone

You were in the Fixed Mindset Zone this time, and this may have held
you back from doing your best. Its great that you were able to reflect
honestly and recognize this. You can learn from it and work on using a
growth mindset the next time you have a challenge. Look at the feedback
below to see how you can move into the Growth Zone.

Mixed Mindset Zone

You were in the Mixed Mindset Zone this timeyou may have used
some growth mindset thinking, but in other ways you may have held
yourself back. Its great that you were able to reflect honestly and
recognize this. You can learn from it and work on using a growth mindset
the next time you have a challenge. Look at the feedback below to see
how you can move into the Growth Zone.

Growth Mindset Zone

You were in the Growth Mindset Zone this timeyou used strategies
that will help you grow your brain and get smarter. Look at the feedback
below to see how you showed a Growth Mindset approach and ways that
you can continue to build your Growth Mindset strategies.

What can you do about it?

Challenges

Take a look at your answers to each of the questions. Where did you
circle a 3? Those were your Growth Mindset areas! Where did you circle
a 1 or a 2? Those are the places to work on. Look at the categories below
to see how moving yourself into the Growth Zone can help.

When you take on challenges and stretch outside your comfort zone, you learn more and your brain
gets stronger and smarter. Whether or not you succeeded, you will grow as a result! Take on a goal
thats a little hard for you next time.

Effort & Practice

Practice gives your brain the exercise it needs to be at its best. When you put in a lot of effort and
practice something, its like a workout for your brainit makes you stronger mentally. Like exercise,
it also takes time to build your brain.

Persistence

When things get hard, dont quitkeep at it! Thats the way to growwhen you stick with something
difficult, it builds up the connections in your brain over time. Remember, it doesnt happen
overnightbut it will happen.

Mistakes

Making mistakes happens to everyone. In a Growth Mindset, you see them as an opportunity to grow
and stretch your brain musclesyou actually use the mistake to learn and get better. This will help
you have a better result over time.

Thoughts &
Feelings

Thoughts & feelings are an important clue to our mindsetwhen we feel like we dont have control or
we are failing, negative feelings can interfere with new learning unless we understand them and deal
with them. Remember that you are in charge of your own learning, and if you want to grow, you will.
When you feel stressed or mad, talk to a friend, use strategies like square breathing and positive selftalk, and make a plan for success.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

144

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 3, Practice It: Mindset Scan: Scan Your Mindset Option A

What will you do to help your brain stay in the Growth Zone?
I will focus on increasing my:

o
o
o
o
o

Challenge-seeking
Effort and practice
Persistence
Learning from mistakes
Growth Mindset thoughts and feelings

How will you do this?


What I will do:

When will I do it?

Who will help me?

How will this help me to grow?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

145

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 3, Practice It: Mindset Scan: Review Your Mindset - Option B
Name: ___________________________________ Class: _________________
For this activity, think about a time when you failed at something that was important to you. Maybe it was
a try-out for a team, a big test, a sports game, a performance, or a project.
Briefly describe the event:

For each of the categories below, check the appropriate box. In the above situation, how did you
respond? Then finish the statement on the right.

In the situation above I used a


Fixed Mindset:

I know this because

Growth Mindset:

Avoided challenges

Took on challenges

Gave up easily

Kept trying

Did not want to put in


effort

Felt that effort was a


good thing

Did not listen to


feedback

Learned from criticism

Felt threatened by the


success of others

Found inspiration in
anothers success

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

146

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 3, Practice It: Mindset Scan: Review Your Mindset - Option B

Reflection Question:
In the situation you described on the previous page, what could you have done differently to get a better
outcome? Think about the growth mindset choice

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

147

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 4, Apply It: Scientific Research Brief Handout

Here are some different research studies that all showed how learning changes the brain.
Babies Brains: Newborn babies have plenty of neurons (over 100 billion), but the cells
have very few connections between them. Because they are learning so much in their first
few years, babies develop many new connections between their brain cells. This
development of connections (or synapses) is called plasticity. Brain plasticity is the
process that allows people to continue learning into adulthood and throughout their lives.
By the time you become an adult you will have a trillion or more of these connections! As
babies, our brains develop connected pathways needed to respond to new experiences.
One instance of this is learning to speak. No baby is born knowing how to speak a
language. Our brains, however, are "wired" to respond to the sound of speech. When
babies hear people speaking, their neurons receive stimulation. As babies hear more and
more speech, their synapses become stronger. If they do not hear a lot of speech, the
pathways for speech can be weak. This is sometimes referred to as the concept of "use it or
lose it." It is through exposure and practice that babies develop strong language and
speaking abilities.
Clever Cabbies: In New York, the streets are a user-friendly grid of streets that are often
named by a number (5th avenue comes before 6th avenue, for example). In London, the
streets look like a tangle of Christmas lights that someone forgot to wrap up after the
holidays. Whats more, the streets have names like Piccadilly and Shaftesbury Avenues.
London cabbies have to memorize the locations of many different places, and calculate the
fastest route from one place to another. Researchers measured the hippocampus--the area
of the brain that remembers information about places--in London cabdrivers and compared
them to other people. The London cabbies were bigger, and the longer they were on the
job, the bigger this area of the brain became! This shows that learning and practicing this
skill made that area of their brain grow. Final Thought: Researchers also found that animals
that hide their food (like squirrels) have a similarly strong hippocampus. Why do you think
that is?
Musical Mastery: When people play an instrument, they use a special area of the brain to
coordinate the movement of their fingers. Researchers found that when people practiced
playing an instrument (especially string and keyboard players), the area of the brain that
controls the fingers (the motor cortex) grew larger! At the same time, these neurons are
more efficient, meaning that the messages are faster and more accurate. Even more
remarkably, researchers found that when a musician listens to a song that s/he can play,
the musicians motor cortex responds. So the fingers move to respond to the sounds the
brain hears! This shows that when you learn and practice a new skill, you can build up that
area of the brain in a way that connects various systems in our body (like hearing and
movement). Final Thought: If hearing and movement can be connected, what else could be
connected in our bodies and senses?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

148

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 4, Apply It: Scientific Research Brief Handout


Learning Languages: Most people think that learning a second language once you are
an adult is very hard. But researchers had adults use special exercises to practice hearing
different sounds. Using a PET scan to measure the activity in the brain, the researchers
found that when people did the special exercises, areas of their brain that they had never
used before became active. In the early stages of learning (like learning a second
language), neurons fire incompletely, and weakly. It is like looking at a very blurry photo.
With more practice, and effort, the picture becomes clearer over time. When we repeatedly
practice and dont give up, less effort is needed to activate the neurons. Over time, it
becomes automatic, and the learner feels fluent. This explains why learning a new
language takes a lot of time. Babies take 5 or more years to learn their language, and they
are practicing constantly! This shows that you can retrain your brain and develop new
abilities all through your life.

New Neurons: Scientists used to think that we had a fixed amount of brain cells and that
we could never grow new ones. But in the past decade research has shown that the brain
grows new cells every day! The cells are grown in the hippocampus, an area important in
memory, and they travel to other areas of the brain. They also found that the brain grows
even more new cells when you are learning new information and skills. Whats more, deep
practice over time helps both new and existing neurons become stronger. These stronger,
thicker neural connections are what make people more easily able to access information, be
more accurate, and sometimes faster at thinking or at a skill. At any age you can and
should continue to build your brain and expand your mind. So, by learning and practicing,
you actually add brain cells as well as new connections. A healthy, strong neuron can be
directly linked to tens of thousands of other neurons, creating more than a hundred trillion
connections!

Remarkable Rats: Twin rats were raised in two different environments: either in a bare
cage with food and water, or in a cage with lots of toys and exercise equipment to explore.
In the bare cages, the cage potato rats just ate and drank and lay around, while in the
enriched environment, the summer camp rats were busy exploring and learning,
exercising their brains. In fact, the summer camp rats also got lots of exercise for their
bodies while the cage potato rats did not. It turned out that the summer camp rats
became much smarter than the cage potato ratsthey were better at learning new things.
And their brains were heavier too: they had more connections between the neurons in
their brains. This research shows that active mental exercise builds up the brain and
makes it smarter. It even suggests that physical exercise can have a positive effect on
brain growth. Even old rats were able to develop their brains in the enriched environment,
proving that youre never too old to grow your brain!

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

149

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Activity 4, Apply It: Scientific Research Brief Handout

Name: _____________________________________________
Directions: In the graphic organizer below, explain what your research brief tells us about human
potential. Then write two pieces of evidence that support your claim and explain why. Finally,
after hearing from your classmates, write a final response to the last question.
Essential Question: What does this brain research reveal about human potential?
The research brief, ________________ reveals that

Evidence 1

Explanation 1

Evidence 2

Explanation 2

Which research study made the biggest impression on you? Why?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

150

Unit 3: Brain Building

Brainology Unit 3 Additional Activity: What Leads to Success?

Name: _____________________________________
Dr. Carol Dweck is a psychologist who is fascinated with why some people are successful and why some
fail. Here is what she discovered after decades of research:
When people believe they failed because they are not smart, they stop trying to learn.
When people believe that they failed because of not working hard enough, they work harder and
learn.
How does a persons attitude affect his/her success?

I think that a persons attitude

Fill in the sentences below to show how our new learning about neurons supports Dr. Dwecks
research findings about successful people!
When I am learning something, my practice and my studying grow _______________________
_________________________________.

Dendrites stretch, lengthen, and grow until

_______________________________________.

The more I grow dendrites, the more

__________________________________________________________________________.
It can be very hard to learn when _________________________________________________, because
____________________________________________________________________.
If I work hard, _______________________________________________________________.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

151

Unit 3: Brain Building

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

152

www.brainology.us

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

UNIT 4: BRAIN BOOSTERS


LESSONS AND MATERIAL GUIDE
FOR TEACHERS

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
153

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

154

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4: Brain Boosters


Table of Contents:
I. Overview and Goals
A. Unit 4: An Overview ....................................................................... 156
B. Online Lesson Summary ................................................................. 157
C. Building, Reinforcing and Maintaining the Growth Mindset ........... 158

II. Lesson Plans


A. Activity 1: The Two Mindsets Part 2 ............................................... 160
B. Activity 2: Online Lesson and Formative Assessment ............... 161-162
C. Activity 3: Choose one a. Option A: BRAIN St udy Plan ............................................................ 163
b. Option B: Learning Strategies Brain Scan ......................................... 164

D. Activity 4: Class Motto ............................................................ 165-166


E. Additional Activities:

a. Student Challenges ............................................................................ 167


b. Memory Sort ............................................................................... 167-168
c. How Do I Study? ............................................................................... 169
d. End-of -Course Presentations ............................................................. 170

III. Reproducibles and Handouts


A. Activity 1: The Two Mindsets Part 2 ....................................... 172-173
B. Activity 2: Online Lesson and Formative Assessment ...................... 174
C. Activity 3: Choose one -

a. Option A: BRAIN St udy Plan ................................................. 175-181


b. Option B: Learning Strategies Brain Scan .............................. 182-184
D. Activity 4: Class Motto ................................................................... 185
E. Additional Activities:

a. Student Challenges ................................................................. 186-190


b. Memory Sort.................................................................................................................. 191
c. End-of -Course Presentations .................................................. 192-195
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

155

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

UNIT 4: BRAIN BOOSTERS


Unit Goal

Extend the concept of the malleable brain to understanding the processes


of memory. Introduce a variety of study strategies to capitalize on the way
the brain works, learns, and remembers in order to deepen and reinforce
the students understanding of the growth mindset, and guide the student
to the study skills resources within the program.

Activities
Activity
#
4-1

Activity

Lesson Plan

Handout

p. 160

pp. 172173

pp. 161162

p. 174

p. 163
p. 164

175-181
182-184

pp. 165166

p. 185

Connect It The Two Mindsets: Part 2

4-2

Check It Complete both, together:


Online Brainology Unit 4
Formative Assessment

4-3

Practice It Choose One:


o Option A: Brain Study Plan or
o Option B: Learning Strategies Brain Scan

4-4

Apply It Class Motto

Key Concepts

Memory processes include sensory (immediate) memory, working


memory, and long-term memory. To encode information in long-term
memory, new connections must be built through repeated practice over
time. To expand working memory capacity, students can use strategies
like chunking and mnemonic. Students may experience difficulty
remembering information unless they use appropriate strategies to build
long-term memory, such as repetition, making connections to other
information, and deliberate practice.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

156

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4: Online Lesson Summary

Memory is stored in the new connections that your brain makes between neurons
when you have a new experience.
There are different stages in memory, each lasting different amount of time: sensory
memory, working memory, and long-term memory.
Memory is a process, and if you skip one stage, the memory will not last.
All information enters through sensory memory, which lasts less than a second.
Things you pay attention to go on to working memory, which lasts from seconds to
minutes. This memory can only hold 4-7 separate pieces of information at once.
Information moves from working memory to long-term memory through a process
called encoding. In order for encoding to happen, you must pay attention, attach new
information to existing information that supports it, and repeat the information.
An example of connecting information together to help expand memory is chunking,
where you remember several bits of information together in a pattern. Other
mnemonics (memory strategies) that connect information together in multiple ways
include visual images and acronyms.
Most good study strategies are those that reinforce this memory process, helping your
brain to make many strong connections between neurons and build a strong
communication network of knowledge.
Some examples of good study strategies can be remembered through the acronym
BRAIN:
o Break down information into basic elements
o Repeat, review, practice skills and information to strengthen memory
o Actively practice new information
o Information-seeking through expert sources
o Never give upstay with the task long enough to let learning and memory take
hold!

What are the most important study skills for a student to know?
By encouraging your students to focus on effort, strategy, and learning, you are laying
the foundations for a constructive approach to learning and supporting a growth
mindset. To help them turn that positive motivation into practical achievement gains,
remind them of the importance of using the right strategies. Many students fail to
understand their role in controlling their own learning. There are a few key skills and
principles that underlie the majority of study strategies, yet are unknown to many
students. Focusing ones attention, taking an active role in learning, repetition,
deliberate practice, and monitoring ones own knowledge are among these strategies.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

157

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4: Building, Reinforcing and Maintaining the Growth Mindset


Providing Student Feedback:

By encouraging students to emphasize their learning strategies, you will help them remember that
they can control how much they learn. When we associate the things we want to remember with
the things we already know and find to be important, the move from working to long-term
memory can be more easily made! Suggestions for feedback include:
Remember, nothing gets in unless you shine your attention spotlight on it!
Take charge of this, get active!
Think about what you need to do: what strategies can you use?
Question yourself: What do I already know about this subject? What do I need to know?
Am I using the right strategy?
If you dont understand something, ask!
See if you can explain it to someone else. Thats the best way to learn.

Concrete Strategies:

Like a network of neurons, a class lesson is a series of ideas connected together to make
mastering a new skill or concept possible. The following strategies are examples of ways to make
connections between new and old knowledge, and will help to move the new knowledge into
long-term memory:
PEMDAS (Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally) is a mnemonic that helps you remember the
order of mathematical operations you must follow in solving a problem. Have students
create their own mnemonic devices and post them around the classroom for inspiration.
In class, learning the most basic way to complete a task (e.g., to solve a problem, compose
an essay) leads us to figure out how to manage similar problems with more complexity and
more steps. Have students create a graphic organizer to map out tasks, showing the series of
steps needed to complete that task.
Write a problem on a sheet of paper that is solved in several lines. Cut the paper into strips
so that each step is on a separate strip. Have students put the pieces together in small
groups.
Consider things students have strong emotional attachments to and make school connect
with those topics, for example keeping a diagram of the Final Four, or tracking the rate at
which a tropical storm is approaching the city. Making connections with things students are
interested in will help them remember concepts. Link a new concept with a popular song.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

158

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4:
Lesson Plans

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

159

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Activity 1, Connect It: The Two Mindsets Part 2


Description: This anticipatory activity for Unit 4 is a deeper exploration of the Two
Mindsets based on the Nigel Holmes Graphic from Unit 3.
Objective: Students will reflect on different scenarios and discover if they hold fixed or
growth mindsets that are situation dependent.
Timeline: Near the beginning of Unit 4 Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to the class that today you will reflect more on the two mindsets and how we
can hold both mindsets at the same time. We are not necessarily completely fixed or
growth in mindset. We make choices constantly some that are influenced by a
fixed mindset and some that are influenced by a growth mindset.
It boils down to our beliefs about our ability in that area.
Ask students to read each of the scenarios below and respond honestly. There are NO
correct or incorrect answers, only honest responses. Ask them to answer only 1-4.
If you choose to apply points for this activity, make it clear that the score will be based
only on their completeness in answering the questions.
Ask them to put their pencils down when they finish and not to go on.
When class is finished, revisit the Nigel Holmes graphic on the two mindsets. Briefly
review the fixed vs. growth mindsets.
Ask students to take a look at the last question on the back of the paper and to review
their responses to each of the scenarios, thinking about which mindset they see in their
answers. Was there an emphasis on one Mindset? Did it depend on the question? How
could they take a scenario where they answered with a fixed mindset, and turn their
answer it into a growth mindset one?
Differentiating Instruction
Process & Product
Some students will benefit from scaffolding
in this lesson. The teacher can model an
answer to one of the scenarios (showing a
complete and thoughtful answer) as well as
model the reflection on the back.
The teacher can provide language response
frames for some or all students: One way I
would react is I would do that
becauseOther people would probably
because

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

160

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Activity 2, Check It: Formative Assessment


Description: Brainology Program Unit 4 Formative Assessment
Objective: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concepts presented in Unit 4.
Timeline: Complete with Brainology Unit 4 Online Lesson - 30 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Distribute the Check It questions to the students.
Have students work silently and independently, completing the online lesson while
filling out the Check It.
An Answer Key is provided.
When gaps are identified in student understanding, work with them individually to
reteach the concepts, or encourage them to go through the online lessons again for a
deeper understanding. Feel free to re-test if appropriate.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

161

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Activity 2, Check It: Formative Assessment ANSWER KEY


Brainology Unit 4 Check It Brain Boosters
1) There are 3 types of memory. How long does each kind of memory last?

Working memory: a few seconds to a few minutes. Anything that you pay attention to will go
into working memory.
Long-Term memory: days, weeks, months, or years. These are created when new connections
are built between nerve cells.
Sensory memory: Less than 1 second--just as long as the nerve signal takes to fade away.

2) What has to happen before something can get into working memory?
You have to pay attention to something for it to make it into working memory. Before new information
gets into your working memory, it has to go through sensory memory.
3) What has to happen before something can get into long-term memory?
Before something gets into your long-term memory, it has to go to working memory. Things that you
repeat and practice will go into long-term memory. Things that you feel strong emotion about will also go
into long-term memory.
4) Name 5 things you could do to improve your memory and get smarter in school: (NOTE: Variations
and/or combinations on the following answers are possible)
Pay attention - Dr. Cerebrus says, turn on the spotlightattention or active learning
Organize the information - Attach the new information to a network of other information that can
support it (as you did when you practiced chunking). Figure out how it fits with other things you already
know, and think about all of them together.
Repetition When you repeat something, you help to move it from short-term to long-term memory
thats when you can say that you really learned something new.
Make it more interesting Connect new information to something youre interested in. (Chris tries to
relate his math problems to basketball stats.)
Find a good strategy practice aloud, talk through your problems with your friends, rewrite notes or
main ideas in your own words, etc.
Break it down large problems can often be broken into smaller, easier ones
Information search look for a person who knows more than you do, or for a website, a magazine, or a
book on the topic.
Create a mnemonic a memorable phrase, song, rhyme, etc. that can help you connect to the newlylearned information.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

162

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Activity 3, Practice It: Option A BRAIN Study Plan


Description: Brainology Program Unit 4 Study Plan. There are two options provided.
Please choose the assessment that is most appropriate for your learners.
Objective: Students will use the B.R.A.I.N. suggestions in the handout on pp. 176-180 or
come up with their own ideas to create a study plan for an upcoming test or project.
Timeline: Near the beginning of Unit 4 Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to the class that this activity will help them create a study plan for more
effective learning on an upcoming test or project.
Remind students of the BRAIN mnemonic they learned in the online lesson.
Break it down
Repeat and review
Active learning
Information search
Never give up!
Model how to choose strategies for a task by using the BRAIN mnemonic and the
strategies handout.
Ask students to track their strategy use and write reflections on how well they worked
on the Study Plan Journal page
(27), and check back to
Differentiating Instruction: Option A
monitor the students
Content & Process
progress toward their goal.
This lesson contains content intended for OnLevel and Advanced Learners. The task is selfreflective and asks students to create a plan based
on the Brainology BRAIN acronym.

Some students will benefit from scaffolding in this


lesson. The teacher can show a model of a finished
Study Plan Journal that shows a student trying
some strategies that work well and a few that
dont. Model how to say something that didnt
work and why as well as something that did work
and why.
The teacher can reflect with the class or in 1:1
mini-conferences to review why repeated practice
over time, and utilizing many different senses
results in greater learning.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

163

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Activity 3, Practice It: Option B Learning Strategies Brain Scan


Description: Brainology Program Unit 4 Self-Assessments. There are two options
provided. Please choose the assessment that is most appropriate for your learners.
Objective: Students will increase metacognition by completing a self-assessment of their
learning strategies. They will use the Brain Scan to target an area in which to improve
throughout the unit.
Timeline: Near the beginning of Unit 4 Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to the class that this activity will help them give themselves a kind of checkup on strategies, challenges, and mindset for learning. Theyll be able to score
themselves to see where they are now, and how to get into the Growth Zone, through
smart strategies. Explain that they wont be graded on their answers, so dont worry
about trying to look good.
Allow students to complete the Learning Strategies Brain Scan and rate their own
learning strategies and mindset. This should be kept in a notebook.
Students will score their strategies on page 2 of the student handout, and use the
feedback to set goals for improving their learning on page 3.
Check back at the end of the unit to see if the students are making improvements.

Differentiating Instruction: Option B


Content
This lesson contains content intended for BelowLevel Learners.
Some students will benefit from scaffolding in this
lesson. The teacher can show a model of a finished
Brain Scan reflection. The teacher can fill one out for
him/herself or for a make-believe teenager to show
what a thoughtful response would look like.
The feedback can be reviewed as a read-aloud and
have students highlight the paragraph in which of the
three learning strategies they want to grow.
The teacher can reflect with the class or in 1:1 miniconferences to review why repeated practice over
time, and utilizing many different senses results in
greater learning.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

164

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Activity 4, Apply It: Class Motto


Description: Brainology Program Unit 4 Application of new knowledge
Objective: Students will deepen their understanding of the concepts learned throughout the
Brainology Program by applying this knowledge to the creation of a Class Motto.
Collaboratively creating a Class Motto will help students commit to growth-minded
choices and reinforce their belonging in the learning community.
Timeline: After completing Unit 4 online lesson Approximately 25 minutes
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to students that part of growing our intelligence is to make commitments
(promises to ourselves) to practice good choices and stick to those commitments.
Ask students to think about if they have ever made a promise to themselves.
Have them think silently. Let them know they will be sharing with others. Then
provide them with this sentence frame:
o Once I promised myself that ___________. I did this because _________.
Ask students to share with an elbow partner. Use random response cards or wooden
craft sticks (i.e. Popsicle sticks) to elicit examples from the class.
Explain that Today, we will write some statements that we will commit to as a class.
Todays commitments, though, will be to take actions that help us grow, bounce back
from mistakes (be resilient), and take on challenges.
Ask students to recall previous lessons on the Growth Mindset. Have a discussion to
elicit ways in which students identified themselves as either growth or fixed minded.
(For example: seeking challenges, receiving feedback, responding to corrections, etc.)
Connect that prior experience to todays objective. Tell the class:
o Today, we will write a motto committing to growth minded choices in the
classroom when we are learning. We can write this motto to say how we will
respond when things get tough. This way we will learn to respond in a growth
mindset more often.
Pass out the Class Motto handout. Student will complete with a partner or small group.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

165

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Activity 4, Apply It: Class Motto, cont.


Post statements on the wall, board, or bulletin board. Each student can vote for a
class statement by putting his/her initials on the statement. Decide how many each
person can vote for. (We recommend no more than 6 statements.)
The teacher can post the most popular statements on the wall (or make a typed
document for the overhead projector/doc camera) and that will help the class make
more growth minded choices all year.
All students can sign the final Class Motto to take ownership and reinforce their
membership in a learning community.

Sample Class Motto from David Reese ES, Elk Grove USD, CA:
I.
II.

When we learn something challenging, We say Yea!


Keep trying, even when it gets hard.

III.

If someone is trying to help or correct us, we will listen carefully.

IV.

We cheer for each other when we work hard!

V.

Remember that everyone has to practice if they want to learn.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

166

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Additional Activities


Student Challenges
Objective: Students will deepen their understanding of the concepts learned in Unit 4 by
applying new knowledge to a unique situation.
Instructions for the teacher:
Five different student challenges are provided: Lucy, Ana, Matt, Byron and Tamiya. Each
challenge is followed by an organizer including the BRAIN mnemonic.
Individually or in groups, students will create a plan for the student challenge using
BRAIN strategies learned
throughout the program.
Differentiating Instruction
Students may share their
Process
plans with the class.
Some students will benefit from scaffolding in this
lesson. The teacher can model an answer to one of the
scenarios (showing a complete and thoughtful
answer) as well as model the reflection on the back.

Memory Sort
Objective: Students will
complete a manipulative sort to
practice the three levels of
memory.

The teacher can provide some or all students with


language response frames such as:

One way ___ can break it down is ___ because ___.


___ should repeat and review by ___ because ___.
So ____ doesnt give up, s/he should ___ because ___.

Instructions for the teacher:


Explain that today students will be practicing the information they learned about the three
levels of memory. Todays practice will utilize a manipulative (sort).
Place students in partners. Ask students to clear their desks so that they have a work
space.
Give each partnership ONE set of cards to share. (Tip: Be sure the cards are shuffled!)
Direct students to lay out the slips of paper into the three categories on the desk: (1)
Sensory Memory (2) Working Memory (3) Long Term Memory
Give class 3-5 minutes to sort in partners, while teacher monitors the progress, giving
feedback and asking students to make corrections.
Show a completed copy of the sort, or use random response for students to check their
work. Point out the cards that go across all three categories aid in the long-term
memorization of the information. Help students to understand that this is a learning
strategy that they can practice on their own.
Students can continue to practice this sort at a later time for repeated practice.
An Answer Key follows.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

167

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Memory Sort ANSWER KEY

Sensory Memory

Working Memory

Long-Term Memory

It is an echo of what you see,


taste, touch, hear, and smell.

This is like a scratch pad in


your brain.

This is like a computer file or


a CD.

This type of memory lasts less


than one second.

This type of memory lasts a


few seconds to a few minutes
at most.
Anything that you pay
attention to goes here.

This type of memory lasts


days, weeks, months, or years.

You can only hold a few


things in this area at a time.

Things that you feel strong


emotion about will go here.

You can move things from


here to the next stage of
memory by repeating them.

This happens when you grow


new connections between your
brains neurons.

Every experience you have


goes into this type of memory.
You can move things from
here to the next stage of
memory by paying attention to
them.

www.mindsetworks.com

Things you repeat and practice


will go here.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

168

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

How Do I Study?
Objective: Students will make connections between their own experiences with studying
and the content of Brainology Level 4: Brain Boosters.
Instructions for the teacher:
Explain to students that the focus today will be on how we study and build our skills. In
Brainology Level 4, they learn about how memory works, and about study strategies
that they can use to make it work better.
To study effectively you need to study smart--find the right strategy and use time
well. Here are two ways of studying. Each takes 45 minutes.
i.

Method 1: Sit and stare at your math book, but dont open it up. Stare at
it REALLY HARD for 12 minutes. Then open it up and read one
problem. Get frustrated when you dont understand it in 3 minutes, and
close the book. Turn on the TV for 10 minutes. Spend 20 minutes
looking for your math homework sheet. Give up when you cant find it.

ii.

Method 2: Write down math rules and problems on index cards (15
minutes). Read them a few times (15 minutes). Then find a friend to quiz
you on the problems (5 minutes). Pick the ones you had trouble with and
read them over again (10 minutes).

Students will write an essay to compare and contrast the two methods described.
Provide the following questions to guide them:
o
o
o
o

What would be the result of using method 1?


What would be the result of using method 2?
Can you think of a time when method 1 would be more effective?
Can you think of an active learning technique that you could use instead
of method 2?
o Which one sounds more like your own study time?
o How will you avoid using method 1 in the future?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

169

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

End-of-Course Activity: Brainology Presentations


Description: Brainology Program End-of-Course Presentations
Objective: Students showcase what they have learned from the program, teaching the information
to others. (Students will need access to materials depending on the media they choose to use for
delivery of their presentation.)
Timeline: 60 minutes total for lesson additional 2-3 minutes, per student, for presenting. Project
can be broken into 4 sessions of 25-30 minutes each. Students will also need to spend some
homework time on preparing their visual aid.
Instructions for the teacher:
o Tell the class that they are going to have the opportunity to showcase what they have
learned from the Brainology program. The students can present to each other, parents,
school staff, other classes, or younger students from another school.
o Each of them will deliver a 2-3 minute presentation on a part of the Brainology program
that was the most significant to them.
o They will have many options for their presentation, using a media that they feel best
communicates what they have learned. Some suggestions are:
A Power Point presentation
A Wordle: www.wordle.net
A Prezi: www.prezi.com
A Blabber: www.blabberize.com
A Glog: www.glogster.com
A Tagxedo: www.tagxedo.com
A paper poster or overhead film
A video
A song
A play
A letter to someone
Note: all of the Web 2.0 suggestions above have free/complimentary student and educator
accounts.
o Ask students to reflect on the Brainology program and use the handout to help them
determine which part of the program they
would like to share/teach to others.
Differentiating Instruction
Product
o Use the handouts to customize your
Students
are
encouraged
to choose their
presentation expectations to your class.
o Take some time to assess which of the
above media options you have available
to you and your students. Consider
making a model to show students using
of the media options (one model
provided).
www.mindsetworks.com

topic based on an experience from the


curriculum that impacted them. This
openness of task allows students to
personalize this presentation. The teacher
should encourage students to select the
multi-media option that is most exciting for
them to communicate what they learned.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

170

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4:
Reproducibles and Handouts

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

171

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Activity 1, Connect It: The Two Mindsets Part 2


Name:__________________________ Class: _____________________
Directions: Pretend that you are in each of the four scenarios below. Explain what you would do, feel,
and/or say.
1. An adult (such as a parent or teacher) gives you feedback about how you performed and how you can
improve (for example, on a test, in a game, at a family event, etc.). What is your reaction?

2. You have a friend who is more skilled at sports than you. You are both on the same team, s/he gets more
playing time, and you feel s/he gets more attention from the coach. How do you react?

3. You made a big mistake on the English essay and wrote to the wrong topic. Your paper came back with
an Incomplete and a zero at the top. What do you do?

4. You are selecting classes to begin High School. You may choose Honors/advanced English, or regular
English. Both qualify you for college. Which do you choose? Why?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

172

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Activity 1, Connect It: The Two Mindsets Part 2 cont.
5. Review your answers to the four (4) questions on the previous page. Which Mindset (growth or fixed) did
you use in those situations? Did it depend on the question? If so, what do you think makes you hold a
fixed mindset in one area and a growth mindset in another?

6. Pick one scenario where you used Fixed Mindset thinking, and explain how you could respond differently
using a Growth Mindset.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

173

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Activity 2, Check It

Check It!
1) There are 3 types of memory. How long does each kind of memory last?
Sensory

Working

2) What has to happen before something


can get into working memory?

Long Term

3) What has to happen before something


can get into long-term memory?

4) Explain or draw a visual representation of 5 different things you can do to improve your
memory and get smarter in school:

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

174

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Unit 4 Activity 3, Practice It Option A: Brain Study Plan

BRAIN STUDY PLAN


Name: ________________________________________________
Assignment or Test: ____________________________________Due Date: ___________________
My Goal for this Assignment/Test:__________________________________________________
Instructions: Use the BRAIN suggestions on the following 6 pages or come up with your own ideas to
complete your study plan. Then track your strategies using the Study Plan Journal page.

Break It Down:
Repeat and Review:
Active Learning:

Information Search:
Never Give Up:
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

175

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

HOW CAN I...

BREAK IT DOWN

Highlight the action words (verbs) in a set of directions. Use these words as a guide
to break down the directions into steps.
While reading, use different colors to highlight different types of important
information (for example, highlight important people and places in yellow,
highlight important dates and times in blue, highlight important concepts or ideas
in green, etc.)
Create a checklist of tasks that you need to accomplish. Check off each one as you
complete the task.
Break long term assignments into smaller, more manageable chunks. Plan on
doing a certain piece of the assignment each day.
Plan ahead: Make a schedule of your non-school responsibilities during the week
so you can manage your school responsibilities (homework, study time, etc.).
Create an outline of key points and facts as you read (SQ3R).
Use mnemonics to help you memorize lists and/ or series of information.
Chunk related bits of information together to help you remember them.
When studying with index cards, separate cards into chunks of 5-7. Study each
chunk until you memorize them before continuing with the next chunk.
Find a pattern.
Create acronyms, such as BRAIN, to remember information.
Use mnemonic devices, such as PEMDAS, to remember information.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

176

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

HOW CAN I...


REPEAT AND REVIEW
Rewrite or type your notes.
Turn the facts in your notes into questions and create your own test.
Create your own study guide and complete it.
Make flash card of important information. Quiz yourself or have a partner quiz you.
Sort into piles the information you know and the information you need to
know. Review the pile of information that you still need to know. Repeat until
all of the cards are in the know pile.
Rewrite important facts, and say them out loud to yourself or to another person
Sort information into similar chunks (i.e., events, places, names). Study each chunk
separately. Repeat with another chunk of information.
Complete additional questions or problems provided in your textbook or online.
Study a little each day. This way you will be repeating and reviewing information
often enough that it will move into long term memory.
Use different channels to review information.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

177

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

HOW CAN I...

ACTIVELY LEARN
Use post-its or bookmarks to jot down questions or connections that you make as
you are reading.
Create a cartoon strip or a story to help remember information.
Draw a picture to represent a word or concept.
Arrange information into a mind map or visual web.
Make personal connections to the text.
Create your own problems or questions.
TEACH SOMEONE ELSE THE INFORMATION!
Put the information into your own words.
Discuss the information with someone else.
Role-play the information.
Use the information to create lyrics to a tune you know well.
Create or find visual images.
Make a video about the topic.
Put the main ideas into a song using a tune you know.
Move around while studying (bounce a basketball to a beat while studying facts).
Use a highlighter to help you focus on important facts.
Use index cards to record and sort information.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

178

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

HOW CAN I...


CONDUCT AN INFORMATION SEARCH

Ask the teacher to explain something in a different way if you do not understand
the first time.
Raise your hand and ask for clarification as SOON AS you dont understand
something.
Attend extra help sessions.
Ask a classmate to explain a concept.
Know the contact information of at least 3 classmates so you can contact them
with questions about schoolwork.
Ask a parent or older sibling.
Use the internet (there are many tutorials for all subjects online).
Use the reference sections in the textbook (index, glossary).
Look for examples in your textbook to help remember steps to a problem.
Look back in your notes.
Mark or star anything you do not understand so that you can be prepared to ask
specific questions.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

179

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

HOW CAN I

NEVER GIVE UP!


Write down negative thoughts and turn them into positive statements.
When taking a test or completing a project, give it all you can at the end. Just
when you think you want to give up, give yourself another push!
Focus on your goal.
Self talk: Tell yourself you CAN! Keep a positive attitude.
Focus on what you will do to handle a challenge instead of worrying what could go
wrong.
Picture your neurons growing new connections as you put forth effort.
When you are having difficulty, try a different strategy. This is the time to
INCREASE your effort!
Use square breathing when you are feeling anxious.
Get at least 8-9 hours of sleep so your brain can be at its best.
Take care of your body by eating brain foods and exercising.
Know yourself. Everyone learns differently. You should never compare your
learning to someone else.
Schedule time to take breaks if you need to.
Use a time management planner to help you get everything you need to get
accomplished.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

180

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

BRAINOLOGY STUDY PLAN JOURNAL


Date

Strategy Used

How did it work?

Reflection:
Which of the strategies you tried worked the best for you?

Why do you think they worked?

Is there anything that you will do differently next time?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

181

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Activity 3, Practice It Option B: Learning Strategies Brain Scan

Scan Your Learning Strategies: Brain Building


To learn, grow, and perform well, you need to use strategies that help the brain develop new connections and get
smarter. You can use this scan to get feedback on your learning strategies and how you can improve them. Check
the steps you took as you were preparing to learn something new.

1. Setting the stage and focusing the spotlight


When you had an assignment, test or project, how did you begin?

o I set a clear and challenging goal for myself.


o I made a plan for how I would do my work.
o I got all the information I needed and focused my mind on the work.
o I got started early and used my time well.
o I made sure I didnt have any distractions.
o Other (please describe):

2. Reaching out to grow new brain connections


When trying to learn something new, what did you do?

o I broke it down into smaller parts or steps.


o I connected the new information to things I already knew.
o I used different pathways or senses to learn (drew pictures, diagrams or charts, made songs or raps,
or acted something out).
o I repeated new words and facts over to myself to learn them.
o I reviewed my assignment, text, and notes before I started working.
o Other (please describe):

3. What did you do to keep your mood and motivation positive?

o I reminded myself to think positive instead of negative thoughts.


o I pictured growing my brain cells and getting smarter.
o I reminded myself that I can learn from mistakes.
o I chose to be with positive people.
o I practiced calming strategies like square breathing, remembering a happy time, or thinking of a
beautiful place.
o Other (please describe):

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

182

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Activity 3, Practice It Option B: Learning Strategies Brain Scan


Score Your Mindset
Count up all your checks and look at the feedback chart below.
If you
checked:

Less than 3

3-5

6 or more

You were in the:

This means:

Fixed Mindset Zone

You didnt use many brain-wise learning strategies this time, and
this may have held you back from doing your best. Its great that
you were able to reflect honestly and recognize this. Now you can
learn from itchoose a couple of areas to build your growth
mindset learning muscles and plan some strategies. Look at the
feedback below to see areas where you can improve and ideas for
how you can move your learning into the Growth Zone!

Mixed Mindset Zone

You used some good strategies but skipped some others, and this
may have held you back from doing your best. Take a look to see
which steps you may have missed, and choose a couple of areas to
build your growth mindset learning muscles and plan some
strategies. Look at the feedback below to see areas where you can
improve and ideas for how you can move your learning into the
Growth Zone!

Growth Mindset Zone

Overall, your use of learning strategies was in the growth Zone this
timeyou used lots of good strategies that will help you grow your
brain and get smarter. Look at the feedback below to see where you
used growth learning strategies and see ways that you can continue
to build on them to continue getting smarter and better.

What can you do about it?

Take a look at your answers in the 3 categories. Where did you


check lots of strategies? Those were your Growth Mindset areas!
Where did you check very few? Those are the places to work on.
Look at the categories below to see how moving yourself into the
Growth Zone can help.

Setting the
stage and
focusing the
spotlight

These strategies help you to have a clear focus and plan and be ready to learn. If you skip
them, you may end up being unclear about what you need to do, lack some materials you
need, be distracted, or not have enough time to complete your work. If you skipped any of the
steps, you can add them next time.

Reaching out to
grow new brain
connections

These strategies help you to start growing new brain connections by finding many ways to
connect and wire in the new material. If you skip these strategies, you may find it harder to
learn and remember new material, especially after a little time goes by. Next time, use these
strategies to break down and preview the new information, connect it to what you already
know, and engage all your pathways (5 senses). If you do those things, youll start growing
new connections faster.

Keeping your
mood and
motivation
positive

Negative emotions can harm your learning. These strategies keep your brain in a positive
state and ready for growth. As a result, you feel calmer and more motivated, even when
things are difficult. Use these strategies to focus your mind on can do thoughts, seek out
positive people, and calm your mind and body.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

183

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Activity 3, Practice It Option B: Learning Strategies Brain Scan

What will you do to help your brain stay in the Growth Zone?
I will focus on increasing my:

o
o
o

Setting the stage and focusing attention


Growing new brain connections
Keeping positive mood and motivation

How will you do this?


What I will do:

When will I do it?

Who will help me?

How will this help me to grow?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

184

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Activity 4, Apply It: Class Motto


Today, we will write a motto committing to growth-minded choices in the classroom when we are
learning. We can write this motto to say how we will respond when things get tough. This way we learn
to respond in a growth mindset more often. Use the following sentence frames:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

When we feel challenged, we will ____________________ because


If something gets in our way, we will __________________ because
When its time to practice, we will ____________________ because
If someone corrects us, we will _____________________ because
When others are successful, we will ____________________ because
If learning becomes frustrating, we will _________________ because
When it is time to learn something new, we will
because

.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Step One: Choose two frames (or use your own language if you like) and complete the statements using
growth minded ideas, strategies, and language.
Step Two: Share with your elbow partner. Work with your elbow partner to check your work and theirs
for coherence (does it make sense?). You will be sharing your statements with the class. Make sure that
your partners motto statement is something that everyone in the class would understand. Feel free to
change the response frame if you need to.
Use the following sentence frames when discussing with your partner:

o
o
o
o
o

When you say ____ what do you mean?


When my statement says ___ do you think that works?
What would it look like if someone ____?
Can we use a different word for ___?
Can you explain how that would be growth minded?

Step Three: Edit or revise your statements based on your conversation with your elbow partner. Decide
which and how many statements you want to share with the class to propose as part of a class motto.
Step Four: Present your statements to the class. (Ideally this would be done on a document camera or
overhead projector. Another option is to have students write them on the board or chart paper.)
If others have similar statements, do not say, They took ours. Instead use a sentence frame below to
show how statements are similar, build on others, or contradict one another.
o
o
o
o
o
o

Our motto statement is similar to ___s in that___.


Our motto statement is very different from ___s because.
What makes our statement a little/very different is ___.
One way our statement is like ____s is that ___.
Our statement is almost exactly like ___s; we said: ___.
We said something like ____s but ours also says ___/but ours leaves out ___.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

185

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Additional Activity: Student Challenges - Lucy

Lucy has to learn and memorize the main information in Chapter 15 of her
textbook.

Break It Down:
Repeat and Review:

Active Learning:
Information Search:
Never Give Up:

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

186

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Additional Activity: Student Challenges - Ana

Ana has a History test in 3 days. For the test, she has to remember all of the
major events of the Revolutionary War in order.
A- Erin looked in the glossary of her text book. She found 15 terms,
but 5 of the terms she needs to define are not in the glossary.
reak It Down:
B- Erin has 3 days to learn and memorize the terms before the test.

Repeat and Review:

Active Learning:
Information Search:
Never Give Up:

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

187

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Additional Activity: Student Challenges Matt

Matt has to learn and remember the parts and functions of the digestive
system of the human body.

Break It Down:
Repeat and Review:

Active Learning:
Information Search:
Never Give Up:

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

188

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Additional Activity: Student Challenges - Byron

Byron is having difficulty understanding how to solve the new word


problems he is learning in math class.

Break It Down:
Repeat and Review:

Active Learning:
Information Search:
Never Give Up:

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

189

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Additional Activity: Student Challenges - Tamiya

Tamiyas science teacher assigned her class 20 science terms to define.


They were told there will be a test on these 20 terms on Friday.
C- Erin looked in the glossary of her text book. She found 15 terms,
but 5 of the terms she needs to define are not in the glossary.
reak It Down:
D- Erin has 3 days to learn and memorize the terms before the test.

Repeat and Review:

Active Learning:
Information Search:
Never Give Up:
Brainology Unit 4 Brain Builders: End-of-Course Presentation

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

190

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Brainology Unit 4 Additional Activity: Memory Sort


Directions: Cut out the cards and sort them into three piles on your desk under the headings:
Sensory Memory, Working Memory, and Long-Term Memory

Sensory
Memory

Working
Memory

Long-Term
Memory

It is an echo of what you


see, taste, touch, hear, and
smell.

This type of memory lasts


days, weeks, months, or
years.

You can move things from


here to the next stage of
memory by repeating them.

Things that you feel strong


emotion about will go here.

This type of memory lasts a


few seconds to a few
minutes at most.

Anything that you pay


attention to goes here.

Every experience you have


goes into this type of
memory.

Write your own!

This type of memory lasts


less than one second.

You can only hold a few


things in this area at a time.

This is like a computer file


or a CD.

You can move things from


here to the next stage of
memory by paying attention
to them.

Things you repeat and


practice will go here.

This is like a scratch pad in


your brain.

This happens when you grow


new connections between
your brains neurons

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

191

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Reciprocal Teaching
Your Audience:
Presentation Time:
Requirements:
Assignment:

You will present something that you


learned from the Brainology program
that made a difference to you.
You may choose your topic based on any ONE of these
reasons:
You would like to share this knowledge, from
Brainology, with others.
You think everyone should know this.
The topic from Brainology is something that surprised
you.
It is the most important thing you learned from
Brainology.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

192

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Presentation Planning Document

What is your main idea


to communicate to
your audience?
What will be your
multimedia
component? (podcast,
PowerPoint, poster, song,
etc.)

What are the most


salient points you
must communicate?

What will hook your


audience the most so
that they learn your
information?

Presentation Outline
Opener/Beginning

Body

Closure

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

193

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Presentation Scoring Guide


Information: Presentation
information is relevant and
shows evidence of learning by
emphasizing important points
in a focused, clear way.

5
Score ________

Multimedia Component:
Presentation is engaging, helps
make information clear, and
the visual media is
appropriate.

5
Score ________

Poise: student presents in a


professional manner, making
eye contact, appropriately
dressed, and speaks clearly..

5
Score ________

Audience: presentation is
clearly appropriate for the
intended audience and context.

5
Score ________

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

194

Unit 4: Brain Boosters

Model: Glogster Multimedia Visual Aide


Created at www.glogster.com

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

195

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

196

Unit Assessments

Building Students Confidence, Fulfillment and Achievement


Through the Understanding of Expandable Intelligence

UNIT ASSESSMENTS AND


RE-TEACHING GUIDE

www.mindsetworks.com
COPYRIGHT 2002-2015 MINDSET WORKS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

197

Unit Assessments

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

198

Unit Assessments

Unit Assessments and Re-teaching Guide


Table of Contents:
I.

Brainology Program Unit Assessments


A.
B.
C.
D.

II.

About the Assessments ............................................................................................ 200


Scoring the Assessments ......................................................................................... 200
Grading the Assessments......................................................................................... 200
Feedback for Students ............................................................................................. 200

Introductory Unit
A. Assessment ....................................................................................................... 201-202
B. Answer Key ...................................................................................................... 203-204
C. Re-Teaching Guide.................................................................................................. 205

III. Unit 1: Brain Basics


A. Assessment ....................................................................................................... 206-207
B. Answer Key ............................................................................................................. 208
C. Re-Teaching Guide.................................................................................................. 209

IV. Unit 2: Brain Behavior


A. Assessment ....................................................................................................... 210-211
B. Answer Key ...................................................................................................... 212-213
C. Re-Teaching Guide.................................................................................................. 214

V.

Unit 3: Brain Building


A. Assessment ....................................................................................................... 215-216
B. Answer Key ...................................................................................................... 217-218
C. Re-Teaching Guide.................................................................................................. 219

VI. Unit 4: Brain Boosters


A. Assessment ....................................................................................................... 220-221
B. Answer Key ............................................................................................................. 222
C. Re-Teaching Guide.................................................................................................. 223

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

199

Unit Assessments

Brainology Program Unit Assessments


About the Assessments
The Brainology Unit Assessments are provided for teachers to monitor their students learning and
progress with the concepts from the Brainology program.
At times, items will assess whether or not students understand key concepts about brain growth and
effective learning habits. At other times, students will be asked to apply what they learned to their own
lives. There will also be questions that ask students to apply their knowledge to a new scenario.
The assessments are built to mimic the new SBAC and PARCC questions in order to provide the students
with more practice with these multi-faceted assessment tools. The Brainology Unit Assessments,
however, are intended to be formative in nature, with students having an opportunity to engage in learning
through participation in the assessments.

Scoring the Assessments


When students provide incorrect answers on this assessment, teachers can learn with which concepts the
students need more help, and how much help is needed.
This is a formative tool, for which incorrect answers will help teachers identify student misconceptions
about the malleability of intelligence, strategies a student doesnt understand, and the learning habits the
student still needs to develop.
Consider scoring these assessments as works-in-progress. Plan to provide re-teaching to students in the
topics that they still need to learn and understand. See the Re-Teaching Guide for ideas.

Grading the Assessments


Consider using a standards-based grading scale, such as:

M: Mastery of Concepts 95-100%


P: Progressing in Concepts 75-94%
NY: Not Yet Progressing in Concepts 0-74%

If you find it necessary to grade the assessments for points and record the grade in your gradebook, let
your students know that they can improve their grades by learning more. Use the Re-Teaching
Suggestions at the back of each unit for addressing gaps in student learning individually, in small groups,
or whole class.

Feedback for Students


The goal in Brainology is for students to learn how to meet their full potential by teaching them about
their brains and giving them strategies for being successful. When students make mistakes on the
assessments, it is the perfect opportunity for teachers to provide individualized corrective feedback to
clarify ideas. Review the Growth Mindset Feedback Tool for ideas.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

200

Unit Assessments

Introductory Unit Assessment

Name:_____________________________

1. What is the Brainology program for? Choose all that apply.

Finding out what is going on inside your brain


Helping you to be a nicer person
Explaining how the brain is important and complex
Teaching you about brain orbs
Teaching you how the brain grows

2. Why should someone learn about the brain?


Because sometimes, it doesnt seem to work very well
Because we should all become scientists
Because we might have brain damage

3. What are some common brain function issues that many people deal with? Choose all that
apply.

Physical brain pain


Concentration
How to learn/how to study
Brain damage
Needing more or less time to learn than school provides
Nervousness during testing
Learning is too easy
Forgetfulness

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

201

Unit Assessments

4. Highlight or underline at least three pieces of evidence from this passage that show how
you can make your brain stronger.

How Do We Know That The Brain Can Grow Stronger?


Scientists started thinking the human brain could develop and change
when they studied adult animals brains. They found that animals who
lived in a challenging environment, with other animals and toys to play
with, were different from animals who lived alone in bare cages. While
the animals who lived alone just ate and slept all the time, the ones
who lived with different toys and other animals were always active.
They spent a lot of time figuring out how to use the toys and how to get
along with other animals.
These animals had more connections between the nerve cells in their
brains. The connections were bigger and stronger, too. In fact, their
whole brains were about 10% heavier than the brains of the animals
who lived alone without toys. The adult animals who were exercising
their brains by playing with toys and each other were also smarter
they were better at solving problems and learning new things.

5. What is the truth about smart and dumb according to the article You Can Grow Your
Intelligence? Choose all that apply.
Some people can learn math and some people really cannot.
People who are very skilled at something probably have practiced it quite a bit.
Everyone starts out in life not knowing much, but our brains grow as we learn new
things.
When we practice and learn, our brain neurons grow and connect to each other.
If people arent good at something right away, then they should stop doing it.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

202

Unit Assessments

Introductory Unit Answer Key


1. What is the Brainology program for? Choose all that apply.

Finding out what is going on inside your brain


Helping you to be a nicer person
Explaining how the brain is important and complex
Teaching you about brain orbs
Teaching you how the brain grows

2. Why should someone learn about the brain?


Because sometimes, it doesnt seem to work very well
Because we should all become scientists
Because we might have brain damage
3. What are some common brain function issues that many people deal with? Choose all that apply.
Physical brain pain
Concentration
How to learn/how to study
Brain damage
Needing more or less time to learn than school provides
Nervousness during testing
Learning is too easy
Forgetfulness
4. Highlight or underline at least three pieces of evidence from this passage that show how you can make
your brain stronger.
How Do We Know That The Brain Can Grow Stronger?
Scientists started thinking the human brain could develop and change when they
studied adult animals brains. They found that animals who lived in a challenging
environment, with other animals and toys to play with, were different from
animals who lived alone in bare cages. While the animals who lived alone just
ate and slept all the time, the ones who lived with different toys and other
animals were always active. They spent a lot of time figuring out how to use the
toys and how to get along with other animals.
These animals had more connections between the nerve cells in their brains. The
connections were bigger and stronger, too. In fact, their whole brains were
about 10% heavier than the brains of the animals who lived alone without toys.
The adult animals who were exercising their brains by playing with toys and
each other were also smarter they were better at solving problems and
learning new things.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

203

Unit Assessments

5. What is the truth about smart and dumb according to the article You Can Grow Your Intelligence?
Choose all that apply.
Some people can learn math and some people really cannot.
People who are very skilled at something probably have practiced it quite a bit.
Everyone starts out in life not knowing much, but our brains grow as we learn new things.
When we practice and learn, our brain neurons grow and connect to each other.
If people arent good at something right away, then they should stop doing it.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

204

Unit Assessments

Introductory Unit Re-Teaching Guide


You may choose to re-teach the Brainology curriculum in a variety of ways. Some options are:

Think-Pair-Share: Allow students to individually reflect and/or write a response to the prompts in
the Re-Teaching Opportunities column. Then give students time to discuss their ideas or thinking
with a partner or triad. Finally, open up the conversation to the whole class. Encourage students to
share something their partner said.
Small group-Whole group discussions: In small groups students can discuss the prompts and then
share their thinking with the class. Sharing could be short presentations, posters or slides, or a class
discussion.
Revisit the Brainology Program: Brainology has many on-ramps for re-teaching. The online
program contains the labs in each unit and the Brain Book, as well as the e-Journal for reviewing
and reinforcing the concepts (see below for specific locations). Additionally, there are
differentiated lesson options that can be delivered if the students need re-teaching. Choose a lesson
that you didnt do the first time around. It may be that it resonates better with your students a second
time with the concept in a different format.
Questions

Questions 1-2 show if


students understand why the
class is learning Brainology.

Content Location

Brainology Online Program,


Intro Unit, in conversations
between Chris and Dahlia.

Re-Teaching Opportunities

Question 3 shows if students


understand common, normal
struggles that most teens
experience.

Questions 4-5 show how


much students understand
from the Intro lesson on You
Can Grow Your
Intelligence.

www.mindsetworks.com

Brainology Online Program,


Intro Unit, in the e-Journal
located in the left menu under
My Challenges.

Go! - Intro Unit Guide, Activity 3:


Practice ItYou Can Grow
Your Intelligence, Option A or B.

How would you explain the


Brainology class to another
student?
Why do you think we are learning
about the brain and how it works?
Do you think young people have
always had struggles learning in
schools? Why or why not?
Can you think of an example of
someone you know, or perhaps a
celebrity or athlete, who has
struggled with to show what they
know?

Why did we read about the science


of the brain?
Why would we spend this time
exploring how to grow our
intelligence?

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

205

Unit Assessments

Unit One Assessment

Name:_____________________________

1. What might be some reasons your brain has trouble learning? Choose all that apply.

Not enough healthy food choices


Not enough sleep
Using too many channels to pay attention to too many things at once
Not using enough channels to learn one new thing
Worrying about something
You just cant do it

2. Which of these strategies is most difficult for you? In the box, explain why. You may
choose more than one if you like.

Taking On Challenges (Difficult Tasks)


Learning From Mistakes
Accepting Feedback And Criticism
Practice And Applying Learning Strategies
Not Giving Up
Asking Questions and For Help
Taking Risks and Trying New Things

3. Which strategies from the previous question would help YOU to learn one thing better?
Explain why.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

206

Unit Assessments

4. In the scenario below, highlight the things Serena should STOP doing.

Serena has a presentation tomorrow in her History class and she must speak on her topic
for 4 minutes. She has her outline of what she wants to talk about and is looking it over
in her room while she is texting Pre-Algebra homework help to her friend. She has music
playing on her laptop and her email account open in case her swim coach sends out
Saturdays race times soon.
The presentation will be graded on public speaking skills as well as content. She feels
like she knows the material, but needs to memorize the order of her speech. Between texts
and email check-ins she re-reads the outline at least 6 times. When her friend calls to get
more help on Pre-Algebra, she answers the phone, puts the outline in her folder, and puts
the folder on her floor.
5. For the above scenario, make recommendations in the box below for what Serena should
do instead. How could she use more channels to make sure she has a great presentation
tomorrow?

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

207

Unit Assessments

Unit One Answer Key


1. What might be some reasons your brain has trouble learning? Choose all that apply.
Not enough healthy food choices
Not enough sleep
Using too many channels to pay attention to too many things at once
Not using enough channels to learn one new thing
Worrying about something
You just cant do it
2. Which of these strategies is most difficult for you? In the box, explain why. You may choose more than one
if you like.
Taking On Challenges (Difficult Tasks)
Learning From Mistakes
Accepting Feedback And Criticism
Practice And Applying Learning Strategies
Answers will vary.
Not Giving Up
Asking Questions and For Help
Taking Risks and Trying New Things
Answers will vary.

3. Which strategies from the previous question would help YOU to learn one thing better? Explain why.
Answers will vary.

4. In the scenario below, highlight the things Serena should STOP doing.
Serena has a presentation tomorrow in her History class and she must speak on her topic for 4 minutes. She has her
outline of what she wants to talk about and is looking it over in her room while she is texting Pre-Algebra homework
help to her friend. She has music playing on her laptop and her email account open in case her swim coach sends out
Saturdays race times soon.
The presentation will be graded on public speaking skills as well as content. She feels like she knows the material, but
needs to memorize the order of her speech. Between texts and email check-ins she re-reads the outline at least 6 times.
When her friend calls to get more help on Pre-Algebra, she answers the phone, puts the outline in her folder, and puts
the folder on her floor.

5. For the above scenario, make recommendations in the box below for what Serena should do instead. How
could she use more channels to make sure she has a great presentation tomorrow?
Answers will vary. Possible responses:

Turn off the phone and music.


Turn off the email account.
Practice speaking instead of only reading.
Stand up and practice standing and talking.
Use the mirror to practice public speaking skills.
Put the folder in her back pack so she doesnt forget it the next day.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

208

Unit Assessments

Unit One Re-Teaching Guide


You may choose to re-teach the Brainology curriculum in a variety of ways. Some options are:

Think-Pair-Share
Small group-Whole group discussions
Revisit the Brainology Program
Questions

Question 1 shows to what


extent students recognize
habits that help them to be
successful.

Content Location

Questions 2-3 show if


students can apply the
effective effort rubric to their
experience.

Questions 4-5 show to what


extent students can transfer
this information to new
contexts.

www.mindsetworks.com

Re-Teaching Opportunities

Brainology Online Program, Unit


1, conversations between Chris
and Dahlia.
Brainology Online Program,
Brain Book, Brain Basics.
Go! - Unit 1 Guide, Activity 1:
Connect It Information Search
and Option A Brain Scan or
Option B Brain Inventory.
Go! - Unit 1 Guide, Activity 4:
Apply ItJohns History Test.

Go! - Unit 1 Guide, Activity 3:


Practice ItEffective Effort
lesson Option A or B.

Go! - Unit 1 Guide, Activity 3:


Practice ItEffective Effort
Rubric.

What are some things you can do


to make sure your brain is ready to
learn?
Lets talk about the food and sleep
choices you made in the past few
days. Are they conducive to
learning? Why or why not?

What are some ways you can try


harder and use good effort?
If youre learning something that
is very challenging and you feel
like you just arent understanding
it, what are some things you could
try that would be different from
what youve tried before?
What advice would you give to a
student who had to study for an
upcoming test?
Describe your surroundings and
strategies the last time you studied
for a test. What worked? What can
you improve for next time?

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

209

Unit Assessments

Unit Two Assessment

Name:_____________________________

Vocabulary
1. What grows on the ends of neurons, like branches, and connects to other neurons to grab
information and send it through the brain?
a. Cell Bodies
b. Dendrites
c. Axons
2. What is the space between neurons where messages are connected to the next neuron?
a. Axon
b. Synapse
c. Brain
3. What is the tube that carries the messages down the neuron?
a. Cell Body
b. Axon
c. Neuron
4. Which strategy would you be most likely to use to get control of your brain? Explain
why and how you will use this strategy.
a. Square-breathing
b. Planning a strategy
c. Positive self-talk
d. Chunking

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

210

Unit Assessments

5. Choose the re-framed statement that changes this negative thought into a positive one:
I always have trouble in this class no matter what I do.
a.
b.
c.
d.

I should never take this class again to spare myself the trouble.
It is probably time to ask for help because what I am doing is not working.
Its OK, I dont have to be good at everything.
There are just some things I wont ever be able to do.

6. Hearing an old song on the radio can make you remember your familys old car, your
favorite shoes from 1st grade, going to the zoo one summer, and getting stung by a bee.
Using language and information from Unit 2, explain how all these thoughts can happen
just from hearing a song on the radio.

7. When many people face a challenge, such as public speaking, taking tough tests, or having
arguments, they experience these physical symptoms: sweating, racing heart, forgetfulness,
blushing, dry mouth, stomach ache/butterflies. Why do people experience these physical
symptoms when they face a challenge?
a. It shows that they are too weak to handle the challenge.
b. The symptoms are normal because everyone feels fight or flight syndrome, which
comes from the brains reaction to threats.
c. It helps them see when they should quit and try something easier.
d. These symptoms dont mean anything.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

211

Unit Assessments

Unit Two Answer Key


Vocabulary
1. What grows on the ends of neurons, like branches, and connects to other neurons to grab information and
send it through the brain?
a. Cell Bodies
b. Dendrites
c. Axons
2. What is the space between neurons where messages are connected to the next neuron?
a. Axon
b. Synapse
c. Brain
3. What is the tube that carries the messages down the neuron?
a. Cell Body
b. Axon
c. Neuron
4. Which strategy would you be most likely to use to get control of your brain? Explain why and how you
will use this strategy.
a. Square-breathing
b. Planning a strategy
Answers will vary.
c. Positive self-talk
d. Chunking
5. Choose the re-framed statement that changes this negative thought into a positive one.
I always have trouble in this class no matter what I do.
a)
b)
c)
d)

I should never take this class again to spare myself the trouble.
It is probably time to ask for help because what I am doing is not working.
Its OK, I dont have to be good at everything.
There are just some things I wont ever be able to do.

6. Hearing an old song on the radio can make you remember your familys old car, your favorite shoes from
1st grade, going to the zoo one summer, and getting stung by a bee. Using language and information from
Unit 2, explain how all these thoughts can happen just from hearing a song on the radio.
Answers will vary. See main ideas below.

Your brain neurons are connected so that neurons that deal with different senses can all be connected
somehow.
The old song makes you think about being that age, so you think of other things from that time
because the neurons are connected

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

212

Unit Assessments

7. When many people face a challenge, such as public speaking, taking tough tests, or having arguments, they
experience these physical symptoms: sweating, racing heart, forgetfulness, blushing, dry mouth,
stomach ache/butterflies. Why do people experience these physical symptoms when they face a challenge?

It shows that they are too weak to handle the challenge.


The symptoms are normal because everyone feels fight or flight syndrome, which comes from the
brains reaction to threats.
It helps them see when they should quit and try something easier.
These symptoms dont mean anything.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

213

Unit Assessments

Unit Two Re-Teaching Guide


You may choose to re-teach the Brainology curriculum in a variety of ways. Some options are:

Think-Pair-Share
Small group-Whole group discussions
Revisit the Brainology Program

Questions

Content Location

Questions 1-3 show whether


the student understands the
new vocabulary in the
lessons.

Questions 4-5, and 7 show to


what extent students
understand the connections
between emotions and
learning.

Question 6 shows if students


understand how neurons,
learning, and senses are
connected.

Brainology Online Program, Unit


2, Level 2 Brain Lab,
Experiments 3 and 4.
Brainology Online Program,
Brain Book, Brain Behavior:
Brain matter.
Brainology Online Program, Unit
2, conversations between Chris
and Dahlia.
Brainology Online Program,
Brain Book, Brain Behavior:
Thinking and Emotions.
Go! - Unit 2 Guide, Activity 3:
Practice It Emotions &
Learning Handout and Option A
Stress Scan or Option B Stress
Inventory.
Brainology Online Program,
Brain Book, Brain Behavior:
News You Can Use.
Go! - Unit 2 Guide, Activity 4:
Apply ItAlicias Presentation.

Re-Teaching Opportunities

Draw a neuron and label the


different parts. You can label the
parts with their scientific name, or
you can label the parts by saying
what they do.

If you were giving advice to


someone who had just failed in
something they really wanted to
do well in, what would you say?
What is one strategy for getting
control of your emotions when
you get stressed or worried?

www.mindsetworks.com

Rayna will perform a new song on


the piano in 7 days at a school
concert. She knows the song, but
is so nervous that she is thinking
about dropping out of the
performance. What advice would
you give Rayna?
What are you passionate about
learning? What do you get excited
about learning? Why? How do
you think excitement helps you
learn something better?

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

214

Unit Assessments

Unit Three Assessment


1.

Name:_____________________________

Highlight or underline at least three of the words and phrases in the research brief below
which show that the London cabbies were learning something challenging.

Clever Cabbies: In New York, the streets are a user-friendly grid of streets that are
often named by a number (5th Avenue comes before 6th Avenue, for example). In
London, the streets look like a tangle of Christmas lights that someone forgot to wrap up
after the holidays. Whats more, the streets have names like Piccadilly and Shaftesbury
Avenues. London cabbies have to memorize the locations of many different places,
and calculate the fastest route from one place to another.
Researchers measured the hippocampus--the area of the brain that remembers
information about places--in London cabdrivers and compared them to other people.
The London cabbies hippocampuses were bigger, and the longer they were on the job,
the bigger this area of the brain became! This shows that learning and practicing this
skill made that area of their brain grow.
2. The brain gets _____ as we learn.
a. Heavier
b. Flatter like a newspaper
c. Larger
d. More gray
3.

How can you keep new neural connections strong?


a. Practice the concept or skill repeatedly over time
b. Learn something new and different right away.
c. Dont think about it for a few days to give yourself a break.

4.

Why does it seem easier for some people to learn in school than others?
a. Some people are naturally smarter than others.
b. Some people have already had some practice and experience in that area.
c. Some people are not able to learn some school subjects.

5.

Which of the following is a characteristic of a growth mindset?


Choose all that apply.
Avoiding challenges
Using effective effort
Being inspired by other peoples success
Listening to and using the feedback from others
Doing well on tests

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

215

Unit Assessments

6.

What can you do if you are trying to learn something challenging? Choose all that
apply.
Find the easiest way to get it done quickly.
Find out what strategies other people use to get good at this challenge.
Be persistent, dont give up, and keep practicing.
Use strategies to get control of your brain in a positive way.
Make sure you are making good lifestyle choices (sleep, nutrition, attitude).

7.

Read the scenario below and help Chris make a decision.

Scenario: Chris is signing up for high school English class and is offered a choice
between an Honors English program and a Standard English program. He wants to be a
professional blogger who writes for a famous sports magazine or a writer who helps
Professional Athletes write their autobiographies. He does really well in Spanish and at
Science and is already taking Honors classes in those subjects. He has always had
trouble in English-Language Arts, but with hard work usually gets Bs on essays. He
knows that the Standard English class will be easier, and he will probably get As
without having to work too hard. What should Chris do?
a. Chris should take the Standard English class.
b. Chris should take the Honors English class.
8.

Explain why you recommended that choice for Chris in the previous question.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

216

Unit Assessments

Unit Three Answer Key


1. Highlight or underline at least three of the words and phrases in the research brief below which show that
the London cabbies were learning something challenging.
Clever Cabbies: In New York, the streets are a user-friendly grid of streets that are often named by a number
(5th Avenue comes before 6th Avenue, for example). In London, the streets look like a tangle of Christmas lights
that someone forgot to wrap up after the holidays. Whats more, the streets have names like Piccadilly and
Shaftesbury Avenues. London cabbies have to memorize the locations of many different places, and calculate
the fastest route from one place to another.
Researchers measured the hippocampus--the area of the brain that remembers information about places--in
London cabdrivers and compared them to other people. The London cabbies hippocampuses were bigger, and
the longer they were on the job, the bigger this area of the brain became! This shows that learning and
practicing this skill made that area of their brain grow.
2. The brain gets _____ as we learn.
a. Heavier
b. Flatter like a newspaper
c. Larger
d. More gray
3. How can you keep new neural connections strong?
a. Practice the concept or skill repeatedly over time
b. Learn something new and different right away.
c. Dont think about it for a few days to give yourself a break.
4. Why does it seem easier for some people to learn in school than others?
a. Some people are naturally smarter than others.
b. Some people have already had some practice and experience in that area.
c. Some people are not able to learn some school subjects.
5. Which of these is a characteristic of a growth mindset? Choose all that apply.
Avoiding challenges
Using effective effort
Being inspired by other peoples success
Listening to and using the feedback from others
Doing well on tests
6. What can you do if you are trying to learn something challenging? Choose all that apply.
Find the easiest way to get it done quickly.
Find out what strategies other people use to get good at this challenge.
Be persistent, dont give up, and keep practicing.
Use strategies to get control of your brain in a positive way.
Make sure you are making good lifestyle choices (sleep, nutrition, attitude).
7. Chriss Scenario
a. Chris should take the Standard English class.
b. Chris should take the Honors English class.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

217

Unit Assessments

8. Explain why you recommended that choice for Chris in the previous question.
Answers will vary.
Chris will learn more by taking the honors class. Learning is more important than a good grade. He has
learned to perform like an Honors student in other courses; he can learn to do it in this situation as well.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

218

Unit Assessments

Unit Three Re-Teaching Guide


You may choose to re-teach the Brainology curriculum in a variety of ways. Some options are:

Think-Pair-Share
Small group-Whole group discussions
Revisit the Brainology Program
Questions

Questions 1-4, and 6 show if


students understand how
challenges and practice grow
intelligence.

Content Location

Question 5 shows if students


understand the components of
a growth mindset.

Questions 7-8 show if


students can apply the growth
mindset to a new context.

www.mindsetworks.com

Re-Teaching Opportunities

Brainology Online Program,


Brain Book, Unit 3.
Brainology Online Program,
Level 3 Brain Lab, Experiments
5 and 6.
Go! - Unit 3 Guide, Activity 4:
Apply ItScientific Research
Briefs.

Go! - Unit 3 Guide, Additional


Activity: What Leads to Success?
Go! - Unit 3 Guide, Activity 1:
Connect ItThe Two Mindsets
Part 1.

Go! - Unit 3 Guide, Activity 3:


Practice ItMindset Scan,
Option A or B.

Why do you think its important to


practice something that youve
just learned?
Imagine you watch other kids
riding bikes but you never try
yourself. Do you think you will
learn how to ride? Why or why
not? How is that related to
learning in school?
How much does a persons
outlook (attitude) affect their life?
Explain.
Why do you think some people
avoid challenges?
What is one thing you want to be
able to do well or learn how to do?
(E.g.: Play a sport, learn a
language, etc.) Make a plan using
the Two Mindsets graphic for how
you could approach this challenge.

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

219

Unit Assessments

Unit Four Assessment

Name:_____________________________

1. When a person tries to memorize a lot of facts the morning of a test, where is that
information stored?
a. Sensory memory
b. Working Memory
c. Long-term memory
2. What is the purpose of the BRAIN acronym?
a. To help us remember the brain foods
b. To help us remember how to use our sensory memory
c. To help us remember how to learn to do something new and/or challenging
3. What are some ways to move information from working memory to long-term memory?
a. Cram for hours the night before a test, performance, or due date
b. Practice and review repetitively over a period of time
c. Make a detailed plan for studying the information
Read the scenario below. Then answer the questions provided.

Estefania decided to take an Early Engineers after-school class from 3:30-5:00. She
heard that learning about engineering can be a great way for young people to be prepared
for 21st century jobs. She had no idea what engineering is, but thought a class for kids
was a great way to find out.
When she walked in on the first day, she noticed that she was the only girl in the room,
but she knew several classmates. As class began, she started to see that engineering
includes a lot of math. She was having a lot of trouble in her math class (she never
seemed to get the right answer), but she decided to give the class a chance anyway.
The first day activity involved building bridges with materials the teacher provided. The
students worked in teams and at first Estefania couldnt understand what to do. She
started asking questions of the other group members, such as, Why did we decide that
the bar goes there and not over there? She then got up and visited two other teams. One
of them had a great idea to ask the teacher for more materials to make their structure
more eye-catching. Another team had begun their supports the same way her team had,
but they were working faster and the whole bridge collapsed.
Estefania went back to her team to let them know what she learned. At the end of class,
her team had a stable bridge that could hold the small sack of flour. It looked nice and it
didnt collapse. Estefania was really proud. She didnt totally understand engineering yet,
and was sure she would make some mistakes along the way, but she was excited for the
next class.
www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

220

Unit Assessments

4. Which of these is an example of Estefania embracing a challenge? Choose all that apply.
She had no idea what engineering is, but thought a class for kids was a great way to find
out.
The students worked in teams and at first Estefania couldnt understand what to do.
She was having a lot of trouble in her math class (she never seemed to get the right
answer), but she decided to give the class a chance anyway.

5. Which of these is an example of Estefania going on an Information Search? Choose all


that apply.
Estefania went back to her team to let them know what she learned.
She started asking questions of the other group members, such as, Why did we decide that
the bar goes there and not over there?
She then got up and visited two other teams.

6. Which words in the passage show that Estefania behaved in a growth-minded way in this
scenario? Choose all that apply.
She didnt totally understand engineering yet, and was sure she would make some mistakes
along the way, but she was excited for the next class.
She was having a lot of trouble in her math class (she never seemed to get the right
answer), but she decided to give the class a chance anyway.
As class began, she started to see that engineering includes a lot of math.

7. What was Estefanias biggest obstacle? Explain.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

221

Unit Assessments

Unit Four Answer Key


1. When a person tries to memorize a lot of facts the morning of a test, where is that information stored?
a. Sensory memory
b. Working Memory
c. Long-term memory
2. What is the purpose of the BRAIN acronym?
a. To help us remember the brain foods
b. To help us remember how to use our sensory memory
c. To help us remember how to learn to do something new and/or challenging
3. What are some ways to move information from working memory to long-term memory?
a. Cram for hours the night before a test, performance, or due date
b. Practice and review repetitively over a period of time
c. Make a detailed plan for studying the information
Read the scenario below. Then answer the questions provided.
4. Which of these is an example of Estefania embracing a challenge? Choose all that apply.
a. She had no idea what engineering is, but thought a class for kids was a great way to find out.
b. The students worked in teams and at first Estefania couldnt understand what to do.
c. She was having a lot of trouble in her math class (she never seemed to get the right answer), but
she decided to give the class a chance anyway.
5. Which of these is an example of Estefania going on an Information Search? Choose all that apply.
a. Estefania went back to her team to let them know what she learned.
b. She started asking questions of the other group members, such as, Why did we decide that the bar
goes there and not over there?
c. She then got up and visited two other teams.
6. Which words in the passage show that Estefania behaved in a growth-minded way in this scenario? Choose
all that apply.
a. She didnt totally understand engineering yet, and was sure she would make some mistakes along
the way, but she was excited for the next class.
b. She was having a lot of trouble in her math class (she never seemed to get the right answer), but
she decided to give the class a chance anyway.
c. As class began, she started to see that engineering includes a lot of math.
7. What was Estefanias biggest obstacle? Explain.
Answers will vary.

www.mindsetworks.com

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

222

Unit Assessments

Unit Four Re-Teaching Guide


You may choose to re-teach the Brainology curriculum in a variety of ways. Some options are:

Think-Pair-Share
Small group-Whole group discussions
Revisit the Brainology Program
Questions

Questions 1-3 show if


students know which skills
and practices are good for
learning something new.

Content Location

Questions 4-6 show if


students can identify the
behaviors that are growth
minded.

Question 7 shows what an


individual students point of
view is about obstacles.

Re-Teaching Opportunities

Brainology Online Program,


Brain Book, Unit 4.
Go! - Unit 4 Guide, Activity 3:
Practice ItBrain Study Plan.
Go! - Unit 4 Guide, Additional
Activity: Memory Sort.

Go! - Unit 4 Guide, Activity 1:


Connect ItThe Two Mindsets,
Part 1.

Go! - Unit 4 Guide, Additional


Activity: Student Challenges.

www.mindsetworks.com

If you were excited about learning


a new subject or concept, how
could you make a successful plan
for true learning?
What are some ideas from
Brainology to help you make
sure you really learn something
new?
What are some things you can try
if you dont understand a new
topic?
Imagine you worked really hard to
prepare for an upcoming science
test, and then when you got your
score back you didnt do as well as
you would have liked. What can
you do to learn from your
mistakes and be more prepared the
next time?
Sabotage is something that people
do to destroy or ruin a plan. Have
you ever done things to sabotage
yourself? Explain.
Why do you think that overcoming
an obstacle can make you feel so
good about yourself?
If you feel like an obstacle is
insurmountable, what can you do
to get help with it?

Copyright 2002-2015 Mindset Works, Inc. All rights reserved.

223