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Link 4X

Installation and Operations Manual

Part Number 281-102471-201


June 2000

Wireless, Inc.
5452 Betsy Ross Drive
Santa Clara, CA 95054-1101

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Notice
Information in this document is subject to change without notice. No part of this document may
be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, for any
purpose, without the express written permission of Wireless, Inc.
Copyright 2000, Wireless, Inc. All rights reserved.
Link 4X and WaveNet Link Series are trademarks of Wireless, Inc.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Table of Contents
1.0

2.0

3.0

4.0

5.0

General Overview ................................................................................................................. 1


1.1

WaveNet Link Series Product Family ....................................................................... 1

1.2

Introduction to the Link 4X......................................................................................... 1

1.3

Regulatory Information .............................................................................................. 2

Link 4X Product Profile .......................................................................................................... 3


2.1

General Overview ...................................................................................................... 3

2.2

Specifications ............................................................................................................ 7

2.3

User Interfaces ........................................................................................................ 10

2.4

ODU Performance Monitoring ................................................................................. 13

2.5

Theory of Operation ................................................................................................ 13

Equipment Installation and Commissioning ........................................................................ 20


3.1

Installation ............................................................................................................... 20

3.2

Install the IDU .......................................................................................................... 21

3.3

Outdoor RF Unit Installation .................................................................................... 22

3.4

Commissioning ........................................................................................................ 28

Link 4X Provisioning ............................................................................................................ 31


4.1

Plan IP Network Addressing ..............................................................................................


31

4.2

Plan Routing Information ....................................................................................................


32

4.3

Configure Radio Terminal ..................................................................................................


32

4.4

Configure Radio ...................................................................................................................


36

4.5

Configure Internet Parameters ..........................................................................................


37

4.6

Configure SNMP ..................................................................................................................


38

4.7

Configure Log In Security ...................................................................................................


40

4.8

Network Operation ..............................................................................................................


43

4.9

Using FTP to Archive or Modify Configurations .............................................................


44

4.10

Monitoring and Trend Analysis ..........................................................................................


45

4.11

RS-232/Telnet Maintenance Port .....................................................................................


47

Maintenance and Troubleshooting ...................................................................................... 49


5.1

Link 4X Maintenance ............................................................................................ 49m

5.2

Identifying and Resolving Receive Signal Strength Issues ..................................... 50

5.3

Where to Get Further Assistance ............................................................................ 51

5.4

Return Procedure .................................................................................................... 52

Appendix A Grounding Practices and Lightning Protection Information....................................... A-1


Appendix B Installation Instructions .............................................................................................. B-1
Appendix C Adjustable Panel Antenna Mount .............................................................................. C-1

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figures
Figure 2.1

Typical Deployment of a Link 4X in a Point-to-Point Configuration .......................... 5-6

Figure 2.2

Link 4X Link IDU ......................................................................................................... 10

Figure 2.2a Outdoor Unit, Front View ............................................................................................ 12


Figure 2.2b Outdoor Unit, Back View ............................................................................................ 12
Figure 2.3

Block Diagram, IDU .................................................................................................... 14

Figure 2.4

Link 4X Block Diagram .......................................................................................... 18-19

Figure 3.1

Link 4X Link Rack Mount............................................................................................ 21

Figure 3.2

Outdoor Unit Mounting Hardware .............................................................................. 22

Figure 3.3

Mounting the Outdoor RF Unit to the Bracket ............................................................ 23

Figure 3.3a Mounting the Bracket Latch and Stand Mount Detail ................................................. 24
Figure 3.3b Locking the Mounting Hardware ................................................................................ 25
Figure 3.3c N-Type Antenna and Siamesed Ethernet/Power Connections .................................. 26
Figure 3.3d Ground Connection .................................................................................................... 27
Figure B.1

Two Foot Diameter Antenna ..................................................................................... B-1

Figure B.2

Mount Configuration .................................................................................................. B-3

Figure B.3

Mounting Hardware Packed ...................................................................................... B-5

Figure B.4

Mounting Hardware Unpacked .................................................................................. B-5

Figure B.5

Parabolic Reflector .................................................................................................... B-8

Figure B.6

Unpacking the Radome ............................................................................................. B-8

Figure B.7

Antenna Mount Assembly ......................................................................................... B-9

Figure B.8

Antenna Mount Assembly ....................................................................................... B-10

Figure B.9

Elevation Rod Assembly ......................................................................................... B-10

Figure B.10 Feed Horn Installation ............................................................................................. B-11


Figure B.11 Feed Horn Polarization Markings ............................................................................ B-12
Figure B.12 Parabola Rear View Showing Polarization Reference Markers .............................. B-12
Figure B.13 Feed Horn Installation ............................................................................................. B-13
Figure B.14 Feed Horn Installation for Vertical Polarized Operation .......................................... B-13
Figure B.15 Azimuth Clamp/Shear Stop Assembly .................................................................... B-14
Figure B.16 Azimuth Adjustment Clamp Assembly ................................................................... B-14
Figure B.17 Hoisting the Antenna ............................................................................................... B-15
Figure B.18 Antenna Alignment using RSL Output while adjusting the antenna ....................... B-16
Figure C.1

Antenna Mount .......................................................................................................... C-1

Figure C.2

Azimuth and Elevation Planning ............................................................................... C-2

Figure C.3

Azimuth and Elevation Planning ............................................................................... C-3

Figure C.4

Flat Panel Antenna .................................................................................................... C-4

Figure C.5

Adjustable Panel Antenna Mount .............................................................................. C-5

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Tables
Table 1.1

FCC U-NII Bands ......................................................................................................... 2

Table 2.1

Recommended Antennas ............................................................................................. 8

Table 2.2

Features Available Through RS-232 Interface ........................................................... 11

Table 3.1

Inventory of Equipment and Installation Materials ..................................................... 20

Table 3.2

Installation Checklist................................................................................................... 28

Table 3.3

Approximation Table .................................................................................................. 29

Table 5.1

Frequencies ................................................................................................................ 31

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Welcome!
Welcome to the Wireless, Inc. WaveNet Link Series product family. This manual is designed
to introduce you to the Link 4X, and to provide you with information necessary to plan, install,
operate and maintain a Link 4X wireless communication system.
The Link 4X is intended for professional installation only. This manual, however, is also
designed for personnel who plan, operate and administrate the Link 4X communication system.
Please review the entire manual before powering up or deploying any Link 4X.
Updates to this manual will be posted on the Wireless, Inc. Customer Service Website at
http://www.wire-less-inc.com. Registered Wireless customers can access Wireless on-line
information and support service, available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our on-line service
provides users with a wealth of up-to-date information, with documents being added or updated
each month.

Radiation Warnings
Microwave Radio Radiation Warning
Under normal operating conditions, Link 4X radio equipment complies with the limits for human
exposure to radio frequency (RF) fields adopted by the Federal Communications Commission
(FCC). All Wireless, Inc. microwave radio equipment is designed so that under normal working
conditions, microwave radiation directly from the radio is negligible when compared with the
permissible limit of continuous daily exposure recommended in the United States by ANSI/IEEE
C95.1-1991 (R1997), Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency
Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz.
Microwave signal levels that give rise to hazardous radiation levels can exist within transmitter
power amplifiers, associated RF multiplexers, and antenna systems.
Never look into the open end of a Waveguide as eyes are particularly vulnerable to radiation.
Do not disconnect RF coaxial connectors, open microwave units, or break down any
microwave screening while the radio equipment is operating.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Microwave Antenna Radiation Warning


Designed for point-to-point operation, an Link 4X microwave radio system will use directional
antennas to transmit and receive microwave signals. These directional antennas are usually
circular or rectangular in shape, are generally located outdoors, and are usually mounted on a
tower or mast.
Referencing OET Bulletin 65 (Edition 97-01, August 1997) from the Federal Communication
Commissions Office of Engineering & Technology, limits for maximum permissible exposure
(MPE) to microwave signals have been adopted by the FCC for both Occupational/Controlled
environments and General Population/Uncontrolled environments. These limits are 5.0 mW/
cm2 and 1.0 mW/cm2, respectively, with averaging times of six-minutes and thirty-minutes,
respectively.
The closer you are to the front center-point of a microwave antenna, the greater the power
density of its transmitted microwave signal. Unless you are very close, however, microwave
exposure levels will fall far below the MPE limits. To determine how close to a microwave
antenna you can be and still remain below the MPE limits noted above, worst case predictions
of the field strength and power density levels in the vicinity of an Link 4X microwave antenna
can be made from the following calculations. The equation is generally accurate in the far-field
of an antenna, and will over-predict power density in the near-field (i.e. close to the antenna).
S = PG/4R2
where:

S = power density (in mW/cm2)


P = power input to the antenna (mW)
G = power gain of the antenna in the direction of interest relative to an isotropic
radiator
R = distance to the center of radiation of the antenna (cm)

Note that G, the power gain factor, is usually expressed in logarithmic terms (i.e., dB), and must
be converted using the following equation:
G = 10dB/10
For example, a logarithmic power gain of 24 dB is equal to a numeric gain of 251.19.
Assuming (1) maximum output power from the Link 4X (+3.5 dBm [2.238 mW]), (2) no signal
loss in the cable connecting the Link 4X to the antenna, and (3) the use of a 27 dBi gain parabolic
antenna, the 5.0 mW/cm2 and 1.0 mW/cm2 MPE power density limits would be reached at
distances of approximately 4.22 cm and 9.44 cm, respectively.
Wireless, Inc. fully supports the FCCs adopted MPE limits, and recommends that personnel
maintain appropriate distances from the front of all directional microwave antennas. Should you
have questions about Link 4X microwave signal radiation, please contact the Wireless, Inc.
Customer Service Department.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Notice Regarding Operation pursuant to FCC part 15 Rules


This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device
pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable
protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial
environment. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if
not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely
to cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference
at his own expense.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

1.0 General Overview


1.1

WaveNet Link Series Product Family


All Link 4X radios are members of the WaveNet Link Series radio product family. The WaveNet
Link Series is designed to provide an economical wireless solution for local access telecommunication requirements.
This manual addresses, in detail, the operation of the Link 4X. For detailed information on other
members of the WaveNet Link Series, please refer to the appropriate Operation Manual(s).

1.2

Introduction to the Link 4X


The Link 4X is a digital radio using BPSK modulation techniques and is designed for use as a
point-to-point communications system. The Link 4X is used in the following applications: pointto-point (building to building), ISPs, CLECs, Wireless Local Loop (WLL), Backup Solutions and
Temporary Links.
The Link 4X radio is designed for operation in two of the Unlicensed National Infrastructure at
frequencies of 5.250 - 5.350 GHz or 5.725 - 5.825 GHz.
Each Link 4X is comprised of an indoor unit which provides the means to connect system power,
formatted data, SNMP interface and RS-232 ports to monitor and control the link. An outdoor
pole mounted RF unit is supplied as part of the system. Each link is powered by means of a DC
power supply which is fed to the unit through a power/data cable. The system has a data total
transmission capacity of 8.448 Mb/s. Refer to the Link 4X data sheets for detailed information
relating to product offerings and specifications.

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

1.3

Regulatory Information
In January 1997, the FCC made available 300 MHz of spectrum for Unlicensed National
Information Infrastructure (U-NII) devices. The FCC believes that the creation of the U-NII band
will stimulate the development of new unlicensed digital products which will provide efficient and
less expensive solutions for local access applications.
The U-NII band is divided into three sub bands at 5.15 - 5.25, 5.25 - 5.35 and 5.725 - 5.825 GHz.
The first band is strictly allocated for indoor use and is consistent with the European High
Performance Local Area Network (HIPERLAN). The second and third bands are intended for
high speed digital local access products for campus and short haul microwave applications.

Table 1.1 - FCC U-NII Bands


Band 1

Band 2

Band 3

5.15 to 5.25 GHz

5.25 to 5.35 GHz

5.725 to 5.825 GHz

Power (Max)

200 milliwatts EIRP

1 watt EIRP

4 watts (EIRP)*

Intended Use

Indoor Use Only

Campus

Approx 10 miles

Frequency

* Note: A recent FCC memorandum opinion and order (M00) revised on June 24, 1998 allows
the use of a directional antenna with 23 dBi gain and a maximum transmitter output power of
1 watt in the 5.725 - 5.825 U-NII band.

WL277906

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.0 Link 4X Product Profile


2.1

General Overview
The Link 4X series of microwave radio products provides digital capacities for 4XE1 data rates
for short-haul applications up to 10 km. The radio terminal operates in the Unlicensed National
Information Infrastructure (U-NII) spectrum with a revolutionary Split Modulation system
architecture that provides full duplex operation in the 5.3/5.7 GHz U-NII frequency bands.
The Link 4X series provides the unique advantage of a very robust digital transmission scheme
employing advanced Forward Error Correction (FEC) techniques to reduce data errors.
The product uses two separate 100 MHz bands within the U-NII frequency spectrum. Within
these bands, the Link 4X series operates in one of many independent channels providing for
frequency reuse and network flexibility, ideal for dense network applications.
Synthesized RF channel selection is field configurable, as are the power output options for the
selection of antenna sizes. Frequency coordination and installation guidelines are provided in
the appendix section of this manual.
Complying with all aspects of FCC Rules Subpart 15.401-15.407, the transmission characteristics of the Link 4X series are ideally suited to meet the peak power spectral density
requirements of the U-NII 5.250 - 5.350 and 5.725 - 5.825 GHz bands.
The Link 4X has been designed for easy access to all interfaces, controls, and displays.
Information in this manual will familiarize you with all of these items. Figure 2.1 illustrates two
(2) Link 4X terminals in a point-to-point configuration.

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

This Page Left Blank Intentionally

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 2.1 (WL272904) goes here

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 2.1 (WL272904) goes here

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.2

Specifications

2.2.1 General Specifications


Frequency Band:
Regulations:
Frequency Range:
Capacity Options:

Full-duplex operation in the Unlicensed National


Information Infrastructure
Complies with FCC Ruling Part 15, Subpart E (U-NII)
5,250 - 5,350 MHz and 5,725 - 5,825 MHz
4xE1

2.2.2 Digital Interface


Type:
Line rate:
Line Code:
Interface:
Connectors:

ITU-T/E1
Based on 4 E-1 inputs
4 x 2.048 Mb/s
HDB3
75 unbalanced or optional 120 unbalanced
BNC (75) or RJ-48C (120)

2.2.3 Transmitter
Frequency Range:
Output Power (maximum):

5.3 GHz (Low Band)


5,250 - 5,350 MHz
0 dBm
+4 dBm
+8 dBm
+12 dBm

5.7 GHz (High Band)


5,725 - 5,825 MHz
0 dBm
+4 dBm
+8 dBm
+12 dBm

Coherent Detection
85.5 dBm
-20 dBm

Coherent Detection
85.5 dBm
-20 dBm

2.2.4 Receiver
Type:
Sensitivity, BER 10-6 Typical:
Maximum RF Input:

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.2.5 Antennas
Flat Panel:

6 (15.24 cm)
12 (.30 m)
24 (.61 m)

Forward Gain
18 dB
23 dB
27 dB

Front/Back Ratio
35 dB
41 dB
45 dB

Parabolic:

2 (.61 m)
4 (1.22 m)

28 dB
34 dB

38 dB
46 dB

Table 2.1 - Recommended Antennas


Type

Manufacturer and Part Number

2' diameter dish, Plane Polerized, 28 dBi

Gabriel SSP2-52ARI

2' diameter dish, Dual Polerized, 28 dBi

Gabriel SSD2-52ARI

*4' diameter dish, Plane Polerized, 34 dBi

Gabriel SSP4-52A

*4' diameter dish, Dual Polerized, 34 dBi

Gabriel SSD4-52A

6" Flat Panel, Plane Polerized, 18 dBi

Gabriel DFPS.5-52

12" Flat Panel, Plane Polerized, 23 dBi

Gabriel DFPS1-52

24" Flat Panel, Plane Polerized, 28 dBi

Gabriel DFPS2-52

* The 4-foot dish antennas are for use outside the USA only, and are not FCC compliant.

WL277907

2.2.6 Diagnostics
Front Panel Indicators:
Alarms:

External Alarm Inputs:


Performance Monitoring:

LED
Power (normally On)
Major Alarm On
Minor Alarm Blinks
Two separate TTL level inputs, ground inputs to alarm
(DB9 connector)
Receive Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI)

2.2.7 Power
Input Voltage Range:
Power Consumption:

20 to 72 VDC
21 watts maximum

2.2.8 Environmental
Temperature Range:
Altitude:
Humidity:

Indoor Unit
-10C to +50C
4,500 meters (15,000 ft)
95% non-condensing

Outdoor Unit
-30C to +60C
4,500 meters (15,000 ft)
Outdoor, all weather
enclosure

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.2.9 Mechanical
Dimensions (HxWxD):

Indoor Unit
44 x 483 x 240 mm
(0.72 x 19.0 x 9.4 in)

Outdoor Unit
310 x 351 x 73 mm
(12.2 x 13.8 x 2.88 in)

Weight:

2.9 kg (6.6 lbs)

5.2 kg (11.5 lbs)

2.2.10 FCC Information (US Only)


This device has not been authorized as required by the rules of the Federal Communications
Commission. This device is not, and may not be, offered for sale or lease, or sold or leased, until
authorization is obtained.
Notes:

1. Link 4X is intended for professional installation only


2. Specifications subject to change without notice

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.3

User Interfaces
The Link 4X provides user interfaces for fused DC power connection, electrical grounding, radio
frequency (RF) antenna connection, E1 Data connection, configuration and RSSI output. The
following provides information on each interface. Figure 2.2 shows the locations of each
connection to the indoor unit.

Indoor Unit, Connections

21-56 VDC Power Input - provided by customer, each terminal consumes 21 Watts
4xE1 Input/Output BNC type - E1 data conforming to the G.703 standard
(Optional RJ-48C Connection)
NMS-Port - RJ-48C - SNMP interface for existing NMS systems
Aux Port 1-RS-232 Connection, DB9 - provides local and remote control over terminals
Aux Port 2-RS-232 Connection, DB9 - provides local and remote control over terminals
ODU Power Interface - Category 3 Siamesed cable provided in the install kit
ODU Data Interface - Category 3 Siamesed cable provided in the install kit
Indoor Unit, Controls and Indicators

Fuse/On-Off Switch - Fuse holder containing a 250 V, 3 amp fuse for protection of the
system. The fuse can be rotated counterclockwise to disable the system, clockwise to
enable.
LEDs, Status and Alarm - The status LED confirms the system is on. The alarm LED
indicates an alarm condition exists. The fault can be determined by means of the local RS232 interface on the IDU and a VT-100 terminal.
G.703 Ground Switch - Enables the customer to configure the ground requirements of the
E1 unbalanced connections according to the G.703 standard.
LEDs, Link, TX and RX - Provide a visual indication of the status of the link, transmitter and
receiver.

Figure 2.2 - Link 4X IDU

G.703 Ground
Switch

21-56 VDC
Input

Fuse -250V 3A

Digital Input

Link 4XTM
+

RS 232 Interface,
DB-9 Connector

ODU Interface

NMS Port

DC
Status

Link

4
AC

3A

AUX Port 2

Tx

Alarms
250V

AUX Port 1

Rx
Data

21-56V
Digital Output

4xE1 Data Input/Output


BNC-Type Connections

NMS - SNMP
Interface, RJ-48c

Siamesed Cat 3
Data/Power
To/From ODU
WL272903

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual


Outdoor Unit

Date/Power Cable - Siamesed Cat-3 Data and power cables.


RSSI - BNC type connector used for RSSI measurement.
Antenna (RF) Connector - N-type connector used for connection with antenna.
Main Power - The Link 4X is designed to work from a power input of 20 to 56 VDC.
Grounding Connector - The front panel of the Link 4X is equipped with an M5 ground
screw and associated washers. This ground screw serves as the proper chassis-ground
connection point for an external ground source. The Link 4X must be grounded in
accordance with the electrical codes, standards, and practices governing the local
installation.

The following alarm configuration features are possible using the RS-232 interface:

Table 2.2 - Features Available Through the RS-232 Interface


Unit

Description

IDU Alarms

AIS 1-4, PLL Alarm, Demux Alarm, ODU Data Lost

IDU Configuration

G-703, Ground, Configuration, Switches

ODU Alarms

ALC, Receive, Demod, Synthesizer

ODU Configuration

Cable Loopback, RF Attenuation, Frequency Selection


WL277902

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 2.2a - Outdoor Unit, Front View

WL272910

Figure 2.2b - Outdoor Unit, Back View

Antenna Connection
(N Type, Female)

Receive Signal Level (RSL)


Output (BNC Type, Female)
Mounting
Studs

Siamesed Category 3
Ethernet and
Power cables

ODU
Ground Connection
WL272905

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.4

ODU Performance Monitoring


RSSI - A voltage provided through a BNC connector on the outside of the ODU. The RSSI port
is used for antenna alignment during installation and for periodic measurement of Receiver/
Path performance. The RSSI voltage is related to Rx BER from -30 dBm to -90 dBm.

2.5

Theory of Operation
General Overview
The Link 4X is a point to point Wireless Extension operating in the 5.3/5.7 GHz UNII band as
authorized in rule sections 15.401 through 15.407. The unit is enclosed in a weather proof
outdoor enclosure and is intended to provide data links over distances up to 10 km. The radio
in the unit operates full duplex, transmitting and receiving data at the rate of 8.448 Mbps. The
radio is modulated using BPSK.

2.5.1 Link 4X Indoor Unit


Circuit Description
The following circuit description is intended to explain the operation of the indoor and outdoor
units at the block diagram level. This text is written with the idea that the reader has the block
diagram readily available, as it will aid in understanding the signal flow in the radio.
Four E1 rate tributaries are time division multiplexed and input to the IDU protection circuit by
means of four panel mounted BNC type connectors. The LIU (Line Interface Unit) converts the
4xE1 data stream from a bipolar HDB3 signal which is input to the Mux/Demux and converts
the 4E1 signal to an aggregate signal. The FGPA scrambles the data into a pseudo random
pattern which passes the data back to the mux and through an E2 rate line interface to and from
the ODU. The microcontroller acts as the processing core to manage all external and internal
functions of the IDU/ODU. This includes monitoring the ODU, IDU for alarm conditions, as well
as providing SNMP and RS-232 control over the terminal. See Figure 2.3.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 2.3 - Block Diagram, IDU


IDU Board
J16

Fuse
5V DC-DC
Converter
Power
Supervisor

Status
Lead

J15
3.3V
Reg

Reset

CPU
68EN302
EEPROM
2K

Modem
Driver

R
J
1

J
2
3

SCC2
SCC3

RS232
XCVR

Ether

Ethernet
XCVR

Front
Panel
Board

PIO
Aux 2

PIO
SCC1
RASO

CSO

CS2

Addr CS1

Aux 1

Data

Boot
512K

Flash1
512K

Flash2
512K

303V
XCVR
addr
data

Data

FPGA
Status
Regs

Addr

Ether

DRAM
8M

TAO

Link Leds

Addr
Decode
Cntrl
Regs

UNI/BI SW

Radio
Sync

De-Scrambler

Scrambler

OTPROM

E1
LIU1

E1 BNC
TX

RX

E1
LIU2
E2
LIU

E1 / E2
MUX

E1
LIU3

E1
LIU4

WL055001

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.5.2 Link 4X Outdoor Unit, Transmitter


The data is differentially encoded and scrambled before it is routed through the transmit
baseband filter to provide spectral shaping. The baseband filter is a five pole low pass filter.
After amplification, the baseband signal is fed to the modulator consisting of a doubly balanced
mixer. The modulator is running directly at the transmitter frequency of 5.775 GHz 50 MHz.
The local oscillator signal of the mixer is supplied from the frequency synthesizer section, with
the frequency dependant on the RF channel selected. Operation of the frequency synthesizer
will be detailed later in this document.
From the output of the modulator, the signal is amplified and then passed through a 150 MHz
wide bandpass filter to remove any local oscillator products from the output spectrum. After
filtering, the signal is passed through a series of amplifier and attenuator stages that are used
to control the output power level. With a combination of fixed and variable attenuation the output
power can be set to one of four different levels to accommodate different antennas used with
the product.
The power setting is maintained by an active ALC circuit that samples the transmitter output
power and then adjusts the variable attenuator to keep the output power constant over the
operating temperature of the unit. The power level is controlled to within 1 dB of the set point.
Following the attenuators the signal is fed through additional amplification to bring the output
level to a maximum of +13 dBm at the output of power amplifier. A lowpass matching section
follows the power amplifier to aid in filtering harmonics of the signal. After passing through the
duplexer, the power level at the antenna port is a maximum of +11 dBm.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.5.3 Link 4X Outdoor Unit Receiver


The receiver in the Link 4X is a conventional dual conversion design with IF frequencies of
474.88 MHz and 70 MHz.
From the receive port of the duplexer, the low level input signal is passed through a low noise
preamplifier that provides 25 dB of gain. Following the preamplifier the signal is passed through
a 200 MHz wide bandpass filter to provide image rejection for the first mixer.
The signal is then mixed with the first LO to convert the signal to 474.88 MHz. Following further
amplification the signal is passed through a five pole, 20 MHz wide bandpass filter. This filter
provides image filtering for the second mixer, and also helps attenuate signals on the adjacent
receive channels. After filtering, the signal is further amplified and then passed through a
variable attenuator stage before it is applied to the second mixer.
The output of the second mixer is at 70 MHz. The 70 MHz IF stages provide additional gain along
with two sections of variable attenuation for the AGC function. The primary adjacent channel
filtering is also at 70 MHz where the signal is passed through a 12 MHz wide SAW filter. The
combination of filters provide a minimum of 47 dB of attenuation at the adjacent receive
channels (10.24 MHz).
At the end of the 70 MHz IF chain the signal is fed into a quadrature demodulator. The carrier
recovery loop consists of a four quadrant multiplier that multiplies I and Q baseband signals to
create an error voltage. This error voltage is then amplified and fed back to the 70 MHz VCO.
This forms a phase locked loop that is locked to the received carrier frequency.
The 70 MHz output is also fed into a wide band logarithmic amplifier that provides a DC voltage
output proportional to the 70 MHz signal strength. The DC voltage is then integrated and fed
back to the variable attenuator stages to form an AGC control loop. This control loop keeps the
signal level at the input to the demodulator chip constant over the entire operating range of the
receiver.
Data recovery from the I baseband signal begins by passing the I signal through a slicer. The
output of the slicer is a digital signal that contains both data and clocking information. A clock
recovery circuit recovers receive timing information that is needed to clock the data through the
descrambler, and differential decoder.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

2.5.4 Synthesizer
The FPGA provides four 22-bit streams in a serial format loaded to the synthesizer. This data
provides all of the possible frequencies at which the system can operate. Depending upon the
dip switch settings selected, the actual frequency being used is selected. When the reset button
is pressed, the FPGA will reload this data to the synthesizer.
Frequency Synthesis
The local oscillator frequencies used in the RF Unit are all synthesized from a 19.2 MHz, 2.5
PPM reference oscillator. The overall frequency stability of the radio is 2.5 PPM, directly
reflecting the reference oscillator stability.
A dual frequency synthesizer chip is used to control both the first and second local oscillator
loops. This chip supports one high frequency oscillator, up to 1.5 GHz, and one lower frequency
oscillator to be used as a second LO.
The first local oscillator VCO operates at one half the transmitter output frequency, and changes
with the transmit channel selected. The first LO consists of a bipolar VCO operating at 2.887
GHz 25 MHz. The output of this VCO is buffered and then passed through a X2 prescaler chip
before being fed back to the synthesizer chip. The phase comparison frequency for the first LO
is 320 kHz.
After amplification the 2.887 GHz signal is passed through a frequency doubler to create the
5.775 GHz signal that is applied to the mixer stages.
The second local oscillator consists of a VCO that is phase locked to 404.88 MHz. This auxiliary
synthesizer is operating with a phase comparison frequency of 240 kHz.

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Figure 2-4 (WL272902) goes here

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Figure 2-4 (WL272902) goes here

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

3.0 Equipment Installation and Commissioning


3.1

Installation
The Link 4X has been specifically designed for ease of installation. The following installation
instructions should be followed.
1. Plan the installation - Decide where each component of the Link 4X will be placed prior
to commencement of any installation activity. Installation considerations for each component in general are as follows:
a. Indoor Unit - Install in floor or rack mount configuration.
b. Outdoor RF Unit - Mount as close as practical to the Antenna assembly. The maximum
distance is determined by the included interconnect cable which is 1 meter in length.
Determine pole mounting details for the Outdoor Unit and Antenna. Adjust output power
according to Table 3.1.
c. Antenna Unit - See Appendix B.
2. Inventory your equipment and installation materials.
To install one (1) terminal you should have the items shown in Table 3.1.
3. The following tools should be on hand:
Tool
Wire Stripper/Cutter
Hand-Held Voltmeter (DMM)
2 Adjustable Wrenches
#2 Philliips Screwdriver

Purpose
General wire stripping and cutting purposes
Confirm magnitude, polarity, continuity
with standard probes
Antenna mounting, Outdoor Unit up to 1.5 cm
Outdoor Unit Grounding

Table 3.1 - Inventory of Equipment and Installation Materials


Qty

Description

Link 4X IDU

Link 4X IDU Install Kit

Link 4X ODU

Pole or Wall Mount Bracket and associated fasteners

Siamesed Data/48 VDC Supply Power Cable

N-Male to N-Male Coaxial Cable Assembly


WL277903

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

3.2

Install the IDU


1. Choose either a desktop or rack mount mounting location.
For a desktop mount configuration, the unit can be installed directly out of the box.
For rack mounting the IDU, installation kit contains rack mounting brackets for flush or
projection mounting. See Figure 3.1 for IDU Install Kit. Remove the desktop mounting
feet and install the rack mount brackets.
2. Make the following connections to the IDU:
21-56 VDC Input
4xE1 Data Input/Output BNC-Type Connections
G.703 Ground Switch
NMS - SNMP Interface, RJ-48C
Aux 1 (DB-9, Terminal Interface, RS-232)
Aux 2 (DB-9, Aux Serial port or Alarm Input)
Siamesed Cat-3 Data/Power To/From ODU

Figure 3.1 - Link 4X Rack Mount

Digital Input

Link 4XTM
+

ODU Interface

DC
Status

4
AC

3A

AUX Port 1

AUX Port 2

Tx

Alarms
250V

NMS Port
Link

Rx
Data

21-56V
Digital Output

12 x 24
Rack Screws
4 Places

WL272911

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

3.3

Outdoor RF Unit Installation


General
The outdoor unit is installed by means of a pole mount adaptor bracket (wall mount optional)
that is secured to the pole using two metal hose type clamps. Figure 3.1 shows the hardware
provided to mount the Outdoor RF Unit.
1. Install the outdoor unit pole mount adaptor bracket using the supplied metal hose type
clamps. See Figure 3.2.
2. Align the four mounting studs on the outdoor unit with the bracket holes (See figure 3.3)
and secure to the bracket by pushing down the latches as shown in Figures 3.3a and 3.3b.
3. Connect the Siamesed Category 3 Data/power cable, the N-type antenna and the ground
connections as shown in Figures 3.4a and 3.4b.

Figure 3.2 - Outdoor Unit Mounting Hardware

Wall Mount Bracket


(Optional)

Pole Mount Bracket

Pole Mount
Bracket Fasteners

Siamesed Catagory 3
Ethernet and Power Cable
for IDU to ODU Interconnection

N-Male to N-Male
ODU to Antenna
Coaxial Cable Assembly
WL272909

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 3.3 - Mounting the Outdoor RF Unit to the Bracket


Outdoor Unit

Pole Mount
Bracket

WL272912

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 3.3a - Mounting Bracket Latch and Stud Mount Detail

Detail of Latch Mechanism


for Securing the Outdoor Unit
to the Pole Mount
(4 Places on Bracket)

Outdoor Unit
Mounting Studs
placed through
this hole

WL272913

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 3.3b - Locking the Mounting Hardware

Press locking latches


down to secure the ODU
to the pole mount bracket

Mounting
Studs x 4

WL272906

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 3.3c - N-Type Antenna and Siamesed Ethernet/Power Connections

N-Type
Antenna
Connector

Siamesed Category 3
Data/Power Cable

WL272907

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 3.3d - Ground Connection

Ground Cable
(not supplied)

WL272908

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

3.4

Commissioning
1. Visually verify that the Link 4X is properly mounted.
2. Verify that the DC power input to the Link 4X is on.
Refer to Table 3.2.

3.4.1 Configuring Link 4X System Antennas


The antennas used on an Link 4X radio system are generally configurable for either vertical or
horizontal polarization. It is extremely important to verify that both antennas are configured for
the same polarization, and that the appropriate antenna polarization has been selected for the
specific radio link.
Table 3.2 - Installation Checklist
Installation Checklist
Is the rack mounting hardware secure?
Is the unit properly grounded?
Is the antenna properly connected?
Are the data connections in place and correct?
WL277908

3.4.2 Aligning the Link 4X System Antennas


With the Link 4X at each site properly configured for operation, antenna alignment must be
performed at both sites. Proper antenna alignment is crucial to the proper operation of an Link
4X radio system, and should only be accomplished by experienced professionals.
The Link 4X is equipped with a ODU mounted BNC-(f) RSSI connector to which an analog or
digital voltmeter can be connected. The voltage range at the test point, between the center
conductor of the connector and ground, varies from approximately two VDC to four VDC,
serving as a receive signal strength indicator (RSSI). The stronger the receive signal, the higher
the RSSI voltage.
Emanating from a microwave antenna is a main beam (or lobe) of RF energy, surrounded by
RF side lobes. The beamwidth of the main beam varies with the size and type of antenna, as
well as the specific frequency of the RF signal, and is generally defined by the nominal total width
of the main beam at the half-power (-3 dB) points. Side lobes surround the main beam at specific
angle distances, and will be lower in power than the main beam.
When aligning an antenna system, it is extremely important to verify that the antennas are both
aligned on the main beam, not on a side lobe. Referencing Table 3.3, the first side lobe will
generally be located at an angle slightly less than twice the antenna beamwidth.
Following the course alignment of an antenna system, a common practice when performing a
fine alignment is to slowly swing each antenna (one at a time!) in both vertical (elevation) and
horizontal (azimuth) planes to verify that the main beam and first side lobe can be accurately
identified. This insures that accurate alignment of the antenna system on the main beam has
been accomplished.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Each Link 4X is shipped with an RSSI test sheet, showing the relationship between the receive
signal strength level (in dBm) and the RSSI level (in VDC). These RSSI test sheets are often
referred to as AGC Curves. The RSSI test sheets can be used to verify that the calculated
receive signal levels match up with the actual receive signal levels. Substantial differences
between calculated and actual levels could point to transmission system problems, side lobe
alignment, path obstructions, etc.

Table 3.3 - Approximation Table


Antenna Diameter and Style

Gain (dBi)

3 dB Beamwidth (degrees)

2-foot parabolic

28

6.1

4-foot parabolic*

34

3.1

1-foot flat panel

23

9.4

2-foot flat panel

28

4.7

* The 4-foot dish antennas are for use outside the USA only, and are not FCC compliant.

30

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

4.0 Link 4X Provisioning


There are four basic management facilities included with each IDU:

HTTP/HTML server providing embedded management Web pages


SNMP MIB-II and Link 4X enterprise MIB support
FTP upload and download of configuration data files and system software
Telnet and direct access through RS-232 maintenance port

Configuration and monitoring of individual IDUs can be accomplished, both locally and
remotely, using the Web pages served from within the IDU itself. In-depth network monitoring
can be accomplished using an SNMP network management station (NMS), using both the
standard MIB-II variables as well as device-specific variables included in the supplied Link 4X
enterprise MIB. The IDU contains a flash file system, and configuration data and system
software stored in various files that can be accessed using FTP. No special management
applications are required to use these facilities.
Network administrators can enable or disable access to these facilities, and can limit access
by use of passwords or SNMP community names.
The RS-232 maintenance port and telnet both give the use of direct access to the IDU software.
Therefore, they should only be used under the direction of Wireless, Inc. support staff.
Security

Physical access to the IDUs is best controlled by the use of pad locks to secure the enclosure
doors. This prevents unauthorized users from accessing the set-up switch or the RS-232
maintenance port (which should only be used under the direction of Wireless, Inc. support staff).
Care should be taken in planning the network locations of management centers so that SNMP
community names and FTP/HTTP/Telnet passwords are not sent over untrusted network links
external to the Link 4X radio network.
Determine who will be allowed to access which level of management information from which
IDUs, and select community names, user names, and passwords accordingly. FTP/HTTP/
Telnet passwords should only be provided to network management staff who are allowed to
reconfigure the IDUs, including making changes to passwords and SNMP access rights. SNMP
community names with write access allows limited reconfiguration rights, but does not include
the rights to change users, passwords, or community names. SNMP community names with
read access do not allow any system configuration changes to be made, but do allow viewing
of system usage and error statistics.

4.1

Plan IP Network Addressing


The radio interfaces on a given local IDU and its associated remote IDU form a unique IP
network (or subnetwork), and need to be assigned the same network address, with unique host
addresses within this network. The Ethernet interfaces on each local and remote IDU are
assigned host addresses within their Ethernet networks. It is a good practice to record the IP
address planning information with the network map.

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4.2

Plan Routing Information


The local and remote IDUs each contain a Route Table that controls how packets are routed
between its Ethernet and radio networks. It is not necessary to add explicit routes for packets
destined for the network addresses of either the radio or Ethernet network, since the IDU will
infer these routes from the IP addresses and subnet masks for these interfaces. A Destination
IP Address value of default will apply to all packets other than those addressed to the local
networks of the Ethernet and radio interfaces or those with explicit Route Table entries. The
Route Table entries contain:
Destination Network Address
Subnet Mask for Destination Network
Next Hop IP Address (address of next IDU on the local Ethernet or radio network)
It is common for the remote IDUs default route to have the Next Hop IP Address be that of the
local IDUs radio interface.
For a local IDU, there is typically a route to each remote LAN. Where the local IDU connects
to a backbone network IDU, then it is common for the local IDUs default route Next Hop IP
Address to be the backbone IDUs interface on the local IDUs Ethernet network.
If there is more than one co-located local site IDU, and packets must be routed between the
multiple radio networks, then each local site IDU needs route table entries for all remote
networks. Alternatively, a separate Ethernet IDU (not a Link 4X IDU) can be used at the local
site to route packets between the local IDUs, allowing each local IDU to only need routes to its
own remote networks.
Route tables entries (other than the default route) apply the subnet mask for the routing
decision. Each route table entry can use a unique subnet mask, and CIDR and supernetting
are supported.

4.3

Configure Radio Terminal


The IDU is configured using the Web browser over the Ethernet interface. In the following
procedures, underlining is used to designate Web page links.

4.3.1 Equipment Needed


A PC with a 10Base-T Ethernet with Netscape Navigator 3.0 (or later) or Microsoft
Internet Explorer 4.0 (or later), and ping and tracerouter utilities
One 10Base-T patch cables (Cat 5)

4.3.2 PC Internetwork Configuration


IP address:
Subnet mask:

10.0.0.xxx (where xxx is any number between 2-254)


255.0.0.0

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

4.3.3 IDU Configuration Procedure


Refer to Figures X.X and X.X when performing the following procedure.
IP address of Ethernet interface: 10.0.0.1; subnet mask: 255.0.0.0
IP address of Radio interface: 172.16.0.1; subnet mask: 255.255.0.0
1. Connect the PC to the NMS port.
2. From the PCs Web browser, open the IDUs IP address (URL) 10.0.0.1 and confirm that
the IDUs identify management page is displayed. Note that no network log in is required
whenever the IDUs Ethernet interface IP address is 10.0.0.x, where x = {1 ... 254}.
Note: IP addresses in the range 10.0.0.1 - 10.0.0.254 should not be used except for
temporary initial configuration.
3. Select configure. Select the link to each of the following Web pages in succession, to
configure or verify the configuration of the IDU. Note that on each configuration page there
is a reset button; this button will reset the parameters to the values that were present upon
entering the page. After making configuration changes on any page, click the submit button
on that page. After completing all desired configuration, select finish. Each of these pages
is described in the sections below:
Radio: Enable/Disable Radio, Enable/Disable Cable Loopback, Frequency Pair (GHz) Tx
Power (dBm)
Internet: Interface Table, Ethernet/Radio IP addresses, Subnet Mask Route Table
SNMP: Enable/Disable SNMP, Access Table
Log in: Enable/Disable HTTP, FTP and Telnet, set user names and passwords
Finish
4. From the finish page, verify that no errors are indicated. If there are, then select the links
in error, and correct the configuration information. Click on the subnet configuration button
to make the new configuration active. No configuration changes will take effect until this
action is performed. Pending changes that have been configured but not submitted will be
saved so that they can be submitted at a later time.

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Identify screen:

WL144002

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Configure screen:

WL144001

5. Reconfigure the PC using an IP address and subnet mask consistent with the IDUs new
internet configuration.
6. Confirm that log in and SNMP security configurations allow access as intended.
7. Select identify and record the IP Addresses and of the Ethernet and Radio interfaces, and
the Hardware and Software Identification information. These are generally useful for
troubleshooting and maintenance.
Log In screen:

WL144004

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

4.4

Configure Radio
Configure Radio screen:

WL144005

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

4.5

Configure Internet Parameters


Performing internet configuration is required in order to deploy the IDU. The default address
established by using the reset switch on the IDU board should not be used beyond the initial
IDU configuration process.

WL144006

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

4.5.1 Interface Table


Update the Interface Table with the new values for the IP Address and Subnet Mask for the
Ethernet and Radio interfaces. Subnet masks must have binary values consisting of a block of
contiguous ones followed by a block of contiguous zeroes.

4.5.2 Route Table


Update the Route Table with the addresses of the networks that the IDU will route packets to,
from the network planning information. A maximum of 64 routes may be entered. The columns
to enter are:
Destination Network IP Address (or default)
Destination Network Subnet Mask (or default, when using default destination)
Next Hop IP Address (address of next IDU on the local Ethernet or radio network)

4.6

Configure SNMP
Performing SNMP configuration is optional. If SNMP is Enables, then authorized users can
access all monitoring variables and/or selected configuration variables. Variables that may be
configured are limited to the normal industry practices for IDUs and radio-specific parameters.
Users may also access a subset of MIB variables through the Web browser interface, upon
supplying a valid Community name (from a valid IP address) to log in through the Web browser
interface. This applies even if they do not have a Web browser network log in user name and
password.
Note: Units are shipped from the factory with a community named public which has Read
access. This allows users to view all configuration information via SNMP. Read access for
the community named public can be removed, thus preventing unauthorized personnel
from viewing SNMP variables (IDU/radio configuration information, etc.).
The SNMP Community Name can be used to provide read-only or read/write access to a
specific user or group of users. You can add a community name, and assign the desired level
of access (read-only or read/write), via the SNMP configuration page. Once you have submitted
the configuration change, you can enter the newly assigned community name in the space
provided on the log in page. You will then have access to the unit at the level assigned to that
community. You can then give that name to a particular user, or to a group of users.

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WL144007

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4.6.1 Community Table


The Community Table allows access to the SNMP Read and Write functions based on
Community names (which serve as SNMP passwords). Community names must consist of
alphanumeric, hyphens, underscores, and/or periods. If one or more Network Manager IP
Addresses are specified, then read and write requests will only be accepted if the IP source
address from the SNMP packet matches one of the addresses listed.
If Traps are selected, then the IDU will send SNMP Traps to the specified IP address(es).
The factory default setting is to allow Read access for the Community Public only, from any
NMS; if this access is not desired, SNMP should be Disabled, the Read Access box should be
de-selected, or the Community name should be changed to another value.

4.7

Configure Log In Security


Configuring log in access is usually recommended, except when extraordinary levels of security
are required. If this is not configured, then it will not be possible to Telnet, or perform Web
browser or FTP based management operations over the network.

WL144008

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4.7.1 User/Password Table


User names and passwords can be established for those allowed full access to the IDU
functions through the Web browser interface or through FTP. These fields may contain
alphanumeric, plus the following symbols: $-_.+!*.

4.7.2 Enable/Disable FTP, HTTP, and Telnet


Network access to the Web browser management pages (HTTP), FTP, and Telnet can be
enabled or disabled. If enabled, then user and password log in values will be checked against
the values entered into the User/Password table at log in time before full access is granted. To
add a new user, enter the user name and password (minimum 8 characters), and select the
add checkbox. The user will be prompted to confirm the password. To delete a user, de-select
the keep checkbox next to the entry.
Note that limited access to SNMP-accessible variables will be allowed through the Web
browser interface if the user supplies a valid SNMP community name at log in time. Access to
SNMP variables will be restricted to read and/or write access depending on the community
name provided and the IP address of the Network Management Station. Configuration Web
pages will only display those fields that can accessed given the security restrictions based on
the community name.
Using FTP, a user can read and write any file on the IDU. Misuse can cause IDU operations
to cease, so it should used with care. This is normally only needed to initially obtain a copy of
the IDUs enterprise MIB from the IDUs flash file system, to save or restore a copy of one or
more of the IDUs configuration files, or to update the IDU with new software.
Telnet access is protected by the same passwords configured for FTP and HTTP access to the
unit. The maintenance console can be accessed by opening a Telnet session to the unit.
Misuse of the console interface could damage the integrity of the system software and/or
configuration. This interface should not be used except under the direction of Wireless, Inc.
support staff.
If HTTP, FTP, and Telnet are disabled, then access to the unit through the Web browser
(HTTP), FTP, and Telnet will be denied, regardless of user and password log in values entered
at log in time. To regain access will require physical access to the setup switch on the IDU board
within the enclosure. The setup switch will have to be used to return to the unit to factory defaults
as described in the Pre-Installation Configuration section of this manual.

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Issue pings in the following order to determine the source of the connectivity problem. If there
is a failure then consider the possible problem sources listed for each step.
Action
ping the IDUs Ethernet interface

Upon Failure, Verify:


IP address, subnet mask, or default gateway
on PC
IP address or subnet mask of IDUs Ethernet
interface (on IDU)
Physical Ethernet link (hub and/or cable) to
remote IDU
IP address or subnet mask of IDUs radio
interface on IDU
radio interface is Enabled

ping the remote IDUs radio interface

ping the local site Link 4X


IDUs radio interface

ping the local site Link 4X


IDUs Ethernet interface

IP address or subnet mask of local IDUs


radio interface
Physical radio link
IP address or subnet mask of local IDUs
Ethernet interface

If communications cannot be established to the IDU, then it may be necessary to use the setup
switch on the IDU board inside of the enclosure to reset the IDUs internetwork configuration
to a known state (see Chapter 4).
If all of these are successful, then verify the route tables of the Link 4X local or remote. If the
route tables are correct, then the problem is likely outside of the Link 4X network.

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4.8

Network Operation

4.8.1 Control Operations


The control management page is used to set the system time to the current time, as understood
by the computer that the Web browser is running on. The system time is expressed relative to
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).
The control page can also be used to reset the Link 4X unit. Note that this operation will take
the IDU and radio off-line for approximately 2.5 minutes.

WL144009

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4.9

Using FTP to Archive or Modify Configurations


It may be desirable to archive a copy of a IDUs configuration for record keeping, or to restore
in case of hardware failures. It may also be desirable to copy all or part of one IDUs configuration
to another IDU. This might be done to insure consistency of data (e.g. security or routing
parameters), or else as a short cut to reduce configuration time. These objectives can be
accomplished by using FTP to retrieve one or more of a IDUs configuration files, which can be
restored to the same unit or another unit when desired. Note that the internal structures of the
data located within the configuration files may change between different software versions,
therefore configuration files should only be stored/restored between units having the same
version of software. Note that it may be necessary to cd to the IDUs file system root (F:) prior
to accessing files.
The IDUs configuration files are located in the IDUs file system as follows:

Radio Configuration Parameters: F:/SNMP/nxconfig.dat


Log in User Names and Passwords: F:/MPN/passwd
Interface IP Addresses and Subnet Masks: F:/MPN/inet
Route Table Entries: F:/MPN/routes
SNMP Community Table: F:/SNMP/config
MIB-II System Group Data: F:/SNMP/nov

FTPing configuration files onto a IDU should be done with care, as errors in the copying process
may render the IDU inoperable pending significant recovery processes.

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4.10 Monitoring and Trend Analysis


Local and remote IDUs can be monitored through either the Web browser or SNMP agent
interfaces.

4.10.1

Web Browser Interface

A subset of the SNMP-accessible statistics is available through the Web browser interface.
These statistics can be read by doing a network log in using either a user name and password,
or by specifying a valid community name that is allowed SNMP read access, and then selecting
monitor. Statistics can be repeatedly sampled by using the reload/refresh feature included with
the Web browser. Monitor RSSI updates automatically approximately every 15 seconds. Radio
statistics, RSSI, Authentication, or System statistics can be selected.
Monitor System Statistics screen:

WL144010

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

4.10.2

Monitor Radio Status

Troubleshooting of the radio link can be accomplished using radio status.


Monitor Radio Statistics screen on a local:

WL144011

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Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

4.10.3

SNMP Network Management Stations

All monitorable statistics are available through SNMP queries. In addition to MIB-II variables,
product-specific variables are available through the Link 4X enterprise MIB (see Appendix Be),
which can be FTPd from F:/n2_4x.mib in the IDUs file system. Most commercial SNMP
Network Management Stations have the ability to sample variables over time and display trends
and/or raise alarms based on defined thresholds. In addition, applicable SNMP traps are
supported, and can be used to raise alarms on the network management station.

4.10.4

Monitoring Error Messages and Traps

The IDUs support SNMP traps. (TBA)

4.11 RS-232/Telnet Maintenance Port


The DB-9 RS-232 port allows a terminal (or terminal emulator) to act as the operating system
console. This port should not be used except under the specific direction of Wireless, Inc.
support staff. This physical interface is not protected against voltage surges, therefore no
cables should be connected to it while the unit is installed outdoors. Misuse of the console
interface could damage the integrity of the system software and/or configuration.
The maintenance port functions can also be accessed by opening a Telnet session to the unit.
Telnet access is protected by the same passwords configured for FTP and HTTP access to the
unit. Again, this interface should not be used except under the direction of Wireless, Inc. support
staff.

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5.0 Maintenance and Troubleshooting


The Link 4X contains static sensitive components, and has no user-serviceable parts.

5.1

Link 4X Maintenance
The Link 4X is designed to operate with no scheduled maintenance activities. From a
precautionary perspective, a regular check of power supply input voltages and RSSI voltages
should be planned by the user.

5.1.1 RSSI Voltage


The Wireless Customer Service department recommends a monthly check of the Link 4Xs
RSSI voltage. Variations in the RSSI voltage could be an indicator of antenna or antenna feed
movement, loose or improper RF cabling or connectorization, path obstructions or reflections,
etc.

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5.2

Identifying and Resolving Receive Signal Strength Issues


There are a great number of items which can affect the transmission of a microwave signal from
one site to another. Every microwave path is unique, and must be evaluated for performance
before a radio link is installed.
Outside of radio equipment issues, antenna alignment, RF signal blockage, and multipath
fading are among the most common transmission problems experienced in the field.

5.2.1 Link 4X Equipment Issues


Frequency Selection

1. Verify the transmit/receive frequency selection for each Link 4X radio is set appropriately,
and that a matched pair of radios has been selected for the system. Each Link 4X terminal
can be set to the frequencies listed in Table 5.1.
2. To reduce the possibility of co-adjacent channel interference, proper frequency coordination and antenna polarization is used to isolate each channel. The concept is to achieve
maximum RF isolation between link channels by means of frequency spacing and antenna
polarization. In a star configuration an optimum frequency and antenna polarization plan
is provided to demonstrate an example of maximum isolation between links (See Figure
5.2).

Table 5.1 - Frequencies


Channel No.

Frequency

5.2608

1'

5.733568

5.27104

2'

5.74592

5.28128

3'

5.75616

5.29152

4'

5.7664

5.30176

5'

5.77664

5.31200

6'

5.78688

5.32224

7'

5.79712

5.33248

8'

5.80736
WL277910

50

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure 5.2- Frequency Selection for the Link 4X Radio

V
V

4
H

4H
6V

8V
2

2H

H 1

1H

5V

7V
3H

V
5
V
7

H
3
H = Horizontal Antenna Polarization
V = Vertical Antenna Polarization
WL035917

51

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

5.3

Where To Get Further Assistance


Your primary source of assistance is the support staff of the organization from which you
purchased this product. The Wireless, Inc. support staff should only be contacted directly if you
purchased this product directly from Wireless, Inc., or if you are unable to obtain sufficient
assistance from your primary support contact.

General Product and Company Information


Wireless, Inc.
5352 Betsy Ross Drive
Santa Clara, CA 95454-1101
USA
Tel:
+408 727 8383
Fax:
+408 727 1259
E-mail:
info@wire-less-inc.com
Website:
www.wire-less-inc.com

Detailed Product Information, Sales, Pricing Information and Pre-Sales


Technical Support
Wireless, Inc.
Sales Department
5352 Betsy Ross Drive
Santa Clara, CA 95454-1101
USA
Tel:
+408 727 8383
Fax:
+408 727 0990
E-mail:
info@wire-less-inc.com
Website:
www.wire-less-inc.com

Post-Sales Technical Support (Customer Service)


To assist you with field issues and, if necessary, to arrange for repair services, Wireless, Inc.s
Customer Service department can be reached via telephone, facsimile, e-mail, mail, or through
our Website.

52

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

5.4

Return Procedure
All material returned to Wireless, Inc. must be accompanied by a Return Material Authorization
(RMA) number from Wireless, Inc.'s Customer Service department. If you purchased your
Wireless, Inc. product through a distributor, the Wireless RMA number should be obtained
through the distributor. An RMA number is necessary to assure proper tracking and handling
of returned material at the factory. Wireless, Inc. reserves the right to refuse shipments not
accompanied by an RMA number. Refused shipments will be returned to the shipper via collect
freight.
To obtain an RMA number, contact Wireless, Inc. as follows:
Telephone:
Fax:
E-mail:

+408 727 8383


+408 727 1259
customerservice@wire-less-inc.com

The following information will be required to issue an RMA number:

Part Number
Serial Number
Failure Description
Contact person, telephone, and fax numbers
Ship-to address
Bill-to address*
Customer purchase order* (P.O.) or reference number

* Required for non-warranty repair services. For non-warranty repair services, an RMA
number will be issued when Wireless, Inc. acknowledges the purchase order.
Important - All non-U.S. returns must include 5 copies of proforma/customs invoice for each
shipment which lists:
RMA number
Value of items
Description of items (including the Wireless model or part number)
Please send all returns to:
Wireless, Inc.
Attn: RMA Department
5452 Betsy Ross Drive
Santa Clara, CA 95054-1101
USA
RMA No. __________
The customer is responsible to properly label and package repairs and prepay shipping to
Wireless, Inc. If possible, the original packaging material should be used to return electronic
parts. The RMA number must be visible on the outside of all packages returned. Unless other
arrangements have been made, all repairs are shipped back to the customer prepaid via ground
carrier.

53

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

54

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Appendix A

Grounding Practices and Lightning


Protection Information

General
Good grounding (earthing) practices, when used in telecommunications, have some direct
benefits which can help you maximize the up time of your system as well as ensure the safety
of those people working on the system. Among these benefits are:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Protection of personnel from electric shock and fire hazards.


Reduction of radiated and conducted electromagnetic susceptibility.
Improved system tolerance to discharge of electrostatic energy and lightning interference.
Minimized service interruptions and service damage.

There is no practice or formula which can completely eliminate the above risks, but we at
Wireless, Inc. believe that good grounding and bonding practices can significantly reduce the
risk of many of these hazards. We have included a bibliography at the end of this appendix which
contains several publications that are readily available and contain detailed information on
many aspects of grounding systems and their design, implementation, measurement, and
maintenance.
Please note that every telecommunication site is unique, and must be evaluated accordingly.
The following information is provided for generic reference and educational purposes only. The
grounding plans and practices for a given site should only be established and accomplished by
trained professionals, working in accordance with local practices and regulations.

Ground Connections
There should be a grounding plan designed at the outset of site design in order to provide the
best grounding procedures and to minimize ground loop currents. This should be achieved by
connecting the outer conductors of the cables through a large section copper strap to a central
grounding point and the size of the conductor should be increased as each branch path is
added. The final conductor should be connected directly to the grounding system. For a radio
site a single copper grounding rod is insufficient because its impedance is likely to be too high.

Lightning Protection
Radio sites can be particularly prone to lightning strikes by virtue of their normally exposed
locations and the presence of relatively tall antenna support structures.
It is not possible to provide and guarantee complete protection from the effects of lightning;
however, they can be significantly reduced by careful attention to grounding, protection
devices, and the layout of the site itself.
Reference should also be made to various publications, some of which are listed in the
Bibliography. Where any site owner or user is in doubt about the protection requirements for any
particular location, the appropriate authority should be consulted.

A-1

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Protection Arrangements
The purpose of any protection arrangement should be to provide a suitable path to ground for
the lightning current, to ensure adequate bonding between structures and all metalwork on the
site and the common grounding system in order to reduce the side flashing, and to attempt to
prevent the entry of flashes or surges into the building.
The resistance to ground should be kept to a minimum and a value of less than 10-ohms is
recommended. The most important feature is that the system should ideally be at equal
potential across the entire site.
Certain authorities and service providers have their own particular practices which have to be
followed where applicable.
Arrangements will vary considerably from very simple sites to complicated sites with multiple
buildings, antenna support structures and associated equipment, and may involve integration
with existing systems. Such systems may require upgrading.

Lightning Conductors
Down conductors, bonding interconnections, ground rings and radial tapes should be of copper
cable or solid copper tape with a minimum cross section according to local practice with all
connections protected by non reactive paste.
Protected test points should be included if appropriate, and sacrificial ground lugs should be
clearly marked and easily accessible for periodic inspection.

Grounding of Antenna Support Structures


A structure will generally act as its own lightning conductor and therefore will not require an
additional conductor from the top to the base. A lightning rod may be required to extend the zone
of protection to protect equipment mounted on the top of the structure. The lightning rod should
extend 2.5-meters above the highest equipment.
Ground mounted support structures should be connected at their base to a ground ring via
sacrificial ground lugs. Towers should have a connection from each leg.
A ground ring should consist of copper cable or solid copper tape with ground rods equally
spaced at 2-meter intervals around the base of the structure as close to it as possible, buried
approximately 0.6-meters deep where soil conditions allow. An alternative method using radials
rather than rings is detailed in The Grounds for Lightning and EMP Protection, second
edition, published by PolyPhaser Corporation.
The ground ring should be connected to the main building ground by the most direct route,
buried as appropriate.
Roof mounted structures should be connected to the main building ground by the most direct
route using sacrificial lugs and copper cable or tape as appropriate. Tower guy wires should be
directly bonded at their lowest point to a suitable ground electrode or connected to the site
ground by the most direct route.

A-2

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Grounding of Feeders
All antenna feeders should be bonded to the tower at the upper and lower ends and grounded
at the point of entry into the building. Weatherproof grounding kits are available from antenna
manufacturers.
Note: Many of the cables used by Wireless, Inc. have braided rather than solid outer
conductors; this type of grounding is not appropriate. In these cases we recommend the
use of Wireless, Inc. approved lightning arrestors. For information on lightning arrestors,
please contact Wireless, Inc.s Customer Service department.

Grounding of Buildings
A ground ring ideally should surround the building and be connected to individual grounds
associated with feeder entry, antenna support structure, building lightning conductor, equipment room, main AC supply and other facilities. Each connection should be made by the most
direct route in order to minimize interaction between the different grounding functions.
The ground ring should consist of copper cable or tape with electrodes 2- meters or greater in
length, buried to a depth of 0.6-meters and at a distance from the building not to exceed 1-meter.
Buildings may require lightning rods where they are not within the zone of another protected
structure.

Bibliograpy
ITU - T K.40

Protection against LEMP in telecommunications centres

ITU - T K.27

Bonding configurations and earthing inside a telecommunication building

ITU - T K.35

Bonding configurations and earthing at remote electronic


sites

ITU - T K.39

Risk assessment of damages to telecommunications sites


due to lightning discharges

ITU - T Lightning Handbook

The protection of telecommunication lines and equipment


against lightning discharges

IEEE Emerald Book - Powering and Grounding


The Grounds for Lightning and EMP Protection, second edition
Published by PolyPhaser Corporation

A-3

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

A-4

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Appendix B Installation Instructions


Read the instructions completely before assembling or installing the antenna. This installation
can be dangerous and requires qualified personnel familiar with microwave assembly and
installation.
Site Planning

1. For antenna mounting and planning dimensions, see Figure B.1 and Table B.1.
2. The antenna is normally assembled with an elevation adjustment range of +50 degrees to
-5 degrees. By inverting the mount, it can be assembled with a +5 degree to -50 degree
range. In either configuration, the antenna centerline can be offset right or left, relative to
the vertical mast pipe (See Figure B.2) by inverting the Horizontal Tube Assembly.

Figure B.1 - Two Foot Diameter Antenna


J

D
P
C

K
A
G

Q
WL035927

B-1

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Table B.1 - Two Foot Diameter Antenna Dimensions


Dimension

Description

2ft. (0.6m) Antenna

Mount Length

22.4" (570mm)

Pivot Point

4.2" (105mm)

Center Line Offset

5.0" (125mm)

Horizontal Mount Strut

N/A

Pvt. Pt. Vertical Mount Strut

8.8" (175mm)

Horizontal Fixed Side Strut

N/A

Antenna Centerline

13.6" (345mm)

Reflector Length

12.3" (315mm)

Short Shroud Length

12.5" (320mm)

Long Shroud Length

15.1" (385mm)

Antenna Diameter

24.0" (610mm)

Radome Length (Standard)

13.4" (340mm)

Mount Strut Depth

N/A

Reflector Vertex

7.6" (190mm)

Mast Diameter

2.4" 4.5" (60-115mm)

Azimuth Adjustable Range

Elevation Adjustment Ranges

+50 /-5

WL035928

B-2

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure B.2 - Mount Configuration


3/8 (10mm)
Round Head
Screw Lockwasher
and Nut (4)
2.4- 4.5
(60-115mm)

Shear Stop
Collar

Elevation
Plate

WL035929

B-3

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual


Unpacking and Preparation

1. Carefully unpack the reflector, mount, shroud (if any), radome (if any) and feed from the
crate. For correct antenna performance, handle all components with care. Set aside the
packaged feed and any shroud or radome. See Figures B.3 through B.6.
Caution: The reflector spinning has been formed to a very close-toleranced parabolic shape.
Careful handling and assembly is required to avoid denting or deforming the reflector,
which would degrade the antenna's performance.
2. Inspect for any damaged parts. See Tables B.2a-B.2d for an inventory of the parts and
hardware shipped with the antenna.
Shroud Attachment

Attach the shroud assembly that is provided with high-performance antennas to the reflector.
The installation procedure is covered by another instruction sheet supplied with the shroud.
Note: Some models have the shroud factory installed.

Table B.2a - Contents List, Reflector Assembly


Part Number

Description

Qty.

23832-3

Refl. Assy. SE 2' Open-2A

Check

WL035930

Table B.2b - Contents List, Feed Assembly


Part Number

Description

Qty.

25736-1

Feed Mounting Clamp

26716-503

Feed S/A 5.250-5.850

AD T5170

RR Track Butyl 3/16x7//8x40'DSS170

FW X0050

Washer 1/4" W 0.734x.065

II-221

Installation Instructions

NU X0060

Hex Nut

SW X0050

Split Washer

4
WL035931

B-4

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure B.3 - Mounting Hardware Packed

Feed Horn
Assembly

Mounting
Hardware

WL035932

Figure B.4 - Mounting Hardware Unpacked

WL035933

B-5

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Table B.2c - Contents List, Mount Assembly


Part Number

Description

Qty

25675-501

Horizontal Pipe Assembly

25725-505

Mast Clamping Assembly

22316-2

Threaded Rod Galv

24525-5

Mast Clamp Half 1"

FW G0120

Washer Galv

NU G0121

Washer Galv

SW G0090

Split Washer Galv

23725-509

Mast Clamping Assy

22316-2

Threaded Rod Galv

24525-8

Mast Clamp Half

FW G0120

Washer Galv

NU G0120

Hex Nut

SW G0090

Split Washer Galv

25727-504

Shear Stop Assy

23285-3

Threaded Rod

24525-2

AZ Clamp Half-Short

NU X0130

Hex Nut

SW G0090

Split Washer Galv

25730-503

Elevation Rod Assy

23611-6

Elevation Rod

23842-501

Elevation Rod Brkt Assy

25666-1

Elevation Support Angle

BO G0080

Hex Bolt Galv

FW G0120

Washer Galv

FW G0140

Washer Galv

NU G0120

Hex Nut Galv

NU X0195

Hex Nut SS

SW G0090

Split Washer Galv

SW G0100

Split Washer Galv

1
WL035934

B-6

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Table B.2d- Contents List, Mount Assembly


Part Number

Description

Qty.

25733-501

Mount Hardware Kit

10749-54

U-Bolt Galv.

23561-2

Spacer

AD M0005

Anti-Seize 1 oz. Tube

BO X0921

Hex Bolt

FW G0120

Washer

FW X00050

Washer

12

NU G0120

Hex Nut Galv.

NU X0060

Hex Nut Galv.

PN G0090

Palnut

SW X0050

Split Washer Galv.

26590-1

Elevation Plate

26591-1

Azimuth Plate

BO X1186

RND HD Screw

NU X0130

Hex Nut

SW X0080

Split Washer

II-232

Installation Instructions

1
WL035935

B-7

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure B.5 - Parabolic Reflector

Parabolic
Reflector

WL035936

Figure B.6 - Unpacking the Radome

WL035937

B-8

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual


Mount Assembly and Attachment

1. The reflector should be placed face down, either on the shroud or blocked up on packing
lumber. Locate the Top and Bottom markings stenciled onto the back of the reflector.
2. Loosely attach Top Support Angles to the Horizontal Tube Assembly as shown in Figure
B.7 and B.8.
3. For desired mount configuration (refer to Figure B.2), attach the Vertical Tube Assembly
to the Horizontal Tube Assembly as shown in Figure B.7 and B.8.
4. Verify proper assembly of the elevation rod hardware as shown in Figure B.9. Remove
outer hardware and insert rod through elevation plate.
Important: For elevation angles grater than 20, Beveled Washers, shown in Figure B.9,
must be used. However, beveled washers may be used for elevation angles greater than
10.
5. Carefully place mount assembly onto antenna backring, taking care not to damage the
reflector. Loosely fasten the Top Support Angles and the Elevation Support Angle to the
antenna backring using 1/2 hardware as shown in Figure B.7.
6. Verify alignment of the Vertical Assembly with the vertical axis of the reflector and secure
the Top Support Angles and the Elevation Support Angle to the ring.

Figure B.7 - Antenna Mount Assembly

3/8 (10mm)
Round Head
Screw Lockwasher
and Nut (4)
2.4- 4.5
(60-115mm)

Shear Stop
Collar

Elevation
Plate

WL035938

B-9

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure B.8 - Antenna Mount Assembly

WL035939

Figure B.9 - Elevation Rod Assembly

Secure Antenna to Mast


Pipe using large and
small Mast Clamps

Attach Shear Stop


Collar on Mast Pipe so
that it will be Under
Azimuth Plate

Position Elevation Plate


on the Mast so elevation
screw is horizontal when
Antenna is aligned

WL035940

B-10

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual


Feed Installation

Following the instructions provided with the feed assembly, install the feed in the reflector. Refer
to Figures B.10 through B.14.

Figure B.10 - Feed Horn Installation


Feed
Support
Clamp

Reflector
V

Hex Nut,
Lockwasher,
Flat Washer

Vertical
V
Graphite
Grease
H

1/4-20
Hex Nut
Horizontal
WL035941

B-11

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure B.11 - Feed Horn Polarization Markings

Feed Horn
Polarization
Markings

WL035942

Figure B.12 - Parabola Rear View Showing Polarization Reference Markers

Horizontal
Polarization
Marking
Vertical
Polarization
Marking

WL035943

B-12

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Figure B.13 - Feed Horn Installation

WL035944

Figure B.14 - Feed Horn Installation for Vertical Polarized Operation

WL035945

B-13

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual


Radome Installation

Molded Radomes (normally optional on standard antennas) should be installed following the
instructions provided.
Azimuth Adjustment Clamp/Shear Stop Installation

1. Verify proper assembly of the azimuth clamp/shear stop clamp as shown in Figure B.15
and B.16. Securely attach the shear stop clamp to the mast pipe as shown, orienting it as
nearly as possible to the antenna boresight direction, and square to the mast axis. Note
that the shear stop clamp used on the two foot antennas also provides the azimuth
adjustment.
2. Refer to Figure B.1 for the position of the antenna centerline relative to the shear stop
clamp. The clamp must be mounted to provide support during installation and azimuth
adjustment.

Figure B.15 - Azimuth Clamp/Shear Stop Assembly

3/8 (10mm)
Round Head
Screw Lockwasher
and Nut (4)

2.4 - 4.5
(60-115mm)
WL035946

Figure B.16 - Azimuth Adjustment Clamp Assembly

WL035947

B-14

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual


Antenna Hoisting and Installation

1. Attach a hoist strap around the vertical assembly or the horizontal assembly as shown in
Figure B.17. Do not hoist by the elevation rod. Make sure that the vertical assembly is
unobstructed where it will mount against the mast pipe.
2. Attach tag lines and carefully lift the antenna into position, resting the vertical assembly on
the shear stop clamp.
3. Fasten the mount to the mast pipe with 1/2 U-bolts. The antenna must be free to rotate
during azimuth adjustment, so tighten only enough to close the gap between the mast and
vertical channel. Do not leave the antenna loose for any extended period of time, i.e.
overnight.

Figure B.17 - Hoisting the Antenna

5
(127mm)

WL035948

B-15

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual


General Antenna Alignment Procedures

Normally the antenna is aligned by performing azimuth and elevation adjustments and
elevation adjustments as necessary until the peak signal is obtained. It may be helpful to repeak one adjustment before finalizing or locking down the other.
Warning: Damage to the antenna can occur if azimuth or elevation adjustments are
attempted without loosening the proper connections as described in the following steps.
Azimuth Adjustment

1. Be sure the mast pipe U-bolts are just loose enough to allow mount rotation while
maintaining complete contact between the mount and the mast pipe.
2. Turn the long stainless steel azimuth screws against the mounting channel. By alternately
turning one azimuth adjustment screw out and the other in, the antenna can be rotated to
the desired azimuth angle. Approximately 1 turn changes the azimuth direction by 1. Avoid
adjusting the antenna beyond the 5 provided by the azimuth clamp as this can damage
the adjusting hardware. Fasten the antenna to the mast pipe and reposition the clamp if
needed.
Note: By securing the mount to the mast pipe and realigning the azimuth clamp with the
antenna boresight, more reliable and precise azimuth adjustments can be achieved.
After all adjustments are made, tighten both of the azimuth screws against the channel and
secure with the lock nuts provided.
3. Tighten the mast pipe U-bolts while maintaining the peak signal by alternating from left to
right in 1/4 turn intervals.
Elevation Adjustment

1. Insure that both of the bolts connecting the mount to the Top Support Angles and the
pivoting Elevation Angle (refer to Figures B.7 and B.9) are just loose enough to allow
resisted rotation.
2. Back the outer nuts on the elevation rod away from the bottom mount plate to allow some
fine adjustment range.
3. Turn the inside nut (with flat washer) on the elevation rod to adjust the elevation angle.
Approximately 5 turns changes the elevation by 1. Remember, for elevation greater than
20, install the two beveled washers as shown in Figure B.9.
4. After all adjustments are made, lock the nut against the bottom mount plate. Tighten the
angle pivot bolt and support bracket bolts.
Important: Be sure to tighten all hardware after final adjustments and insure that split
lockwashers, palnuts, or jam nuts are used where provided.

B-16

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual


Inspection and Maintenance

1. Before leaving the installation, check that all hardware on the mount, shroud, radome, and
feed is tight and that nuts are locked in place.
2. Inspection of the antenna should be performed at lease once a year to check its condition
and to insure safe operation and maintenance. Qualified personnel, knowledgeable and
experienced in antenna installations, are required for this inspection.
Supplemental Information

Table B.3 is provided for installers unfamiliar with adequate nut tightening procedures for use
on stainless steel bolts, U-bolts, galvanized bolts or any bolts without the ASTM-A325 marking
on the head. Disregard these recommendations when specific tightening requirements are
given.
Note: It is not recommended to reuse a palnut that has already been fully tightened or
deformed in any way. It should be replaced by a new palnut.
Weather Proofing the Type N Female Connector on Feeds

Remove the protective cover from the end of the feed and mate the connectors, screwing the
male connector firmly onto the feed.
Important: After connecting the coaxial cable, wrap the Type N connector with the gray butyl
rubber, squeezing it firmly around all joints to make a continuous seal. Finish the
weatherproofing by wrapping the butyl rubber with several layers of black PVC tape (not
supplied).

Table B.3 - Nut Tightening Procedures


Nominal Bolt Size

Nut Torque

Palnut Locknut Torque

1/4 "

50 in./lb.

40 in./lb.

5/16 "

102 in./lb.

60 in./lb.

3/8 "

15 ft./lb.

85 in./lb.

7/16 "

24 ft./lb.

15 ft./lb.

1/2 "

37 ft./lb.

16 ft./lb.

5/8 "

74 ft./lb.

28 ft./lb.

3/4"

175 ft./lb.

44 ft./lb.

7/8 "

212 ft./lb.

51 ft./lb.

1"

318 ft./lb.

59 ft./lb.
WL035950

B-17

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

B-18

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Appendix C

Adjustable Panel Antenna Mount

Assemble the panel mount according to Figure C.1. Orient Antenna using instructions supplied
with the antenna. Antenna models used with this mount may be circular, square or diamond
shaped. To change the offset of the antenna, unbolt the mount from the antenna, invert the
mount and reattach to the antenna.

Figure C.1 - Antenna Mount


Top View

Optional Mast Clamp Kit


for 1.9 (48mm) DIA thru
4.5 (114mm) DIA Masts

2 3/8 (60mm)
DIA Mast
(2) 1/4 U-Bolt w/
Washer, Lockwashers
and Nuts
Azimuth Adjustment
Slots

Rear View
Offset Left

Side View

Rear View
Offset Right

Elevation
Adjustment
Slots

WL035951

C-1

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Loosen the azimuth or elevation locking hardware while maintaining sufficient friction to prevent
unwanted slippage. See Figure C.2.
Insert flat blade screw driver into slot B and pry in direction of the arrow or into slot A and pry
in opposite direction, as shown in Figure C.2. Stop prying approximately as new overlapping
slot in bottom plate becomes sufficiently visible when viewed through slot A.

Figure C.2 - Azimuth and Elevation Planning


Top View

Top View

Sectional View

Sectional View

C-2

WL035952

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Insert Screw Driver into slot A and pry in direction of the arrow, as shown in Figure C.3. Stop
prying approximately as new slot in bottom plate becomes sufficiently visible when viewed
through slot B. Continue alternating slots and prying in either direction until desired alignment
is obtained. Lock down hardware securely before leaving the site.

Figure C.3 - Azimuth and Elevation Planning


Top View

Top View

Sectional View

Sectional View

WL035953

C-3

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Attach the antenna to the mount as shown in Figure C.4. For antenna polarization, assemble
the antenna to the mount using four sets of nuts and washers after desired polarization is
selected. In horizontal polarization the arrow sticker should be pointed in a horizontal direction.
Likewise, in vertical polarization the arrow sticker should be pointed in a vertical position.
Important: After cable connection is completed, wrap connection with Butyl or other
waterproof tape, supplied by the customer.
Each panel antenna has four factory sealed drain holes located on the back of the antenna. After
orienting the antenna to its proper polarization, the lower most sealed drain hole(s) must be
punctured with a pointed tool. See Figure C.4.
Caution: Do not allow the tool to protrude into the drain hole more than 1/4 (7mm) or damage
to the antenna may result.

Figure C.4 - Flat Panel Antenna

Antenna
Polarization
using Nuts
and Washers

Polarization
Arrow

Drain
Holes

WL035954

C-4

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

Aim the antenna according to Figure C.5. Orient the antenna using instructions supplied with
the antenna. Antenna models used with this mount may be circular, square or diamond shaped.
To change the offset, unbolt the mount from the antenna, then invert the mount and reattach
in the antenna.

Figure C.5 - Adjustable Panel Antenna Mount


Side View

1/4 Carriage Bolts


w/ Washers, Lockwashers
and Nuts (2)

Elevation
Adjustment
Clamp Kit for
1.9 (48mm) DIA
Thru 4.5 (114mm)
DIA Masts

Rear View
Right Offset

Rear View
Left Offset

WL035955

C-5

Link 4X Installation and Operation Manual

C-6