PEACE ACTION MAINE’S

2008 PEACE VOTER GUIDE
This voter guide has been prepared by Peace Action Maine to educate the public on candidates’ positions on peace, militarism and foreign policy issues. It is based primarily on questionnaire responses. This voter guide is not to be construed as an endorsement of any candidate or political party.

HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Michael Brennan’s Responses Mark Lawrence’s Responses Chellie Pingree’s Reponses Ethan Strimling’s Responses 4 6 8 13

NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND NUCLEAR POWER
Michael Brennan’s Responses Mark Lawrence’s Responses Chellie Pingree’s Reponses Ethan Strimling’s Responses 17 18 19 20

ARMS SALES AND MILITARY AID
Michael Brennan’s Responses Mark Lawrence’s Responses Chellie Pingree’s Reponses Ethan Strimling’s Responses 24 25 26 27

MILITARISM AND THE WAR ECONOMY
Michael Brennan’s Responses Mark Lawrence’s Responses Chellie Pingree’s Reponses Ethan Strimling’s Responses 30 31 33 35

THE WARS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE WAR ON TERROR
Michael Brennan’s Responses Mark Lawrence’s Responses Chellie Pingree’s Reponses Ethan Strimling’s Responses 39 40 41 43

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HUMAN RIGHTS
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INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
1. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would reverse the Military Commissions Act of 2006 and restore the writ of habeas corpus? Yes. 2. Do you believe that the US should operate prisons outside of its borders? No. 3. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would abolish the death penalty? Yes. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would initiate hearings that might lead to the criminal prosecution of elected officials and contractors involved in war crimes and constitutional violations? Yes. 5. When, if ever, do you consider the use of military force to be appropriate? I might consider the use of military force appropriate in one of two circumstances – to prevent or counteract genocide, or in response to military action against the United States by another state actor. 6. Do you believe that economic sanctions or embargoes are an effective tool of foreign policy? No. 7. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would enable undocumented immigrants currently working in the United States to attain legal resident status and, eventually, full citizenship? Yes. 8. Do you believe that the US should become party to the Kyoto Protocol? Yes.

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
9. What will you do to eliminate poverty? I will propose and work for: * A national campaign to cut poverty by half over the next five years by increasing the earned income tax credit, “making work pay” and increasing high school graduation rates. This campaign would be the first step in a larger campaign to end poverty in America. * Workers’ rights to organize and oppose “free trade” deals that allow good paying American jobs to leave the country. * Letting the Bush tax cuts expire in 2010 and passing new tax reform focused on reducing the share of taxes paid by middle and working class people. * Establishing a National Housing Trust Fund to finance the development of affordable housing. * The creation of a Financial Products Safety Commission to protect consumers from deceptive credit practices and products.

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
1. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would reverse the Military Commissions Act of 2006 and restore the writ of habeas corpus? What this administration has done to the Constitution is appalling. I strongly support reversing the Military Commissions Act of 2006 and restoring the writ of habeas corpus. 2. Do you believe that the US should operate prisons outside of its borders? No. I believe America should abide by the Geneva Conventions and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 3. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would abolish the death penalty? I support the abolition of the death penalty. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would initiate hearings that might lead to the criminal prosecution of elected officials and contractors involved in war crimes and constitutional violations? I believe that Congress must aggressively hold hearings into the rationale used for the U.S. to enter into the war in Iraq and the conduct of the war, including allegations of corruption by private contractors. I also believe Congress should be conducting impeachment hearings against Vice President Cheney and President Bush. Any information that comes to light about potential criminal activity should be given to the appropriate prosecutorial agency. 5. When, if ever, do you consider the use of military force to be appropriate? It depends on each individual situation, but I consider force to be appropriate when our national security is threatened, and when the shared security of the world is threatened. I support multilateralism in our foreign policy because our world is more interdependent than ever before. However, military force should always be the last resort.

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
6. Do you believe that economic sanctions or embargoes are an effective tool of foreign policy? Economic sanctions or embargoes should be considered as part of a multinational effort, only when the humanitarian effects of such efforts have been properly weighed. 7. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would enable undocumented immigrants currently working in the United States to attain legal resident status and, eventually, full citizenship? I support creating a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Concurrently I believe we should crack down on employers who exploit the labor of undocumented immigrants. 8. Do you believe that the US should become party to the Kyoto Protocol? Absolutely yes. 9. What will you do to eliminate poverty? First, we need to withdraw from Iraq and repeal the Bush tax cuts. We need to take the savings to pay down our debt and invest in domestic needs, such as infrastructure and social programs. Creating a universal single-payer health care system will reduce people’s burdens, and such a system should include strong mental health services. Beyond that we need to invest in communities and encourage a shift in our focus away from individualism and toward helping one another.

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
1. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would reverse the Military Commissions Act of 2006 and restore the writ of habeas corpus? Yes. As part of the Responsible Plan to End the War in Iraq, I have endorsed H. R. 1416, the Habeas Corpus Restoration Act. The Military Commission Act of 2006 fundamentally undermines the constitution and the rule of law. It is just one astonishing example of the damage we all have to work to undo in the wake of the Bush Presidency. The ACLU, among other organizations has done amazing work fighting this Act and educating the public about habeas corpus. As they say, in passing the Military Commissions Act, “they cast aside the Constitution and the principle of habeas corpus, which protects against unlawful and indefinite imprisonment. They also gave the president absolute power to designate enemy combatants, and to set his own definitions for torture.” The Act is a huge shift of power to the President and flies in the face of core American values protecting us against unlawful or indefinite imprisonment. 2. Do you believe that the US should operate prisons outside of its borders? No. 3. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would abolish the death penalty? Yes. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would initiate hearings that might lead to the criminal prosecution of elected officials and contractors involved in war crimes and constitutional violations? Yes. For the last seven years, we have been burdened by an administration that has disrespected the rule of law, engaged in warrant-less wiretaps, abandoned habeas corpus, and chipped away at our civil rights. It's no wonder that we have lost so much respect around the world. 8

HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Our system of government, with three distinct branches, was built to provide for accountability. This Congress should hold hearings to examine the actions of the Bush Administration and those who have worked under their watch. 5. When, if ever, do you consider the use of military force to be appropriate? We should use our military force defensively and, in some cases, preemptively for self-defense. I do not believe in preventive war—that is, a war waged to prevent a hypothetical attack 6. Do you believe that economic sanctions or embargoes are an effective tool of foreign policy? Yes. It’s true that the effectiveness of sanctions and embargoes are a hotly debated topic, but they worked in South Africa and together with our allies, the United States should employ the full array of non-military means to influence developing or otherwise transitional governments. However, like so many policy issues, I would expect to continue to analyze the impact of these tools. 7. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would enable undocumented immigrants currently working in the United States to attain legal resident status and, eventually, full citizenship? Yes. We all know that our immigration system in broken, and Washington hasn't done anything to fix it – this will be an important topic for our federal government to address in the coming years. I support reforming our immigration laws by focusing first on securing our borders, cracking down on employers who hire undocumented workers, and allowing undocumented people here now to get right with the law by paying back taxes and a fine, and getting to the back of the line.

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
8. Do you believe that the US should become party to the Kyoto Protocol? Yes. The United States should absolutely become party to the Kyoto Protocol. The international partnership is essential to truly address climate change and our country should be a leader, using its leverage to encourage international solutions, not a lone actor on a global issue. That said, the Kyoto Protocol expires in 2012 and we should be a full and willing partner in crafting a post Kyoto climate change agreement. 9. What will you do to eliminate poverty? Maine has a shrinking middle class and an increasing gap between the rich and everyone else. Overall, we are 38th in the nation in per-capita income, which presents serious challenges for us. In recent years, the incomes of the richest families have climbed substantially, while the incomes of the lower-income families have seen only small increases. There are a number of policies that I support that can reduce poverty, but one of the most important on this list is universal health care. Health care costs among the insured and the uninsured are a leading cause of poverty, particularly among the working poor. Second, increasing the number of good paying jobs is essential. Union jobs increase the standard of living for those who have them, and they raise the floor of pay and benefits for others in the community–particularly so for women. I am staunchly pro-union and believe we should strengthen unions’ ability to organize. We can also increase the number of good-paying jobs through responsible economic development by truly tying incentives to the creation of jobs. As a State Senator, I worked to create “corporate accountability” and to set higher standards for taxpayer investments in business.

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Third, being able to access an education – particularly for single parents – is possibly the most critical component of lifting a family out of poverty. As Senate Majority Leader, I sponsored Maine’s “Parents As Scholars” program that allows Maine’s working poor to attend college, get better jobs and change their lives. “Parents of Scholars” participants are among our best success stories of government empowering women and families and making them a vital part of the economy. Fourth, I agree with John Edwards: "Our tax code is the perfect example of the Two Americas -- one for the wealthiest Americans and Washington insiders, and the other for everyone else." Tax policy is a place to support broader policy objectives, level the playing field, and tie requirements for concrete results to government support of business and community ventures that strengthen our society. There is a lot that needs to be done -- including a repeal of the Bush tax cuts for the highest income Americans, higher capital gains taxes on investment income, and closing tax loopholes for private equity and hedge funds. We should restrict government contracts to American-based corporations and clarify rules At the same time, our tax cuts should be focused on areas that will help working families -- with credits that support access to higher education, child care costs, and tax policies that do not punish wage earners. Beyond these top examples, there are a number of important policy initiatives that can help lift families out of poverty, including making secondary education more affordable for everyone-increasing the minimum wage, reducing the cost of energy and making us energy independent. A major component of all of this is the federal government meeting its obligations when it comes to Medicare, Medicaid and education, in particular. Our state and 11

HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
federal budgets are a reflection of our shared priorities and unfortunately, the last seven years of the Bush Administration have set a series of priorities that harm the poor, homeless and disadvantaged. We need to roll back the Bush tax cuts for the wealthy, end the war in Iraq and get our federal priorities straight. A state like Maine is in no position to provide a safely net and opportunities for the poor without a true state-federal partnership.

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
1. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would reverse the Military Commissions Act of 2006 and restore the writ of habeas corpus? Yes. The Military Commissions Act was passed in the final hours of the 109th Congress. This disastrous act stripped jurisdiction from U.S. courts to hear habeas corpus (the principle that protects against unlawful and indefinite imprisonment) claims from Guantánamo detainees. It also gave the president absolute power to designate enemy combatants and allows for the admission of evidence obtained by torture. This tears at the heart of our Constitution. The writ of habeas corpus must be restored. In Congress I will not only work on legislation to restore habeas rights and prohibit evidence gathered in coercive interrogations, but will also work on a broader initiative to close Guantánamo and transfer detainees to military prisons in the United States. 2. Do you believe that the US should operate prisons outside of its borders? No. 3. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would abolish the death penalty? Yes. The death penalty does not deter crime and is a monumental flawed public policy. The majority of developed nations have abandoned capital punishment. The United States stands alongside China, Iran and Saudi Arabia when it comes to implementing this ultimate human rights abuse. Since the Supreme Court ruled to reinstate the death penalty, over one hundred men and women have been released from Death Row after new evidence has come to light. There is evidence that such information has come too late for several individuals and that innocent people have been put to death. This is a wrong that can never be righted. Studies show that the death penalty is applied randomly, that race is a determining factor in who gets sentenced to death, and that executions cost the taxpayers millions and 13

HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
millions of dollars. We should abolish the death penalty and rely instead on a sentence of life without parole. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would initiate hearings that might lead to the criminal prosecution of elected officials and contractors involved in war crimes and constitutional violations? Yes. In May of 2007, I delivered the 11,200 signatures collected by Maine Campaign to Impeach to the Maine Legislature demanding that our Legislators use their authority to start Congressional impeachment proceedings against President Bush and Vice President Cheney. The Bush administration has sanctioned warrant less domestic surveillance, illegal wiretaps, torture of war criminals, leaking of classified information for partisan political purposes and other things we thought could never happen in America. We need to affirm the U.S. Constitution and remind future administrations that no one is above the law. 5. When, if ever, do you consider the use of military force to be appropriate? Military force can be an appropriate response to an attack on the United States. 6. Do you believe that economic sanctions or embargoes are an effective tool of foreign policy? Yes. Economic sanctions are best used when the goals are limited and clearly defined and when they are imposed quickly and decisively to maximize their impact. They are also most effective when applied multilaterally, against otherwise friendly nations and is also helped by international publicity of the threat of further sanctions. Economic sanctions can achieve realistic goals and should be an integral part of U.S. foreign policy.

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HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
7. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would enable undocumented immigrants currently working in the United States to attain legal resident status and, eventually, full citizenship? Yes. We are a nation of immigrants and have always welcomed the innovation and hard work that immigrants bring to this country. 8. Do you believe that the US should become party to the Kyoto Protocol? Yes. 9. What will you do to eliminate poverty? We need to provide education and opportunity to all Americans. The United States is a country of boundless opportunity where everyone has the opportunity to better themselves through education and hard work. Our government needs to champion the common good, not just the narrow self-interest of big corporations. All Americans must have access to high-quality education and health care and must be given the opportunity to participate in our nation’s economic prosperity.

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NUCLEAR WEAPONS
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NUCLEAR POWER

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NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND NUCLEAR POWER
1. Do you support the research and/or development of new U.S. nuclear weapons? No. I have been involved in the anti-nuclear movement in the US for three decades. 2. Do you support the elimination of nuclear weapons worldwide? Yes. 3. Would you vote to enforce the agreements of the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty, specifically in light of the U.S.-India Nuclear Deal? Yes. 4. Would you vote to renew the funding for the Reliable Replacement Warhead (RRW) program? No. 5. Would you vote to enable the implementation of the Bush Administration’s Complex Transformation plan? No. 6. Do you support the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Depository? No. 7. Do you believe that nuclear power is a safe and viable energy alternative to fossil fuels? No.

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1. Do you support the research and/or development of new U.S. nuclear weapons? No. 2. Do you support the elimination of nuclear weapons worldwide? Yes. 3. Would you vote to enforce the agreements of the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty, specifically in light of the U.S.-India Nuclear Deal? I support enforcing agreements in the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty. 4. Would you vote to renew the funding for the Reliable Replacement Warhead (RRW) program? I support strengthening non-proliferation efforts, so at this point I do not see the need to renew the program’s funding. 5. Would you vote to enable the implementation of the Bush Administration’s Complex Transformation plan? I would vote against enabling the implementation of the Complex Transformation plan. 6. Do you support the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Depository? No. 7. Do you believe that nuclear power is a safe and viable energy alternative to fossil fuels? I do not. We need to develop safer and more viable alternatives, such as solar and wind power. Beyond that, we need to learn to live within our means and conserve our resources.

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NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND NUCLEAR POWER
1. Do you support the research and/or development of new U.S. nuclear weapons? No. 2. Do you support the elimination of nuclear weapons worldwide? Yes. 3. Would you vote to enforce the agreements of the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty, specifically in light of the U.S.-India Nuclear Deal? Yes. 4. Would you vote to renew the funding for the Reliable Replacement Warhead (RRW) program? No. The United States must be a model for disarmament if we expect the rest of the world to move in that direction. Research and development of new nuclear weapons will incentivize the distribution of old and new nuclear technology around the world and continue our path in the wrong direction. 5. Would you vote to enable the implementation of the Bush Administration’s Complex Transformation plan? Given that Complex Transformation is a sort of precursor of the RRW program, I feel similarly and would not enable the implementation of it. (http://www.fcnl.org/issues/item.php?item_id=2158&issue_id=51) 6. Do you support the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Depository? No. 7. Do you believe that nuclear power is a safe and viable energy alternative to fossil fuels? No.

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NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND NUCLEAR POWER
1. Do you support the research and/or development of new U.S. nuclear weapons? No. See answer to next questions. 2. Do you support the elimination of nuclear weapons worldwide? Yes. With the end of the Cold War, the threat of a large scale nuclear war diminished. Unfortunately, today the threat of nuclear proliferation is greater than ever. The United States cannot continue its position of global nuclear dominance for this stance will undoubtedly accelerate nuclear proliferation by other nations. We must work towards elimination of our nuclear arsenals. Unfortunately, the Bush administration has taken many dangerous, reckless steps in the wrong direction. Bush has withdrawn from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, drawn up plans for a nuclear strike against Iran, violated the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and even proposed the development of new nuclear weapons. The nuclear bomb is useless for war. It is indiscriminately destructive and a threat to all. This fact must be driven home to all who possess these mindbogglingly ruinous weapons. Nuclear weapons are a threat to the existence of the world and the world must work together to eliminate these weapons. As Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, William Perry and Sam Nunn so eloquently stated in their piece in the Wall Street Journal: “Reassertion of the vision of a world free of nuclear weapons and practical measures toward achieving that goal would be, and would be perceived as, a bold initiative consistent with America's moral heritage. The effort could have a profoundly positive impact on the security of future generations.”

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NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND NUCLEAR POWER
3. Would you vote to enforce the agreements of the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty, specifically in light of the U.S.-India Nuclear Deal? Yes. When the Bush administration announced its intention to “enable full civil nuclear energy cooperation and trade with India” it deliberately sidestepped the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. India has never signed the Treaty and has tested nuclear weapons. Because it does not accept international monitoring of all nuclear facilities it should be exempt from U.S. trade in nuclear reactors, technology, and fuel. This agreement sets a dangerous precedent for our future dealings with Pakistan, Iran, and North Korea. 4. Would you vote to renew the funding for the Reliable Replacement Warhead (RRW) program? No. Most of the current U.S. nuclear warheads were built in the 1970s and 80s. The RRW program was instituted to maintain and replace deteriorating warheads and to “improve the reliability, longevity, and certifiability of existing weapons and their components.” However, while this deterioration is a potential problem, I believe it is one that has been overstated. The RRW program also runs the risk of disrupting our international non-proliferation efforts and could lead to the development of new nuclear weapons and nuclear testing and a renewed nuclear arms race. Spending on nuclear weapons is exorbitant and wasteful and the RRW is unnecessary. 5. Would you vote to enable the implementation of the Bush Administration’s Complex Transformation plan? No. The Complex Transformation plan is a plan to restructure the nation’s nuclear weapons infrastructure. The goal is to consolidate existing nuclear facilities and also to increase the capacity to produce more plutonium for new nuclear weapons. This program takes the United States in the absolute wrong direction. It undermines our security and threatens the spread of nuclear weapons. I strongly oppose this plan.

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6. Do you support the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Depository? No. The core question of how to safely dispose of nuclear waste has never been adequately answered. Questions remain about the long-term viability of Yucca Mountain and the project faces a long list of scientific, technical, public health, legal, and safety problems. Obviously, the problem of nuclear waste disposal must be addressed, but Yucca Mountain is not the answer. 7. Do you believe that nuclear power is a safe and viable energy alternative to fossil fuels? No. I would not support the building of any additional nuclear power plants. This industry could not exist without government subsidies and tax breaks. Insurance costs alone would be prohibitive without the government’s intervention. I am not convinced that this is a safe technology nor has the core question of how to dispose of nuclear waste ever been adequately answered.

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ARMS SALES
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MILITARY AID

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ARMS SALES AND MILITARY AID
1. Do you support an international treaty to ban cluster bombs? Yes. 2. Would you vote to make the United States a signatory of the 1997 Convention and Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and their Destruction better known as the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty or Ottawa Treaty? Yes. 3. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to governments using child soldiers? Yes. 4. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to Israel? See explanation below. 5. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to Pakistan? See explanation below. 6. Do you support eliminating military aid and arms sales to countries deemed undemocratic by the U.S. State Department? See explanation below. 7. Do you support selling weapons or providing military assistance to countries in conflict? If it depends on the country, what criteria would you use to comply with the US Arms Export Control Act? Depends on the country. See explanation below. I believe that the US should be a party to an international arms trade treaty that would state clearly that all international transfers of arms shall be authorized by a recognized state and carried out in accordance with national laws and procedures that reflect, as a minimum, states’ obligations under international law. Such a treaty would also clearly state that states shall not authorize international transfers of arms that violate their expressed obligations regarding arms under international law. I would support making all future decisions on military aid and weapons sales to ALL countries by first consulting the obligations and prohibitions of such a treaty. 24

ARMS SALES AND MILITARY AID
1. Do you support an international treaty to ban cluster bombs? Yes. 2. Would you vote to make the United States a signatory of the 1997 Convention and Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and their Destruction better known as the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty or Ottawa Treaty? I support signing the treaty. 3. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to governments using child soldiers? Congress needs to review on a case-by-case basis any allegations of U.S. military aid and weapons sales to governments using child soldiers. 4. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to Israel? No. 5. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to Pakistan? No. 6. Do you support eliminating military aid and arms sales to countries deemed undemocratic by the U.S. State Department? I believe each country should be examined on a case-by-case basis. I do not believe our foreign aid should be contingent on the establishment of western-style democracies. We should look at the humanitarian policies of that nation, the international and American interests at stake, and the purpose for which such aid is to be used. 7. Do you support selling weapons or providing military assistance to countries in conflict? If it depends on the country, what criteria would you use to comply with the US Arms Export Control Act? I would use the criteria I note above.

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ARMS SALES AND MILITARY AID
1. Do you support an international treaty to ban cluster bombs? Yes. 2. Would you vote to make the United States a signatory of the 1997 Convention and Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and their Destruction better known as the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty or Ottawa Treaty? Yes. 3. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to governments using child soldiers? Yes. 4. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to Israel? No. 5. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to Pakistan? Yes. By providing F16 fighters capable of delivering nuclear warheads to BOTH Pakistan and India, the US has only served to increase the possibility of conflict between the two countries. 6. Do you support eliminating military aid and arms sales to countries deemed undemocratic by the U.S. State Department? Yes. 7. Do you support selling weapons or providing military assistance to countries in conflict? If it depends on the country, what criteria would you use to comply with the US Arms Export Control Act? No.

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ARMS SALES AND MILITARY AID
1. Do you support an international treaty to ban cluster bombs? Yes. Cluster bombs are designed to scatter widely and detonate when they hit their target. However, upwards of 30 percent of these explosives fail to explode on contact and remain a risk to innocent lives long after conflicts have ended. These bombs can be as devastating as landmines to the civilian population that is left to deal with the unexploded remnants. 2. Would you vote to make the United States a signatory of the 1997 Convention and Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and their Destruction better known as the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty or Ottawa Treaty? Yes. The Treaty stops the production and development of anti-personnel mines and requires the destruction of any stockpiles. The United States has refused to sign unless the treaty includes an exception for the DMZ between North and South Korea, stating that the million landmines in this area help maintain peace between the two countries. However, other mining options are available under the terms of the Ottawa Treaty, including anti-tank mines, anti-handling devices and other explosive devices. Landmines that remain buried long after conflicts have ended continue to maim and injury innocent civilians worldwide. 3. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to governments using child soldiers? Yes. The problem of child soldiers is most critical in Africa where child soldiers, some as young as nine years old, are being used in a number of countries. Our money would be better spent supporting programs specifically aimed at disarming child soldiers, giving them new skills and helping them return to their communities. 4. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to Israel? No. We need to work with Israel and the Palestinians to bring peace and stability to the Gaza Strip and the West Bank and to create an independent Palestinian state alongside Israel. Israel is 27

ARMS SALES AND MILITARY AID
our strongest alley in this volatile region of the world; it is a strong democracy that continues to be threatened by countries that refuse to recognize Israel as a legitimate political entity. Israel deserves our continued aid and support. 5. Do you support eliminating US military aid and weapons sales to Pakistan? Yes. The United States gives millions of dollars each month in aid to Pakistan. When Pakistani President Musharraf suspended constitutional rights in that country we should have suspended our military aid. 6. Do you support eliminating military aid and arms sales to countries deemed undemocratic by the U.S. State Department? Yes. See below. 7. Do you support selling weapons or providing military assistance to countries in conflict? If it depends on the country, what criteria would you use to comply with the US Arms Export Control Act? Depends on the country. U.S. arm sales are often justified as a way to secure access to overseas military facilities or other political support and as a way to promote stability and democracy in a region. But all too often these sales end up fueling conflict, arming human rights abusers or falling into the hands of our adversaries, and serve to empower unstable, undemocratic regimes. We need to change our policies and stop arms exports to countries that systematically abuse human rights. We also need to explore other possible ways of support, such as economic aid or political support that we can give to other nations as an alternative to military aid.

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MILITARISM
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THE WAR ECONOMY

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1. Would you vote to reinstate the military draft? No. 2. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would amend Section 9528 of the No Child Left Behind Act to protect the privacy of American high school students? Yes. In fact, I have proposed completely repealing No Child Left Behind. 3. Do you believe that the US should ever employ private military contractors? If so, how do you propose holding these contractors and corporations accountable? No. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would offer tax exemptions, reimbursements or credits to weapons manufacturers doing business in Maine? No. 5. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would convert a minimum of 15% of current U.S. defense spending to provide for social programs? Yes. 6. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would establish a Department of Peace? Yes.

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1. Would you vote to reinstate the military draft? No. I oppose reinstating the military draft. 2. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would amend Section 9528 of the No Child Left Behind Act to protect the privacy of American high school students? I would vote to repeal all of No Child Left Behind. 3. Do you believe that the US should ever employ private military contractors? If so, how do you propose holding these contractors and corporations accountable? To the extent that private contractors are employed, their activities need to be held to the same strict standards as our military personnel. This includes competitive bidding and auditing of their use of funds. Strict accounting practices need to apply and it must be clear that any incidents of abuse will be punished. It is inevitable that any military department must contract for some goods and services. However, the increasing trend to contract out substantive military functions, including but not limited to security services, is a dangerous trend and must be stopped. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would offer tax exemptions, reimbursements or credits to weapons manufacturers doing business in Maine? I have no plans to introduce, co-sponsor or promote any such legislation. I would look at any proposal before Congress individually and with the same scrutiny I would apply to all such tax exemptions, reimbursements, or credits.

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5. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would convert a minimum of 15% of current U.S. defense spending to provide for social programs? I believe we need to end the war in Iraq now and use the money we are spending there and put it towards our domestic needs, including paying down the deficit and investing in families through social programs and infrastructure investments, to name a few. 6. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would establish a Department of Peace? I support the establishment of a Department of Peace that would work to diminish the role of violence in this country and around the world.

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1. Would you vote to reinstate the military draft? Yes. 2. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would amend Section 9528 of the No Child Left Behind Act to protect the privacy of American high school students. Yes. Information not otherwise given or publicly available to military recruiters or other organizations should not be mandated available through a child’s school by federal funding of education.

3. Do you believe that the US should ever employ private military contractors? If so, how do you propose holding these contractors and corporations accountable? No. The use of contractors in Iraq has clearly demonstrated that people engaging in combat must either be U.S. soldiers or be held to the same standards of accountability and conduct. I spoke out against the use of private contractors, both because of accountability and cost, before our invasion of Iraq was fully executed. You can see that footage on my website: http://chelliepingree.com/issues/iraq_1.html.

4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would offer tax exemptions, reimbursements or credits to weapons manufacturers doing business in Maine? No. As a State Senator I fought against many of these types of tax breaks and would continue to do so in Congress.

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MILITARISM AND THE WAR ECONOMY
5. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would convert a minimum of 15% of current U.S. defense spending to provide for social programs? Yes. There is no question in my mind that the war in Iraq is a drain on all of our domestic priorities and that we need to shift a substantial portion of the defense spending into health care, education and domestic investments that would begin to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. The next President and Congress are going to be faced with critical decisions regarding the size and distribution of resources devoted to national defense. At $541 billion (54% of the discretionary budget), President Bush’s FY09 Pentagon budget request (Department of Defense plus the nuclear weapons portion of the Department of Energy) eliminates no major weapons systems and is 5% larger in real terms (adjusted for inflation) than the FY08 budget request. If this budget is approved, which observers expect it to be, it will be a 44% increase since 2000. This would make the Department of Defense budget at its highest level ever, in real terms--and that does not include war spending. $200 billion for the war in FY09 is a conservative estimate. We are currently spending $12 billion a month in Iraq. 6. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would establish a Department of Peace? Yes. The need for such a thing speaks to the serious failures of the Bush administration, as our State Department should carry out this function.

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MILITARISM AND THE WAR ECONOMY
1. Would you vote to reinstate the military draft? No. The military should remain an all volunteer organization. 2. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would amend Section 9528 of the No Child Left Behind Act to protect the privacy of American high school students? Yes. Section 9528 of the NCLB Act requires local schools to give student’s name, address and phone numbers to any military recruiters upon request. This private information is given without parental knowledge or consent and it enables military recruiters to aggressively recruit minor students at home by telephone calls, mail and personal visits. While students and parents have an opt-out option, this information is not always readily available. A better policy would be one that protects a student’s privacy while giving an opt-in option to those who want more information on military service. Schools should also limit institutional recruiters (including military) access to a few times a year on campus. 3. Do you believe that the US should ever employ private military contractors? If so, how do you propose holding these contractors and corporations accountable? No. The Bush administration has embraced the alarming practice of outsourcing the United States military. Private military contractors have been essential to the war in Iraq and are used to perform a variety of jobs, including security. Private contractors have been hired to maintain sophisticated U.S. weapons systems such as the B-2 bomber, they help operate the Aegis missile-defense system, they offer protection for non-military transport convoys, help train Iraqi police, and provide every-day support services for the troops. Yet there is lack of public information about the costs involved in using private contractors and the standards around the hiring, performance and training of employees. Private contractors also lack accountability and are not held responsible under U.S. law for abuse and other transgressions. Private contractors in Iraq have been linked to the killing of innocent Iraq civilians, the abuse of Iraqi prisoners, 35

MILITARISM AND THE WAR ECONOMY
supplying substandard materials to the troops, and have been suspect in widespread war profiteering. We should not be relying on private companies whose overriding principal is making money, but instead we need to return these jobs to our military who are dedicated to servicing our nation. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would offer tax exemptions, reimbursements or credits to weapons manufacturers doing business in Maine? In short, my answer is no. I have been opposed to special interest tax breaks that do not benefit the community since I started serving on the Taxation Committee. I will continue this policy in Congress. 5. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would convert a minimum of 15% of current U.S. defense spending to provide for social programs? Yes. The United States accounts for almost half of all world wide military spending. There has been a renewed military build-up in this country beginning in 2001. Bush’s 2009 proposed budget includes increases in both war spending and non-war military budgets while cutting important programs for children, the elderly, and lower income households. This is a travesty. While it is important to provide for a strong defense there is certainly ample room for cuts to be made in our military spending.

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MILITARISM AND THE WAR ECONOMY
6. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would establish a Department of Peace? Yes. Last year, Ed and Elaine Brown retreated to their fortified compound in Plainfield, New Hampshire, declared they did not recognize the federal government and pledged to die in a storm of bullets rather than surrender to federal agents. News reports recalled similar standoffs at Waco and Ruby Ridge and detailed the bloody endings. However, months after the New Hampshire standoff began it ended peacefully, with no shots fired, when US marshals walked on to the property pretending to be supporters of the Browns. The US Marshals chose to pursue a nonviolent resolution, one that was amazingly successful. Just imagine what our nation might accomplish were we to examine practical, diplomatic, nonviolent solutions to domestic and international conflicts. We study war, we should also study peace.

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THE WARS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE WAR ON TERROR

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THE WARS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE WAR ON TERROR
1. What do you perceive to be the root causes of terrorism? Terrorism is a complex phenomenon and not easily explained, but I do believe there are a set of factors at the root of it. Poverty is clearly one of the major causes of terrorism. There is also a significant amount of anger and frustration that people around the world feel when they believe that their human rights are not being respected by either their government or the most powerful nations on earth. Religious intolerance is another significant cause. In any particular case, it is likely that more than one of these factors, as well as possibly others, are in play. 2. Do you support the war in Afghanistan? No. 3. Would you vote to continue to fund the war in Iraq? No. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would allow for the complete and withdrawal of all U.S. troops, U.S. military bases and military contractors hired by the U.S. government from Iraq? Yes.

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THE WARS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE WAR ON TERROR
1. What do you perceive to be the root causes of terrorism? Terrorism is a criminal act against domestic and international law and cannot be tolerated in a humane society. Its root cause is the intentional disregard of the sanctity of human life and the resorting to criminal violence to achieve a political end. All civilized nations must unite to reject terrorism and support the respect for human life and social justice throughout the world. 2. Do you support the war in Afghanistan? America and other members of the international community should support the democratically elected government of Afghanistan and assist them in preventing the re-establishment of a safe haven for al Qaeda within its borders. 3. Would you vote to continue to fund the war in Iraq? No. I believe Congress has made a crucial mistake in continuing to fund the war. I would vote to de-fund the war because the leverage Congress has is the power of the purse. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would allow for the complete and withdrawal of all U.S. troops, U.S. military bases and military contractors hired by the U.S. government from Iraq? Yes, the War in Iraq should never have been authorized. If elected, I will support – and would be willing to cosponsor – legislation that would end the war in Iraq now and would allow for a complete withdrawal of U.S. troops, bases, and military contractors from Iraq engaged in that war.

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THE WARS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE WAR ON TERROR
1. What do you perceive to be the root causes of terrorism? This is a much discussed question in recent years, and with good reason, as we’ve all worked our way through a post 9-11 world and witnessed ongoing violence in several parts of the globe. At its core, terrorism is viable due to a lack of economic opportunity and social justice. It may at times be generated around religious fundamentalism or in response to questionable U.S. policies, but the reason is takes hold has more to do with deep, long-term economic frustration. 2. Do you support the war in Afghanistan? Yes. The world erred in allowing the Taliban to flourish, a military strike on Afghanistan should have been our last option and we need to support Afghan reconstruction efforts.

3. Would you vote to continue to fund the war in Iraq? No. Please see my answer to the next question. I think that ending the funding of the war in Iraq will prove to be the only way to begin to remove our troops. 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would allow for the complete and withdrawal of all U.S. troops, U.S. military bases and military contractors hired by the U.S. government from Iraq? Yes. We must end the war now. Congress must stop funding the war and rescind its authorization if the administration refuses to make plans for immediate withdrawal, including leaving no permanent bases behind. We can't continue to squander our resources on the worst foreign policy mistake in our country's history. Leaving will be complicated, but staying only continues the tragic loss of our soldiers, Iraqi citizens, and almost unthinkable amounts of money.

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THE WARS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE WAR ON TERROR
I also believe that while Congress and the President debate whether we can "win" the war instead of how best to withdraw our forces form Iraq with the least amount of damage, they are irresponsibly prolonging this disaster. Instead, they should be tackling the hard debate of what needs to be done next. America must no longer be seen as an aggressor in the world. We need to embrace a new foreign policy to restore our reputation. To this end, this spring I joined with Darcy Burner (a candidate for Congress in Washington State,) and military and national security experts like General Paul Eaton (US Army Ret.) to create a comprehensive plan to end the war in Iraq and repair the damage it has caused, at home and abroad. Since then more than fifty US House and US Senate candidates and over 25,000 Americans have endorsed it. The Responsible Plan to End the War in Iraq builds off the work of the Iraq Study Group and existing legislation in Congress and is intended to accomplish three objectives: 1. End the military effort in Iraq and bring our troops home; 2. Begin to repair the damage five years of war and occupation have caused, at home and abroad; 3. Prevent a repeat of this sort of epic and costly foreign policy blunder in the future.

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THE WARS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE WAR ON TERROR
1. What do you perceive to be the root causes of terrorism? Economic insecurity and cultural alienation. 2. Do you support the war in Afghanistan? No. I support bringing Osama bin Laden to justice. In 2001 we invaded Afghanistan in an effort to disrupt the Taliban and to avenge the terrorist attacks of September 11th. Seven years later, the Afghanistan/Pakistan border region remains a breeding ground for Taliban, al-Qaida and other militant groups, Osama bin Laden is still at large, and Afghanistan leads the world in poppy production, accounting for 95 percent of the world’s crop. Afghanistan is a country that has been in turmoil and war for the last twenty years. Ethnic, religious, social, and geographic difficulties have kept the country from forming into a strong state. Insurgent violence is increasing in Afghanistan. It is time to reexamine our military presence in Afghanistan; a successful response to the threats of al-Qaida requires a multi-faceted approach, not one that only relies on our military. Our continued presence in Afghanistan will produce only limited success and will come at a great cost, in terms of lives and for the possibility of a stable, democratic future for the country. 3. Would you vote to continue to fund the war in Iraq? No. I will not vote for any future funding for operations in Iraq that doesn’t include a clear withdrawal date. To date the war has cost American taxpayers over $500 billion dollars. For-profit independent contractors who have been allowed to operate in Iraq with little oversight or accountability have fleeced countless millions of these dollars. The war continues to cost well over $10 billion dollars a month. Just think of what we could have done here at home with that money.

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THE WARS IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE WAR ON TERROR
We cannot go on sacrificing the lives of American troops and innocent Iraqi civilians. Even some of our most experienced military experts and commanders now question our strategy and goals in Iraq, whatever they may be. It is time to begin the total withdrawal of our troops from Iraq in a safe and orderly manner. We need to pursue a diplomatic solution, one that will not cause the people of Iraq to suffer even more. We need to work to regain America’s prestige and standing in the world, to once again become the beacon of hope, opportunity and democracy. And we need to bring our sons and our daughters home, now 4. Are you willing to introduce, co-sponsor and/or promote legislation that would allow for the complete and withdrawal of all U.S. troops, U.S. military bases and military contractors hired by the U.S. government from Iraq? Yes. The war in Iraq will go down in history as one of this nation’s greatest military blunders. It didn’t have to be this way. In February of 2003, six weeks before the first bombs fell on Iraq, I introduced a resolution to the Maine Senate calling for a halt to the impending attack and urging President Bush to pursue a diplomatic, not a military, solution in Iraq. The Maine Senate endorsed this resolution and became the first state legislative body in the nation to take a stance against war in Iraq. I have been against the war since before it began and I will work to bring our troops home now.

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For more information about the candidates’ stances on these issues, contact their campaigns:

Michael Brennan for Congress
www.brennanforcongress.org

Chellie Pingree for Congress
www.chelliepingree.com

PO Box 285 Portland, ME 04112 (207) 773-1323
votebrennan@brennanforcongress.org

PO Box 17613 Portland, ME 04112 (207) 773-0155
campaign@pingreeforcongress.com

Adam Cote for Congress
www.adamcote.com

Dean Scontras for Congress
www.teamdean08.com

PO Box 6902 Portland, ME 04103-6902 (207) 347-3103
cote@adamcote.com

PO Box 15418 Portland, ME 04112 (207) 221-3447
info@teamdean08.com

Mark Lawrence for Congress
www.marklawrence.org

Ethan Strimling for Congress
www.ethan08.com

PO Box 183 Springvale, ME 04083 (207) 490-6275
mark@marklawrence.org

PO Box 7448 Portland, ME 04112 (207) 874-0808
info@ethan08.com

Steve Meister for Congress
www.stevemeisterforcongress.com

Charlie Summers for Congress
www.summersforcongress.org

PO Box 2208 Augusta, ME 04338-2208 (207) 620-7280
stevemeisterforcongress@gmail.com

107 Exchange Street Portland, ME 04101 (207) 883-5105
ruth@summersforcongress.org

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