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GENERAL INDUCTION

Southern Cross Operations

Health, Safety and Environment Department


General Induction Module 1 Monday, September 19, 2011

Housekeeping Issues

Timeframe

Attendance Form and photo

Handouts

Toilets

Tea/Coffee facilities

Assessment

Learning difficulties

Transport

Questions

Administration Area Evacuation

Activate or respond to the evacuation siren

Check wind direction and proceed to the Emergency Assembly Point at the
Visitors car park

Register with the Evacuation Point Coordinator

Remain at the Emergency Assembly Point until advised otherwise

Emergency Assembly Points are discussed


in area specific inductions

Welcome to
Southern Cross Operations

Ensuring your Health and Safety is our primary concern at Southern Cross
Operations. This induction forms the first step in your journey to working
safely

There are four components to today's induction:

Address by the General Manager

Corporate Induction

Southern Cross Operations General Induction

Environment Induction

There may be area specific inductions that you will need to complete

If you have a question at any stage of the induction, please ask!

General Manager Address

Welcome
Kous Kirsten General Manager Southern Cross Operations
Kous has been with StBarbara for several years in both
site based and corporate roles.

Alternate General Managers


Gordon Murray (Manager Mining)
Roy Hewitt (Manager Processing)
Ashok Doorgapershad (Manager - Geology)
Linc Downward (Manager HSE)
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Vision Statement
To be a successful and growing Australian gold company
Underpinned by foundations of:

Safe production

Environmental sustainability

Beneficial relationships with the communities to which we belong

Respect for the rights and aspirations of our employees & contractors

Ethical business dealings

Values Statement
We act with honesty and integrity
We treat people with respect
We value working together
We deliver to promise
We strive to do better

Incident Description
On the 7th May 2010 an
underground service crew
member was standing in a
detached IT basket ready to fill
up the water supply drum for
grouting operations from a
1000lt Pod supported by an
approaching IT.

Incident Description
While in a raised position the
1000lt water pod used to fill the
drum slipped from the forklift
tynes coming into contact with
the service crew member as it
rolled into the IT basket.
The worker was located here in
the basket to open the water
valve located at the front of the
water pod.
He received fractured ribs and
vertebra and damage to his
spleen.
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Incident Description
Whilst undertaking electrical
work around mill 1 an
apprentice
electrician
received an electric shock
and superficial burn whilst
cutting a 415V cable.

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Incident Description
Damage to the cable
cutting tool. Sufficient
energy to melt the steel
blade.

The apprentice received


superficial burns and after
medical assessment was
allowed to return to work.

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Stop
Do I understand the task?
Nothing is so urgent we cant afford the time to do it safely
Think
What hazards are present?
Do I have everything I need to do the job safely?
Assess and Act
Will anyone else be affected by my actions?
Get the right permits and tools
Use the right procedure for the job
Report
Can I do the job safely? If not contact your Supervisor
Report any hazards
Task completed safely
Watch for hazards that change
Stick to the JHA or procedure
Follow instructions

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Expectations
My expectations of you while you are on this site are:

That you will present at the start of your shift Fit for Work

That you will participant in PASS meeting and contribute proactively

That you will consider your Duty of Care towards yourself and your work mates

That you will follow procedures, JHAs and make good decisions

That you will report all incidents

That you will abide by the Rules To Live By

What you can expect from me:

You have my word that I fully support the Vision of this company

You have my authority to stop the job if you think it is unsafe

You have my confirmation that incidents will be investigated appropriately

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This Presentation
The site induction is a very important kick off session as it provides me with
the opportunity to inform you about our operation and what is expected from
you during your time here.
It also provides you with the opportunity to ask questions so please pay
attention to the presenter and do not hesitate to seek clarity or additional
information on any of the subjects discussed today.
Thank you

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Corporate Structure

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St Barbara Corporate Structure

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Duty of Care

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Duty of Care - Employers

Provide and maintain a safe workplace, plant and systems of work

Ensure the safe use, cleaning and maintenance of plant and equipment

Provide employees with adequate information, instruction and training

Provide employees with adequate personal protective equipment

Consult and cooperate with employees on matters concerning safety

Mines Safety and Inspection Act 1994, Part 2, Section 9

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Duty of Care - Employees

Take reasonable care to ensure your own safety

Take reasonable care to ensure the safety of others, through any act or
omission

Follow instructions from supervision

Wear and maintain personal protective equipment

Report all incidents, hazards and near misses

Not misuse or deliberately damage any safety equipment

Mines Safety and Inspection Act 1994, Part 2, Section 10

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HSE Policy & Systems

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Occupational Health & Safety


Policy Statement

A safe workplace is fundamental to


the success of the Company and
the well being of its employees,
contractors, consultants and visitors

St Barbara is committed to
achieving a workplace that is free
from harm and supported by a
culture which ensures safety is an
absolute priority

The OHS Policy Statement details


how St Barbara will meet these
objectives

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Health and Safety


Management System

St Barbara has an overriding commitment to health and safety and


believes that all incidents are preventable

The Health and Safety Management System provides defences

Safe Systems policies, procedures, protocols, instructions, forms

Safe Equipment provision of safe and appropriate tools and equipment

Safe People establishing a safe culture within our people

Safe Environment maintain an environment that is safe to work in

The Health and Safety Management System provides the framework to


help us achieve these aims

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Health and Safety


Management System
Health and Safety Management Standards

Leadership, Accountability and Ethics


Risk and Change Management
Contractor Management
Incident Reporting & Investigation
Communication, Consultation and Participation
Workplace Inspections
Planning, Goals and Targets
Training, Competency and Behavior
Health and Hygiene
Legal Requirements, Commitments & Document Control
Crisis & Emergency Management
Design, Construct, Commissioning & Decommissioning
Monitoring, Audits & Review

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Critical Risk Control Standards (CRCS)

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Critical Risk Control Standards (CRCS)

The CRCS have been introduced to St Barbara after a review of incidents in


the mining industry have identified a series of key critical risks risks that
often result in fatalities

The CRCS establish minimum business wide requirements and


performance expectations for managing these risk areas

The existence of the CRCS does not presume coverage of all risk areas
faced by our operations.

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Critical Risk Control Standards (CRCS)


The 12 Critical Risk Control Standards:

Light Vehicles

Surface Mobile Equipment

Underground Mobile Equipment

Lifting Operations

Hazardous Material Handling

Underground Ground Control

Plant Equipment and Power Tools

Isolations

Working at Heights

Surface Mining Ground Control

Confined Space

Explosives
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Rules to Live By

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Rules to Live By
Context:
Many companies have rules in place that prevent fatalities. These rules are
often mixed up with less critical rules and their importance is lost. This places
personnel at serious risk.
The Rules To Live By are designed to prevent fatalities: They must be:
1.
2.
3.

Clearly defined
Understood by all St Barbara employees and contractors
Supported by a fair process to manage a breach of one or more rules

Purpose:
Explain why we need these Rules To Live By

Explain the process for a breach of any Rule


Provide explanation for each of the Rules
Responsibilities
Confirmation of understanding

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Why Rules To Live By?


There are a large number of rules within our Company.
Never work at height without fall protection (Implied - Consequence is high)
Monthly report to be completed by 4th of the month (Important - less critical)
The Rules To Live By are there as a barrier to prevent Fatality and Serious Injury.
These are the rules that you rely upon, they must be understood and adhered to in all
instances.
Many large companies have rules such as cardinal rules, life saving rules, life preserving
rules etc - they have developed over time to drive a culture of Operational Discipline
where rules are respected and the consequences are well understood.

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Why Rules To Live By?


Rules To
Live By

Fatality
Lost
Time
Injury

Vision
Statement

CRCS

Safe production
HIF Audits

Safe Operating
Procedures

Environmental
sustainability

Alternative
Disabling injury

Beneficial
relationships
Respect

Medical Treated Injury

Ethics

First Aid Injury

PASS
START SAFE
STAY SAFE

Hazard / Near Miss

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Breaching the Rules To Live By


If you breach one or more of the Rules To Live By, you will be subject to a
disciplinary process. The outcome will range from:
Return to normal active duties,
Written Warning,
Dismissal

It is important with every breach that an ICAM investigation is completed to identify


all underlying causes and provide lesson's learned from the incident.

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Process for a Breach of the


Rules To Live By

Incident Occurs

Fatality

YES

Crisis Management Team


Activated.
ICAM Team Established.

NO

In the event that a St Barbara

Initial investigation
completed. Pt one
Significant Incident released

employee (including
contractors) are suspected of
breaching one or more of the

Suspected Breach of
the Rules To Live By.

Rules To Live By, the breach


of the Rules To Live By

Person is stood down


pending the ICAM

process will be followed and


managed by the Site General

Wilful Breach

Mistake or Slip/Lapse
Accident

No Breach

Gross Misconduct
Dismissal

Serious Breach
Written warning through
to dismissal

Return to active duties

Manager/delegate or
equivalent.

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Rule Number 1 - Isolation


Rule

Never work on equipment that has not been correctly isolated from all
energy sources.

Intent To ensure the hazard of an energy source is controlled when work is


performed. This includes stored energy.
Expectations Permit to Work (PTW) Procedure is applied.
The limits / extent of the isolation is understood by those on the job.
The Equipment Testing (Jogging, Adjusting, Maintaining or Operating) Procedure is
applied when required.
Equipment is isolated from all energy sources before work commences.
All work performed is within the scope of the isolation.
Test that the isolated equipment cannot be accidentally energised during work.
Personnel will always only use their personal Danger Tag and Padlock.
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Rule Number 2 Underground Tag, Personal


Danger Tag and Padlock
Rule

Never remove another persons Underground Tag, Danger Tag and Padlock.

Intent To ensure personnel working underground or on equipment with a


Personal Danger Tag and Padlock or Underground Tag are identified.
Expectations Personnel place and remove their own Underground Tag or Personal Danger Tag and
Padlock.
In the event that a Underground Tag or Personal Danger Tag and Padlock needs to be
removed the Authorised Removal of Underground Tag or Personal Danger Tag
procedure is applied.

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Rule Number 3 Operate or Modification


Rule Never move, operate or modify equipment unless competent and
authorised.
Intent To ensure equipment is operated safely and that all modifications are
assessed before changes are made.
Expectations All personnel who operate or maintain equipment are deemed competent and
authorised.
The Management of Change Procedure is followed and all modifications are reviewed
to ensure the change does not result in additional risk.

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Rule Number 4 - Safety Device


Rule

Never remove, bypass or modify a safety device without authorisation. (e.g.


guard, interlock, barricade, out of service tag, smoke detector, limit switch,
emergency stop, sign)

Intent - To ensure safety devices/systems remain in place and that the risks to
personnel are assessed before changes are made.
Expectations
All changes to alarms and interlocks comply with procedure
Guarding is only removed when the Permit to Work (Isolation) procedure is used
Gridmesh is only removed after the risk is controlled with hard barricading
Danger tape, hard barricaded or coned areas are only accessed after obtaining
permission from an Authorised person

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Rule Number 5 Delineated Area


Rule

Never enter a delineated hazardous area without authorisation.


(e.g. Fenced area, Danger taped area, Coned areas, Confined space,
Underground work environment)

Intent To protect personnel from hazardous situations.


Expectations The Barricading Procedure is applied.
People who require entry into a delineated area seek authorisation from the
appropriate person.
The efficiency of the delineated area is maintained (entering and exiting) by those
permitted to work within the hazardous area.

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Rule Number 6 Suspended Load


Rule Never work or travel under a suspended load.
Intent To ensure personnel are not at risk of being struck by the uncontrolled
vertical or horizontal or rollover movement of a suspended load. Controlled
suspended load examples are:
Approved Control

NOT Approved

Vehicle hoist with annual certified inspection

Crane suspended load

Raised truck tub or cabin with approved secondary safety device

Raised bucket

Vehicle on approved safety stands on appropriate hard standing

Vehicle jack

Crane load lowered onto an approved stand

Expectations

Lifts are controlled and only authorised personnel are allowed to access the lift area.
Lift areas are clearly barricaded to prevent people being inadvertently under a load.
Tag lines are used as required to maintain a safe distance from the suspended load.
Secondary controls for suspended loads will be risk assessed and approved.

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Rule Number 7 Working at Heights


Rule Never work at heights without fall protection controls in place.
Intent To prevent personnel working at height from falling. Personnel apply a
working at heights hierarchy of controls.
Example of Possible Controls
Handrails and walkway

Purpose designed platform

Elevated work platform

Scaffold

Harness and restraint line

Three points of contact

Expectations There is a common understanding of Working at Height and Fall Protection.


Fall prevention equipment is fit for purpose and maintained.
Personnel working at height are authorised to do so.
Safe access is provided where practicable to eliminate the need to use fall prevention
devices.
Throughout the job, at height risks are identified, a risk assessment is undertaken and
controls implemented before proceeding with the job.
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Training and Awareness


Implementation
The St Barbara Induction process will be managed be the General
Manager/delegate or equivalent and all new employees will be introduced to the
Rules To Live By prior to starting any work
Supervisor are responsible to:
Discuss and receive personal written commitment to the Rules To Live By from
new employees including contractors (using this presentation and Rules To
Live By assessment form).
A record of this commitment is kept on file by the Operation

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For your protection!!

THE RULES TO LIVE BY ARE


THERE TO PROTECT YOU AND
YOUR WORKMATES FROM
SERIOUS HARM OR A FATAL
INCIDENT
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Rules to Live By
At St Barbara we NEVER:
1.

Work on equipment that has not been correctly isolated from all energy sources

2.

Remove another persons Underground Tag, Danger Tag and Padlock

3.

Move, operate or modify equipment unless authorised

4.

Remove, bypass or modify a safety device without authorisation

5.

Enter a delineated hazardous area without authorisation

6.

Work or travel under a suspended load

7.

Work at heights without fall protection controls

If you breach one or more Rules to Live By, you will be subject to a disciplinary process

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Hazard and Risk Management

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Learning outcomes
At the end of the session you should be able to:

Undertake hazard identification

Apply a risk assessment to hazards

Demonstrate a thorough understanding of JHA and StartSafe

Have the ability to apply these to your day-to-day work

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Why do we need to manage hazards?


People working in the mining industry
must deal with hazards that most
people never encounter...
Department of Minerals & Resources Publication

With this in mind, we are here today to


increase our awareness and skills in
managing the hazards and risk
associated with our industry.

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Why must we change?


Many incidents are caused by:

Poor hazard identification

Inadequate management of change

Complacency

Lack of appropriate training

Inadequate supervision

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Hazard Identification

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Hazard
A hazard is something that has the ability to cause:

Injury or illness

Damage

Production loss

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Hazard Identification
Ask yourself:

Do you understand the scope of works?

Have you done the task before? Familiar or unfamiliar?

Do you fully understand the sequence of events and your role?

Have you identified all energy sources?

Are you capable of completing the task? What about human error?

Will anyone else be impacted by your work?

What can go wrong?

What can hurt me?

Hazards are not always obvious. The more thorough your hazard and risk
assessment, the less likely you are to be injured!

50

Hazard identification
Share with the group a hazard from your workplace. Identify:

The hazard

The types of losses that could occur if the hazard is uncontrolled

Injury/Illness/Damage/Down Time/Environment Damage

The consequences to you and/or your team

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Common major mining hazards

Toxic chemicals and chemical interaction

Electricity

Hot work and fires

Mechanical fixed plant

Dust and fibres produced in mining and crushing

Confined spaces

Working at heights

Light and heavy vehicle interaction

Mobile plant

Rock falls, ground subsidence and inrushes

Explosives

Manual handling
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Common stored energy hazards

Chemical

Noise

Electrical

Vibration

Mechanical

Spring

Pressure

Ergonomics

Gravity

Combinations of the above

Thermal

Ensure when completing a JHA that you identify the energy source and
document the controls put into place to control the energy source

53

Hazard identification

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Hazard identification

55

Hazard identification

56

Hazard identification

57

Hazard identification

58

Hazard identification

59

Hazard identification

60

Hazard identification

61

Hazard Reporting

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Hazard / Near Miss reporting

Required to report all incidents / hazards / near misses to your supervisor

Hazards and near misses can be reported on the Hazard / Near Miss
Report

The expectation is that you will also take some action to abate the hazard
or warn others of its presence

TIP: Check if a hazard you have reported is outstanding if so raise this at a


safety or toolbox meeting

63

Hazard / Near Miss reporting

64

Risk Assessment

65

Risk
Risk has 2 components:

The chance of a hazard causing injury or illness, damage or production loss

The severity of the consequences to you or the Company

66

Risk Assessment
Risk assessment is the overall process we use to provide a safe work place and
includes:

Hazard identification

Risk assessment

Risk and hazard control

Review and continual improvement

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Hierarchy of Controls

ELIMINATE: The complete removal of the hazard from the task

SUBSTITUTE: Replacing the source of the hazard with something less hazardous

REDESIGN: Adding something to protect or modify to reduce the risk

SEPARATE: Ensuring the hazard is de-energised, contained or secured away

ADMINISTRATION: Create and follow procedures, JHA, training, etc

PPE: Use the correct PPE

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Steps of risk management

1.

Identify the hazard

2.

Assess the risk

3.

Implement controls

4.

Take action

69

Operational Risk Matrix

70

Operational Risk Matrix

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Risk Management

72

Developing controls
When you develop controls to manage risk you need to consider:

Hierarchy of Controls

Hard and soft barriers

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Hard and soft barriers


Hard barriers are a permanent, tangible
solution to managing a hazard:

Elimination

Substitution

Redesign

Separate

Soft barriers rely on adherence to


polices or procedures:

Administration

PPE
What is the better option?

74

An example of barriers
Take a work at height task:

Fall protection

Fall arrest

Handrails

EWP/Scissor Lift

Scaffold

Critical Risk Control Standard 9

Rules to Live By 7

Work Certificate

Operator training

75

Establishing controls

Controls must be specific:

Just saying PPE even gloves can be broad: PVC gloves, riggers
gloves, nitrile gloves, welding gloves, rubber gloves, dish washing
gloves, cut resistant gloves.....

Avoid using general controls:

Use correct lifting technique you may know what you mean by
this, but do others?

76

Implementing controls
Every identified hazard or risk must have a control
Controls must be implemented prior to commencing
work
You must continually monitor and review your controls
to ensure their efficacy

77

Supervisors
Supervisors must:
Drive hazard identification and risk management activities
Ensure StartSafe compliance
Ensure quality and constancy of JHAs
Validate effectiveness of controls
Ensure that risk levels are appropriately assigned and authorised
Ensure that work crews operate within the scope of works or
Certificate

78

Risk Management at St Barbara

79

Risk management activities


There are three risk management activities undertaken at St Barbara:

StartSafe

Job Hazard Analysis (JHA)

Team Based Risk Assessment (TBRA)

80

Flowchart

81

START SAFE

82

START SAFE

Stop
Think
Assess and Act
Report
Task completed safely

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START Safe

Personal hazard identification system

Requires that you stop and think before commencing a task

Use the checklist to help identify task specific hazards and assess the
risk

Requirement to complete a START Safe prior to job/task commencement

84

START Safe

85

START Safe

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START Safe

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START Safe

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JHA

89

Job Hazard Analysis


A Job Hazard Analysis is carried out every time:

There is a change of task within a SWP

A supervisor requests that a JHA is completed

If a Certificate requires a JHA

If more than one department/company are working in an area

The work is not normally undertaken by the department/company

The work being undertaken could effect the work of others

Personnel involved can include

Task supervisor

Employees who will complete the task

Representatives from adjoining work groups

Health and Safety Representatives


90

When should you do a JHA?

91

JHA Steps
1.

Establish the scope of work and


the team required

2.

Define the steps required for the


task

3.

Identify the hazards associated


with each step

4.

Establish controls already in place


for hazards if any!

5.

Establish additional or new


controls required for each step

6.

Seek supervisor input and


approval to commence work

92

JHA tips

Have the right team involve operators, personnel nearby, contractors,


technical specialists

Have broad steps but ensure that all steps that may have hazards are
identified

Attach mud maps, diagrams, MSDSs etc

Collect data prior to commencing the JHA (MSDS, Certificates)

Put specific information in the hazards and controls area

93

JHA bad habits

Being too general with controls

Not reviewing a JHA when changes occur

Not ensuring that all personnel on the job understand the JHA

Using soft controls only

Supervisors not reviewing and approving JHAs

94

JHA to SWP

JHAs can be used as reference material to develop a SWP

Wherever possible, regular tasks should be converted to SWPs

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JHA
Lets look at a St Barbara JHA...

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TBRA

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Team Based Risk Assessment


A Team Based Risk Assessment (TBRA) is a comprehensive exercise where
every activity that is carried out in the workplace is broken down into task
steps and analysed:
A TBRA is completed for

Any new task

The introduction of new plant, equipment or contracting companies

Non-routine or abnormal tasks

Personnel involved can include

Task specialists, manufacturers and suppliers

Department Managers

HSE Advisors

Employees and the area involved


98

Activities

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Activity
Complete a JHA:
Your task:

Clean gutters at Camp and install gutter guard

You have a platform ladder available

Consider the safest method to do the task

You have a team of 5 available

Task must be done ASAP

100

101

Incident Reporting

102

Incident Reporting

The Mines Safety and Inspection Act requires that all incidents are
reported to the employer

SBM requires that you report incidents immediately and if there is a


personal injury (regardless of severity) the injured person shall be taken
immediately to the SBM Medic

103

Incident Reporting Procedure

The Incident Report is managed in four sections:

Incident Details: This section details what occurred and must be completed
immediately after an incident. It should the be forwarded to the HSE Team

Investigation: The severity of the incident determines the investigation team


and time frame. Generally a Manger, Supervisor and a Health and Safety
Representative are included on the team

Corrective Actions: Actions are allocated to remedy the situation and ensure
that repeat incidents are eliminated

Review and Sign-Off: The sign-off process ensures that all appropriate
measures have been taken to ensure repeat incidents do not occur

Incident data is entered into InControl by Department Moderators

104

Incident Report Form

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Common Causes of Incidents

Unsafe systems of work and unsafe workplaces

Lack of information, instruction or supervision

Staff being unfamiliar with a new work environment, machinery, materials


or tools

Lack of hazard and near miss reporting

Complacency

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HSE Communications

107

Positive Attitude Safety Systems


(PASS)

PASS is a method of conducting safety meeting which encourages


proactive discussion about safety

Each work group holds a PASS meeting daily

The success of PASS meetings depends on the input received from the
workforce

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The PASS Concept

Reflecting on the previous days activities in regards to safety and ensuring


that necessary action is initiated

Discuss and support positive behaviours of the previous day so that they
will be repeated and reinforced

Encourage employees to plan the days activities and work and:

Think, what are the hazards?

Think, what can go wrong?

Consider, what can I DO to improve safety?

Put in place controls and strategies to minimise risk and harm

109

Health and Safety Meetings


Each work area conducts regular health and safety meetings:

Daily: Pre-start and PASS meetings

Weekly: Tool Box Meetings to raise and discuss issues with the entire crew,
supervision and HSE Team

Monthly: Environment, Safety and Health Advisory Committee (ESHAC)


where safety representatives can raise unresolved issues through to St
Barbara

Safety issues should be raised immediately do not hold off until a meeting!

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Safety and Health Representatives

Represent fellow workers in matters pertaining to health and safety

Are consulted by management about changes to the mine which may


effect health and safety

Can be present at an employees interview pertaining to a health and


safety matter

Reports immediately any hazard

Can investigate any incident or occurrence at a mine that effects health


and safety

Can inspect parts of the mine

Acts as a conduit between the workforce and management

Can issue Provisional Improvement Notices

111

Fitness For Work

112

Fitness for Work

To ensure SBM meets it obligations insofar


as providing a safe workplace, a Fitness for
Work program has been implemented

All employees and contractors must


present for work in a fit condition

Fitness for Work can include:

Drugs

Alcohol

Fatigue

Physical condition

Mental condition

113

Fitness for Work


Three main factors effecting
fitness for work:

Drugs: including over the


counter, prescription and illicit
drugs

Alcohol

People Factors: such as stress,


mental health, fatigue, physical
condition

Drugs

Alcohol

People Factors

114

Fitness for Work - Alcohol

You must present for work with a 0.00% blood alcohol


content

If in doubt, self test machines are available at camp

You shall present for daily pre-shift alcohol breath testing

If you return a positive result, you will be retested after


20 minutes have elapsed. The second reading is the
confirmatory reading and will be recorded

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Fitness for Work - Alcohol

BAC under 0.10%: You will be stood down from work for the rest of the day
and escorted to your accommodation and the day shall be taken as unpaid
or annual leave. Disciplinary action will be taken

BAC over 0.10%: Summary dismissal

Prevention is the key!

116

Fitness for Work - Drugs

Zero tolerance to drugs of abuse

St Barbara also reliably tests for synthetic cannabis (Kronic)

All on-site screening is sent to an accredited laboratory for GCMS analysis

You may be stood down on pay pending the confirmatory test

Confirmatory positive results will result in termination

All testing on site is conducted to AS4308

All testers are trained to the requirements of AS4308 by an independent


registered training organisation

117

Fitness for Work - Testing

Various testing is carried out at SBM for drugs and/or alcohol:

Pre-employment

For cause

Post incident

Random and/or Blanket

Self testing

Methods used include:

Supervisor assessment

Breathalyser

Urine sampling

Refusal to test is considered a positive result and disciplinary action will occur

118

Fitness for Work People Factors

It is important to recognise that individual issues may effect your Fitness


for Work:

Stress or mental health

Fatigue

Physical condition

Talk with your Supervisor if any of these issues are troubling you

Confidential assistance may be sought from the SBM Medics

119

Fatigue
Fatigue is a feeling of weariness, tiredness of a lack of energy that does not go
away when you rest. Fatigue can be severely debilitating and can effect your
overall Fitness for Work. Fatigue has many causes:

Medical Causes: such as diseases or illnesses

Lifestyle Causes: such as sleep deprivation/disturbances, overwork,


drugs/alcohol, lack of exercise, poor diet, stress, shift work, etc

Emotional and Stress Causes: such as depression, grief, anxiety, mental health
issues, unemployment, etc

120

Fatigue
The symptoms of fatigue can include

Chronic tiredness or sleepiness

Headache, dizziness, blurry vision

Sore or aching muscles, muscle weakness

Slowed reflexes or responses, impaired hand-eye coordination

Impaired decision making, judgement, attention span and concentration

Moodiness and irritability

Loss of appetite, reduced immune system function

Short term memory problems

Hallucinations

Low motivation

Inappropriate sleeping
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Fatigue Danger Signs


You could be at severe risk if you:

Are yawning

Are blinking more than usual

Are having trouble keeping your head up

Notice your eyes closing for a moment or going out of focus

Forget driving the last few kilometres or working the last few minutes

Your thoughts are wondering

Your forget to do something critical, miss a gear while driving, miss an exit

STOP WORK and see your Supervisor!

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Fatigue

Treating fatigue is based on managing the causes and most of the time
fatigue can be traced back to one or more of your habits or routines

Fatigue is one of our bodies normal responses to stressors, but chronic


fatigue puts you and your colleagues at risk of serious harm or even death

You should see your Supervisor and a SBM Medic if you are fatigued

YOU have a Duty of Care to report personal fatigue to your Supervisor

YOU have a Duty of Care to monitor your workmates and report any
concerns to your Supervisor

123

Equal Opportunities and Harassment

124

Equal Opportunity and


Tolerance Policy

St Barbara is committed to creating and


maintaining equal opportunities in its
workplace

125

Equal Opportunity and


Tolerance Policy
St Barbara will:

foster tolerance in the workplace

promote the prevention of discrimination including, but not limited to, gender,
race marital or family status, age, sexual orientation, disability, religious or political
beliefs

investigate and resolve all complaints of discrimination or harassment

regularly review equal opportunity policies and procedures

126

Contact Officers

If you feel you have been harassed, bullied or discriminated against, speak
to one of the Contact Officers

The role of the Contact Officer is not to investigate your claim, but to
facilitate the process

Sally Doley HSE - 08 9081 1390

Sonya Dunbar Administration - 08 9081 1304

127

Employee Assistance Program

Established by St Barbara and provides:

Confidential assistance to St Barbara employees and their families

Professionally qualified Psychologists and Social Workers thorough


PPC Worldwide

Able to assist with any issue that may be impacting on your lives
including: alcohol and drug use, stress, depression/anxiety, balancing
work/family life, etc

See your Supervisor or a SBM Medic for more information

128

Site Requirements

129

Entry Requirements

All personnel wishing to enter site must be authorised by SBM


Management (this includes visitors, sales reps, etc)

All Visitors must check in at Reception prior to proceeding onto site

You must have an area specific induction to enter:

Process ROM & Haul Roads

Process Plant

TSF

Underground Mine

Open Pits / Haulage Roads

130

Behavior

Certain conduct is strictly prohibited on site for health, safety, security,


legal, social or economic reasons, and includes:

Firearms

Possessing/consuming alcohol or illicit drugs

Fighting, horseplay or practical jokes

Deliberate damage to property or equipment

Placing of graffiti, pornography or pictures displaying nudity

Sleeping whilst on duty

Smoking in prohibited places

Swearing/inappropriate language over two-way radios

Mobile phones for personal use when conducting work, or using mobile equipment

Use of personal music devices (ie walkman, Ipod)

Stealing, removing any item from site (including potentially gold bearing material and
old or obsolete equipment)
131

Removing items from site


Should you need to remove any equipment, plant, document or other item
from site, lease, facility, or company accommodation, you must have the
approval of a Level 3 Manger (or above)
This includes:

Obsolete or old equipment/items/objects

Broken or damaged equipment/items/objects

Any item owned, leased or hire purchased by St Barbara

Contracting companies may have additional requirements in this area!


Any evidence of removal of rocks, sand, dirt, ore (etc) that contains or
potentially contains gold or other minerals, will be reported to the Police
Gold Stealing Detection Unit

132

PPE Surface Operations

Hard Hat

Safety Glasses (tinted for outdoors only)

Lace up, steel toed safety boots or


Steel toed rubber boots

High visibility clothing

Long sleeved cotton collared shirt

Cotton trousers or jeans

Overalls

Gloves (carried)

Hearing protection (carried)

133

PPE - Underground Operations

Hard Hat (fitted with cap lamp)

Safety Glasses (tinted for outdoors only)

Lace up, steel toed safety boots or


Steel toed rubber boots

High visibility clothing

Long sleeved cotton collared shirt

Cotton trousers or jeans

Overalls

Gloves

Hearing protection

Miners Belt and Self Rescuer


134

Vehicles and Driving

135

Site Driving Requirements

Private vehicles are not permitted on site and must be parked in the
Visitors Carpark near Administration

Two wheel drive vehicles are not permitted on haul roads, ramps or pit
areas

You shall not drive into areas where you do not hold a valid induction and
you shall not operate a vehicle unless authorised

Vehicle operations are crucial to our operation. SBM expect that you
operate vehicles responsibly

Company vehicles shall not be used out of hours without authorisation

136

Vehicle Requirements

No vehicle is to tow or recover equipment unless engineered to do so

No vehicle is to be tow, push or roll started

All vehicles should be regularly cleaned and maintained

Company/Contractor vehicles (whether leased, owned or hired) shall:

Be four wheel drive

Have a roof mounted amber flashing/rotating beacon

Have a site compliant UHF radio

Have a fire extinguisher and first aid kit and cargo restraint barriers

Be roadworthy (and where appropriate registered, licensed and insured)

If capable of exceeding the lowest posted speed limit, be fitted with a


speedometer

137

Site Driving Requirements

Pre-start checklists must be completed as per site requirements

Defects must be reported immediately. Out of Service Tags should be


utilised if the defect is safety critical

You must not operate any vehicle unless you are licensed, competent and
authorised

All road signs and traffic management staff shall be obeyed

Drive to the conditions

138

Seat Belts

The wearing of seat belts is mandatory under R 4.16 of the Mines Safety
and Inspection Regulations

Penalty: First Offence $5000

139

Unattended Vehicles/Plant
Unattended vehicles/plant shall not be left idling at any time

Vehicles/plant should be parked in designated areas

If being left unattended, the park brake must be applied, left in gear and the
ignition should be turned off

The only exemption occurs where:

The vehicle/plant must be left idling to complete a specific task (ie hiab
operations, mobile cranes)

The vehicle is an emergency vehicle

Controls are in place to prevent the vehicle/plant rolling away

140

Heavy Vehicle Interaction

Light and heavy vehicle interactions are an inherently dangerous aspect of


mining

Light vehicles must remain a minimum of 50m from heavy equipment at


all times

Heavy vehicles have a significantly reduced field of vision

Passing or overtaking heavy vehicles is PROHIBITED on all haul roads and


ramps except:

If he heavy vehicle is a working grader or a tracked machine tramming

You have made positive radio communications with the operator and he gives
permission to pass, stops and lowers the ground engaging tool

Haul Trucks shall not be passed or overtaken at any time

141

Big and small dont mix

142

143

Mobile Plant
You shall not attempt to operate any mobile plant if you do not possess the
relevant licence/competency or are not authorised by Supervision

Elevated Work Platform (EWP)

Must be approved and be included on the Classified Plant Register

Licensed and authorised operator

Fall prevention equipment to be worn

Daily pre-start checklist completed

Forklift / Telehandler

Licensed and authorised operator

Daily pre-start checklist completed


144

Mobile Plant
You shall not attempt to operate any mobile plant if you do not possess the
relevant licence/competency or are not authorised by Supervision

Cranes

Must be approved and be included on the Classified Plant


Register

Licensed and authorised operator for the class of crane

Daily pre-start checklist completed

Rigging / Dogging

Licensed and authorised

145

Mobile Plant
Do you understand the risks?

146

Certificates and Tagging

147

Certificates to Work

Certificates to Work control our higher risk tasks and include:

Isolation

Power Line Access

Confined Space Entry

Hot Work

Excavation

Grid Mesh Removal

Reagent Work

Working at Height

Area Specific Inductions will advise of the applicable Certificates

148

Tagging

Personnel required to tag will require training

The main tags used at SBM include:

Personal Danger Tag (PDT)

Out of Service Tag

Isolation Tag

Information Tag

149

Personal Danger Tag


ONE USE:
Protects YOU by ensuring that the
machinery/equipment
you
are
working on cannot be energised

Personal Danger Tags must be attached to


physical and/or electrical isolation points.

Only the person whose name appears


on the tag can place or remove the
tag

150

Out of Service Tag


ONE USE
Identification of faulty equipment:
Can be placed by anyone but may
only be removed by a person qualified
to service that equipment

Out of Service Tags must be attached to


physical and/or electrical isolation points.

151

Isolation Tag
ONE USE:
Equipment Isolation:
utilised by
authorised isolators only.

Isolation Tags must be attached to physical


and/or electrical isolation points.

152

Information Tag
ONE USE:
Used to convey general information
that others may need to know about

Information Tags can be attached to


anything.

153

Manual Handling

154

Manual Handling

Is defined as any activity that requires us to use our body to push, pull, lift
lower, restrain or move an object

It includes repetitive or awkward working positions or postures

155

Lifting

Lifting and moving loads is the most common area of manual handling
where injuries occur

One in three injuries to Australian workers are caused by manual handling

Inappropriate lifting techniques can result in long term damage to your


back

156

Proper Lifting Technique


DOS

Plan ahead

Use good technique

DONTS

Bend your back

Twist while lifting

Bend at the knees

Maintain your natural spinal


curve

Attempt to handle anything


above your capacity

Obscure your vision

Keep the load close to your


body

Reduce the weight

Use mechanical aids

Two-person lift

Don't take the easy way out

157

Work at Heights

158

Work at Heights

CRCS 9 Working at Heights specifies minimum controls necessary for Work at


Heights

Personnel must be trained prior to conducting any work at heights

Includes situations where objects may be dropped down to a lower level

159

Work at Heights

At St Barbara, you are deemed to be working at heights where ever there


is a risk of a fall, regardless of height

Risk assessments should identify work that is required at heights

Where possible, all work should be conducted from an approved platform


with a barrier

If this is not possible fall restraint equipment may be required

160

Work at Heights

Specific controls are in place for:

Working from ladders (must maintain 3 points of contact)

Elevating work platforms (EWP)

Scaffolding construction/dismantling

161

Ladders & Step Box


All work to be conducted on site that utilises a ladder or a step box shall
accompany a Working at Heights certificate (outside of the workshop).
General Safety Tips with Ladders
Inspect Ladder for: Damage, Industrial Purpose, Stability.
Secure Ladders when transporting in vehicle tray
3 Points of contact for climbing/ descending
Only 1 person to be on a ladder at a time.
Have a rope line or someone pass up the tools
Inspect & return ladders to storage after use
Electrical work must not be conducted from metal ladders
Permits are not required for regular tasks with mobile platform ladders
included into the Safe Working Procedure.

162

Ladders & Step Box


Setting Up Ladders
4:1 Angle required (4m up needs 1m out)
Extend ladder 1 m past platform level
Secure the ladder by rope or purpose made clips.
(have a spotter support the base whilst doing this)
Usage Of Ladders:
Never stand on upper rungs of ladder
A Frame - never use top two rungs
Lean-too ladders Do not use last 1m of ladder
If you need to use these rungs stop You need a bigger ladder or another method.

Consider the usage of a harness and lanyard to restrain a fall when:


utilising a ladder above normal head height
there is a possibility of a fall to levels below (over handrails)
there is a task involved that obscures vision
Always have a person aware of your location and activities when working on a ladder.
163

Confined Spaces

164

Confined Space
AS/NZS 2865:2009
An enclosed or partially enclosed space that is not intended or designed primarily for
human occupancy, within which there is a risk of one or more of the following:
a) An oxygen concentration outside the safe oxygen range
b) A concentration of airborne contaminant that may cause impairment, loss of
consciousness or asphyxiation
c) A concentration of flammable airborne contaminant that may cause injury
from fire or explosion
d) Engulfment in a stored free-flowing solid or a rising level of liquid that may
cause suffocation or drowning

You must be trained and competent prior to entering a confined space.

165

Confined Spaces

Examples of confined spaces can include

Storage tanks

Waste or storage pits

Furnaces

Mills

Excavations

Vessels

Wells

Chutes

Tunnels

Crushers

Caverns
166

Electrical Safety

167

Electrical Safety

All electrical shocks (no matter how minor) must be reported immediately

If you receive an electric shock, you must be assessed by a SBM Medic

Electrical work can only be carried out by licensed and authorised


electricians

All electrical equipment must be tested and tagged in accordance with


quarterly inspection requirements, prior to use on site

You must not use any electrical equipment that is damaged, faulty or
shows unusual levels of wear and tear

You must tag out and report fault electrical equipment

168

Electrical Tagging

All electrical equipment must have a current test tag

December to February
March to May
June to August
September to November
Yearly Office Equipment

169

Hand Held Electrical Tools and Leads

All electrical tools and leads used at SXO must have:

IP66 plugs and sockets

Braided leads and braded extension leads

Contractors must present all electrical tools to the SBM Electrician prior to
use on site

170

Hot Work

171

Hot Work
Hot Work can be defined as any activity that produces heat, sparks or flame

Such as oxy cutting, welding, grinding, etc

All Hot Work must be authorised under the Work Certificate System, except if
carried out in a designated workshop

Prior to carrying out Hot Work you must ensure

That you have communicated your intent to other workgroups in the area

Signage has been placed on lower levels

The area has been cleared or flammable materials are covered

That a fire extinguisher is handy

You are wearing the appropriate PPE

172

Hazardous Materials

173

Hazardous Materials

Hazardous materials on site include:

Sodium Cyanide / Hydrogen Cyanide

Lead Nitrate

Hydrogen Peroxide

Sodium Hydroxide

Hydrochloric Acid

Quick Lime

Diesel Fuel

Explosives

Arsenopyrites and Dusts

More information is provided in Area Specific Inductions


174

Hazardous Materials

When working in areas with


hazardous materials you may
need a Permit to Work

You should be aware of all


information relating to hazardous
materials prior to working with or
near areas where they are stored
or used

175

Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)


MSDS are available from the manufacturer of ChemAlert and are available to
all staff. A MSDS contains the following essential information:
1.

Identification and Supplier

10. Stability and reactivity

2.

Hazard identification

11. Toxicological information

3.

Composition / ingredients

12. Ecological information

4.

First aid measures

13. Disposal considerations

5.

Fire fighting measures

14. Transport information

6.

Accidental release

15. Regulatory information

7.

Storage and handling

16. Other information

8.

Exposure / PPE

9.

Physical and chemical properties

176

Storage and Handling

Storage of hazardous materials shall be in accordance with the MSDS and


relevant standards and procedures

Prior to handling hazardous substances:

Refer to the MSDS for instructions

Ensure you have the correct substance

Ensure that PPE as required by the MSDS is worn

Prior to decanting hazardous substances into other containers

Ensure that the container is appropriate to contain the substance

Ensure that the container is appropriately labelled

Ensure that the empty container is disposed of appropriately

Disposal of hazardous substances shall be in accordance with the MSDS


and applicable legislation and environmental standards
177

Signage

178

Signage

Please take note of signs as they convey critical safety information

Please report any broken or damaged signage

179

Safety Sign Types

PROHIBITION
Regulatory

MANDATORY
REGULATORY
WARNING

Hazard

DANGER
Emergency &

EMERGENCY

Fire

FIRE
180

Thank you for your attention


Please remember....
There is no job at St Barbara, that is so urgent that it cannot
be completed safely

181

CHANGE LOG

(Hidden Slide)

DATE

NAME

CHANGES MADE

25/07/2010

Wade Bloffwitch

Added General Manager Slides to the induction

25/07/2010

Wade Bloffwitch

Unhide CRCS slides

25/07/2010

Wade Bloffwitch

Unhide rules to live by slides

17/10/10

Wade Bloffwitch

Hid the rules to live by Triangle

17/10/10

Wade Bloffwitch

Moved the list of the rules to live by to the end of the section

1/03/2011

Sally Doley

Modified slide 53 to include energy source requirement to be added to JHA when isolating

16/03/2011

Wade Bloffwitch

Added slide on stealing and removal of property as requested by Management Team

7/4/11

C. Brookes

Added slide x 2 on Ladders / Step box as PER CRCS 9 Audit

08/06/

Wde Bloffwitch

Modified Management Team slide to show current team

16/6/2011

Craig B

Electrical Test/Tag Date changes

25/07/2011

Wade B

Added Kronic information to slide 117

182