GLOBAL DAY OF SOLIDARITY FOR TROY DAVIS

RESOURCE KIT

ABOUT AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Our Mission: We are individuals from across the world standing up together for human rights. Our purpose is to protect people wherever justice, freedom and dignity are denied. We investigate and expose abuses, educate and mobilize the public to create a safer and more just world. We received the Nobel Peace Prize for our life-saving work in 1977. Our Vision: Our vision is of a world in which every person - regardless of race, religion, gender, ethnicity and other distinctions - enjoys all of the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights standards. Our History: Founded in 1961, our organization has campaigned successfully for the International Criminal Court and a UN Convention against Torture. Through our research and action, governments have been persuaded to stop human rights violations and change their laws and practices. Death sentences have been commuted. Torturers have been brought to justice. And prisoners of conscience have been released. Our Organization: Amnesty International has a varied network of members and supporters around the world. At the latest count, there were more than 2.2 million members, supporters and subscribers in over 150 countries and territories in every region of the world. Although they come from many different backgrounds and have widely different political and religious beliefs, they are united by a determination to work for a world where everyone enjoys human rights. AI is a democratic, self-governing movement. Major policy decisions are taken by an International Council made up of representatives from all national sections. AI's national sections, like AI USA, and local volunteer groups are primarily responsible for funding the movement. No funds are sought or accepted from governments for AI's work investigating and campaigning against human rights violations.

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CONTENTS
OVERVIEW BACKGROUND: TROY DAVIS HEARING “LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE” ACTION HOW TO: HOLD A VIGIL HOW TO: TABLE EFFECTIVELY WHAT IS A TEACH-IN? HOW TO: ORGANIZE A TEACH-IN TEACH-IN CHECK LIST “LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE” HANDBILL TROY DAVIS FACT SHEET TROY DAVIS PETITION FACT SHEETS: -RACE -INEFFECTIVE LEGAL REPRESENTATION -INNOCENCE -GENERAL FACTS EVENT SIGN-IN SHEET RESOURCE PEOPLE FEEDBACK FORM

Troy Davis Campaign: June 22 Global Day of Solidarity
Troy Davis has a hearing date (June 23, 2010) – Please Take Action!

Who: Everyone who is concerned about the human rights case of Troy Davis. What: A day of solidarity activities in communities around the world. When: Tuesday, June 22, 2010 (anytime). (This is the day before the hearing). Where: A visible location in your community. Why: To keep a light on the Troy Davis case and to demonstrate a global community standing together and remain vigilant as the court reviews the new evidence. How: Please organize an activity, such as: a. a vigil b. tabling c. a teach-in This kit provides some “how to” guides on organizing activities. Also, please use the tools—the event sign-in sheet to keep in touch with folks who come out, the fact sheet to educate them about the case, the petition and the handbill about the photo mosaic action. At all events, please take part in the photo mosaic action (“Lend Your Face for Justice”). Important: We want to be able to report how many events will be taking place to demonstrate the tremendous support. Please email dpac@aiusa.org to let us know if you will organize an activity. Please include the name of your community, the type of event and how others can join you (i.e. a contact name, email address, time and location of the activity). Available resources: For links and downloadable items, visit www.justicefortroy.org Note: We are not calling for protests as the justice system has opened an important door to review the case. Activities should mark the eve of the hearing, when we will remain watchful and hopeful that the justice system will finally provide a fair process where testimony that has not yet been examined in a court of law will be properly heard. Therefore, please keep messages respectful in tone (e.g. “I am Troy Davis”, “We are Troy Davis”, “Georgia, the world is watching”, “Fairness matters”). As with all activities, please take advantage of the opportunity to educate people about Davis’s story, the larger system that it represents and the importance of abolishing the death penalty and the importance of becoming a member of AI to support this long term human rights agenda.

BACKGROUND: TROY DAVIS HEARING
The Case Troy Davis has been on death row since 1991 for the 1989 murder of a white police officer in Savannah, Georgia. No physical evidence links him to the crime and of the nine key non-police witnesses, seven have recanted or contradicted their testimony. Of the two remaining, one is the alternative suspect (who turned Davis in) and the other can only be sure of the color of the t -shirt. In the 1990s, when Davis needed investigation and work done on his appeals, the office representing death row inmates got a 2/3 budget cut – leaving just two lawyers to defend about 80 people on death row in Georgia. In 1996, the Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) further limited prisoner’s ability to appeal in federal courts. So far, at each stage of his appeals, the courts have deferred to the decision of the jury, hesitant to go against the original trial decision and unwilling to hear testimony from the recanting witnesses. No court has been willing to bring the witnesses, despite how many there are, back into a court of law to cross examine their testimony, until now. Troy has faced execution three times and was less than two hours from execution at one point. What is the hearing? On August 17, 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered an evidentiary hearing to “receive testimony and make finding of fact as to whether evidence that could not have been obtained at the time of trial clearly establishes petitioner’s innocence.” This was in response to a petition Troy filed before the Supreme Court (an original habeas petition) seeking relief on grounds of “actual innocence”. They delegated the hearing to the federal district court of southern Georgia (in Savannah), as the Supreme Court is not a “fact finding” body. Judge William Moore was assigned the case. He ordered the hearing after requesting briefs from the two legal teams in preparation for the hearing. The hearing will begin on Wednesday, June 23 at 10am and could be as short as one day and as long as a few days. It is unclear what the judge could do at the conclusion of the hearing. He may issue his recommendations or findings then or perhaps after further deliberation some time later. It is unclear whether he could grant relief to Troy or whether this would have to come directly from the Supreme Court. If he does not believe that the evidence meets a very high legal standard, he could clear the way for an execution date to be set again. Also, whatever decision emerges could lead to an appeal by the dissatisfied side. What it is NOT This is not a new trial! The legal standard is extremely high! Troy is presumed guilty and the burden rests on him to “clearly establish his innocence”. In a new trial, he would be presumed innocent and the state would have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that he is guilty to a jury. This is especially difficult because the crime happened over twenty years ago.

“LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE” PHOTO MOSAIC ACTION
Please feature this action at whatever type of activity or event you organize for the Global Day of Solidarity!
We are building a giant image of Troy Davis made up of thousands of faces of people who support the call for justice in his case. The large composite image will be displayed in various venues around the world to educate people about his story and keep the spotlight on his case so that justice will finally be served! Set up a station at your event or activity where someone can take photographs of individuals. All you need is a digital camera and a sign. People stopping by your event can do this activity with other groups or simply as an individual. Be sure to give them a copy of the handbill in this kit, as it has instructions.

HOW TO LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE: 1. Take a digital picture of yourself Specifications: -The photo must only feature you (no group shots) -Position your camera normally for a horizontal image -Get a tight shot of your face – head and shoulders only -Optional: write on a sheet of paper with a thick marker or print out "I lend my face for justice!" Hold this just under your chin for the photo. 2. Email it to us at ace70daily@photos.flickr.com All images will be reviewed before being posted. Important - Terms of Agreement: By uploading or sending your picture to us, you consent to AI using your image in any materials, including print and electronic, for all actions undertaken by our organization on behalf of Troy Davis.

www.amnestyusa.org/abolish - dpac@aiusa.org - 202-544-0200

HOW TO: HOLD A VIGIL
Summary Vigils are typically silent and solemn gatherings held in a public space. Vigils can be a powerful means of bring attention to an issue, a prisoner of conscience, etc. This page reviews important points to remember when organizing a vigil. A powerful way to raise community members' interest in human rights issues is to hold a silent candlelight vigil on behalf of a person or group of people your group is supporting. Consider inviting not only students and community members but ally organizations as well. Vigils can also draw attention to other events you have planned, such as a guest speaker or film screening. Some points to remember Obtain permission from local authorities or your school administration. A permit to demonstrate is often required. Plan adequate time to obtain permits - depending on the venue, it can take weeks or even months for a permit to be issued. Plan your program. Set the length of the vigil by determining how it will start, how it will end and what will happen in between. Some vigils begin with a few words about the purpose, a reading about a case or a poem that demonstrates the importance of the issue or situation. During the vigil, participants may either maintain a silent focus or choose instead to read names or statements relevant to the issue. To wrap up, give a call to action, and make sure everyone is asked to join AIUSA. To get your message across, be sure to have clearly worded signs that demonstrate your purpose. Incorporate photos if possible (i.e., a giant photo of the person or issue you are focusing on). Bring lots of candles. Use wax-paper cups to prevent candles from dripping or blowing out. Simply cut a hole in the bottom of each cup and insert candles. Use the candlelight to create a pattern - a line or a circle - that can easily be seen by others. Don't block entrances, sidewalks or passages. Designate two spokespersons to stand apart from the vigil line or circle to distribute action materials and talk to passersby who want to know what your group is doing. The vigil itself should be as free from distraction as possible. As with any event, bring a sign-in sheet and clipboard to pass around or to greet people with. Remember to follow up with newcomers. Concentrate on the quality of the vigil; numbers are important, but are not decisive. Check List Identify and reserve your location Do you have a banner? (Contact your Regional Office if not) Create a flyer for your group Use the sign-in sheet Need help? (Contact your Regional Office)

HOW TO: TABLE EFFECTIVELY
Tabling is an effective way to make AI more visible in your community. Your group can publicize its current work, announce upcoming events, recruit new members, and raise funds by tabling. Tabling can also provide members of the public an opportunity to take action. Possible venues include community festivals, art shows, special events, ethnic festivals, and local coffeehouses and bookstores. Schools venues also include outside of dining halls, the student union, school library or any place many students pass by.

TIPS ON TABLING:
Appearance is important. Attractive and well-organized materials and visuals will catch people’s eye. Videos or slide shows on a loop or images in a free-standing document holder are useful. Table with at least two people. Engage more people at the same time; have a buddy to help with questions, spot you if you need a bathroom break, keep up spirits if you encounter negative individual Be proactive, polite and friendly. Stand behind or in front of your table, rather than sit, to be proactive and inviting. Be mindful of your body language. Don’t expect that everyone who is supportive of the issues will approach your table. Don’t assume those passing by are disinterested. When a passer -by gives you eye contact or looks at your table, greet them and have a short phrase to invite them to the table, e.g. “Hi there! How are you? Can I tell you about a human rights action we’re asking people to help us with today – it won’t take much time and it’s free!” Humor can break the ice, but avoid sarcasm. Cookies and baked goods are often a useful lure. Don’t feature too many things. The “Lend Your Face” photo mosaic action and petition form will be sufficient. Be prepared to describe the case and the action in about 1 minute. You should also be able to answer basic questions about AI. Know what your ask is. Have a finite number of asks and prioritize them. For example: sign our petition on prisoner X; sign our postcard action on country Y; join our mailing list; make a contribution/ buy a sticker or button. You will sense how much you can ask someone, so take it one ask at a time. Troubleshooting. Don’t spend a lot of time with people who are clearly trying to push your buttons or just enjoy arguing. Get them to do your actions and try to move them along politely so that you don’t miss other passers-by. It’s perfectly normal not to have the answers for all questions – tell them you are not sure, but they could either look at the website, or if they give you their contact information you’d be happy to get back to them (but don’t say this unless you really intend to get back to them). Sign-up sheet and money jar. Don’t miss the opportunity to get people’s contact info so that you can add them to your email list and invite them to upcoming meetings and activities. You may find new group members or valuable supports—so, always follow-up! Also, a simple money jar (if the venue permits) gives you an opportunity to raise funds for stamps and supplies and make a contribution to AIUSA to help support the organization’s work. Be prepared to tell someone what the funds will be used for. If you have someone’s attention, ask them if they’re a member of AI and encourage them to become one (brochures available from Regional Offices - contact info at end of kit)

SUPPLY CHECKLIST:
(Check with your Regional Office or DPAC for supplies). Table - reserve a table with the venue or secure your own well in advance. Banner - should be clearly visible from a distance. Information - make copies of concise handouts. Flyers - have info about your upcoming events. Sign In Sheet - get people's contact information and follow up with them about future events. Action Opportunities - supply background information on opportunities for immediate action. Pens, clipboards, paperweights (rocks work). Donation Jar - raise funds for AI’s work.

WHAT IS A TEACH-IN?
A Teach-in is a session hosted by any group or organization to discuss an important topic. Teach-ins are informative sessions on recent events which people may not be able to understand clearly through news sources alone. It is a chance to inform people about an issue and provide them with opportunities to take action · What is the goal of the teach-in? The primary goal of your teach-in for Troy Davis is to inform the participants about the particulars of the case in such a way that they leave feeling energized and excited to take action. Students should come away knowing exactly what they can do, and feeling confident that they have a sufficient grasp of the background information to spread the word to others. Since 1973, over 130 people have been released from death rows throughout the country due to wrongful convictions. In 2003 alone, 10 wrongfully convicted defendants were released from death row. The possibility of innocent people facing execution in the US is very real. It is so important that we continue to keep the light on Troy Davis’ case to ensure that the process is fair and that the questions pointing to his innocence be properly investigated and resolved. · Where should you hold your teach-in? You can hold a teach-in just about anywhere, but make sure to keep in mind your audience when choosing a location. If you are a leader or member of a student group, and you would like your fellow students to attend the teach-in, it is a good idea to have it either on or near campus, in a central location that others can get to without too much trouble. Cafeterias, lecture halls, classrooms, large conference rooms, or available study rooms are all good choices. If you are a leader or member of a community group, you could use a community center or a faith center with a recreational room. Libraries also typically have large meeting rooms that you could reserve. Other, more informal settings work as well. You could hold a teach-in at your home or in the lunch room during your break at work, or even outside in a park. The important thing to consider is that your participants should be in a setting that is comfortable to them, so that they feel at ease and receptive. · Who is the audience for your teach-in? If you are a student, the answer to this question is fairly simple. Your audience will most likely be other students and faculty members from your school. But anyone, whether part of a student group, community group, or acting as an individual, can expand the attendance of their teach-in by inviting other groups that would be interested in hearing about Troy’s case. If there is a local chapter of the NAACP, or Murder Victims Families for Human Rights, or other similar groups, they may be interested in attending your event. (Or even helping with it! See the checklist for more about this.)

HOW TO: ORGANIZE A TEACH-IN
Below is a sample guide to a 1-hour teach-in. The guide also contains suggested times for a 1 ½ hour teach-in if you would like to have more discussion. It is a good idea to plan for more time with a larger group so that everyone gets a chance to ask their questions and share their responses. The teach-in divides the hour into several sections, with a suggested time-line for each part, details about the activities, and the locations of the materials you will need from this packet. Keep in mind that this guide is just that – a very adaptable, moldable, expandable, contractible guide. Use it in the way that works for you and your group. If you are working in tandem with a faith community to put on your teach-in, you may want to include time for a prayer or an explanation of the religious aspects of the issue. There is a lot of space for audience reactions and answers to questions throughout the teach-in. You may find that you have to limit this a little bit if you are working with a larger group. Information in [brackets] is for a 1 ½ hour teach -in.

Part I: Welcome and Overview
Suggested time: 5 minutes [10 min. for a 1 ½ hour teach-in] Welcome the participants and briefly introduce the Troy Davis case and it’s significance . As your participants arrive, make sure they sign in so that you know how many have attended, and so that you will have their contact information for future use. If you have a large group, or the participants may not know each other, it is a good idea to have everyone fill out a name tag. When everyone is seated, welcome all of the teach-in participants and introduce yourself and the other facilitators. Briefly explain why everyone is there, both for Troy and to combat the larger problem of the death penalty and its application. You should also explain a little bit about Amnesty’s role in the case, and how we have coordinated efforts with other organizations. Keep this short – save the details for later on. [If everyone present is not familiar with each other, have them do brief introductions. Each participant should say their name, and why they are there. ] After all of this, you can go over the goals of the teach-in and make sure no one has any questions. This would be a good time to use a flip chart to enumerate your goals. These might include: · To get people talking about Troy Davis’ case, why it is important, and what can be done. · · · Educate the participants about the flaws in the justice system that led to the problems present in Troy Davis’ case. Educate participants about Amnesty International and their role in individual cases such as Troy’s. Increasing the amount of action taken in support of Troy Davis.

Consider allowing the participants to provide more goals if time allows.

Part II: Background About Racism in the Application of the Death Penalty
Suggested Time: 10 minutes [15 minutes]

Inform participants about the history of unfair applications of the death penalty due to race and arbitrariness. During this time, review the fact sheets about the impact of racism on the death penalty. You can have participants read it aloud, or allow them to read it quietly to themselves. Afterwards allow the participants to give their reactions to what they read, and ask a few discussion questions if there are not a lot of volunteers to give reactions. Also make sure to allow participants to raise questions of their own, for the facilitators or for the group as a whole. Here are some suggestions: 1. Were these statistics shocking to you, or did you expect that there were racial disparities in the use of the death penalty? 2. How do these statistics fit in a historical context? In what ways do they evoke (or not) the lynching that occurred in our country from the abolition of slavery continuing until recent years? 3. To what extent do you think the racism in our criminal justice system is explicit or implicit? What do you think these statistics say about the value placed on human life in the U.S.? 4. Do you think that there are simple fixes to some of these problems? Do you think that these problems can be fixed at all?

Part III: Institutional Flaws
Suggested Time: 10 minutes [15 minutes] Inform participants about the flaws in the criminal justice system that have led to cases such as Troy’s, and cases where the defendant has been found innocent Ask your participants if they are aware of any issues within the criminal justice system that could lead to incorrect or hasty verdicts, or a de facto denial of due process rights. In other words, what are some of the problems present in the system that have an adverse affect on the system’s outcomes? Also, ask them about their impressions of innocence in this country: to what extent is “innocent until proven guilty” a reality? Does the system have enough built-in safeguards to ensure that innocent people are not punished for crimes they did not commit? Or why are the safeguards not working? Share some of the statistics from the fact sheet about innocence and ineffective representation. [Also, look up some instances where death-row inmates have been exonerated in your state and share their stories with the participants (if there are no examples of this, or no recent examples, use cases from another state). You can find these stories on the web site for the Death Penalty Information center,

on this page: http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/innocence-and-death-penalty Ask your audience if the statistics and stories are shocking or surprising to them, and if they have any reactions.]

Part IV: The Case of Troy Davis
Suggested Time: 10 minutes [15 minutes] This portion of the teach-in serves to explain the details of Troy’s case to the participants At this time you should pass out the fact sheet about Troy’s case and give your participants time to look it over. They are probably coming to the event with varied backgrounds of knowledge about the case, from none at all to those who have been following it. Allowing them to read it over themselves prevents you from boring those who already know, or skipping over things for those who don’t. You can hand out the timeline as well for more background information. After it seems like everyone is finished, ask them for their reactions to the facts. Here are a few questions to help get a discussion started:

· · ·

Does Troy Davis’ story surprise you, in light of what you know about racism, innocence, etc.? Do you think that the problems seen in his case are unique? Or do you think that there are more complicated reasons? What do you think would be an appropriate remedy for Troy Davis?

It is important that you are well-versed about the developments of the Troy Davis case, and are able to answer any questions that may be asked. If there is a question you are not sure about, let them know that you will find the answer and get back to them. Feel free to contact DPAC if you have any questions that you are unsure how to answer.

Part VI: What you can do
Suggested Time: 5 minutes

“Lend Your Face for Justice!”
At the end of your event, ask people to go to an area where you can have some volunteers stationed to take people’s photographs for the photo mosaic project (see the handbill in this kit). Spread the Word and Stay in the Loop Encourage them to take copies of the fact sheet and petition to further educate and activate others. To get alerts on the case, encourage them to send a text message with the word “troy” to 90999. Let them know that you are available for questions and can help them if they would like more resources. Ask the participants if they have more questions about the content of the teach-in.

TEACH –IN CHECKLIST
Here is a list of planning goals for your teach-in. Keep in mind that every teach-in is different, and you will probably need to adjust these to make them work for your event. Identify a core group of people to help with your teach-in. This could include student organizers, community organizers, other allied student or community groups, faith communities, or anyone available who has been personally impacted by the death penalty or by Troy Davis’ case. o If there are other human rights groups in your campus or community, they may want to help with your event. It is good to reach out to different organizations to broaden your audience. If you do ask other groups or individuals to collaborate, make sure that you are flexible. Include them in all parts of the planning, and consider their input. Ask them well in advance about becoming involved in the event, and try to be specific about how you would like them to help. Some options for involvement include: Asking them to co-sponsor, and bring a speaker from their organization Asking them to co-sponsor and advertise the teach-in to their members Asking them to post information about the teach-in on their web site or in their newsletter. During the first meeting, it is important to plan the following things: o An agenda for the teach-in, and possible speakers. Amnesty International has a list of speakers that may be available to speak on the subject of the death penalty. Contact your DPAC (Death Penalty Abolition Coordinator) to obtain a copy. o o o o o o How you will publicize Turnout goals Location Date and time of the teach-in Assignments for those involved A planning timeline

o

Once you have a date and location for the teach-in, make sure to register at www.amnestyusa.org/teachin so that others can find your event, and so that Amnesty can help to promote it. Identify who is part of the broader group(s) planning the event. Get in touch with them to keep them up-to-date about the plans and how they may be able to help. Make sure that each person involved with putting together the event has a specific task, and a timeline for completing it. Follow up with them frequently to make sure that they are not having trouble completing it.

Advertise for your event in as many places as possible. Here are some suggestions: o o Ask to have a listing run in the school or local paper. Make flyers to hang on bulletin boards around campus, in grocery stores, coffee shops, or libraries, or in other public places. Make sure to ask before hanging a flier somewhere if you are not sure. Send out mass e-mails. This is an easy way to tell a lot of people about your teach-in. Facebook events are also a good way to reach a network of people. Create quarter page fliers for your members to hand out to people throughout the day. This gives the person a tangible reminder that they are less likely to forget about than an advertisement seen in passing. Tell all of your friends and family about the event – and tell all of them to tell their friends! Word of mouth is an excellent way to get people interested in attending. Having a conversation with someone about the event is more likely to get them interested than an e-mail or a flier.

o o

o

On the day of the event, make sure that you have all the materials you will need. These materials may include: Food and drink It is important that you provide at least water for your participants, but a few snacks or even sandwiches or pizza would be great. It does not have to be anything too fancy, and if you do not have a large budget you can always ask local businesses to donate food. If you are on campus, you can ask other student groups where they have had success with this in the past and go from there. Tables and chairs A flip chart to write on Multimedia facilities (if needed) A sign-in sheet so that you know who was in attendance and can follow up with them Copies of any handouts you will need to distribute Evaluation sheets for feedback about your event Copies of the petition to Georgia Authorities Materials for the hand-print petition After the event, schedule a meeting with the other planners for after the event to review the evaluation forms, discuss the successes of the teach-in, and talk about how it could have been improved.

LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE!

LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE!

We are building a giant image of Troy Davis made up of thousands of faces of people who support the call for justice in his case. The large composite image will be displayed in various venues around the world to educate people about his story and keep the spotlight on his case so that justice will finally be served! HOW TO LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE: 1. Take a digital picture of yourself Specifications: -The photo must only feature you (no group shots) -Position your camera normally for a horizontal image -Get a tight shot of your face – head and shoulders only -Optional: write on a sheet of paper with a thick marker or print out "I lend my face for justice!" Hold this just under your chin for the photo. 2. Email it to us at ace70daily@photos.flickr.com All images will be reviewed before being posted. Important - Terms of Agreement: By uploading or sending your picture to us, you consent to AI using your image in any materials, including print and electronic, for all actions undertaken by our organization on behalf of Troy Davis. www.amnestyusa.org/abolish - dpac@aiusa.org - 202-544-0200

We are building a giant image of Troy Davis made up of thousands of faces of people who support the call for justice in his case. The large composite image will be displayed in various venues around the world to educate people about his story and keep the spotlight on his case so that justice will finally be served! HOW TO LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE: 1. Take a digital picture of yourself Specifications: -The photo must only feature you (no group shots) -Position your camera normally for a horizontal image -Get a tight shot of your face – head and shoulders only -Optional: write on a sheet of paper with a thick marker or print out "I lend my face for justice!" Hold this just under your chin for the photo. 2. Email it to us at ace70daily@photos.flickr.com All images will be reviewed before being posted. Important - Terms of Agreement: By uploading or sending your picture to us, you consent to AI using your image in any materials, including print and electronic, for all actions undertaken by our organization on behalf of Troy Davis. www.amnestyusa.org/abolish - dpac@aiusa.org - 202-544-0200

LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE!

LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE!

We are building a giant image of Troy Davis made up of thousands of faces of people who support the call for justice in his case. The large composite image will be displayed in various venues around the world to educate people about his story and keep the spotlight on his case so that justice will finally be served! HOW TO LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE: 1. Take a digital picture of yourself Specifications: -The photo must only feature you (no group shots) -Position your camera normally for a horizontal image -Get a tight shot of your face – head and shoulders only -Optional: write on a sheet of paper with a thick marker or print out "I lend my face for justice!" Hold this just under your chin for the photo. 2. Email it to us at ace70daily@photos.flickr.com All images will be reviewed before being posted. Important - Terms of Agreement: By uploading or sending your picture to us, you consent to AI using your image in any materials, including print and electronic, for all actions undertaken by our organization on behalf of Troy Davis. www.amnestyusa.org/abolish - dpac@aiusa.org - 202-544-0200

We are building a giant image of Troy Davis made up of thousands of faces of people who support the call for justice in his case. The large composite image will be displayed in various venues around the world to educate people about his story and keep the spotlight on his case so that justice will finally be served! HOW TO LEND YOUR FACE FOR JUSTICE: 1. Take a digital picture of yourself Specifications: -The photo must only feature you (no group shots) -Position your camera normally for a horizontal image -Get a tight shot of your face – head and shoulders only -Optional: write on a sheet of paper with a thick marker or print out "I lend my face for justice!" Hold this just under your chin for the photo. 2. Email it to us at ace70daily@photos.flickr.com All images will be reviewed before being posted. Important - Terms of Agreement: By uploading or sending your picture to us, you consent to AI using your image in any materials, including print and electronic, for all actions undertaken by our organization on behalf of Troy Davis. www.amnestyusa.org/abolish - dpac@aiusa.org - 202-544-0200

GEORGIA: JUSTICE MATTERS
STOP THE EXECUTION OF TROY DAVIS
Troy Davis has been on death row for more than 18 years for the murder of police officer Mark Allen MacPhail in Savannah, Georgia. His compelling case of innocence raises critical questions about the death penalty and the larger criminal justice system. There was no physical evidence against Troy Davis The weapon used in the crime was never found The case against him consists entirely of witness testimony Seven of the nine non-police witnesses have recanted or contradicted their testimony Many of the witnesses have stated that they were pressured or coerced by police One of the two witnesses who has not recanted or contradicted testimony is the principal alternative suspect Nine individuals have signed affidavits implicating the alternative suspect There has never been an evidentiary hearing in a federal appeals court to examine the new witness testimony On August 17, 2009, the US Supreme Court ordered an evidentiary hearing in Savannah’s federal district court to review evidence of Davis’ innocence. If the judicial system continues to focus on procedures and technicalities instead of the fundamental issue of innocence, Davis is at risk of a fourth execution date. We must prevent his execution and ensure justice for Troy Davis! Educate your community about his case and the larger system it represents. Sign the petition and ask others to do the same.

LEARN MORE and TAKE ACTION: www.justicefortroy.org
Read Amnesty International’s report: ’Unconscionable and Unconstitutional’: Troy Davis Facing Fourth Execution Date in Two Years
www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/AMR51/069/2009

GEORGIA: JUSTICE MATTERS
STOP THE EXECUTION OF TROY DAVIS
We the undersigned call on Georgia authorities to grant clemency to Troy Davis. We are concerned that strong questions of innocence have yet to be resolved. Seven of the nine non-police witnesses have changed their story and no physical evidence links Davis to the crime. Georgia cannot afford to make such a mistake! Sincerely, NAME ADDRESS CITY, STATE, ZIP
Keep me updated

Please send completed petitions to:

THE DEATH PENALTY AND RACE
Updated Apr. 2010

Since 1977, the overwhelming majority of death row defendants have been executed for killing white victims, although African-Americans make up about half of all homicide victims. African-Americans account for one in three people executed since 1977.

In a 1990 report, the non-partisan U.S. General Accounting Office found “a

pattern of evidence indicating racial disparities in the charging, sentencing, and imposition of the death penalty.” The
study concluded that a defendant was several times more likely to be sentenced to death if the murder victim was white. This has been confirmed by the findings of many other studies that, holding all other factors constant, the single most reliable predictor of whether someone will be sentenced to death is the race of the victim.

Race of homicide victims in cases resulting in death sentences since 1976
2% 15%

6%

African American Hispanic
White

77%

Other

From initial charging decisions to plea bargaining to jury sentencing, African-Americans are treated more harshly when they are defendants, and their lives are accorded less value when they are victims. All-white or virtually all-white juries are still commonplace in many localities. A report sponsored by the American Bar Association in 2007 concluded that one-third of African-American death row inmates in Philadelphia would have received sentences of life imprisonment if they had not been African-American. A January 2003 study released by the University of Maryland concluded that race and geography are major factors in death penalty decisions. Specifically, prosecutors are more likely to seek a death sentence when the race of the victim is white and are less likely to seek a death sentence when the victim is African-American. A 2007 study of death sentences in Connecticut conducted by Yale University School of Law revealed that African-American defendants receive death penalty at three times the rate of white defendants in cases where the victims are white. In addition, killers of white
“We simply cannot say we live in a country that offers equal justice to all Americans when racial disparities plague the system by which our society imposes the ultimate punishment.”
- Senator Russ Feingold on Civil Rights as a Priority for the 108th Congress, Senate, January 2003
Read the full report: “United States of America: Death by discrimination - the continuing role of race in capital cases” http://www.amnesty.org/en/report/info/AMR51/046/2003

INEFFECTIVE LEGAL REPRESENTATION
Updated Sept. 2009

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Nearly one in four condemned inmates has been represented at trial or on appeal by court-appointed attorneys who have been disciplined for professional misconduct . ("Quality Of Justice" Dallas Morning News, Sept. 10, 2000) An investigation by the Texas Defender Service in 2002 found that, "Death row inmates today face a one-in-three chance of being executed without having the case properly investigated by a competent attorney and without having any claims of innocence or unfairness presented or heard." In Washington State, one-fifth of the 84 people who have faced execution in the past 20 years were represented by lawyers who had been, or were later, disbarred, suspended or arrested. (Overall, the state’s disbarment rate for attorneys is less than 1%.) (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Aug. 6-8, 2001) According to an investigation by the Chicago Tribune, 12% of those sentenced to death from 1976-1999 were represented by, "an attorney who had been, or was later, disbarred or suspended--disciplinary sanctions reserved for conduct so incompetent, unethical or even criminal that the state believes an attorney's license should be taken away." In North Carolina, at least 16 death row inmates, including 3 who were executed, were represented by lawyers who have been disbarred or disciplined for unethical or criminal conduct. (Charlotte Observer, Sept. 9, 2000) Inadequate counsel can also mean overworked attorneys with not enough resources. In Troy’s case he was represented in state appeals court by a resource center with two lawyers supporting 80 clients, and they were unable to produce the evidence of innocence we are all now familiar with. This proved extremely costly when he got into federal court.

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I desperately tried to represent Mr. Davis during this period, but the lack of adequate resources and the numerous intervening crises made that impossible ... We were simply trying to avert total disaster rather than provide any kind of active or effective representation.
– Lawyer working on Troy Davis' state appeals In 1996, Bill Clinton signed the Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) into law, which had the effect of adding more red tape to the process of seeking federal appeals. Because of AEDPA, you cannot get a hearing on evidence of innocence, no matter how compelling, unless you also prove that you could not have raised that evidence earlier. In other words, even if you can prove your innocence, a court will not hear your evidence if they determine you could have brought it up in a lower court. Under AEDPA, the fundamental question of innocence is less important that the procedural rules of the appellate process. Despite Troy’s overworked and under -resourced legal support in state court, federal courts have ruled that Troy could have raised his evidence of innocence earlier, and have denied him a hearing, not because of the quality of the evidence but only because the timing of its raising. Inadequate counsel, combined with AEDPA’s procedural restrictions - and harsh interpretations of federal judges about what Troy’s state lawyers realistically could have done – have conspired to deny Troy Davis a hearing on his evidence of innocence.

THE DEATH PENALTY AND INNOCENCE
Updated Apr. 2010

Since 1973, over 130 people have been released from death rows throughout the country due to evidence that they were wrongfully convicted. In 2003 alone, 10 wrongfully convicted defendants were released from death row.

Examples of wrongful convictions:
Illinois Madison Hobley, Aaron Patterson, Stanley Howard and LeRoy Orange, pardoned in 2003 North Carolina Jonathon Hoffman exonerated in 2007 Sent to death row on the basis of “confessions” extracted through the use of torture by former Chicago Police Commander Jon Burge and other Area 2 police officers in Chicago. They were pardoned by outgoing Governor George Ryan, who also commuted the remaining 167 death sentences in Illinois to life imprisonment.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the 1995 murder of a jewelry store owner. During Hoffman’s first trial, the state's key witness, Johnell Porter, made undisclosed deals with the prosecutors for testifying against his cousin. Porter has since recanted his testimony, stating that he lied in order to get back at his cousin for stealing money from him.

Alabama Daniel Wade Moore acquitted in 2009

When Moore was originally found guilty for murder and sexual assault of Karen Tipton in 2002 he was sentenced to death by the judge overruling the jury’s original consensus. However, he was acquitted in 2009 when 256 pages of withheld evidence were finally revealed.

Factors leading to wrongful convictions include: Inadequate legal representation Police and prosecutorial misconduct Perjured testimony and mistaken eyewitness testimony Racial prejudice Jailhouse “snitch” testimony Suppression and/or misinterpretation of mitigating evidence Community/political pressure to solve a case

“I cannot support a system which, in its administration, has proven so fraught with error and has come so close to the ultimate nightmare, the state’s taking of innocent life… Until I can be sure that everyone sentenced to death in Illinois is truly guilty, until I can be sure with moral certainty that no innocent man or woman is facing a lethal injection, no one will meet that fate.”
- Governor George Ryan of Illinois, January 2000, in declaring a moratorium on executions in his state, after the 13th Illinois death row inmate had been released from prison due to wrongful conviction. In the same time period, 12 others had been executed.

DEATH PENALTY FACTS
Updated December 2009

THE DEATH PENALTY DEFIES INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS STANDARDS. Over two-thirds of the countries in the world – 139 – have now abolished the death penalty in law or practice. In 2008, 93% of all known executions took place in five countries - China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and the US. THE DEATH PENALTY IS RACIALLY BIASED. Since 1977, the overwhelming majority of death row defendants (79%) have been executed for killing white victims, even though African-Americans make up about half of all homicide victims. THE DEATH PENALTY CLAIMS INNOCENT LIVES. Since 1973, 139 people have been released from death rows throughout the country due to evidence of their wrongful conviction. In this same time period, more than 1,000 people have been executed. THE DEATH PENALTY IS NOT A DETERRENT. FBI data shows that all 14 states without capital punishment in 2008 had homicide rates per capita at or below the national rate. THE DEATH PENALTY COSTS MORE AND DIVERTS RESOURCES FROM GENUINE CRIME CONTROL. The greatest costs associated with the death penalty occur prior to and during trial, not in postconviction proceedings. Even if all post-conviction proceedings (appeals) were abolished, the death penalty would still be more expensive than alternative sentences. THE DEATH PENALTY DISREGARDS MENTAL ILLNESS. The execution of those with mental illness or “the insane” is clearly prohibited by international law. In the US, constitutional protections for those with other forms of mental illness are minimal, however, and dozens of prisoners have been executed despite suffering from serious mental illness. THE DEATH PENALTY IS ARBITRARY AND UNFAIR. Almost all death row inmates could not afford their own attorney at trial. Local politics, the location of the crime, plea bargaining, and pure chance affect the process and make it a lottery of who lives and who dies. Since the US Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976, 80% of all executions have taken place in the South (37% in Texas alone).
LEARN MORE ABOUT THE DEATH PENALTY: www.amnestyusa.org/death-penalty/death-penalty-facts FIND OUT ABOUT THE DEATH PENALTY IN YOUR STATE: www.amnestyusa.org/death-penalty/action/page.do?id=1101153 Amnesty International USA’s Death Penalty Abolition Campaign: 202-544-0200 / bevans@aiusa.org

END THE DEATH PENALTY

www.amnestyusa.org/abolish

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RESOURCE PEOPLE
If you need help with your activities or want to connect with other groups in your area, here are people that can help. Your State Death Penalty Abolition Coordinator (SDPAC) SDPACs are volunteer leaders who keep up with death penalty developments, particularly in your state. They have a lot of knowledge about the issue. They can help connect you to local speakers, share with you the focus of the work in your state and how you can get plugged in. Your Field Organizer or DPAC can connect you to your SDPAC. Your Field Organizer in your Regional Office Field Organizers are the primary activist support staff people. Your Field Organizer can help you access materials in the Regional Office, connect you to other activists and help you if you need help figuring out your activities. The Death Penalty Abolition Campaign (DPAC) in the Washington Office DPAC can help you find materials and resources for your activities and answer your questions about the issues, as AIUSA’s issue experts on capital punishment. Please contact your Field Organizer for support first, but let DPAC know if you have issue-specific needs.

REGIONAL OFFICES AND FIELD ORGANIZERS
Mid-Atlantic Regional Office 600 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20003 202-544-0200 Fax: 202-546-7142 Emilia Gutierrez (egutierrez@aiusa.org): Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington DC, West Virginia Northeast Regional Office 58 Day St., Somerville, MA 02144 617-623-0202 Fax: 617-623-2005 Cynthia Gabriel (cgabriel@aiusa.org): Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont Thenjiwe McHarris (NY Office 212-633-4215, tmcharris@aiusa.org): New York, New Jersey Mid-West Regional Office 53 W. Jackson Blvd., Room 731, Chicago, IL 60604 312-427-2060 Fax: 312-427-2589 Ernest Coverson (ecoverson@aiusa.org): Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota Carrie Neff (cneff@aiusa.org): Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, Wisconsin Southern Regional Office 730 Peachtree St. Suite 1060, Atlanta, GA 30308 404-876-5661 Fax: 404-876-2276 Everette Thompson (ethompson@aiusa.org): Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi Mana Kharrazi (mkharrazi@aiusa.org): Alabama, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina Lisa Adler, (Ladler@aiusa.org): Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas Jared Feuer (jfeuer@aiusa.org): Georgia Western Regional Office 350 Sansome St, Ste 210, San Francisco, CA 94104 415-288-1800 Fax: 415-288-1861 William Butkus (wbutkus@aiusa.org): Alaska, Hawaii, Montana, Nevada, N. California Kalaya'an Mendoza (kmendoza@aiusa.org): Colorado, Idaho, S. California, Wyoming Sara Schmidt (sschmidt@aiusa.org): Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington

DEATH PENALTY ABOLITION CAMPAIGN (DPAC)
AIUSA National Capitol Office, 600 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20003 202-544-0200 x 500 Fax: 202-546-7142 Brian Evans, Campaigner: bevans@aiusa.org Laura Moye, Director: lmoye@aiusa.org

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AIUSA, 600 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20003 / Fax: 202-546-7142 / bevans@aiusa.org

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