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PASADENA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

SCHOOL ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN


2016-2017
-The Single Plan for Student Achievement
Altadena Elementary School
19-64881-6021505
CDS Code
Date of this revision: May 20, 2016
The Single Plan for Student Achievement (SAP/SPSA) is a plan of actions to raise the academic performance of all
students to the level of performance goals established under the California Academic Performance Index. California
Education Code sections 41507, 41572, and 64001 and the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) require each school
to consolidate all school plans for programs funded through the School and Library Improvement Block Grant, the Pupil
Retention Block Grant, the Consolidated Application, and NCLB Program Improvement into the Single Plan for Student
Achievement.
For additional information on school programs and how you may become involved locally, please contact the following
person:
Contact Person:

Lorena Martinez

Position:

Principal

Phone Number:

626-396-5650

Address:

743 East Calaveras Street


Altadena, CA 91001
martinez .lorena@ousd.us

E-mail Address:

The District Governing Board approved this revision of the School Plan on .

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Table of Contents
Mission Statements and School Descriptions ............................................................................................................................................3
School Data for 2015-2016 School Year (Prior Year)..................................................................................................................................6
School Improvement Progress Narrative ...................................................................................................................................................7
Planned Improvements for Student Performance - Summary of School Targets for School Year 2016-2017 ........................................10
Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page.....................................................................................................12
Summary of Expenditures in this Plan .....................................................................................................................................................65
Total Allocations and Expenditures by Funding Source ......................................................................................................................65
Total Expenditures by Object Type .....................................................................................................................................................66
Total Expenditures by Object Type and Funding Source.....................................................................................................................67
Total Expenditures by Goal .................................................................................................................................................................67
Restricted Funding Personnel ..................................................................................................................................................................68
Centralized Services .................................................................................................................................................................................69
School Site Council Membership .............................................................................................................................................................70
Recommendations and Assurances .........................................................................................................................................................71
Appendices...............................................................................................................................................................................................72
School Program Improvement (PI) Activities Plan 2015-2016 ............................................................................................................73
School Accountability Report Card......................................................................................................................................................75
Site Level Parent Involvement Policy ..................................................................................................................................................76
Site Level School/Parent Compact ......................................................................................................................................................77
Attendance Improvement Implementation Plan ................................................................................................................................78
Instructional Services ..........................................................................................................................................................................79
Comprehensive School Safety Plan Sb-187 .........................................................................................................................................84
Kindergarten Transition Plan and Objectives ......................................................................................................................................85

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Mission Statements and School Descriptions


2016-2017
School Vision and Mission
Mission:
It is the mission of Altadena Elementary School to develop caring, responsible citizens who embrace a strong sense of self and
community.
The staff at Altadena Elementary School has one simple focus: to help produce citizens who are academically and socially prepared
to overcome the twenty-first centurys challenges of an exponentially increasing global community. We are committed to providing
every student with a rigorous, balanced, and integrated curriculum in a safe and productive learning environment.
Vision:
Altadena Elementary School is the school where college- and career-bound students achieve through high academic standards,
rigorous instruction, timely assessments, and mutual accountability.
Our motto states, Altadena Elementary: Where college bound students attend.

School Profile Description


Please include:
geographical, social, cultural, educational and economic community base
grade levels/school configuration
student enrollment figures/trends
poverty level (e.g., percentage of students that are on free/reduced price lunch)
feeder program and schools
language, racial and ethnic make-up of the student body
school staffing
school facilities, including technology, library and media resources
how the school community works together to establish and promote the culture of the school
description of how the school provides individual student academic assessment results in language the parents understand,
including an interpretation of those results
other important characteristics of the school and
FOR SCHOOLS IN PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT (PI) identify areas and/or subgroups not meeting AYP targets and identify
the schools year of PI status.
Geographical, Social, Cultural, Educational and Economic Community Base:
Altadena Elementary School has a very special heritage, having been built on the present site in 1903. Altadena Elementary can be
reached by traveling north on Lake Avenue to Calaveras Street, then west on Calaveras Street to El Molino. The PreK-5th grade
Altadena campus is located on the corner of Calaveras and El Molino. Altadena Elementary School is one of the 18 elementary
schools in the Pasadena Unified School District. Our schools community is highly supportive of our school and helps set the high
academic goals for all of our student.
Grade Levels/School Configuration:

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Altadena Elementary is a Full Inclusion school and serves both regular education and special education students in grades K through
Fifth. The school has a full day Kindergarten program. The staffing ratio for grades K through Fifth is 25:1. All 14 of our teachers are
highly qualified. Currently, there are two Kindergarten classes, one First/Second combination class, one First grade class,one Second
grade class, two Third grade classes, two Fourth grade classes, and two Fifth grade classes (separated in blocks according to subject
matter one for Math and Science and the other for English Language Arts and Social Science). Altadena School also offers
Coordinated Early Intervening Services (CEIS) for Kindergarten and First grade students who need extra academic support in English
and Mathematics. In addition, Altadena Elementarys Full Inclusion program serves students with both mild-moderate and
moderate-severe disabilities at all grade levels and offers three Learning Labs with two full-time and one part-time Special Education
Coordinators to meet the specific needs of our students with Special Education IEPs. Altadena Elementary also boasts a Running
Club Program (Tuesday-Thursday mornings) and a Fine Arts Rotation Program on Friday afternoons.
Student Enrollment Figures/Trends:
Currently, Altadena has 298 students enrolled. In the 2014 - 2015 school year, 263 students were enrolled in Kindergarten through
Fifth grade. In the 2013-2014 school year, 283 students were enrolled in grades pre-Kindergarten through Five. From 2010,
enrollment figures show a steady increase in the number of students Special Education IEPs.
Poverty Level (e.g., percentage of students that are on free/reduced price lunch):
This year, 84% of Altadena School's students participate in the Free/Reduced Lunch Program, which is 7-percentage points less than
the 2014 - 2015 school year. Based on the level of participation in the Free/Reduced Lunch Progam, 84% of Altadena School's
students are Socioeconomically Disadvantaged.
Feeder Program and Schools:
Altadena Elementary primarily feeds into Elliot Middle School.
Language, Racial and Ethnic Make-up of the Student Body:
Altadena Elementary School has a diverse student body, with 54% self-identified as Hispanic/Latino and 32% self-identified as
African American. Of the remaining 14%, 4% are White, 2% are Asian, and 8% are unidentified or Other ethnicity/race. The Home
Language Survey results indicate that 59% of the students speak English only, 40% speak Spanish, and 1% speak a language other
than English or Spanish. Additionally 30% of the students at Altadena School are classified as English learners. ______ of the
students have a Special Education IEP.
School Staffing:
Altadena Elementary School has 16 fully credentialed teachers and/or certificated staff who meet all credential requirements in
accordance with State of California guidelines. There were no teacher misassignments/vacancies for the 2013-2014 school year.
100% of classes are taught by No Child Left Behind (NCLB) compliant teachers.
School Facilities, including Technology, Library and Media Resources:
Altadena Elementary School is currently comprised of 30 classrooms, a Resource Staff Room, a Resource Specialist Room, a Speech
Therapy Room, three Learning Labs, a LEARNS Tutoring Room, a DVEAL Services Room, a Counseling Room, a Library, a Staff Lounge,
a Nurses Room, a Staff Workroom, two Community Rooms, a Front Office, a Cafeteria/Auditorium, two offices, and three
playgrounds.
Computer skills and concepts are integrated throughout the standard curriculum so as to prepare students for technological growth
and opportunities. The school boasts 40 laptops, 50 Writers, 30 iPods, 30 iPads, and 60 Chromebooks. Students receive computerassisted instruction on a regular schedule. Software and downloaded applications include programs to develop critical thinking skills,
technological skills, and mathematical proficiency.
How the School Community Works Together to Establish and Promote the Culture of the School:
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The Altadena School community helps to set high academic goals for all of our students. The faculty provides a rigorous and
balanced instructional program based on the California State Standards and is supported by a school community that works together
to establish and promote a culture of teamwork, high expectations, and success as well as a positive climate for learning and
achieving.
As an integral part of our schools educational program, all students are encouraged to participate in the schools academic and
extracurricular activities designed to promote positive attitudes, encourage achievement, and aid in the prevention of behavioral
problems. As such, students at Altadena Elementary School are guided by specific rules and expectations that promote respect,
responsibility, and safety. The overarching goal is to provide students with opportunities to learn and display self-discipline and
control. Furthermore, here at Altadena School, students academic progress, good behavior, and achievements are recognized and
celebrated during monthly school-wide assemblies.
Students have the opportunity to participate in the after-school LEARNS program. The LEARNS program provides students with one
hour of academic studies, one hour of homework help, and one hour of enrichment. The LEARNS program works closely with the
staff at Altadena School to support the academic growth of students.
Altadena Elementary School has also implemented a Fine Arts Friday Program, where each grade level participates in the fine arts.
Students in grades three through five receive instrumental music instruction. We also provide students the opportunity to be
exposed to a variety of musical performances through music and singing assemblies such as string quartets and opera.
Description of How the School Provides Individual Student Academic Assessment Results in Language the Parents Understand,
Including an Interpretation of those Results:
Various measures of student achievement are used as an ongoing part of the quality instructional program at Altadena Elementary
School. These measure students actual progress as well as the effectiveness of the instructional program. ELA, Math, and Science
Trimester Assessments are given to all grades to monitor students progress in core subject areas. Altadena Elementary School
provides individual student academic assessment results and an interpretation of those results in various ways and in the languages
the parents understand. The following are used to ensure that all parents are regularly communicated with and understand the
information:
Trimester Report Cards are available in English and the students home language.
Progress Reports bearing ELA Assessment Scores, Math Assessment results and results from other class assessments (both
formal and informal) for all core subjects (ELA, Math, Social Studies, and Science) are available in English and the students
home language.
Teachers avail themselves for conferences with parents regarding their childs progress. as needed,
Other Important Characteristics of the School:
Altadena Elementary School is continually working towards improving student achievement. As such, the school is continually
seeking ways to ensure progress and achievement through ongoing professional development and analyses of student assessment
data.

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School Data for 2015-2016 School Year (Prior Year)


Student Enrollment by Group

Student Demographics

Culture/Climate
14-15

15-16

94.74

94.16

--------

African American

76

26.7%

Attendance %

Asian

0.4%

Truancy %

Hispanic/Latino

180

63.2%

White

13

4.6%

# of

Multiple/No Response

0.4%

# of individual students

Other

1%

English Learner

86

30%

# mandated

Socio-Econ. Disadvantaged

250

84%

# permissive

Special Education

52

17%

Foster Youth
Total Enrollment:

Suspensions
3.1

9.9

Referral for Expulsions

%
285

--------------Reclassification
Target

-------15% increase

% of students who
reclassified

10.8%

% of students that moved


up by 1+ levels

36.1%

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School Improvement Progress Narrative


Target/Goal/ Focus
Area

Prior Year Goal


Use either annual goal/target (if available) or monitoring
indicators

Met? Yes (Y) No (N)


Progress (P)

Using initial benchmarks, trimester, targeted online programs, No


and performance tasks, 60 % of all students will be at grade
level and 100% of students will show at least a 10% positive
growth.

Analysis
Explain why met or did not meet
Analyze and address both implementation and outcomes.
The results of the Trimester 1 and Trimester 2 Mathematics
assessments, showing the percentage of students who met or
exceeded grade level standards, indicate that this goal was not
met. The assessment results are below:
1st Grade: T1 = 50% and T2 = 83%
2nd Grade: T1 = 29% and T2 = 24%
3rd Grade: T1 = 16% and T2 = 23%
4th Grade: T1 = 2% and T2 = 2%
5th Grade: T1 = 2% and T2 = 0

Math

The goal was not met because our students were not prepared for
the rigor of the assessments. This issue will be addressed through
professional development and collaboration activities for the
faculty.

Using initial benchmarks, trimester, targeted online programs, No


and performance tasks, 60 % of all students will be at grade
level and 100% of students will show at least a 10% positive
growth.

The results of the Trimester 1 and Trimester 2 English Language


Arts assessments, showing the percentage of students who met or
exceeded grade level standards, indicate that this goal was not
met. The assessment results are below:
1st Grade: T1 = 35% and T2 = 74%
2nd Grade: T1 = 12% and T2 = 21%
3rd Grade: T1 = 18% and T2 = 24%
4th Grade: T1 = 11% and T2 = 15%
5th Grade: T1 = 4% and T2 = 0

English Language
Arts

The goal was not met because our students were not prepared for
the rigor of the assessments. This issue will be addressed through
professional development and collaboration activities for the
faculty.

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At least 20% of the EL students will reclassify; 30% of EL Progress


students will move one or more levels up; and no students will
regress.
Closing the Gap

Based on the CELDT and other data, only 11% of our English
learners were reclassified to fluent English proficiency. On the
CELDT, 41% of our English learners moved one or more levels, and
19% of the English learners had negative movement on the CELDT.
The goal was not met because our students did not possess the
English language skills needed to succeed on the CELDT. This issue
will be addressed through professional development and
collaboration activities for the faculty.

Parent involvement in SSC, AAPC, PTA, and ELAC will increase No


by 15%. Benchmark attendance will be taken at Aug/Sept
2015 meetings for comparison. Back to School Night and
Parent/Community
Open House sign in sheets will be collected and
Engagement
compared/contrasted.

Baseline data and current data are not available.

Out of classroom referrals will decrease by 25% throughout No


the school year. Initial measurements to be recorded in
Aug/Sept. of 2015 and to be compared to data collected
School Safety,
throughout the remainder of the school year. 25% goal to be
Climate and Culture reached by March 2016. School wide implementation of RTI
and character education.

RtI not implemented schoolwide and training has not been


provided for staff.

School Selected

Graduation
Career/College
Ready
Formerly CAHSEE

School will continue to expand its use of technology with the Progress
addition of an online program to support math skill acquisition
and one to support literacy.

Some classrooms have expanded use of technology in a manner


that supports math skills acquisition and literacy.

N/A

Other Successes/Challenges/Areas for Improvement not noted above as part of a specific targeted area for improvement
Success/Challenge/Area for Improvement
The Single Plan for Student Achievement

Related Goal Area (if


applicable)

Analysis - What made success possible? For challenges or areas of improvement, address
the underlying needs and potential barriers.
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Inclusion

Closing the Achievement Gap Met all timelines for IEP meetings.

Technology

Technology

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

Implemented instruction in the use of IPads, IPods, laptops, and Chromebooks for students.

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Planned Improvements for Student Performance - Summary of School Targets for School Year 2016-2017
Area of Focus

School Targets

Math

By May 2017, 50% of the students in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades will meet or exceed grade level standards in mathematics, as measured by the
2017 CAASPP-SBAC.

English Language Arts

By May 2017, 50% of the students in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades will meet or exceed grade level standards in English language arts, as measured
by the 2017 CASSPP-SBAC.

Closing the Gap- must include


one indicator for EL

By November 1, 2016, 100% of ELs will advance one level on the English proficiency scale, as measured by the CELDT. By May 31, 2017, 50%
of English learners will meet or exceed grade level standards in English Language Arts.

Parent and Community


Engagement

By June 2017, 75% of the parents/guardians will have attended at least two of the six parent information nights from among the following
choices: Back to School Night, Parent-Teacher Conference, Family Reading Night, Family Math Night, Science Fair and Art Show, and teachersponsored parent information nights.
By June 2017, active participation in ELAC and AAPC will have increased by 50%, compared to the participation in those parent groups during
the 2015-2016 school year.

School Safety, Climate and


Culture

By December 2016, Altadena Elementary School will have trained all staff in the implementation of the Positive Behavioral Interventions and
Support (PBIS) program, aka RtI-Behavior, and there will be schoolwide implementation of the program.

School Selected*

By October 2016, all teachers will integrate technology, across the curriculum, at every grade level and students in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades
will routinely use computers in the classroom for assessments, research, writing, and presentations.

Graduation/Career and College N/A


Ready (High Schools Only)
must include an indicator for
CAHSEE
* Select one of the following: Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology, Special Education.

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CDE MEASURES(not exhaustive list)


These are the measures identified within the LCAP as per CDE

PRIORITIES

Conditions for Learning

Basics (B)

Rate of teacher misassignment


Student access to standards-aligned instructional materials
Facilities in good repair

Implementation of CCSS (CCSS)

Implementation of CCSS for all students, including ELs and students

Course Access (CA)

Student access and enrollment in a broad course of study that includes all of the subject areas

Student Achievement (SA)

Performance on standardized tests


Score on API
Share of students that are college and career ready
Share of ELs that become English proficient
EL reclassification rate
Share f students that pass AP exams with 3 or higher
Share of students determined prepared for college as measure by the EAP

Other Student Outcomes (OSO)

Other indicators of student performance in required areas of study. May include performance
on other exams

Parent Involvement (PI)

Efforts to seek parent input


Promotion of parental participation

Student Engagement (SE)

School attendance rates


Chronic absenteeism rates,
Middle and high school drop out rates
Graduation rates

School Climate (SC)

Student suspension rates


Student expulsion rates
Other local measures

Student Outcomes

Engagement

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Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
By May 2017, 50% of the students in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades will meet or exceed grade level standards in mathematics, as measured by the 2017 CAASPP-SBAC.

Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
X Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

1st Grade: Fewer than 70%


of the students in first
grade
mastered
the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

-MA.1.NBT.B.2.
Understand that the
two digits of a twodigit number
represent amounts of
tens and ones.
Understand the
following as special
cases:
-MA.1.OA.C.5. Relate
counting to addition
and subtraction (e.g.,
by counting on 2 to

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

Daily activities will

focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
rigorous mathematics
program, with
particular attention to
number sense,

algebraic reasoning,
measurement,
geometry, operations,
factoring, problem
solving, statistics, data
analysis, and
probability.
Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
administrator,

instructional coaches,
resource staff.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in Math.

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

May 2016 - June x


2017

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
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What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

add 2).

-MA.1.OA.C.6. Add
and subtract within 20,
demonstrating fluency
for addition and
subtraction within 10.
Use strategies such as
counting on; making
ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2
+ 4 = 10 + 4 = 14);
decomposing a
number leading to a
ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3
- 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using
the relationship
between addition and
subtraction (e.g.,
knowing that 8 + 4 =
12, one knows 12 - 8 =
4); and creating
equivalent but easier
or known sums (e.g.,
adding 6 + 7 by
creating the known
equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 =
12 + 1 = 13).

Use of technology,
manipulatives, and
visuals, and flexible
grouping as
instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Professional
development focused
on rigor, stamina, and
best practices in
mathematics.

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

2nd Grade: Fewer than


50% of the students in
second grade mastered the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
rigorous mathematics

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

grade level will meet


or exceed the
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in Math.

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
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May 2016 - June


2017

100,000
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What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

-MA.2.G.A.3. Partition
circles and rectangles
into two, three, or four
equal shares, describe
the shares using the
words halves, thirds,
half of, a third of, etc.,
and describe the
whole as two halves,
three thirds, four
fourths. Recognize

that equal shares of


identical wholes need
not have the same
shape.

-MA.2.MD.C.8. Solve
word problems
involving dollar bills,
quarters, dimes,
nickels, and pennies,
using $ and symbols
appropriately.

-MA.2.NBT.A.4.
Compare two threedigit numbers based
on meanings of the
hundreds, tens, and
ones digits, using >, =,
and < symbols to
record the results of
comparisons.

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

program, with
particular attention to
number sense,

algebraic reasoning,
measurement,
geometry, operations,
factoring, problem
solving, statistics, data
analysis, and
probability.
Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
administrator,

instructional coaches,
resource staff.

Use of technology,
manipulatives, and
visuals, and flexible
grouping as
instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Professional
development focused
on rigor, stamina, and
best practices in

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

Expenditures
By the end of the first
trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in Math.

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in Math.

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What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

mathematics.

3rd Grade: Fewer than 50%


of the students in third
grade
mastered
the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

-MA.3.MD.A.1. Tell
and write time to the
nearest minute and
measure time intervals
in minutes. Solve word
problems involving
addition and
subtraction of time
intervals in minutes,
e.g., by representing

the problem on a
number line diagram.
-MA.3.OA.D.9.
Identify arithmetic
patterns (including
patterns in the
addition table or
multiplication table),

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

Daily activities will

focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
rigorous mathematics
program, with
particular attention to
number sense,

algebraic reasoning,
measurement,
geometry, operations,
factoring, problem
solving, statistics, data
analysis, and
probability.
Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
administrator,

instructional coaches,
resource staff.
Use of technology,
manipulatives, and
visuals, and flexible
grouping as

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in Math.

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

May 2016 - June


2017

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
15 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

and explain them


using properties of
operations.

-MA.3.NBT.A.1 Use
place value
understanding to
round whole numbers
to the nearest 10 or
100.

instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

-MA.3.NBT.A.2.
Fluently add and
subtract within 1000

using strategies and


algorithms based on
place value, properties
of operations, and/or
the relationship
between addition and
subtraction.

-MA.3.MD.B.4.
Generate
measurement data by
measuring lengths
using rulers marked
with halves and
fourths of an inch.
Show the data by
making a line plot,
where the horizontal
scale is marked off in
appropriate unitswhole numbers,
halves, or quarters.

-MA.3.NF.A.3.a.

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

assessments in Math.

Professional
development focused
on rigor, stamina, and
best practices in
mathematics.
Time for teachers to
collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

16 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

Understand two
fractions as equivalent
(equal) if they are the
same size, or the same
point on a number
line.

-MA.3.NF.A.3.d.
Compare two fractions
with the same
numerator or the
same denominator by
reasoning about their
size. Recognize that
comparisons are valid
only when the two
fractions refer to the
same whole. Record
the results of
comparisons with the
symbols >, =, or <, and
justify the conclusions,
e.g., by using a visual
fraction model.

-MA.3.NF.A.2.b.
Represent a fraction
a/b on a number line
diagram by marking
off a lengths 1/b from
0. Recognize that the
resulting interval has
size a/b and that its
endpoint locates the
number a/b on the
number line.

-MA.3.NF.A.3. Explain

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

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6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

equivalence of
fractions in special
cases, and compare
fractions by reasoning
about their size.

-MA.3.OA.A.2.
Interpret wholenumber quotients of
whole numbers, e.g.,
interpret 56 8 as the
number of objects in
each share when 56
objects are partitioned
equally into 8 shares,
or as a number of
shares when 56
objects are partitioned
into equal shares of 8
objects each.

-MA.3.OA.B.5. Apply
properties of
operations as
strategies to multiply
and divide.

-MA.3.NF.A.2.a.
Represent a fraction
1/b on a number line
diagram by defining
the interval from 0 to
1 as the whole and
partitioning it into b
equal parts. Recognize
that each part has size
1/b and that the
endpoint of the part

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

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6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

based at 0 locates the


number 1/b on the
number line.

4th Grade: Fewer than 50%


of the students in fourth
grade
mastered
the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

-MA.4.OA.C.5.
Generate a number or
shape pattern that
follows a given rule.
Identify apparent
features of the pattern
that were not explicit
in the rule itself.
-MA.4.OA.A.2.

Multiply or divide to
solve word problems
involving multiplicative
comparison, e.g., by
using drawings and
equations with a

symbol for the


unknown number to
represent the
problem,
distinguishing
multiplicative
comparison from

Daily activities will

focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
rigorous mathematics
program, with
particular attention to
number sense,

algebraic reasoning,
measurement,
geometry, operations,
factoring, problem
solving, statistics, data
analysis, and
probability.
Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
administrator,

instructional coaches,
resource staff.
Use of technology,
manipulatives, and
visuals, and flexible
grouping as
instructional
strategies.

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in Math.

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

May 2016 - June


2017

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in Math.

Increase use of

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

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6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

additive comparison.

academic language.

-MA.4.OA.A.3. Solve

multistep word
problems posed with
whole numbers and
having whole-number
answers using the four
operations, including
problems in which

remainders must be
interpreted. Represent
these problems using
equations with a letter
standing for the
unknown quantity.

Assess the
reasonableness of
answers using mental
computation and
estimation strategies
including rounding.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

-MA.4.NBT.A.1.
Recognize that in a
multi-digit whole
number, a digit in one
place represents ten
times what it
represents in the place
to its right.

-MA.4.NBT.B.5.
Multiply a whole
number of up to four
digits by a one-digit
whole number, and
multiply two two-digit

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

Professional
development focused
on rigor, stamina, and
best practices in
mathematics.
Time for teachers to
collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

20 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

numbers, using
strategies based on
place value and the
properties of
operations. Illustrate
and explain the
calculation by using
equations, rectangular
arrays, and/or area
models.

-MA.4.OA.B.4. Find all


factor pairs for a
whole number in the
range 1-100.
Recognize that a
whole number is a
multiple of each of its
factors. Determine
whether a given whole
number in the range 1100 is a multiple of a
given one-digit
number. Determine
whether a given whole
number in the range 1100 is prime or
composite.

-MA.4.NBT.A.3. Use
place value
understanding to
round multi-digit
whole numbers to any
place.

-MA.4.NBT.A.2. Read
and write multi-digit

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

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6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

whole numbers using


base-ten numerals,
number names, and
expanded form.
Compare two multidigit numbers based
on meanings of the
digits in each place,
using >, =, and <
symbols to record the
results of
comparisons.

-MA.4.NBT.B.6. Find
whole-number
quotients and
remainders with up to
four-digit dividends
and one-digit divisors,
using strategies based
on place value, the
properties of
operations, and/or the
relationship between
multiplication and
division. Illustrate and
explain the calculation
by using equations,
rectangular arrays,
and/or area models.

-MA.4.NBT.B.4.
Fluently add and
subtract multi-digit
whole numbers using
the standard
algorithm.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

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6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

-MA.4.OA.A.1.
Interpret a
multiplication
equation as a
comparison, e.g.,
interpret 35 = 5 7 as
a statement that 35 is
5 times as many as 7
and 7 times as many
as 5. Represent verbal
statements of
multiplicative
comparisons as
multiplication
equations.

-MA.4.NF.B.4.b.
Understand a multiple
of a/b as a multiple of
1/b, and use this
understanding to
multiply a fraction by a
whole number.

-MA.4.NF.B.3.d. Solve
word problems
involving addition and
subtraction of
fractions referring to
the same whole and
having like
denominators, e.g., by
using visual fraction
models and equations
to represent the
problem.

-MA.4.NF.B.4.c. Solve

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

23 of 85

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

word problems
involving
multiplication of a
fraction by a whole
number, e.g., by using
visual fraction models
and equations to
represent the
problem.

-MA.4.NF.B.3.c. Add
and subtract mixed
numbers with like
denominators, e.g., by
replacing each mixed
number with an
equivalent fraction,
and/or by using
properties of
operations and the
relationship between
addition and
subtraction.

-MA.4.NF.C.5. Express
a fraction with
denominator 10 as an
equivalent fraction
with denominator 100,
and use this technique
to add two fractions
with respective
denominators 10 and
100.

-MA.4.NF.B.3.a.
Understand addition
and subtraction of

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

24 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

fractions as joining and


separating parts
referring to the same
whole.

-MA.4.NF.B.4.a.
Understand a fraction
a/b as a multiple of
1/b.

-MA.4.NF.A.1. Explain
why a fraction a/b is
equivalent to a
fraction (n a)/(n b)
by using visual fraction
models, with attention
to how the number
and size of the parts
differ even though the
two fractions
themselves are the
same size. Use this
principle to recognize
and generate
equivalent fractions.

-MA.4.NF.B.3.b.
Decompose a fraction
into a sum of fractions
with the same
denominator in more
than one way,
recording each
decomposition by an
equation. Justify
decompositions, e.g.,
by using a visual
fraction model.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

25 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

Fifth Grade: Fewer than


50% of the students in fifth
grade
mastered
the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

-MA.5.NBT.A.1.
Recognize that in a
multi-digit number, a
digit in one place
represents 10 times as
much as it represents
in the place to its right
and 1/10 of what it
represents in the place
to its left.

-MA.5.NBT.A.3. Read,
write, and compare
decimals to
thousandths.

-MA.5.NBT.A.2.
Explain patterns in the
number of zeros of the
product when
multiplying a number
by powers of 10, and
explain patterns in the
placement of the
decimal point when a
decimal is multiplied

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

Daily activities will

focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
rigorous mathematics
program, with
particular attention to
number sense,

algebraic reasoning,
measurement,
geometry, operations,
factoring, problem
solving, statistics, data
analysis, and
probability.
Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
administrator,

instructional coaches,
resource staff.
Use of technology,
manipulatives, and
visuals, and flexible
grouping as
instructional
strategies.

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in Math.

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

May 2016 - June


2017

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in Math, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in Math.

Increase use of
academic language.
Analyze assessment

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

26 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

or divided by a power
of 10. Use wholenumber exponents to
denote powers of 10.

-MA.5.OA.A.2. Write
simple expressions
that record
calculations with
numbers, and
interpret numerical
expressions without
evaluating them.

-MA.5.OA.B.3.
Generate two
numerical patterns
using two given rules.
Identify apparent
relationships between
corresponding terms.
Form ordered pairs
consisting of
corresponding terms
from the two patterns,
and graph the ordered
pairs on a coordinate
plane.

-MA.5.NBT.A.3. Read,
write, and compare
decimals to
thousandths.

-MA.5.NF.A.2. Solve
word problems
involving addition and
subtraction of

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

data and use the


analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Professional
development focused
on rigor, stamina, and
best practices in
mathematics.

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

27 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

fractions referring to
the same whole,
including cases of
unlike denominators,
e.g., by using visual
fraction models or
equations to represent
the problem. Use
benchmark fractions
and number sense of
fractions to estimate
mentally and assess
the reasonableness of
answers.

-MA.5.MD.B.2. Make
a line plot to display a
data set of
measurements in
fractions of a unit (1/2,
1/4, 1/8). Use
operations on
fractions for this grade
to solve problems
involving information
presented in line plots.

-MA.5.NF.A.1. Add
and subtract fractions
with unlike
denominators
(including mixed
numbers) by replacing
given fractions with
equivalent fractions in
such a way as to
produce an equivalent
sum or difference of

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

28 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

fractions with like


denominators.

-MA.5.NF.B.4. Apply
and extend previous
understandings of
multiplication to
multiply a fraction or
whole number by a
fraction.

-MA.5.NBT.B.7. Add,
subtract, multiply, and
divide decimals to
hundredths, using
concrete models or
drawings and
strategies based on
place value, properties
of operations, and/or
the relationship
between addition and
subtraction; relate the
strategy to a written
method and explain
the reasoning used.

-MA.5.NF.B.3.
Interpret a fraction as
division of the
numerator by the
denominator (a/b = a
b). Solve word
problems involving
division of whole
numbers leading to
answers in the form of
fractions or mixed

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

29 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

numbers, e.g., by using


visual fraction models
or equations to
represent the
problem.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

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Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
By May 2017, 50% of the students in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades will meet or exceed grade level standards in English language arts, as measured by the 2017 CASSPP-SBAC.

Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
X English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

1st Grade: Fewer than 60%


of the students in second
grade
mastered
the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

-LA.1.RF.1.3.g.
Recognize and read
grade-appropriate
irregularly spelled
words.
-LA.1.L.1.2.d. Use
conventional spelling
for words with
common spelling
patterns and for
frequently occurring
irregular words.

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.
Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

2000-2999: Classified
Personnel Salaries

Title I

28,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

31 of 85

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

May 2016 - June x


2017

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

-LA.1.L.1.2.e. Spell
untaught words
phonetically, drawing
on phonemic
awareness and spelling
conventions.

-LA.1.RL.1.1. Ask and


answer questions
about key details in a
text.

-LA.1.RL.1.2. Retell

stories, including key


details, and
demonstrate

understanding of their
central message or
lesson.

-LA.1.W.1.1. Write
opinion pieces in
which they introduce
the topic or name the
book they are writing
about, state an
opinion, supply a
reason for the opinion,
and provide some
sense of closure.

-LA.1.L.1.1.e. Use
verbs to convey a
sense of past, present,
and future (e.g.,

Yesterday I walked
home; Today I walk

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

Explicit instruction on
the parts of the
sentence, spelling, and
punctuation
Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

Increase use of
academic language.
Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.
Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.
Time for teachers to
collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.
Maintain a school
library with a library

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

32 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

home; Tomorrow I will


walk home).

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

coordinator.

2nd Grade: Fewer than


50% of the students in
second grade mastered the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

-LA.2.RI.2.1. Ask and


answer such questions
as who, what, when,
where, when, why,
and how to
demonstrate
understanding of key
details in a text.
-LA.2.L.2.1.a. Use

collective nouns (e.g.,


group).
-LA.2.L.2.2.a.
Capitalize holidays,
product names, and

geographic names.

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.

Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.
Explicit instruction on
the parts of the
sentence, spelling, and
punctuation
Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

2000-2999: Classified
Personnel Salaries

Title I

28,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

May 2016 - June


2017

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
33 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

Maintain a school
library with a library
coordinator.

3rd Grade: Fewer than 50%


of the students in third
grade
mastered
the
following standards, as

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

Language Arts.

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

34 of 85

May 2016 - June


2017

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

evidenced by the results of


the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

-LA.3.RI.3.7. Use
information gained
from illustrations (e.g.,
maps, photographs)
and the words in a text
to demonstrate
understanding of the
text (e.g., where,

when, why, and how


key events occur).
-LA.3.RI.3.2.
Determine the main
idea of a text; recount
the key details and
explain how they
support the main idea.
-LA.3.RL.3.5. Refer to
parts of stories,
dramas, and poems
when writing or
speaking about a text,
using terms such as
chapter, scene, and
stanza; describe how
each successive part
builds on earlier
sections.
-LA.3.RL.3.9. Compare
and contrast the
themes, settings, and
plots of stories written

components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)
or exceed grade level
standards.

Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.
Explicit instruction on
the parts of the
sentence, spelling, and
punctuation

Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

2000-2999: Classified
Personnel Salaries

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

Title I

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

28,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

35 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?
by the same author
about the same or
similar characters
(e.g., in books from a
series).

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

groupings.

Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

Maintain a school
library with a library
coordinator.

4th Grade: Fewer than 50%


of the students in fourth
grade
mastered
the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

-LA.4.RL.4.5. Explain
major differences
between poems,
drama, and prose, and
refer to the structural
elements of poems
(e.g., verse, rhythm,
meter) and drama
(e.g., casts of

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.
Intervention, coaching

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

2000-2999: Classified
Personnel Salaries

Title I

28,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

36 of 85

May 2016 - June


2017

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

characters, settings,
descriptions, dialogue,
stage directions) when
writing or speaking
about a text.

-LA.4.RI.4.2.
Determine the main
idea of a text and
explain how it is

supported by key
details; summarize the
text.
-LA.4.RI.4.7. Interpret
information presented
visually, orally, or
quantitatively (e.g., in
charts, graphs,
diagrams, time lines,
animations, or

interactive elements
on Web pages) and
explain how the
information
contributes to an
understanding of the
text in which it

appears.
-LA.4.L.4.2.
Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of
standard English
capitalization,
punctuation, and
spelling when writing.

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.

Assessments in English
Language Arts.

Explicit instruction on
the parts of the
sentence, spelling, and
punctuation

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

Increase use of
academic language.
Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.
Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.
Time for teachers to
collaborate in grade
level and vertical

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

37 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

teams.

-LA.4.L.4.5.b.
Recognize and explain
the meaning of
common idioms,
adages, and proverbs.

-LA.4.RL.4.2.
Determine a theme of
a story, drama, or
poem from details in
the text; summarize
the text.

-LA.4.L.4.5.a. Explain
the meaning of simple
similes and metaphors
(e.g., as pretty as a
picture) in context.

-LA.4.RL.4.4.
Determine the
meaning of words and
phrases as they are
used in a text,
including those that
allude to significant
characters found in
mythology (e.g.,
Herculean).

-LA.4.RI.4.5. Describe
the overall structure
(e.g., chronology,
comparison,
cause/effect,
problem/solution) of
events, ideas,

Maintain a school
library with a library
coordinator.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

38 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

concepts, or
information in a text
or part of a text.

-LA.4.L.4.1.
Demonstrate
command of the
conventions of
standard English
grammar and usage
when writing or
speaking.

5th Grade: Fewer than 50%


of the students in fifth
grade
mastered
the
following standards, as
evidenced by the results of
the T-1 and T-2 benchmark
assessments:

-LA.5.RL.5.9. Compare
and contrast stories in
the same genre (e.g.,
mysteries and
adventure stories) on
their approaches to
similar themes and
topics.

-LA.5.RL.5.2.
Determine a theme of
a story, drama, or
poem from details in
the text, including how

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.

Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.
Explicit instruction on

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
the students will meet
or exceed grade level
standards.

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
students at each grade
level, will meet or
exceed grade level
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

2000-2999: Classified
Personnel Salaries

Title I

28,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

May 2016 - June


2017

By the end of the


39 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

characters in a story or
drama respond to
challenges or how the
speaker in a poem
reflects upon a topic;
summarize the text.

-LA.5.RI.5.7. Draw on
information from
multiple print or digital
sources,
demonstrating the
ability to locate an

answer to a question
quickly or to solve a
problem efficiently.

-LA.5.RL.5.5. Explain
how a series of
chapters, scenes, or
stanzas fits together to
provide the overall
structure of a

particular story,
drama, or poem.
-LA.5.RL.5.4.
Determine the
meaning of words and
phrases as they are

used in a text,
including figurative
language such as
metaphors and
similes.

-LA.5.RL.5.3. Compare
and contrast two or

the parts of the


sentence, spelling, and
punctuation
Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

second trimester, 50%


of the students at each
grade level will meet
or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

Increase use of
academic language.
Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.
Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.
Time for teachers to
collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.
Maintain a school
library with a library
coordinator.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

40 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

more characters,
settings, or events in a
story or drama,
drawing on specific
details in the text (e.g.,
how characters
interact).

-LA.5.L.5.4.a. Use
context (e.g.,
cause/effect
relationships and
comparisons in text) as
a clue to the meaning
of a word or phrase.

-LA.5.RI.5.4.
Determine the
meaning of general
academic and domainspecific words and
phrases in a text
relevant to a grade 5
topic or subject area.

-LA.5.RI.5.2.
Determine two or
more main ideas of a
text and explain how
they are supported by
key details; summarize
the text.

-LA.5.RI.5.8Explain
how an author uses
reasons and evidence
to support particular
points in a text,

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

41 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

identifying which
reasons and evidence
support which
point(s).

-LA.5.RL.5.1. Quote
accurately from a text
when explaining what
the text says explicitly
and when drawing
inferences from the
text.

-LA.5.RL.5.5. Explain
how a series of
chapters, scenes, or
stanzas fits together to
provide the overall
structure of a
particular story,
drama, or poem.

-LA.5.RL.5.6. Describe
how a narrators or
speakers point of view
influences how events
are described.

-LA.5.RI.5.3. Explain
the relationships or
interactions between
two or more
individuals, events,
ideas, or concepts in a
historical, scientific, or
technical text based
on specific information
in the text.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

42 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

43 of 85

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

6/10/16

Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
By November 1, 2016, 100% of ELs will advance one level on the English proficiency scale, as measured by the CELDT.
By May 31, 2017, 50% of English learners will meet or exceed grade level standards in English Language Arts.

Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
X Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

Between 2014-2015 and


2015-2016, of the 59
students who took the
CELDT in October 2016,
18.6%
had
negative
movement, 40.7% had no
movement, and only 40.7%
advanced at least one level.

Provide daily ELD


instruction.
Use data from
assessments to
identify and provide
intensive intervention
for our long-term EL
students.

Implement technology
as a strategy to
enhance curriculum
and instruction.

Provide professional
development and
implement Project
GLAD to enhance
quality and

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

Imagine Learning data


will provide ongoing
assessment of
progress of English
learners in the area of
English language arts.
On weekly teacher
generated
assessments in ELA,
75% of the students
will meet or exceed
grade level standards.

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

May 2016 - June x


2017

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
English learners at
each grade level, will
meet or exceed grade
44 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

effectiveness of
instruction for English
learners.

First Grade:
-On the the ELA T1
assessment, only 43%
of the ELs met or
exceeded the grade
level standards for
ELA. (Number of ELs
tested = 7)

-On the ELA T2


assessment, 71% of
the ELs met or
exceeded the grade
level standards for
ELA. (Number of ELs

Provide and monitor


after school tutoring
opportunities

Increase rigor and


relevance in ELD
instruction.

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

level standards in
English language arts,
as measured by the
PUSD Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the English learners
at each grade level will
meet or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
English learners will
meet or exceed grade
level standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
English learners at
each grade level, will
meet or exceed grade
level standards in
English language arts,

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

45 of 85

May 2016 - June


2017

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

tested = 7)

Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.

Explicit instruction on
the parts of the
sentence, spelling, and
punctuation

Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.

Time for teachers to

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

as measured by the
PUSD Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the English learners
at each grade level will
meet or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

46 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

Second Grade:
-On the the ELA T1
assessment, 0% of the
ELs met or exceeded
the grade level
standards for ELA.
(Number of ELs tested
= 13)

-On the ELA T2


assessment, only 14%
of the ELs met or
exceeded the grade
level standards for
ELA. (Number of ELs
tested = 14)

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.

Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.

Explicit instruction on
the parts of the
sentence, spelling, and
punctuation

Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
English learners will
meet or exceed grade
level standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
English learners at
each grade level, will
meet or exceed grade
level standards in
English language arts,
as measured by the
PUSD Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

May 2016 - June


2017

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the English learners
at each grade level will
meet or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
47 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

Third Grade:
-On the the ELA T1
assessment, only 9%
of the ELs met or
exceeded the grade
level standards for
ELA. (Number of ELs
tested = 11)

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

assessments in English
Language Arts.

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
English learners will
meet or exceed grade
level standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures
48 of 85

May 2016 - June


2017

100,000

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

-On the ELA T2


assessment, only 16%
of the ELs met or
exceeded the grade
level standards for
ELA. (Number of ELs
tested = 12)

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.

Explicit instruction on
the parts of the
sentence, spelling, and
punctuation

Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Classroom

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
English learners at
each grade level, will
meet or exceed grade
level standards in
English language arts,
as measured by the
PUSD Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the English learners
at each grade level will
meet or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

49 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.

Fourth Grade:
-On the the ELA T1
assessment, only 11%
of the ELs met or
exceeded the grade
level standards for
ELA. (Number of ELs
tested = 18)

-On the ELA T2


assessment, only 5%
of the ELs met or
exceeded the grade
level standards for
ELA. (Number of ELs
tested = 20)

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

Daily activities will


focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.

Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.

Explicit instruction on
the parts of the

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

On weekly teacher
generated
assessments, 75% of
English learners will
meet or exceed grade
level standards.

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

165,000

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
English learners at
each grade level, will
meet or exceed grade
level standards in
English language arts,
as measured by the
PUSD Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,0000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

May 2016 - June


2017

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
50 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

sentence, spelling, and


punctuation

Fifth Grade:

Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the
analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.

Time for teachers to


collaborate in grade
level and vertical
teams.

Daily activities will

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

of the English learners


at each grade level will
meet or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

On weekly teacher

1000-1999: Certificated
51 of 85

District Funded

165,000

May 2016 - June


6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

focus on Common
Core State Standards
and all the
components of a
comprehensive ELA
program, with
particular attention to
instructional rigor in
vocabulary
development, reading
comprehension,
written conventions,
and the writing
process.

-On the the ELA T1


assessment, only 0%
of the ELs met or
exceeded the grade
level standards for
ELA. (Number of ELs
tested = 12)
-On the ELA T2
assessment, 0% of the
ELs met or exceeded
the grade level
standards for ELA.
(Number of ELs tested
= 12)

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)
generated
assessments, 75% of
English learners will
meet or exceed grade
level standards.

Intervention, coaching
and PD provided by
support staff, CRT and
LDRT.

Explicit instruction on
the parts of the
sentence, spelling, and
punctuation

Use of Step-Up to
Writing, Thinking
Maps, Daily Language
Review, and flexible
grouping, as
instructional
strategies.

Increase use of
academic language.

Analyze assessment
data and use the

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

By the end of the first


trimester, 25% of the
English learners at
each grade level, will
meet or exceed grade
level standards in
English language arts,
as measured by the
PUSD Trimester 1
Assessments in English
Language Arts.

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

2017

Personnel Salaries
1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

District Funded

70,000

5000-5999: Services And LCFF-LCAP


Other Operating
Expenditures

100,000

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

5,000

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

District Funded

25,000

By the end of the


second trimester, 50%
of the English learners
at each grade level will
meet or exceed the
standards in English
language arts, as
measured by the PUSD
Trimester 2
assessments in English
Language Arts.

52 of 85

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

analysis to drive
instruction,interventio
n, and student
groupings.

Classroom
observations with
timely feedback from
administrator,
instructional coach,
and resource teacher.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

53 of 85

6/10/16

Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
By June 2017, 75% of the parents/guardians will have attended at least two of the six parent information nights from among the following choices: Back to School Night, Parent-Teacher
Conference, Family Reading Night, Family Math Night, Science Fair and Art Show, and teacher-sponsored parent information nights.
By June 2017, active participation in ELAC and AAPC will have increased by 50%, compared to the participation in those parent groups during the 2015-2016 school year.

Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
X Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

Approximately, 15% of
our parents and/or
community members
attend school-based
parent activities and
other school functions.

Increase

communication with
parents and
community members
by email, phone calls,
phone blasts, and mail.

Less than 10% of our

schools
Hispanic/Latino
parents actively

participate in Altadena
Elementary Schools
English Language
Advisory Committee
(ELAC) meetings.

Improve school
website

Less than 10% of our


school's African-

Inform families that


extracurricular
community resources
are available and
accessible to students
and parents (such as
Boys/Girls Scouts,
AYSO, Little League,
enrichment program

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

Monitor monthly signin sheets for AAPC and


ELAC.
Monitor sign-in sheets
for Back-to-School
Night, Parent-Teacher
Conferences, Family
Reading Night, Family
Math Night, Science
Fair and Art Show, and
other school events.

5800:
Professional/Consulting
Services And Operating
Expenditures

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

Title I Part A: Parent


Involvement

7000-7439: Other Outgo Title I Part A: Parent


Involvement

54 of 85

1,000

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

August 2016 - June


2017

455

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?
American parents
actively participate in
the African-American
Parent Council (AAPC)
meetings.

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

for the Arts, Math and


Science, etc.).

Increase Altadena
Elementary Schools
interactions,
involvement, and

relationships with
parents and the school
communitys
significant subgroups
as partners in their

childrens education.

Phone blasts will be


used to communicate
with parents about
upcoming and current
events at school.
Continue Family Math
and Reading Nights,
and parent education
events.
Provide professional
development for
stakeholders on best
practices and
strategies to improve
parent-staff-teacher
communication.

Use ELAC, DVeal, and


AAPC for
dissemination of
information &
opportunities to
participate and
encourage higher
parent participation in
parent workshops,
school, and
community events.

Provide Spanish
translation, as needed.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

55 of 85

6/10/16

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

56 of 85

6/10/16

Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
By December 2016, Altadena Elementary School will have trained all staff in the implementation of the Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support (PBIS) program, aka RtI-Behavior, and there
will be schoolwide implementation of the program.
By June 2017, Altadena Elementary School will have an ADA of at least 96%.

Area of Focus:
X School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

Approximately 20
students were
suspended from
school during the
2015-2016 school
year.

Approximately 50
referrals for
misbehavior in the
classroom were
received by the
principal during the
month of May 2016.

In the 2014-2015
school year, the ADA
for Altadena School
was 94.74%. As of

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

Implement and adhere Semi-monthly meetings of


PBIS (RtI-Behavior) Team
to the school-wide
behavior plan & RTI.
Bi-annual Review 360 data.
School-wide behavior
Office
referrals
for
assemblies.
misbehavior
will
be
Student of the Month reduced by 10%, each
successive month.
(The
for academic,
office referrals for May
behavior, and
attendance standings. 2016, will be tracked by the
office manager and serve as
the
baseline for office
Use of referral forms.
referrals for the month of
September 2016.)
Parenting classes
through DVeal and
Suspensions
will
be
AAPC.
reduced by 50%, as
measured against the total
number of suspensions for

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

4000-4999: Books And


Supplies

LCFF-LCAP

500

1000-1999: Certificated
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

75,000

2000-2999: Classified
Personnel Salaries

Title I

11,000

2000-2999: Classified
Personnel Salaries

District Funded

10,000

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When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

May 2016 - June


2017

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

May 2016, the ADA for


2015-2016 is 94.16%

Use Game Room and


Cougar Store to
reinforce good
behavior.

Social Worker or
Guidance Counselor to
coordinate PBIS Team
meetings and facilitate
follow-up on office
referrals for
misbehavior.

Project Aide-Behavior,
to work under the
supervision of the
Guidance Counselor to
follow-up on office
referrals for
misbehavior.

Increase Clerk Typist


position from 0.75 FTE
to 1.0 FTE and make
this position
responsible for
following up on
absences, by
contacting the parents
of absent students on
a daily basis.

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

the 2015 - 2016 school


year.

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Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
By October 2016, teachers will integrate technology, across the curriculum, at every grade level and students in 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades will routinely use computers in the classroom for
assessments, research, writing, and presentations.

Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, XTechnology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

Some teachers are

comfortable using
technology throughout
the instructional day.

Some teachers have


trained their students
to use google apps and
other applications and
software for
assessments, research,
writing, and
presentations.

Students will use a


variety of technology
as learning tools.

Teachers will use


various forms of
technology, including
computers,
smartboards, and
document cameras to
instruct, integrate
technology into the
curriculum.

Teachers will use


EADMS to generate
assessments and
analyze assessment
data.

Students in grades 1st

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

Weekly review of
teacher lesson plans
during collaboration
meetings.

Data talks at semimonthly collaboration


meetings.

6000-6999: Capital
Outlay

59 of 85

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

LCFF-LCAP

10,000

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

August 2016 - June x


2017

6/10/16

What are the needs that


can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
-who will be measured
training will be needed to
when using what tool?
implement our strategy?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

- 5th will become


adept at using the
Chromebook laptops.

Technology will be
integrated throughout
the curriculum and
used as instructional
tools.

Professional
development will be
provided to enhance
teachers' knowledge
and use of technology
tools.

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Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

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What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

6/10/16

Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

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What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

6/10/16

Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

63 of 85

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

6/10/16

Planned Improvements in Student Performance Target/Goal Page


Target : (insert annual target/goal)
Each school should write a goal that will be measured against internal measures; benchmarks, trimesters, performance tasks, end of course exams???
Area of Focus:
School Safety, Climate and Culture (safe, respectful, responsible) (LCAP: SC, SE)
Math (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Graduation/College and Career Ready (LCAP: SA)
English Language Arts (LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
(High Schools only must include an indicator for CAHSEE)
Closing the Gap (must include EL reclassification goal of no less than 15% increase School Selected (circle one): Science, Social Studies/History, VAPA, Technology,
(LCAP: SA, CA, OSO, CCSS)
Special Education,
Parent and Community Engagement (LCAP:PI)
What are the needs that
can be identified from
outcomes?
What do we need to work
on to improve results in this
area?

What strategies or actions


should be implemented to
address this need?

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

How and when will we


monitor the progress of our
strategy?
What resources or
training will be needed to
-who will be measured
implement our strategy?
when using what tool?
-what is the target (base &
goal)

64 of 85

What funding source and amount will be


used in our implementation?

When will we
implement our
strategy?

X if included
as part of
Program
Improvement
(PI) Schools
ONLY

6/10/16

Summary of Expenditures in this Plan


Total Allocations and Expenditures by Funding Source
Total Allocations by Funding Source
Allocation

Balance (Allocations-Expenditures)

Unrestricted

17,605

17,605.00

Title I

68,296

-82,704.00

Title I Part A: Parent Involvement

1,455

0.00

LCFF-LCAP

74,700

-1,660,800.00

-4,245,000.00

Funding Source

District Funded

Total Expenditures by Funding Source


Funding Source

Total Expenditures

District Funded

4,245,000.00

LCFF-LCAP

1,735,500.00

Title I

151,000.00

Title I Part A: Parent Involvement

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

1,455.00

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Summary of Expenditures in this Plan


Total Expenditures by Object Type
Object Type

Total Expenditures

1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries

3,835,000.00

2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries

161,000.00

4000-4999: Books And Supplies

125,500.00

5000-5999: Services And Other Operating Expenditures

1,600,000.00

5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Operating


ExpendituresCapital Outlay
6000-6999:

401,000.00
10,000.00

7000-7439: Other Outgo

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

455.00

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Summary of Expenditures in this Plan


Total Expenditures by Object Type and Funding Source

Object Type

Funding Source

Total Expenditures

1000-1999: Certificated Personnel Salaries District Funded


2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries

3,835,000.00

District Funded

10,000.00

5800: Professional/Consulting Services And District Funded


Operating
4000-4999:Expenditures
Books And Supplies
LCFF-LCAP

400,000.00
125,500.00

5000-5999: Services And Other Operating


ExpendituresCapital Outlay
6000-6999:

LCFF-LCAP

1,600,000.00

LCFF-LCAP

10,000.00

2000-2999: Classified Personnel Salaries

Title I

151,000.00

5800: Professional/Consulting Services And Title I Part A: Parent Involvement


Operating
7000-7439:Expenditures
Other Outgo
Title I Part A: Parent Involvement

1,000.00
455.00

Summary of Expenditures in this Plan


Total Expenditures by Goal
Goal Number

Total Expenditures

Goal 1

1,825,000.00

Goal 2

1,965,000.00

Goal 3

2,235,000.00

Goal 4

1,455.00

Goal 5

96,500.00

Goal 6

10,000.00

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Restricted Funding Personnel


2016-2017
Personnel

Funding

General Duty and SPSA support

Wendy Castillo

Title 1 & District Funded

Clerk Typist - 25% Title 1 & 75% District Funded

Vacant

Title 1 & District Funded

Library Coordinator - 37.5% Title 1 & 37.5% District Funded

Vacant

LCFF/LCAP & District Funded

Community Assistant - 37.5% LCFF/LCAP & 37.5% District Funded

Vacant

LCFF/LCAP & District Funded

Social Worker/Guidance Counselor - 40% LCFF/LCAP & CWAS

Vacant

District Funded

Instructional Coach - 100%

Vacant

District Funded

Instructional Coach - 50%

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Centralized Services
Provided by Student Support Programs

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School Site Council Membership

Allisonne Airitam

1st

Carolyn Artiaga

2nd

Karina Contreras

6th

Aimee Daniels

1st

Debra Jenkins DeBose

1st

Gregory Demus

3rd

Donald Goodrich

2nd

Dana Hill

1st

Regina Major

9th

12th

Panagiota Regopoulos

President

Numbers of members of each category:

Secondary
Students

Parent or
Community
Member

Year of
Term (1st,
2nd, etc.)

Other
School Staff

Officer Position
(President, Secretary,
etc.)

Classroom
Teacher

Name of Members

Principal

Education Code Section 64001(g) requires that the SAP/SPSA be reviewed and updated at least annually, including proposed
expenditures of funds allocated to the through the Consolidated Application, by the school site council. The current make-up of the
school site council is as follows:

X
X

For elementary schools there should be parity between the number of staff on the site council and the number of
parents/community members. For secondary schools, staff should make up one half of the council, students should make up one
fourth and parents/community should make up one fourth.
The minimum number of SSC members for elementary is 10 and for secondary is 12.
For any SSC, teachers should make up the majority of staff members on the SSC.

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Recommendations and Assurances


The school site council recommends this school plan and proposed expenditures to the district governing board for approval and
assures the board of the following:
1.

The school site council is correctly constituted and was formed in accordance with district governing board policy and state law.

2.

The school site council reviewed its responsibilities under state law and district governing board policies, including those board
policies relating to material changes in the school plan requiring board approval.

3.

The school site council sought and considered all recommendations from the following groups or committees before adopting
this plan (Check those that apply):
X

English Learner Advisory Committee


Signature

African American Parent Council


Signature
Community Advisory Committee for Special Education Programs
Signature
Gifted and Talented Education Program Advisory Committee
Signature
Other committees established by the school or district (list):
Signature

4.

The school site council reviewed the content requirements for school plans of programs included in this Single Plan for Student
Achievement and believes all such content requirements have been met, including those found in district governing board
policies and in the LEA Plan.

5.

This school plan is based on a thorough analysis of student academic performance. The actions proposed herein form a sound,
comprehensive, coordinated plan to reach stated school goals to improve student academic performance.

6.

This school plan was adopted by the school site council at a public meeting on: May 17, 2016

The English Learner Advisory Committee had the opportunity to provide input and advice on the development of this school plan
specifically as it relates to EL students:

Signature of ELAC chairperson

Signature of ELAC committee member

Meeting Date

Attested:
Debra Jenkins DeBose, Acting Principal
Typed Name of School Principal

Signature of School Principal

Date

Signature of SSC Chairperson

Date

Panagiota Regopoulos
Typed Name of SSC Chairperson

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

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Appendices

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Pasadena Unified School District


Program Improvement Schools ONLY
School Program Improvement (PI) Activities Plan 2015-2016
Per ESEA Section 1116, LEAS must report school level PI activities related to Title I Part A. This includes, but is not limited to, student
participation and PI compliance activities based on the number of years a school is in PI status.
Site completes ONLY sections relevant to their PI level, and ONLY sections in which they have related actions/activities (e.g., PI 4
school might only have information in section 1, sections 7, 8, or 9, and section 10). Rather than leave a section blank, please mark
unused sections with N/A.
Information

WHO

WHAT

All PI Levels

As a Focus School, Altadena Elementary School


will also have a TOSA II (District Coach) assigned
to it to further support the CRT/LDRT/Principal in
designing targeted interventions and professional
development. This District Coach will report to
PUSD Central Office, not to the administration of
Altadena School.

PI Year

Decrease management authority


(eg., District provides increase administrative oversight
over decisions made previously at site level )

PI 3

N/A.

Replace school staff relevant to the failure of making AYP


(eg., specific grade levels of content areas that are not
meeting targets)

PI 3

N/A.

Implement a new curriculum, including appropriate


professional development

PI 3

N/A.

Extend school year or day

PI 3

N/A.

Appoint or contract with outside expert to advise the


school on making AYP based on its school plan

PI 3

N/A.

Restructure or plan to restructure the internal


organization

PI 3-5

N/A.

Plan to or open school as a public charter school

PI 4-5

N/A.

Plan to or did replace all or most of school staff


(eg., broader action taken to change staff at the site)

PI 4-5

For 2016 - 2017, a new principal, with proven


success in improving student outcomes, has been
appointed. Additionally, the new principal will be
able to recommend the transfer of staff who are
not working in a manner that is supportive of
improved academic achievement.

10

Description of internal organizational


improvements/restructuring activities planned based on
data

PI All levels

The 2016 - 2017 SPSA and the Focus School


Proposal, dated May 20, 2016, outline specific
things that school will do to improve student
achievement. Among other things, in 2016 2017, the school will adopt a co-teaching model
that pairs a general education teacher (content

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6/10/16

specialist) with a special education teacher


(access specialist) who will co-plan and teach to
ensure that instruction in the core academic areas
is differentiated to meet the diverse learning
needs of the students.
Additionally, there will be ongoing professional
development in balanced literacy and effective
instructional strategies for meeting the needs of
English learners who make up 30 percent of the
school's total enrollment.
Altadena School will participate in Instructional
Rounds as a method of developing a site focus
and shared leadership on the campus.
A Director of School Transformation will be
assigned and will work exclusively with Altadena
School and other FOCUS Schools to ensure that
systems are in place to improve student
achievement.

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School Accountability Report Card


Insert the latest, always a year behind.

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Site Level Parent Involvement Policy

All schools will address actions to promote parent involvement/engagement. School sites must work with parents through committee to develop and review site level policy
based on the criterion provided.
This must be reviewed annually and updated to reflect current practice

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Site Level School/Parent Compact

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Attendance Improvement Program


Attendance Improvement Implementation Plan
School: Altadena Elementary School

Principal: Debra Jenkins DeBose, Acting Principal

School Number: 19-64881-6021505

Counselor:

Date Completed: 5/20/2016

Principal Signature:
Goal: Increase the percentage of students attending at 96% or higher.

2014-2015 Current ADA Percentage


94.27%

2015-2016 ADA Short Term Goal


95.51%

2016-2017 ADA Long Term Goal


97%

GOAL 1: ATTENDANCE & DROPOUT PREVENTION PLAN


Strategy & Activity Description

Frequency
Daily/Weekly/Monthly/Yearly

Target Audience/s

Communication with parents daily or as Absences & Tardies


needed.

Daily

Measure of Success
Attendance Rates

GOAL 2: TEACHING ATTENDANCE


Strategy & Activity Description
Attendance clerk calls daily.

Frequency
Daily/Weekly/Monthly/Yearly

Target Audience/s
Absences & Tardies

Daily

Measure of Success
Attendance Rates

GOAL 3: PREVENTION & INTERVENTION


Strategy & Activity Description
A2A Mentoring

The Single Plan for Student Achievement

Frequency
Daily/Weekly/Monthly/Yearly

Target Audience/s
Absences & Tardies

Weekly

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Measure of Success
Attendance Rates

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Pasadena Unified School District


Instructional Services
GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION
GATE Principals Checklist
The grey portions detail State requirements of school districts for GATE programs. The white portions that follow are ways that the District expects the schools to implement the
state requirements in the grey. Please review this revised Checklist that is now aligned with the current District GATE Plan that has been approved by the State and the Board of
Education. Rate your school using the rubric below to show how well the school is implementing the School GATE program in alignment with the District GATE Plan.
Rubric
1 = This is an established practice that has been in place since before the current school year.
2 = This practice is being implemented for the first time during the current school year.
3 = This practice is being developed now to be implemented during the upcoming school year.
Section 1: Program Design
1:1 The plan for the district program has a written statement of philosophy, goals, and standards appropriate to the needs and abilities of gifted learners.
1:2 The program provides administrative groupings and structures appropriate for gifted education and available to all gifted learners.
1:3 The program is articulated with the general education programs.
Does the school administrative leadership team have access to and review the LEA GATE plan on an annual basis to ensure that
the school plan is articulated with the District plan?

Do K-2 teachers observe for potential giftedness and use flexible groupings in response to observed characteristics of
giftedness in the classroom?

Are GATE students in grades 3-5 placed in cluster groupings or part-time groupings?

Are GATE students in grades 6-12 encouraged to participate in rigorous classes such as Pre AP, AP and Honors?

Are GATE services provided to students during the regular instructional school day?

Are all parents informed of the schedule of the GATE Parent Leadership meetings?

Are all parents informed of the GATE Parent Education Workshops offered by the District?

Do secondary counselors review their case loads to be aware of which students are GATE so that they can be appropriately
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Section 1: Program Design


1:1 The plan for the district program has a written statement of philosophy, goals, and standards appropriate to the needs and abilities of gifted learners.
1:2 The program provides administrative groupings and structures appropriate for gifted education and available to all gifted learners.
1:3 The program is articulated with the general education programs.
counseled and encouraged to participate in rigorous academic courses as they transition from elementary to middle school and
middle school to high school?
Section 2: Identification
2:1 The nomination/referral process is ongoing.
2.2 An assessment/identification process is in place to ensure that all potentially gifted students are appropriately assessed for identification as gifted students.
2:3 Multiple service options are available within the gifted education program and between other educational programs. Placement is based on the assessed needs of the
student and is periodically reviewed.
Has a process been developed at the school for teachers and/or parents to request that any student in grades 2-11 be
evaluated for GATE identification? Has a process been developed at the school for teachers and/or parents to request that any
student in grades 2-11 be evaluated for GATE identification?

Is there a plan to articulate the plan above to parents and teachers on an annual basis?

Does the plan inform parents and teachers of the GATE referral window of September December?

Does the school testing calendar include GATE testing administered by classroom teachers in grades 2 during the GATE testing
window of November January?

Has a process been developed at the school to review research-based characteristics of giftedness with all teachers, but with
special emphasis on 2nd grade teachers?

Section 3: Curriculum and Instruction


3:1 A differentiated curriculum is in place, responsive to the needs, interests, and abilities of gifted students.
3:2 The differentiated curriculum for gifted students is supported by appropriate structures and resources.
Elementary
Are teachers trained on the development and implementation of an Individual Learning Plan (ILP) for GATE students?

Do all teachers include a discussion of the ILP during the November parent conference for GATE students?

Does differentiation of instruction focus on the depth and complexity of content, advanced or accelerated pacing, and the
unique expression and application of student understanding?

Are the following instructional options used in the development of the School GATE Plan:
Individual Learning Plan
Independent projects
GATE clusters
Curriculum compacting
Vertical subject-matter acceleration
Grade skipping

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Section 3: Curriculum and Instruction


3:1 A differentiated curriculum is in place, responsive to the needs, interests, and abilities of gifted students.
3:2 The differentiated curriculum for gifted students is supported by appropriate structures and resources.

Outside tutoring
IB program

Middle School
Are high-achieving GATE students placed in accelerated or honors classes?
Does differentiation of instruction focus on the depth and complexity of content, advanced or accelerated pacing, and the
unique expression and application of student understanding?
Are the following instructional options used in the development of the School GATE Plan:
Honors class
Pre-AP classes
IB classes
Enrichment classes
Vertical subject-matter acceleration
High School
Do honors classes offered in the core subject areas of ELA and math provide a more rigorous educational experience?
Are Advanced Placement classes are available?
Is the IB diploma program available?
Do students qualify for enrollment in Honors, Advanced Placement, and/or IB classes based on teacher recommendation, GPA,
grades in the specific subject, standardized test scores, and/or portfolio or demonstration options?
Are the following instructional options used in the development of the School GATE Plan:
Honors classes
AP classes
IB classes
Career Pathways classes
All Grades
Does the Principal provide leadership in supervising and monitoring implementation of the GATE Principals Checklist to ensure
that GATE students are receiving an appropriate education?

Does the Principal lead the work of the School GATE Team (Principal, GATE Site Representative, GATE Parent) to review and
modify the GATE Principals Checklist annually as needed?

Does the School Site Council review and approve the GATE Principals Checklist annually?

Is the GATE Principals Checklist developed in response to the specific and varied learning needs of the individual school
population?

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Section 4: Social and Emotional Development


4:1 Actions to meet the affective needs of gifted students are ongoing.
4:2 At risk gifted students are monitored and provided support (e.g. underachievement, symptoms of depression, suicide, substance abuse).
Do schools provide enrichment activities that foster social interaction among GATE students?

Do elementary GATE students have the opportunity to visit secondary schools and/or shadow secondary students in Honors or
AP classes to help ease anxiety about transitioning to secondary school?

Are high school students informed of the opportunity for concurrent enrollment at Pasadena City College?
Do GATE students have access to small-group counseling sessions offered at the school and are made aware of services
available outside of the school?

Section 5: Professional Development


5:1 The district provides professional development opportunities related to gifted learners on a regular basis.
Does the Principal schedule time for the GATE Coordinator to provide professional development at the school site during A
meetings on any of the following topics:
PUSD GATE Program Overview
GATE Identification Process
Characteristics of Gifted Learners from Diverse Populations
How to get or renew GATE Certification
How to create and use the Individual Learning Plan

Does the Principal schedule other GATE-related professional development at the school site during A meetings on any of the
following topics:
Kaplans Icons of Depth and Complexity
Kaplans Content Imperatives
Tiered Assignments
Curriculum Compacting
Flexible Grouping
Dabrowskis Over-excitabilities
Other

Section 6: Parent and Community Involvement


6:1 Open communication with parents and the community is maintained.
6:2 An active GATE advisory committee with parent involvement is supported by the district.
Does the school have a GATE Parent Advisory Committee (PAC) that meets four times per year?

Does the GATE PAC review the School GATE Plan for the purpose of suggesting improvements?

Is the socioeconomic, linguistic and ethnic diversity of the school represented on the GATE Parent Advisory Committee?

Does the school regularly send a parent representative to the District GATE Parent Leadership meetings?
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X
6/10/16

Section 6: Parent and Community Involvement


6:1 Open communication with parents and the community is maintained.
6:2 An active GATE advisory committee with parent involvement is supported by the district.
Is the School GATE Plan shared with parents and the community effectively and systematically?

Section 7: Program Assessment


7:1 The district provides ongoing student and GATE program assessment that is consistent with the programs philosophy, goals, and standards.
Do all stakeholders (GATE PAC, administrators, teachers, community members and students) have an opportunity to give input
on the development, implementation, and effectiveness of the school GATE program on an annual basis?
Name of School Site:

Altadena Elementary School

--------------Principal:

Debra Jenkins DeBose, Acting Principal

--------------School Site Council Chair (typed): Panagiota Regopoulos


--------------Date Approved By GATE Site Advisory Council: ---------------Date Approved By School Site Council 5-31-2016
Dates and times of calendared site GATE Advisory meetings
2012-2013:
Mandatory
1st

August 30, 2016 @ 2:30 p.m.

2nd

October 25, 2016 @ 2:30 p.m.

3rd

January 30, 2017 @ 2:30 p.m.

4th

April 25, 2017 @ 2:30 p.m.

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Pasadena Unified School District


Comprehensive School Safety Plan Sb-187
Pursuant to Education Code EC 35294 et seq., every school in California is required to develop a comprehensive school safety plan to address safety concerns identified through
a systematic planning process. A school site council or safety planning committee shall review and update the plan by March 1st of each year. Each school shall report on the
status of the plan in the annual School Accountability Report Card (SARC).
This is to certify that Altadena Elementary School has complied with Senate bill 187 Comprehensive School Safety plan requirements established by California Education Code EC
35294 et seq. and approved by our School Site Council for the current school year.
Principal:

Date:
(Signature)

School Safety Committee Chair:

Date:
(Signature)

In the 2002 legislative session, Senate Bill (SB) 1667, School Violence and Assembly Bill (AB) 2198, School Violent Crime were approved by the Legislature and became effective
January 1, 2003.
SB 1667 requires the following school safety plan changes:
EC 35294 requires schools to hold a public meeting at the school site to allow members of the public the opportunity to express an opinion about the plan. SB 1667 amends EC
3524.8 to require schools to notify, in writing, the public of the meeting.
This is to certify that the Pasadena Unified School District has complied with SB 1667, pursuant to EC 35294.8 to notify the public of the public meeting.

District Representative: Sonia Rodarte, Director of Child Welfare, Attendance and Safety

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Pasadena Unified School District


Kindergarten Transition Plan and Objectives
Objective

One of the major challenges children have to faces in their early childhood years is the transition to kindergarten. It sets the tone and
direction of a childs school career. In 2006, the Pasadena Unified School District convened a Transition to Kindergarten Focus Committee in
conjunction with the City of Pasadenas Childcare Office, Head Start, and the Los Angeles Office of Childcare. PUSD representation on this
committee includes preschool and Kindergarten teachers and administrative leadership.

Mission

The mission of this committee is to collaborate with educators and members of the community in order to plan and develop policies that will
serve to provide effective transitions from preschool to Kindergarten.

Findings

Findings by the National Center for Early Development and Learning indicate a need for greater communication among Kindergarten
teachers, families and the school. With the support of Transition to Kindergarten Focus Committee, the PUSD organized an informational
forum for parents whose children were transitioning to Kindergarten and developed Kindergarten Readiness Packets that are distributed
annually each spring to families.
Instruction is provided to families, in English and Spanish, on the use of the materials in the kit. Materials included: pamphlets on activities
parents and children could do together to get ready for Kindergarten, arts and craft supplies, transition booklet, PreK literature selections
from Open Court, picture books and much more. Our plan is to improve and expand this effort to provide support and instruction to parents
combined with engaging school readiness materials that are given to graduating PUSD preschool students.

Actions

A key component of our Early Reading First plan is to expand promising practices to support the language development and literacy of
English learners (ELs), we continue looking to expand the promising practices being developed at our three English Learner Acquisition and
Development Pilot Program schools; Longfellow, Washington and Willard. PUSD utilizes the lessons learned from these promising English
learner strategies as well as from a successful Reading First program. We continue to seek to improve alignment, continuity and the sharing
of best practices in language development and literacy for preschool and elementary schools, our proposed professional development plan
includes training teachers in the adopted reading program (now Open Court, with potential new adoption anticipated next year) as well as
training for English learner strategies and providing ongoing coach support.
Increased communication between our preschool and Kindergarten teachers will also strengthen the transition to Kindergarten and the
types of promising practices being used at our elementary schools, including the development of Individual Learning Plans, newcomer
support, intervention strategies, Reclassification, and follow-up.

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The following monies reflect dollars that are recommended be held centrally to support District priorities. These are monies that are above the
administrative set-aside, which is generally 10% and indirect costs that are approximately 5% ( these fluctuate each year based on state formulas - total is
never higher than 15%).

Title I guidelines require consultation and input from SSC, not approval.

Site Services 2016-17


School:

Altadena

Resource
Total District
Setaside

30100 Title I
Intervention Support

Total Cost to School


`

300,000.00

# of students
# of FRL students @
school

Per Pupil Cost to


School
Setaside/District FRL
# 7,619

238 $

Total Cost to School

39.38 $

9,372.44

9,372.44

PASADEMA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT


ALTADENA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Where College Bound Students Attend
2015 - 2016
SCHOOL COMPACT`

Staff/Teacher
As a Pasadena Unified School District teacher/administrator I will:
Teach classes through interesting and challenging lessons that promote student achievement.
Endeavor to motivate my students to learn.
Have high expectations and help every child to develop a love of learning.
Communicate regularly with families about student progress.
Encourage parent involvement in school activities.
Enforce rules equitably and provide a safe, orderly, and caring learning environment.
Provide meaningful, daily homework assignments to reinforce and extend learning.
Participate in professional development opportunities that improve teaching and learning.
Support the formation of partnerships with families and the community.
Participate in collaborative decision making with other school staff and families for the benefit of students.
Respect the school, students, staff, and families.
Student
I agree to carry out the following responsibilities:
Come to school ready to learn and work hard.
Bring necessary materials, completed work assignments, and homework.
Know and follow school and class rules.
Communicate regularly with my parents and teachers about school experiences so that they can help me to be
successful in school.
Make sure to get plenty of sleep, make healthy eating choices, and exercise.
Limit my TV watching and video game playing and instead study or read every day after school.
Respect the school, classmates, staff, and families.

Family/Parent/Guardian
I agree to carry out the following responsibilities:
Provide a quiet time and place for homework completion and limit TV viewing, video game playing, computer and
phone time.
Review homework completion and ask my child about his/her school day.
Convey the importance of reading by having daily/nightly reading time together as a family.
Ensure that my child attends school every day, gets adequate sleep, regular medical attention, proper nutrition and
exercise.
Regularly monitor my childs progress in school.
Support the schools discipline and dress codes.
Participate at school in activities such as school decision making, volunteering and/or attending parent-teacher
conferences, Open House, and Back-to-School Night.
Communicate the importance of education and learning to my child.
Respect the school, staff, students, and families.

Please read, sign and return the tear-off to Altadena Elementary School
ALTADENA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Where College Bound Students Attend
Compact
2015 - 2016
I have read the Altadena Elementary School-Parent Compact and will do my part:
Students Name: ____________________________

Grade: ____

Students Signature:
Parents Signature: __________________________
Principals Signature: ________________________
Teachers Signature:

Date: ______
Date:
Date: ______
Date:

PARENT INVOLVEMENT POLICY


ALTADENA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Where College Bound Students Attend

Purpose: Altadena Elementary School recognizes that parents are invaluable resources in the
process of educating students. Parents play an important role as the first teachers of their children
and parental support is critical to a childs success. It is the intent of Altadena Elementary School to
establish a collaborative partnership between the home and school, and that the Title I program will
be used to facilitate this endeavor.
I.

Altadena has developed a written parental involvement policy with input from parents
Parent Representatives from School Site Council, PTA, ELAC, AAPC, parent of GATE
students and staff have jointly developed the parental involvement policy.
Parents, including PTA, ELAC, AAPC, and Parents of GATE students, participate in the
periodic updates of the policy to meet the changing needs of parents in the school. The
SSC reviews and approves the policy.
Parents who do not speak English and whose primary language is Spanish, will receive the
Policy in Spanish.
Parents receive a copy of the parental involvement policy during the registration process.
Copies of the policy are also available during PTA and ELAC meetings, and the schools
main office.
Altadena Schools Parental Involvement Policy is available to the local community.

II.

Involvement of Parents
1. Altadena School offers flexible number of meetings.
PTA meetings are held on monthly on different days and times to accommodate as
many parents as possible.
English Language Advisory Committee (ELAC) meetings are held the 2 nd Tuesday of
the month at 8:15 am.
School Site Council (SSC) meetings are held the 3rd Wednesday of the month at 2:45
pm.
2. Involves parents in the development of the schools Single Plan for Student Achievement.
PTA, ELAC, AAPC, and GATE parents will annually have the opportunity to review and
offer input in the schools Single Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA) and periodic
updates of the schools parental involvement policy.
3. Altadena School provides parents with an explanation of the curriculum, assessments, and
proficiency levels students are expected to meet.
Parents are informed about the curriculum used at the school, the academic
assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are
expected to reach at PTA, ELAC, AAPC, and SSC meetings, newsletters, and at parent
workshops offered through the school.
4. Altadena School provides parents, if requested, with opportunities for regular meetings to
participate in decisions relating to the education of their children.
Annual parent-teacher meetings to review student academic goals.
IEP meetings.
Student Study Team meetings with parents and staff.

III.

Communication
In an effort to communicate effectively to all parents, the school will use
several
modes of communication to get information out to parents.
Weekly telephone messages are sent to all parents in English and Spanish.
Telephone messages will be sent in advance of meetings and events.
Newsletters with information from different parent groups and school happenings will go out
on a bi-monthly basis.
The after school program LEARNS will be notified of upcoming events so they can share it
with parents at pick up times.
Teachers will communicate with students and parents regarding school events and policies.
Parents will let teachers know their availability for volunteering.
Parents and staff members will make personal contact with parents in an attempt to be
more inclusive and get more parents involved.
The school will send information by email, mail, and through telephone messages.
The schools website is updated every other day.
Important flyers and announcements will be communicated to LEARNS staff so they can
share the information with parents at pick up.

IV.

Building Capacity for Involvement


Altadena School engages parents in meaningful interactions with the school. It supports a
partnership among staff, parents, and the community to improve student academic
achievement.
Altadena parents receive information on parent trainings and content standards, as well as
how to help improve the achievement of their children.
Altadena weekly updates the website that provides calendar for parents to ensure they are
informed about parent meetings, school events, and activities.

PUSD

Pasadena Unified School District

351 South Hudson Avenue


Pasadena, California 91101
Phone: (626) 396-3600
www.pusd.us

Altadena
Elementary School
Where College Bound Students Attend

743 East Calaveras Street Altadena, CA 91001


Phone: (626) 396-5650
CDS Code: 19-64881-6021505

DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT


The Pasadena Unified School
Districts mission is to provide
a caring, engaging, challenging
educational experience for every
student every day.

SUPERINTENDENT
Brian McDonald, Ed.D.

superintendent@pusd.us
BOARD OF EDUCATION
Elizabeth Pomeroy, President
District 5
pomeroy.elizabeth@pusd.us

Kimberly Kenne, Vice President


District 1
kenne.kimberly@pusd.us
Roy Boulghourjian, Clerk
District 2
boulghourjian.roy@pusd.us
Adrienne Ann Mullen, Member
District 3
mullen.adrienne@pusd.us
Patrick Cahalan, Member
District 4
cahalan.patrick@pusd.us
Larry Torres, Member
District 6
torres.larry@pusd.us
Scott Phelps, Member
District 7
phelps.scott@pusd.us
Altadena Elementary School

Dr. Debra Debose, Interim Principal


debose.debra@pusd.us

2014-2015 School Accountability Report Card


Published in the 2015-2016 School Year
SARC Information

Every school in California is required by state law to publish a School Accountability Report
Card (SARC) by February 1 of each year. The SARC contains information about the condition
and performance of each California public school. Under the Local Control Funding Formula
(LCFF) all local educational agencies (LEAs) are required to prepare a Local Control
Accountability Plan (LCAP), which describes how they intend to meet annual school-specific
goals for all pupils, with specific activities to address state and local priorities. Additionally, data
reported in an LCAP is to be consistent with data reported in the SARC.
For more information about SARC requirements, see the California Department of
Education (CDE) SARC Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/.
View this SARC online at the school and/or LEA Web sites.
For more information about the LCFF or LCAP, see the CDE LCFF web page at
http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/aa/lc/.
For additional information about the school, parents and community members should
contact the school principal or the district office.

Principals Message
We thank you for choosing beautiful Altadena Elementary and we look forward to serving your
childs needs at our little neighborhood school.
Our mission is to develop caring, responsible citizens who embrace a strong sense of self
and community and are college bound. We are committed to providing every student with a
rigorous, balanced, and integrated curriculum in a safe and productive learning environment.
Altadena is a school where every student is successful.
Teaching and Learning is changing and our faculty is highly qualified to take on the challenge.
We are fortunate to have a Master Teacher at each grade level, as we transition to a Districtwide focus on literacy. We will continue to develop and differentiate curriculum and pedagogy,
aligned with new standards, in order to meet the diverse needs of our students. The Pasadena
Unified School District motto is communicated through our service to the children and families
of Altadena:
Our Children. Learning Today. Leading Tomorrow.
I invite you to join with us, work with us and grow with us, in service to the children and the
community of Altadena. Faculty, staff, families, community partners, and business partners
are committed to developing a thriving school community. We will honor the strengths of the
faculty and school community, preserve school traditions and lead the implementation of new
traditions, pedagogy and initiatives, inspiring the growth of Altadena Elementary School into an
Inclusion Model Demonstration School for Educational Excellence.
The school community continues to develop:
College Going Culture
Positive Behavior Incentive System
Recess and Lunch Hour Student Activities
Fine Arts program
Certified organic garden
Intentional Instruction and School Wide Health and Wellness Initiatives
Participation in District and Community Sponsored events
Ballet Folklorico

Published: February 2016

School Mission Statement

School Attendance (School Year 2014-15)

Our mission is to develop caring, responsible citizens who embrace a


strong sense of self and community.

School districts receive financial support from the state for the education
of the students they serve based on how many students attend each
day. Most importantly, attendance is critical to academic achievement
and regular daily attendance is a priority at Altadena Elementary School.
Student attendance is carefully monitored to identify those students
exhibiting excessive attendance concerns.

We are committed to provide every student with a rigorous, balanced,


and integrated curriculum in a safe and productive learning environment.
Altadena is a school where college-bound students achieve through high
standards, assessment, and accountability.

Attendance, tardy, and truancy policies are clearly stated, consistently


enforced, and consequences fairly administered. Parents are advised
of their responsibilities, including proper notification of when and why
students are absent. Independent study is available for students who
require extended leaves from school.

Our entire staff unanimously decided to have one simple motivation:


to help produce citizens who are academically, socially and physically
prepared to overcome the worlds challenges.

School Enrollment (School Year 2014-15)

The school monitors student attendance very closely and reports


excessive unexcused absences to designated authorities. Students are
referred to the districts School Attendance Review Board (SARB) when
they have persistent attendance problems in school.

During the 2014-15 school year, Altadena Elementary School enrolled


265 students in grades kindergarten through five. The charts display
school enrollment broken down by grade and student group.

A. Conditions of Learning

Enrollment Trend by Grade Level


2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

42

36

38

1st

85

50

34

2nd

51

62

47

3rd

52

47

61

4th

57

45

43

5th

59

43

42

State Priority: Basic


The SARC provides the following information relevant to the Basic State
Priority (Priority 1):
Degree to which teachers are appropriately assigned and fully
credentialed in the subject area and for the pupils they are teaching;
Pupils have access to standards-aligned instructional materials; and
School facilities are maintained in good repair.

Teacher Assignment

Enrollment by Student Group

The district recruits and employs qualified credentialed teachers. This


chart shows information about teacher credentials.

2014-15
Percentage
Black or African American

27.7%

American Indian or Alaska Native

0.8%

Asian

0.4%

Filipino

0.4%

Hispanic or Latino

65.2%

White

2.7%

Two or More Races

3.0%

English Learners

27.7%

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

90.5%

Students with Disabilities

2.7%

Foster Youth

3.4%

Misassignments refers to the number of positions filled by teachers who


lack legal authorization to teach that grade level, subject area, student
group, etc.
Teacher Credential Status
School

District

13-14

14-15

15-16

15-16

Fully Credentialed

17

17

10

615

Without Full Credentials

Teaching Outside Subject


Area of Competence (with full
credential)

Teacher vacancies reflect the number of positions to which a single


designated certificated employee has not been assigned at the beginning
of the year for an entire semester or year.

Community & School Profile


(School Year 2015-16)

Misassignments/Vacancies

Pasadena is located just 15 minutes from downtown Los Angeles,


at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains. The citys popular shops
and restaurants blend comfortably with tree-lined streets, distinctive
neighborhoods, historic buildings and a vibrant cultural scene.

13-14

14-15

15-16

Misassignments of Teachers of
English Learners

Misassignments of Teachers (other)

Pasadena is most famous for the annual Tournament of Roses Parade


and Rose Bowl Game.

Total Misassignments of Teachers

Vacant Teacher Positions

Altadena Elementary School is located in the community of Altadena


and was originally established in 1903. It is one of 28 schools in the
Pasadena Unified School District.

Altadena Elementary School

Published: February 2016

Highly Qualified Teachers (School Year 2014-15)


The Federal No Child Left Behind Act requires that all teachers in core subject areas meet certain requirements in order to be considered as Highly
Qualified. Minimum qualifications include: possession of a Bachelors Degree, possession of an appropriate California teaching credential, and
demonstrated competence in core academic subjects. For more information, see the CDE Improving Teacher and Principal Quality Web page at:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/nclb/sr/tq/.
Note: High-poverty schools have student eligibility of approximately 40 percent or more in the free and reduced price meals program. Low-poverty
schools have student eligibility of approximately 39 percent or less.
NCLB Compliant Teachers
% of Core
Academic
Courses
Taught
By Highly
Qualified
Teachers

% of Core
Academic
Courses
Taught By
Non-Highly
Qualified
Teachers

School

100.0%

0.0%

All Schools in District

88.8%

11.2%

High-Poverty Schools in District

87.0%

13.0%

Low-Poverty Schools in District

100.0%

0.0%

Textbooks & Instructional Materials (School Year 2015-16)


Pasadena Unified School District held a public hearing on October 30, 2015, and determined that each school within the district has sufficient and
good quality textbooks, including instructional materials, texts for Visual and Performing Arts, Health, and Foreign Languages, and science lab
equipment, pursuant to the settlement of Williams vs. the State of California.
All students, including English Learners, are given their own individual standards-aligned textbooks or instructional materials, or both, in core subjects
for use in the classroom and to take home. Additionally, all textbooks and instructional materials used within the district must be aligned with the
California Content Standards and Frameworks, with final approval by the Board of Education. The table displays information collected in November
2015 about the quality, currency, and availability of the standards-aligned textbooks and other instructional materials used at the school.
District-Adopted Textbooks
Grade
Levels

Subject

Publisher

Adoption
Year

Sufficient

% Lacking

K-5

Mathematics

Houghton
Mifflin

2008

Yes

0.0%

K-5

Reading/
Language Arts

SRA/McGrawHill

2002

Yes

0.0%

K-5

Science

Houghton
Mifflin/
Harcourt

2007

Yes

0.0%

K-5

Social
Science/
History

Scott
Foresman

2006

Yes

0.0%

School Facilities (School Year 2015-16)


Altadena Elementary School was originally constructed in 1903. With a majestic view of the San Gabriel Mountains, it is a beautiful campus located
near North Lake Avenue in Altadena on the corner of El Molino and Calaveras. It is currently comprised of 22 classrooms, two Learning Resource
Classrooms, a speech therapy room, a tutoring room, a parent/community room, two after-school rooms, a counseling room, a library, a staff lounge,
a staff workroom, a preschool classroom and two playgrounds. Due to the passing of a multi-million dollar bond project, the campus was thoroughly
modernized from 2002 to 2004. Staff and students now benefit from a library/media center, additional Internet connections, and air conditioning in all
classrooms. Future deferred maintenance projects include removal and replacement of 60 tons of playground sand in the sand box area and removal
of sand and replacement with woodchips in the kindergarten play structure at the front of the school. Measure TT has also enabled the school to
make more upgrades to the campus; the projects are complete and awaiting final approvals. Renovated classrooms are now occupied and in use;
including a new multi-use cafeteria/auditorium outfitted with state of the art sound and video system. The new Community Room is located within this
building. Gardens and outdoor classrooms are in the planning stage.

Cleaning Process
Altadena Elementary School provides a safe and clean environment for students, staff, and volunteers. The district governing board has adopted
cleaning standards for all schools in the district. Basic cleaning operations are performed on a daily basis throughout the school year with emphasis
on classrooms and restrooms. A joint effort between students and staff helps keep the campus clean and litter-free. The principal works daily with
three custodians to develop sanitation schedules that ensure a clean, safe, and functional learning environment.

Altadena Elementary School

Published: February 2016

Maintenance & Repair


A scheduled maintenance program is administered by Altadena Elementary Schools custodial staff on a regular basis, with heavy maintenance
functions occurring during vacation periods. Additionally, a scheduled maintenance program is administered by Pasadena Unified School District to
ensure that school grounds and facilities remain in excellent repair. A work order process is used when issues arise that require immediate attention.
Emergency repairs are given the highest priority; repair requests are completed efficiently and in the order in which they are received.
The chart displays the results of the most recent school facilities inspection. Facilities information was collected in December 2015.
School Facility Conditions
Date of Last Inspection: 12/02/2015
Overall Summary of School Facility Conditions: Good
Items Inspected

Facility Component
System Status
Good

Fair

Deficiency & Remedial


Actions Taken or Planned

Poor

A113- HVAC thermostat


loose and hanging. (Work
order submitted.)

Interior

A205 Library & B211- Missing


ceiling tiles. A111- Two
stained ceiling tiles. (Work
orders submitted.)

Cleanliness (Overall
Cleanliness, Pest/Vermin
Infestation)

Electrical

Restrooms/Fountains

Safety (Fire Safety,


Hazardous Materials)

Structural (Structural
Damage, Roofs)

External (Grounds, Windows,


Doors, Gates, Fences)

Systems (Gas Leaks, Mech/


HVAC, Sewer)

B204- Two missing ceiling


tiles in restroom. (Work order
submitted.)

B. Pupil Outcomes
State Priority: Pupil Achievement
The SARC provides the following information relevant to the Pupil Achievement State Priority (Priority 4):
Statewide assessments (i.e., California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress and its predecessor the Standardized Testing and
Reporting Program); and
The percentage of pupils who have successfully completed courses that satisfy the requirements for entrance to the University of California and
the California State University, or career technical education sequences or programs of study.

California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP)


California EC Section 60640 authorized the replacement of the Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) Program with a new assessment
program, referred to as the CAASPP. All students in grades three through eight and eleven were assessed using computer-based tests in English/
Language Arts and Mathematics; students in grades five, eight, and ten were also tested in Science. Science assessments were paper-based and
included California Standards Tests (CSTs), California Modified Assessment (CMA), and California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA).
Students receive an overall score for each subject, ranging from 2,000 to 3,000. Overall scores are reported within one of four levels:
Performance Level 1: Standard not met - Needs substantial improvement for success in future coursework.
Performance Level 2: Standard nearly met - May require further development for success in future coursework.
Performance Level 3: Standard met - Demonstrates progress toward mastery.
Performance Level 4: Standard exceeded - Demonstrates advanced progress toward mastery.
ELA results include information about the students performance in the areas of reading, writing, listening, and research. Reports of mathematics
results include information about students performance in problem solving, using concepts and procedures, and communicating mathematical
reasoning.

Altadena Elementary School

Published: February 2016

The first table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards) in English
Language Arts/Literacy (grades 3-8 and 11) and math (grades 3-8 and 11).
The following tables display information on student achievement at each performance level in English/Language Arts and Mathematics for the school
by student groups for grades three through five.
Double dashes (--) appear in the table when the number of students is ten or less, either because the number of students in this category is too small
for statistical accuracy or to protect student privacy.
Note: A student is defined as socioeconomically disadvantaged if the student was eligible for the free or reduced-price lunch program (also known
as the National School Lunch Program or NSLP), migrant, foster youth or homeless, or neither of the students parents was a high school graduate.
California Assessment of
Student Performance and Progress
Percent of Students Meeting or Exceeding the State Standards
School

District

State

English Language Arts/Literacy


(Grades 3-8 and 11)

Subject

11

36

44

Mathematics (Grades 3-8 and 11)

10

28

33

California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress - Grade 3


English-Language Arts

Mathematics

Percent Achievement Level


Total
Enrollment

Number
Tested

Percent
Tested

One

Two

Three

All Students

68

66

97.1

68

24

Male

68

40

58.8

73

23

Female

68

26

38.2

62

Black or African
American

68

23

33.8

Hispanic or Latino

68

39

White

68

Two or More
Races

Percent Achievement Level

Four

Number
Tested

Percent
Tested

One

Two

Three

Four

66

97.1

58

24

15

40

58.8

63

20

15

27

12

26

38.2

50

31

15

74

22

23

33.8

61

22

13

57.4

67

26

39

57.4

59

26

15

2.9

--

--

--

--

2.9

--

--

--

--

68

2.9

--

--

--

--

2.9

--

--

--

--

Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged

68

59

86.8

69

25

59

86.8

63

22

12

English Learners

68

22

32.4

73

23

22

32.4

64

18

18

Students with
Disabilities

68

14

20.6

64

29

14

20.6

57

21

Student Groups

California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress - Grade 4


English-Language Arts

Mathematics

Percent Achievement Level

Percent Achievement Level

Total
Enrollment

Number
Tested

Percent
Tested

One

Two

Three

Four

Number
Tested

Percent
Tested

One

Two

Three

Four

All Students

42

41

97.6

61

27

10

41

97.6

54

39

Male

42

24

57.1

63

29

24

57.1

67

25

Female

42

17

40.5

59

24

18

17

40.5

35

59

Black or African
American

42

11

26.2

82

18

11

26.2

45

45

Asian

42

2.4

--

--

--

--

2.4

--

--

--

--

Filipino

42

2.4

--

--

--

--

2.4

--

--

--

--

Student Groups

Hispanic or Latino

42

26

61.9

58

27

15

26

61.9

58

38

White

42

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Two or More
Races

42

4.8

--

--

--

--

4.8

--

--

--

--

Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged

42

36

85.7

64

28

36

85.7

56

39

English Learners

42

21.4

--

--

--

--

21.4

--

--

--

--

Students with
Disabilities

42

10

23.8

--

--

--

--

10

23.8

--

--

--

--

Altadena Elementary School

Published: February 2016

California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress - Grade 5


English-Language Arts

Mathematics

Percent Achievement Level


Total
Enrollment

Number
Tested

Percent
Tested

One

Two

Three

All Students

41

40

97.6

53

33

Male

41

23

56.1

70

17

Female

41

17

41.5

29

Black or African
American

41

11

26.8

American Indian or
Alaska Native

41

Hispanic or Latino

41

Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged

Percent Achievement Level

Four

Number
Tested

Percent
Tested

One

Two

Three

Four

13

40

97.6

53

40

23

56.1

48

39

53

18

17

41.5

59

41

64

18

11

26.8

73

18

2.4

--

--

--

--

2.4

--

--

--

--

28

68.3

50

36

14

28

68.3

46

46

41

39

95.1

51

33

13

39

95.1

51

41

English Learners

41

19.5

--

--

--

--

19.5

--

--

--

--

Students with
Disabilities

41

13

31.7

92

13

31.7

77

Student Groups

California Standards Test (CST) - Science


The California Standards Test (CST), a component of the CAASPP Program, is administered to all students in the spring to assess student
performance in relation to the State Content Standards. Student scores are reported as performance levels: Advanced (exceeds state standards),
Proficient (meets standards), Basic (approaching standards), Below Basic (below standards), and Far Below Basic (well below standards).
The first table displays the percent of students achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards) in Science
(for grades 5, 8, and 10), for the most recent three-year period. The second table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at the
Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards) for the most recent testing period.
For detailed information regarding the results for each grade and performance level, see the CDE CAASPP Results Web site at http://caaspp.cde.
ca.gov/caaspp2015/Index.aspx.
California Standards Test
Percentage of Students Meeting or Exceeding State Standards
Subject
Science (Grades 5, 8,
and 10)

School

District

State

2013

2014

2015

2013

2014

2015

2013

2014

2015

35

56

29

50

52

49

59

60

56

California Standards Test


Percentage of Students
Meeting or Exceeding State
Standards
Subgroups
Subject

Science

District

49

School

29

Hispanic or Latino

30

Males

37

Females

20

Socioeconomically
Disadvantaged

30

*Scores are not disclosed when


fewer than 10 students are tested
in a grade level and/or subgroup.

Altadena Elementary School

Published: February 2016

State Priority: Other Pupil Achievement


The SARC provides the following information relevant to the Other Pupil Outcomes State Priority:
Pupil outcomes in the subject areas of English, Mathematics, and Physical Education.

Physical Fitness (School Year 2014-15)


In the spring of each year, Altadena Elementary School is required by the state to administer a physical fitness test to all fifth grade students. The
physical fitness test measures each students ability to perform fitness tasks in six major areas. Students who either meet or exceed the standards in
all six fitness areas are considered to be physically fit or in the healthy fitness zone (HFZ).
Percentage of Students in Healthy Fitness Zone
2014-15
Grade Level

Four of Six
Standards

Five of Six
Standards

Six of Six
Standards

9.8%

9.8%

22.0%

C. Engagement
State Priority: Parental Involvement
The SARC provides the following information relevant to the Parental Involvement State Priority (Priority 3):
Efforts the school district makes to seek parent input in making decisions for the school district and each school site.

Parent & Community Involvement (School Year 2015-16)


As a neighborhood choice school, Altadena offers many and varied opportunities for parents and families to connect with our school community.
Parents are encouraged to take leadership roles in, or attend, school site and District organizations and committees such as, Parent Teacher
Association, School Site Council, African American Parent Council, English Learner Advisory Committee, Citizens Action Committee and more.
Parents are also offered a variety of learning opportunities and workshops to assist in the success of their children.
Altadena Elementary School has forged partnerships with community businesses, and a large cadre of community volunteers have donated
countless hours to the school community. California Credit Union, League of Women Voters, Metropolitan Associates, Parent Education Foundation
(PEF), Pasadena Symphony, Music Center, Rotary Club and Monte Cedro all donate funds and volunteer time to assist Altadena Elementary School
in providing a thriving learning community in which all students can be successful.

Contact Information
Parents who wish to participate in Altadena Elementary Schools committees, school activities, or become a volunteer may contact the main office at
(626) 396-5650, or visit the district website at www.pusd.us.

State Priority: School Climate


The SARC provides the following information relevant to the School Climate State Priority (Priority 6):
Pupil suspension rates;
Pupil expulsion rates; and
Other local measures on the sense of safety.

Discipline & Climate for Learning


Students at Altadena Elementary School are guided by Positive Behavioral Supports and Interventions. Expectations of Respect, Responsibility and
Safety are explicitly taught to promote not only respect, responsibility and safety but, also, cooperation, courtesy, and acceptance of others.
The district provides an annual Student Conduct Code for each of its sites, supplemented by a set of behavioral expectations developed by Altadena
Elementary School.
Parents and students are informed of discipline policies through
classroom orientation, school wide assemblies, and parent
newsletters. The programs design establishes guidelines to provide
students with a meaningful, productive, and enjoyable school
experience.
The table displays the suspension and expulsion rates at the school,
in the district, and throughout the state. Expulsions occur only when
required by law or when all other alternatives are exhausted.

Altadena Elementary School

Suspensions & Expulsions


Suspensions

Expulsions

12-13

13-14

14-15

12-13

13-14

14-15

School

3.1%

9.9%

3.3%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

District

6.8%

6.4%

4.9%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

State

5.1%

4.4%

3.8%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

Published: February 2016

Student Recognition
Positive recognition creates a learning environment that fosters respect for the individual and promotes self-esteem. In addition to classroom prizes,
the following awards and recognition are given at monthly schoolwide assemblies.
Academic Improvement
Good Behavior
Students receive certificates/rewards at monthly assemblies
Perfect Attendance - students are recognized at monthly assemblies

Extracurricular Activities
Students are encouraged to participate in the schools academic and extracurricular activities that are an integral part of the educational program.
These schoolwide and classroom incentives promote positive attitudes, encourage achievement, and aid in the prevention of behavioral problems.
Students participate in the instrumental music program, and the LEARNs program. The LEARNs program provides students with one hour of
academic studies, one hour of homework help, and one hour of enrichment. All students at Altadena Elementary School are provided with music
instruction.
Altadena Elementary School has implemented a Fine Arts Program, where each grade level participates in fine arts standards. We have various
music and singing assemblies such as string quartets and opera. Students in grades three through five receive instrumental music instruction.

Safe School Plan (School Year 2015-16)


The safety of students and staff is a primary concern of Altadena Elementary School. All visitors to the campus must sign in at the office and wear
a visitors pass at all times. Students are monitored before, during, and after school by supervision aides, resource teachers, and the principal.
Teachers help supervise students during recess. There are designated areas for student drop-off and pick-up.
The School Site Safety Plan is revised annually by the Leadership Team and School Site Council. The Safety Plan is reviewed with all staff members
and modified based on student data at the beginning of each school year. The plan was most recently updated and reviewed with school staff in
December 2015.
Key elements of the Safety Plan include the maintenance of a safe, orderly, and drug-free school. The school is in compliance with the laws, rules,
and regulations pertaining to hazardous materials and state earthquake standards. The schools disaster preparedness plan includes steps for
ensuring student and staff safety during an emergency. Fire, disaster, and lockdown drills are conducted on a regular basis throughout the school
year.

D. Other SARC Information


The information in this section is required to be in the SARC but is not included in the state priorities for LCFF.

Adequate Yearly Progress (School Year 2014-15)


No Child Left Behind (NCLB) is a Federal law enacted in January 2002 that reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). It
mandates that all students (including students who are economically disadvantaged, are from racial or ethnic minority groups, have disabilities, or
have limited English proficiency) in all grades meet the State academic achievement standards for Mathematics and English/Language Arts by 2014.
Schools must demonstrate Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) toward achieving that goal.
The Federal NCLB Act requires that all schools and districts meet the following AYP requirements:
Participation rate on the States standards-based assessments in English/Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics.
Percent proficient on the States standards-based assessments in ELA and Mathematics.
Graduation rate.
There are several consequences for schools that do not meet the AYP standards, including additional tutoring and replacing of staff. Students would
also be allowed to transfer to schools (within their District) that have met their AYP, and the former school would be required to provide transportation
to the new site. Results of school, District, and State performance are displayed in the chart.
More information about Title I and NCLB requirements can be found on the California Department of Educations website http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/
ac/ay/ and the U.S. Department of Educations website http://www.nclb.gov.
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
School
Made AYP Overall

District

Yes

No

English Language
Arts

Mathematics

Participation Rate

Yes

Yes

Percent Proficient

N/A

N/A

Met AYP Criteria

State

English Language
Arts

Yes

Mathematics

English Language
Arts

Mathematics

No

No

Yes

Yes

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Met Attendance Rate

Yes

Yes

Yes

Met Graduation Rate

N/A

Yes

Yes

Altadena Elementary School

Published: February 2016

Federal Intervention Program (School Year 2015-16)


Schools and districts receiving Federal Title I funding enter Program Improvement (PI) if they do not make AYP for two consecutive years in the same
content area (English/Language Arts or Mathematics) or on the same indicator (graduation rate). After entering PI, schools and districts advance to
the next level of intervention with each additional year that they do not make AYP.
For detailed information about PI identification, see the CDE PI Status Determinations Web page: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ay/tidetermine.asp.
Federal Intervention Programs
School
Program Improvement (PI) Status
First Year in PI
Year in PI (2015-16)

District

In PI

In PI

2003-2004

2011-2012

Year 5

Year 3

# of Title I Schools Currently In PI

20

% of Title I Schools Currently In PI

90.9%

School Leadership
Leadership at Altadena Elementary School is a responsibility shared among district administration, the principal, instructional staff, students, parents
and community members. Stakeholders are encouraged to participate in decision making processes leading to the educational plan, ensuring
instructional programs are consistent with students needs and comply with district goals.
Opportunities for involvement include: Data Team, English Language Advisory Committee (ELAC) , Fine Arts Committee, Grade Level Chairs, Grade
Level Teams, Safety Committee, School Site Council, and Technology Committee.

Counseling & Support Staff (School Year 2014-15)


In addition to academics, the staff at Altadena Elementary strives to assist students in their social, emotional and personal development. Staff
members are trained to recognize at-risk behavior in all students. The school values the importance of on-site counseling and has procedures in
place to ensure that students receive the services they need. The school has a social worker on staff.
The school does not have an academic counselor. The chart displays a list of support services that are offered to students at Altadena Elementary
School. Note: One Full Time Equivalent (FTE) equals one staff member working full time; one FTE could also represent two staff members who each
work 50 percent of full time.
Counseling & Support Services Staff
Number of
Staff

Full Time
Equivalent

Health Clerk

0.6

Inclusion Aide

9.0

Inclusion Teacher

2.0

Nurse

0.2

Psychologist

0.3

Resource Specialist
Program (RSP) Teacher

0.6

RSP Aide

1.0

Speech/Language
Specialist

0.8

The schools English Language Development (ELD) program assists students who are English Learners (EL). Instruction is delivered as a Structured
English Immersion (SEI) program, which mainstreams non-English speakers into regular classes. The program is conducted by classroom teachers
who have all received extensive training in Specially Designed Academic Instruction Delivered in English (SDAIE) strategies.
Altadena Elementary is one of two PUSD schools involved in a Special Education Inclusion Program designed to address needs of identified
students. The pilot program provides additional support staff to ensure that each students needs are met in a general education classroom.
Academic recovery interventions and community/peer tutoring have been implemented to assist students in their success. Altadena Elementary
provides additional assistance for students after school, which is conducted by credentialed teachers. Altadena Elementary strives to be Where
College Bound Students Attend. A college going culture is emphasized and 5th grade students are expected to attend a college tour in the spring,
familiarize themselves and their families with the UC/CSU systems, and complete a college application as a Spring Promotion Project.
Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) students are clustered into the same classrooms, where they will receive more rigorous offerings and activities
along with regular classroom work. This year the Innovation Club will enhance the offerings for GATE students and their classmates by offering
Coding and Science curriculum to extend their learning. GATE students are identified based on test scores and teacher recommendations.

Altadena Elementary School

Published: February 2016

Professional Development
Staff members build teaching skills and concepts through participation in conferences and workshops throughout the year. For the past three years,
the district offered two staff development days.
During these sessions, teachers are offered a broad-based variety of professional growth opportunities in curriculum, teaching strategies, and
methodologies.

Class Size
The table indicates the average class size by grade level, as well as the number of classrooms that fall into each size category.
Class Size Distribution
Classrooms Containing:
Average
Class Size
13

14

15

1-20
Students
13

14

15

21-32
Students
13

33+
Students

14

15

13

14

15

By Grade Level
K

24

24

23

25

25

25

25

25

24

17

23

20

25

23

22

24

22

14

Additional Internet Access/Public Libraries


For additional research materials and Internet availability, students are encouraged to visit the libraries located in Los Angeles County, which contain
numerous computer workstations.

Expenditures & Services Funded (Fiscal Year 2013-14)


At the time this report was published, the most recent financial and salary comparison data from the State of California was for the 2013-14 school
year. The Expenditures Per Pupil table provides a comparison of a schools per pupil funding from unrestricted sources with other schools in the
district and throughout the state.
Supplemental/Restricted expenditures come from money whose use is controlled by law or donor. Money designated for specific purposes by the
district or governing board is not considered restricted. Basic/Unrestricted expenditures, except for general guidelines, is not controlled by law or
donor.
For detailed information on school expenditures for all districts in California, see the CDE Current Expense of Education & Per-pupil Spending Web
page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/ec/. For information on teacher salaries for all districts in California, see the CDE Certificated Salaries & Benefits
Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/. To look up expenditures and salaries for a specific school district, see the Ed-Data Web site at: http://
www.ed-data.org.
Expenditures per Pupil
School
Total Expenditures Per Pupil

$9,291

From Supplemental/Restricted Sources

$3,893

From Basic/Unrestricted Sources

$5,397

District
From Basic/Unrestricted Sources
Percentage of Variation between School & District

$4,991
8.1%

State
From Basic/Unrestricted Sources
Percentage of Variation between School & State

Altadena Elementary School

10

$5,348
0.9%

Published: February 2016

School Site Teacher Salaries (Fiscal Year 2013-14)


The Average Teacher Salaries table illustrates the average teacher salary at the school and compares it to the average teacher salary at the district
and state.
Average Teacher Salaries
School & District
School

$74,353

District

$70,542

Percentage of Variation

5.4%

School & State


All Unified School Districts

$71,529

Percentage of Variation

3.9%

Teacher & Administrative Salaries (School Year 2013-14)


This table displays district salaries for teachers, principals, and superintendents, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the
same type and size. The table also displays teacher and administrative salaries as a percent of the districts budget, and compares these figures to
the state averages for districts of the same type and size. Detailed information regarding salaries may be found at the CDE Web site.
Average Salary Information
Teachers - Principal - Superintendent
2013-14
District

State

Beginning Teachers

$41,415

$43,062

Mid-Range Teachers

$60,566

$67,927

Highest Teachers

$85,450

$87,811

Elementary School Principals

$108,937

$110,136

Middle School Principals

$109,039

$115,946

High School Principals

$115,962

$124,865

Superintendent

$247,200

$211,869

Salaries as a Percentage of Total Budget


Teacher Salaries

33.0%

39.0%

Administrative Salaries

6.0%

5.0%

District Revenue Sources (Fiscal Year 2014-15)


In addition to general state funding, Pasadena Unified School District received state and federal categorical funding for the following support
programs:
Title I, Parts A & D - Basic & Delinquent Funds
Title II, Parts A & D - Teacher Quality & Technology
Title III, Limited English Proficient (LEP)

DataQuest
DataQuest is an online data tool located on the CDE DataQuest Web page at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/ that contains additional information
about this school and comparisons of the school to the district, the county, and the state. Specifically, DataQuest is a dynamic system that provides
reports for accountability (e.g., test data, enrollment, high school graduates, dropouts, course enrollments, staffing, and data regarding English
learners).

Altadena Elementary School

11

Published: February 2016