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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

ROCKY MOUNTAINS

The United States of America encompasses a range of natural features thal


have shaped its history in unmistakable ways. Chief among these features
are the Rocky Mountains and the lVississippi River, both ol which extend
through the country from the northern to the southern borders. The majestic
Rockies are known as the continental divide, because these high ridges
determine whether rivers llow east or west. The mighty Mississippi, its 3,710
miles making it the third longest river in the world, is the watershed lor twothirds of the country.

The Rocky lV0untains are America's backbone, an aggressive young range


that extends north into Canada and s0uth to the Texas-Mexico border. The
states of Montana, ldaho, Wyoming. Colorado, and Utah, the least populated
regions in the country, all share in the alpine grandeur ofthese granite giants,
which attract hikers and sightseers in the summer and skieIs in the winter.
Utah lies at one of the lowest p0ints in the Great Basin 0n the weslern side
of the Rockies. The shores of the Great Salt Lake that has leeched here from
the western sl0pes were made fruitful by the Mormon settlers, who
established their reilgious and secular capital in Salt Lake City. The state's
grea'test glory lies in a cluster of national parks in the southeast; these carved
rock masterpieces are monuments to the power of desert erosion.

Physiographically, the United States is divided into a number 0f distinct


regions. These include the Appalachian l\/lountains, Atlantic Coastal Plain,
Gulf Coastal Plain, Central Lowlands, Great Plains, Rocky M0untains, Great
Basin, Pacific Coast Range, Alaska, and Hawaii. The states that have been
created within these areas take their characters as much from the land as
from the inhabitants.

ALASKA AND HAU/AII


Separated from the rest of the USA, Alaska and Hawaii are worlds unto
themselves; and what different worlds they are. Alaska is a world of ice and
snow, a land of breathtaking beauty that is home to abundant wildlife,
ice-covered Jjords, dramatic glaciers and clear mountain vistas punctuated
by the 20,230-f oot Mount lvlcKinley.

Hawaii is a world of sun and sea, a tropical paradise atop a chain o{ volcanic
islands. Here in the tropics, the Pacific is warm but trade winds cool the air
to balmy temperatures.

PACIFIC COAST
Thanks to the mountains that line the Pac fic Coast thrs region is verdant
rather than arid, the Coasta, Cascade. and S erra Nevada Ranges act as
barriers, blocking incoming ocean morsture. The coasts of Washington and
0regon recerve almost 80 inches of rainfall annual y. the highest average in
the nation. East o,f the rnountains. the regi0n revefts to desert and arid
plateau. Washington is cleft f0r more than half of lts iength by Puget Sound.
a vast Pacific inlet with close to 200 islands and a favorite dest natlon for
recreation. 0n its east sh0re, Seattle, the state's largest city. s a care{u ly
tended community with an active civic arts program. The 0lympic Peninsula
protects Seattle from the raw Pacific. Here, 0lympic National Park contains
the finest remaining stand of Pacilic Northwest rain forest, active glaciers,
and scenic ocean shore. Bisecting the state, the Cascade Mountains
dominate the horizon with their sharp peaks. North Cascades National Park,
with its abundant rain, is a playground for the moisture, {ull of waterlalls, ice
fa ls and other liquid phen0mena set among lush lorests and meadows.
Further south l\4ount Rainier National Park is the greatest single-peak glacier
,e back from the dead. as
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C0lorado is the most mountarnous state; 54 oJ its peaks are over 14,000 feet
high. Denver is the region's largest city. Called the NIile-High City, it was
lounded as a rough-and-ready miners' lown and is now a notable cultural
and commercial center. Mining towns are testim0nials to the mineral fever
thatfired the area during the 1860s and'70s; among them, ldaho Springs,
Telluride, and Leadville retain vintage flavor. The legendary skiing towns of
Vail and Aspen attract athletes from around the world for vigorous outdoor
sports. Rocky Mountains National Park attracts hikers and anglers to its lorty
heights and trout-rich lakes. The eastern portion of Wyoming is grazing land;
the Rockies burst up to the east. Yellowstone National Park sits on t0p of the
world's largest assembly of geysers, of which 0ld Faithtul is the star.
Montana is a ranching and mining state. Gold put it on the map;Virginia City,
fully restored gold rush town is the place to relive the era. Bighorn Canyon
National Recreation Area attracts water lovers. 0n the Canadian border,
Glacier Nationai Park, a scenic preserve that includes 50 glaciers, is a
monument to a force o{ nature that siqnificantly shaped this area. ldaho's
peaceful Coeur d'Alene Lake sits at the top of the Bitterroot Range that runs
the length of the state. With n the Sau/tooth Mountains, the Salmon River
mostly stays above ground level. t/ith cascades marking its path, although
along a 70-m le stretch n He I s Canyon it carves down 9,000 feet. Skiers
flock to Sun Va ey. a g ossy resort whose pleasures extend into the warm
months Some of the volcan c forces that lie beneath the earth have left
spectacular scenery at Craters of the lVoon Nalional lvlonument, preserved in
cones craters. f ows. and caves.
a

GREAT PLAINS
East of the Rocky Mountains, the Great Plains states of North Dakota, South

Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma are Amerca's breathing room, a


vast plateau that extends like a placid sea. Nolv completeiy tamed, the land
supports grain and catte. But the tam ng. during the last century, was a
dramatic time \vhen pioneers a"a c3',',bc-'s fcught. r'r th the aid of soldiers,
'la: ,: Ai:er cans \vho had roamed tt for
10 wrest the yast acrea_Oa rrom
m lenn a. The gc den pia,n of North 0akota.','Jhich contains the geographic

:f:

is broken by the blue of Lake


Sakakal'rea. a 200-mile-long manmade lake impounded by one of the world's
center of the N0rth American c0ntinent.

longest rolled earth dams; the lake is a magnet for lovers oi water sports
and camping. In South Dakota, Badlands National Park, formed by erosion
Little Missouri River, reveals animal fossils f rom 40

lc l\lelinnrl

Fo

ED #rES
Southern New England has a more gentle prolile, the peaks of the
Appalachians rounding ofl into hills. ln Massachusetts, the Berkshires
relresh city dwellers with canopies of trees and myriad ponds. Throughout
New England, autumn is a time of particular beauty, when the deciduous
foliage of the forests flames into most colors of the spectrum from red t0
yellow.
Boston is the largest city in New England, a prosperous urban and intellectual
center that takes pride in its heritage as the fountainhead of the American
Revolution. Here, the Freedom Trail memorializes the world of famous
patriots such as Benjamin Franklin and Paul Revere. The beaches of southern
New England have their own special allure. Cape Cod National Seashore
extends its sandy claw into the Atlantic, allowing beachcombers to enjoy
both sunrise and sunset over the ocean.0n the nearby islands 0,f Martha's

Vineyard and Nantucket, square-rigged ships have been replaced by


vacationers. The entrance to the state of Rhode lsland is crowned by
Newport, a community of palatial "cottages" where America's richest
capitalists once spent their ind0lent summers. Many of these mansions
are now open as museums. The maritime glory of New England lives on
in the Mystic Seaport Museum, located 0n the Connecticut coast. This
re-creation of a 1gth-century coastal village features restored sailing
vessels.

MID-ATLANTIC
,found
The influence of both the Appalachians and the Atlantic Coastal Plain is
in the mid-Atlantic states 0{ New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Deiaware.

and Maryland. The inland portions 0f New York are mountainous to the
north: located at the western end of the state, on the Canadian border,
Niagara Falls reigns as one o,f the world's most regal attractions. Draining
Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie, the 3,175-loot-long cataracts
release 700,000 gallons per second of rainbow-tinted foaming fresh water
over a 184Joot drop into Lake 0ntario. The state's other main attraction is
man-made; New York City is the most populous in the country and,
accordinq to its inhabitants, the m0st mportant in the world. This is a
metropolis 0{ superlatlves, h0rne of the c0untry's richest concentrati0n 0f
cultural pursuits, boast ng arch tecture din ng shopp ng. and entertainment
o,f pre-eminent quality.

* Located here, too, is lhe sile 0f the former World

Trade Center (WTC),


deslroyed by acts ol terrorism on 9/11/2001. The publisher. Unique Media',
has elected to leave the WTC illustrati0n on all Unique Maps:' pending a
decision on lhe fulure ol the site.

To the south, the area of New Jersey known as the Jerser Sr:'. --.-.
peaceful sun-warmed beaches down the length ot the state. n
Crty even losinq can be fun in the din 0f fabulous gambling casin0s. L0cai.:
at the entrance to Delaware Bay, Cape Niay is a national historic landmark
of beautifully preserved Victorian architecture. Across the bay, Delaware
Iras beautiful seaside retreats. Past the end of the bay in the state of
Pennsylvania on the Delaware River, was the first capital of the fledgling
-::.lbllc. Federalist m0numents include lndependence Hall and
't- EU rn nde0endence National Historic Park in
-'
, - - -/''?shington. DC has been the Arner can capital since 1790 and

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INFORMATION

To I f ree numbers marked

Alabama Bureau of Tourism & Travel .


401 Adams Ave.. l\l0nl00mery. AL 36104

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with an

..334-242-4169
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.....907-929-2200

Alaska Tlavel lnduslry Assoc.


Ste. 20'1. 2600 Cordova St.,
Anchorage, AK 99503-2745
Arizona ollice of Tourism
Ste.'155, 1110 W. Washington St., Phoenix. AZ 85007

. . 602-364-3700
866-891 -3640.

Arkansas Dept. ol Parks & Tourism


Room 4A-900, 0ne Capitol N4all, Little Rock, AR 72201

.....501-682-7777

Calif0rnia Travel & Tourism C0mmission


Ste.480. 980 gth St. Sac'ament0 CA 9581 1

.....916-444-4429

Colorado Touris.r
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SOO.NAT-U RAL-

800-862-2543.
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. . 860-270-8000
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Visil Florida
Ste. 300, 661 E. Jefferson,

. 303-892-3885
800-c0L0RAD0"

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302-739-4271
866-284-7483.

. . 850-488-5607

rllsA) 888 73s-2872

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are accessible from Canada, as well as from the USA.


Louisiana office ol Tourism
Depl. ot Culture. Recreation & Tourrsm
1051 N. 3rd St., Baton Rouge, LA 70802
Maine Tourism Assoc.
327 Wa\il St., Hal o\J'/el

N4E

04317

Maryland Office of Tourism Devel0prnent


gth Floor.217 E Red,,r00c St 3at ^'.r. ',":2-2:?

St

Paul, IVN 55101

290. Truman State Ollice Bldg..


Jefferson city. rn. 65101

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lilissouri Division ol Tourism

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0hio Dept, 0l Devel0pment, Division oi Travel & Tourism .


P0 Box 1 001 . Columbus, 0H 4321 6-1 001

Mississippi Devel0pment Authorily . . . .


I vis on 0{ T0urism, P0 Box 849, Jackson, IVS 39205

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. 207-623-0363
888-tVAtN E-45.

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300 N. Washington Sq., Lansing, IVI 4891 3


lvlinnesota 0llice ol Tourism
100 Nletro Sq. Bldg., 121 7th Pl. E..

North Dakota Tourism Depl. .


Century Cent:r
Ste 2 1600 E. CentLrr,,Ave. Bismarck. ND 58503-0649

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Massachuselts 0ffice ol Travel & Tourism


Ste. 45i0. Stale Transportat on B dg
1 0 Park P aza, Boston l,/lA 021 1 6

Michigan Economic Developmenl & Travel Corp,

.225-342-8119
800-3s4-8626.

61

4-466-8844

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405-521 -3981

0regon Tourism Commission


775 Summer St. NE, Salem, 0R 97301

503-986-0000
800-547-7842.
7 17 -787 -5453

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Pennsylvania Tourism off ice


4th Floor. 400 Nofth St !a,'s::t': DBhode lsland Tourism Dlr

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60r -359-3297

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800-51 9-2300-

Oklahoma Travel & Tourism Division .


Tourisrn & Recreation Dept., P0 Box 52002,
Oklahoma CiIy. 0K 7 31 52-2002

800-657-37CC-

.573-751-4133

7A1-328-2525
800-435-5663

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800-652-6552.

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800-847-4872.
1A1-222-2601

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3:!-556-2484',
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SoLn 0akola Dept. ol Tourism

605-773-330

711 E. Wells Ave.. Pierre. SD 57501

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DAKOTA'
A1q-7n1 -C1 qO

Mount St. Helens Volcanic l\,4onument Visitors Center explains it all.

T0resIS covenng snarp-e0ge0 granrle mounlarns. lMan nas sculple0 Ine


South Dakota landscape as well: N/lount Rushmore National N/lonumenl

Separated from Washington by the Columbia River, 0regon was the land at

is famous lor its 60{oot-high bas relief mountainside depicting Presidents


Washington, Jeflerson, Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt.

the end of the rainbow duririg pioneer times, the destination of settlers
looking for rich, well-watered soil that would be fruitful under the plow.
Forestry and agriculture are the state's economic mainstays, although many

tourisls are attracted by its pristine shoreline, perhaps the most dramatic
west of lVaine, and gentle mountains. For all its serenity, 0regon, like all the
Pacific coast, has been marked by volcanic activity. Crater Lake gives its
name to a national park that is the site of the deepest, bluest lake in the
country, formed in a caldera blasted out 7,000 years ago.

Calilornia is a land of many faces, ranging from the lush forests of the
northwest to the harsh deserts of the southeast. The northeast is known as
the Redwood Empire, named for the towering, rosy-barked trees that are
unique to the state. Running down the center of the state, the immense
Central Valley is watered by the Sacramento River; rich soil and sunshine
make this area the nation's garden, spilling forth huge crops of fruits and
vegetables. lViners stampeded to the north of the Sierra Nevada mountains
after 1849, for this section is gold country. There are jewels in this range as
well: Yosemite National Park, renowned Ior its granite mountains, deeply
carved g0rges, and lofty waterfalls; and Kings Canyon and Sequoia National
Parks, whose rocky canyons shelter the state's biggest redwoods under the
gaze of Mount Whitney. Behind the Sierras, the Great Basin begins; within it,
Death Valley National Park shows the richly colored beauty of land stripped
down to its bones.
To the lvest of the Central Valley, Caillornia enjoys a balmy l\4editerranean
climate, which nurtures fine vintages in the wine country just north of San
Francisco. This city has made its reputation with a magical mix o{ the bawdy
and the beautilul, all of it artlully arranged on the lovely hills that guard the
entrance t0 San Francisco Bay, one ol the finest natural harbors in the world.
The coastal midsection of the state has dramatic rocky beaches backed by
vigorous mountains. The Hearst San Simeon State Historical l\/lonument, a
millionaire's grandiose palace now open t0 the public, is well-sited to enjoy
the scenery. 0n the southern coast, Los Angeles, second-largest city in the

its metropolitan charms in a unique, low-rise style.


Disneyland is the original Magic Kingdom, the first of the famous mouse-made

country, presents

realms ol never-ending fun.

SOUTI{\MEST
Texas was once part of the Spanish empire; and San Antonio has beautifully
preserved the mood ol its Spanish past. The big cities o{ Texas, DallasFt. Worth and Houston, are glassy new, lull of all the good things that oil and
ranching money can buy. A popular attraction near Houston is NASA's
Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, headquarters for the US manned spaceflight program. The last great wilderness area of Texas is Big Bend National
Park, a microcosm ol the many topographies of the state.

In New Mexico. bisected by the Rio Grande, the Spanish world never really
died. Located on a high plateau liberally punched through with mesas and
mountains, this state has a crystal-clear atmosphere and a strong cultural
tradition thal reaches far back to indigenous Iorebears. N/exican, American,
and Native-American have uniquely combined in Santa Fe, once the capital
for the entire Spanish southwest. Taos attracts everyone {r0m art pilgrims t0
ski bums. The Sangre de Christo mountain area is rich with wildlife and
outdoors enthusiasts. Pre-Columbian Pueblo monuments include Chaco
Culture National Historical Park and Gila Cliff Dwellings National lVonument.
Acoma is a still-living pueblo famous f0r its pottery and the skill of its water
carriers. Six 17th-century missions and lhree Pueblo villages are preserved
at Salinas Puebl0 lVissions National lV0nument.
Arizona is lower, flatter, and warmer, a gentle setting for its jewel, the Grand
Canyon. This exquisite 277-mile-l0ng carving. the work 0f the Colorado
River, illustrates the fluidity and patlence of water as it chisels down 5,000
feet throuqh the rainbow strata of earth. With the aid of irrigation, Phoenix,
a thriving regional commercial center, makes the desert lush. Nevada's {ocal
point, Las Vegas, is an oasis of light and entertainment in the desert, a resort
town that has turned legal gambling and reliable sunshine into a Ilashy show.
Reno, its northern counterpart, is slightly less glitzy but with all the thrills
intact. The history behind Nevada's nickname, the Silver State, comes t0 life
in Virginia City and Carson City, legacies of the silver-mining frenzy after the
Civil War.

One of the last free-flowing stretches of the Missouri river, known as "Big
lMuddy," runs through Nebraska at the lVissouri National Recreational River.
Kansas remembers the cowboys in Dodge City, once known as the cowboy
capital of the world. Another repository of cowboy memorabilia is found in
0klahoma at 0klahoma City's National Cowboy Hall of Fame and Western
Hefltage Center. 0il replaced cows as the focus of 0klahoma's 2oth-century
economy; indicators of the rmportance of the black gold are the oil wells
surrounding the state capital.

CENTRAL
The Central Lowlands, occupied by the states of lVinnesota, Wisconsin,
Michigan, lowa, [t4issouri, lllinois, Indiana, 0hio, and West Virginia, is the
fresh water region of the country. Dominated by four of the Great Lakes
and the Mississippi, Missouri,
Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie
Wisconsin, lllinois, and 0hio rivers, this area has used its abundant
resources to develop manufacturing and agriculture. 0hio's three C cities,
Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus, are prosperous industrial towns. A

completely different way of life is followed by the Amish, wh0 inhabit an area
in the northeast of the state. These gentle farmers and craftspeople eschew
electricity and internal combustion engines, preserving the plain old ways
that they feel bring them closer to God. A faster pace is experienced in
lndianapolis, lndiana at the lndianapolis 500 [/otor Speedway. The pace
gears down at the Children's Museum of lndianapolis, which is the largest
museum of its type in the world.
Chicago lllin0is, America's third-largest city, is a welcoming town famous
for its architecture, including 0ne of the world's tallest buildings, the 1 ,454{oothigh Sears Tower. Chicago's museums are world-class as well. ln St. Louis
Missouri, Jellerson National Expansion Memorial celebrates the territorial
growth o,f the country with the 630-fo0t-high stainless steel Gateway Arch.
Just north, the l\Iissouri River joins the Mississippi, creating the mighty "0le
IVan River" that Ilows t0 the Gulf. For insiqht into the farming that is the basis
of its economy, lowa ollers the Living History Farms, which demonstrate the
history o, regional agricullure from the early lowa peoples to contemporary
times. West Virginia is "almost heaven"; and one of the most scenic spots
is the dramatic New River Gorge.
The Great Lakes rule lhe northern portion of the Central region, where both
industry and agriculture depend on fresh water. The lakes and their network
o{ rivers also form the system that transports many of America's abundant
raw materials, Irom grain and livestock to Iumber and iron ore. Staples of the
American way of life are produced in this area: Minneapolis, Minnesota is the
milling and baking capital; lVlilwaukee, Wisconsin is famous for its beer, and
Detroit, Michigan is known as the lvotor City. For natural beauty, the Great

Lakes area includes numerous pristine sites, including Pictured Rocks


National Lakeshore, a pan0rama of erosion-carved cliffs, waterfalls, lakes
and forests, and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, a diverse
andscape of massive sand dunes, beaches, and deciduous woods.

NEU/ ENGLAND
The rocky New England states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont,
N/assachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode lsland are iocated at the northern
end of the Appalachian IMountains. This chain is the oldest on the North
American continent; eons of erosion by glaciers and the fierce climate have
sculpted it into a dramatic landscape ot mountainous crags and gorges
interspersed with gently rolling hills. A fresh-water-rich region, New England
is dappled with lakes and ponds and latticed with rivers and streams. The
tempestuous Atlantic Ocean has shaped the coast into a rugged panorama of
rocky beaches, peninsulas, and olfshore islands. ln n0rthern New England,
Maine is particularly renowned for its shoreline, although the conilerous
forests to the north also attract many visitors. New Hampshire, beloved of
skiers and hikers, is the most mountainous of the New England states. lts
pristine wilderness offers both winter and summer pleasures. Vermonl includes
the Green Mountains National Forest among its attractions.

,rl

Supreme court are the seats .i'rliiiii'i*,'i,"-,irliur,


iroirirr po*ur.
Between them, arranged along the Mall and around the Tidal Basin, are the
country's most important monuments and museums. Nearby, Annapolis
Maryland is home to the US Naval Academy. Baltimore is one of the w0rld's
greatest port cities.

Ge0rgia Depl. 0l Econ0mic Devel0pment.


Sle. 1200. 75 5th S1. NW, Atlanta, GA 30308

404-962-4083

Hawaii Visitors & C0nventi0n Bureau. . .


Ste. 801, 2270 Kalakaua Ave., Honolulu, Hl 968'1 5

808-923-1 81 1

800-847-4842.

ldaho Dept. of Commerce & Division 0l Tourism. . . . .


700 W State St., Boise, lD 83720-0093

lllinois Bureau ol Tourism.

SOUTH
Occupying the Atlantic and Gul,f Coastal Plains and including the lower
Appalachians, bounded on the west by the Mississippi, the south is a
temperate area with a unique culture and history. ln 1 860, this region, which
includes the states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia,
Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louis ana, Arkansas, Kentucky, and
Tennessee, withdrew from the Union over the issue of slavery, f0rming the
Confederacy. This era and the Civil War that f0llowed ended in 1 865 with the
surrender 0f the rebels and the emancipation of the slaves; and it has had a
lasting influence on soutle'rers.
Colonial Historic Park, in Virginia, was the site in 1607 of the first Englishspeaking colony in the New World. The sense of history remains strong in
this state. which includes in its eastern area such historic sites as lvlount
Vernon, home of George Washingt0n, the first American president;
Monticello, the classically inspired home of Thomas Jefferson, the nation's
third president; Williamsburg, the country's Iinest preservation town; and
Jamestown, a reproduction of the original settlement. A number o,f places
important to the Confederacy have also been preserved, among them
Fredericksburg, Petersburg, Appomattox, and the city 0f Richmond, which
was the Confederate capital and is now the home of the Museum of the
Confederacy. Another area of great historic importance to the nation is the
Cumberland Gap, located in the Appalachians where the borders of Virginia,
Kentucky, and Tennessee meet. This was the gateway t0 the west; and
restless settlers looking for new lives passed through it following the trail
blazed by Daniel Boone. Nature is opulent in this territory and more species
of wildflowers are foun0 here than exist in the entire continent of Europe. The
Great Smoky lVountains National Park is the center of visitor activity.
Low and lazy describes the southern Atlantic coast, a place where sea and
land stretch out on the same level. This region is especially lovely in the
spring, when blooming magnolias, azaleas, dogwoods, and camellias
perfume the air. ln N0rth Carolina, Cape Hatteras National Seashore,
protected by the outer banks, has broad sounds and river estuaries rich with
marine lile. IVyrtle Beach and Hilton Head lsland are warm and relaxing
destinations for vacationers in South Carolina. Savannah, Georgia, with its
beautifully restored National Historic Landmark District mansions, preserves
the gracious heritage o,f the antebellum south. Atlanta is the largest city in the
s0uth; a growing center that still retains rts regional flavor. Further south the
Great 0kefenokee Swamp is a national wildlile refuge.

Florida has a faster tempo, reaching supersonic pace at the John F. Kennedy
Space Center on Cape Canaveral. 0rlando is the home of Walt Disney World,
a universe unto itsel,f. N/iami Beach is where irostbitten northerners come t0
thaw out their bones. For more restful enjoyment, Everglades National Park,
occupying most 0l the tip of the state. is the largest subtropical w lderness
in the conterminous United States.

0n the Gull Coast, Louisiana.is a place o,f sleepy bayous. This is Cajun
Country, an area settled in the lBth century by French Acadians from Nova
Scotia that still retains a unique language and culture. New 0rleans, on the
IVlississippi Delta, is famous for its annual Mardi Gras celebration. The
French 0uarter is the most picturesque of the New 0rleans urban districts.

ln Huntsville, the Alabama Space and Rocket Center is the largest space
museum in the world. Memphis Tennessee. like its Egyptian namesake, is a
city ruled by kings: in antebellum times it was King Cotton; nowadays, it's the
memory of King Elvis Presley, whose shrine al Graceland still attracls
pilgrims. Nashville is also a shrine - to country rather than rock music. The
Grand 0le 0pry, located in the 0pryland LJSA Musical Showpark, is the place
to worship. F0r thousands of years pe0ple have journeyed to the hot springs
oI Arkansas to relax and enjoy its steamy waters. The Natchez Trace Parkway
runs through Mississippi, al0ng the course of the historic trace the native
peoples, and then settlers, look in days gone by. Kentucky is known for
its thoroughbred horses and its r0lling hills ol bluegrass. lt's als0 home t0
Fort Knox.

la;ut,Udd//

800-G0HAWAT
.

208-334-2470

800-635-7820.
312-814-4732
800-226-6632.

Dept. of Commerce & Economic Opportunity


Ste.3-100. James R. Thompson Bldg..
100 W Randolph St Ch cago. lL 60601

.......

lndiana Dept. ol Commerce. Tourism Division


Ste. 700, 1 N. Cap to Ave. nd anapo is. N 46204-2288

317-232-8860
800-289-6646.

lowa Division of Tourism.


Dept. of Economic Development

515-242-4705
800-345-4692.

200 E. Grand Ave., Des [,4oines, lA 50309


Kansas Dept. ol Commerce.

785-296-2009

Travel & Tourism Developmenl Division


Sle. 1 00, I 000 SW Jackson St..
Topeka, KS 66612-1354

8OO-2.KANSAS-

Kentucky Depl. ol Tourism


Ste. 2200, Capital Plaza Tower, 500 Mero St.,
Franklort. KY 40601

502-564-4930
800-225-8747.

lept. of Commerce, 1424 Ninth

!e

Ave.,

800-541-1 447.
-

25th Floor, Wm. Snodgrass Tennessee Tower


312 8th Ave. N.. Nashville, TN37243

800-G02-TEN

142-171-3796

Texas Dept. ol Transportation


Travel Services Section. P0 Box 149248, Austin, TX 78714-9248

800-452-9292800-888-8TEX-

800-548-3390

ena, l\4T 59620

Nebraska Divisi0n 0l Travel & T0urism


Dept. o,f Economic Development, P0 Box 98907
Lincoln, NE 68509-8907
Nevada Commission on Tourism
401 N. Carson St.. Carson C tl' l,'.r

800-2 28--1307

UlahTravel C0uncil, Council Hall/Capitol Hill


300 N. state st., salt Lake city, UT 84'1 14

, | 5'687-4322

89;l'

800-638-2328-

New Hampshire Divisi0n 0l Travel & Tourism 0evelopment


Dept. ol Resources & Econom c Deve opment. P0 Box 1 856,
Concord, NH 03302-1856

.603-271-2343

New Jersey ollice 0f Travel & Tourism.


New Jersey Commerce Commission
20 W. State St., P0 Box 820. Trenton, NJ 08625-0820

.609-292-2470

New Mexico Dept. ol Tourism.


Lan,y Bldg..491 Old Santa Fe Trail.
Santa Fe, NNi 8750'1

.505-827 7440

SOO.FUN-INNH-

802-828-3

Washington Slate Tour sm

Dept.otT'adedi-. - -:.:.-".

. : :,--:

23

:,1 -:a-ll::

-:"erVsitors Center
- -', ::-3.S: r:---:-l \.t;232':
Washingl0n D.C. C0nvenli0n & Tour sm CorF
:-:
4lhFro-r:-- . :"..', ,': ---,--..

:-,'. :

-_.1

- -'-::----,
::

-'--:_j,-:

518-474-4116
80O-LOVENY8OO-CALLNYS

. 91 9-733-41 71

800-847-4862.

"

West Virginia Division of Tourism


Dept. ol Commerce, Labor, Environmental Resources & Trave
90 Mac0orkle Ave. SW, South Charleston, WV 25303

304-558-2200
8OO-CALLWVA-

608-266-21 61
800-432-TR P307 -777 -7717

l-25 at College Dr., Cheyenne. WY 82002

800-225-5996'

OCENN

i,,rs
i-AND."!
G$LF OF a24.9fr4

Wisconsin Depl. of Tourism


P0 Box 7606, lvladison, Wl 53707-7606
Wyominq Business C0uncil Divisi0n 0l Tourism

;"":
GLACIER EAYN.P fPRESERVE

o(o
a+

fsio.,o*
F isrp.no

030
800-200-1 1 60-

Virginia Tourism Corp,.

\:^JKOO|AK

801 -538-1

Ca::: .-it..-.

800-537-7397

"

0lympia, WA 98504-2500

N0rlh Car0lina Division of Tourism. .


4324 [,4ail Service Center
301 N. Wilmington St., Raleigh, NC27699-4324

i>

.............

Vermont Dept. 0l Tourism & Marketing


D':.,',.'3: a 3e a,','i St l,4ontpel er, VT 05633-1301

800-733 6396-

New York State Dept. 0l Economic Devel0pment.


Division ol Tour sm P0 Box 2603.
Albany, NY 12224-0603

ARCT/C

Unique Medio Mops'


This Unique Media Map@ is entirely hand-drawn and painted in a
watercolor technique designed to create an original and sophisticated landscape graphic.
Unique Media lnc. originated this novel style of three-dimensional
mapping. lt is a fresh innovation on the lascinating and centuriesold artform of bird's-eye-view pictorial maps. Our artistic illustration
style coupled with our special interpretation of scale gives a real
feeling for the layout and beauty of urban and nalural environments.
Whether applied to continental landmasses or to a city block, the
Unique Media Perspective@ helps you visualize both the

individual landmarks and overall landscape of the area. The


geography comes alive and gives you a clear sense of orientation.
Add to this the interesting, objective text and handy format and you
have a reference that you can use time and lime again.
We take great pride in our work. Thousands of hours o{ artwork and
detailed research go into the crealion of each title.

Unique Maps@ are available folded and flat laminated.


Unique Collection@ titles include:
Florida
Manhattan
New York City
San Diego
San Francisco
Greater Los Angeles
Las Vegas (Grand Canyon, Lake Mead)
California and Nevada
Pacific Northwest
Pittsburgh
San Antonio. Texas
Niagara Falls (Buffalo, Hamilton)
United States (U.S.A.)
Downtown Toronto
Greater Toronto and Area
City of North York
Canada (Ottawa)
Vancouver
The World

The Unique Map@ custom imprinted, has proven very successful


in corporate promotional use. (Quantities of 3,000 or more only)

/,r7rt@-

Fr ded
2OO9 ED T ON

:r

r:-. . Canaca 204

Produced and Publ shed O1 992


Uniq!e Media lncorporated (all rights reserved)
Box 4400 Don l\/l lls. Ontar o. Canada lVl3C 2Tg
\416) 924-a644 Fax 1416) 924'7322

NOTICE
Un que Med a lnc c a ms lhe fo low ng: i) protection under the nat ona laws of Canada lhe Un led States and oiher
co!ntr esi i ) all protection ava iable through inlernat ona agreements: i) fu protect on w th respect io copyr ghis,
trademarks (tadedress) and olher nte lectua propeily r ghisi v) the reservat on of a riqhts for a I map producls.
to the pailicuiar form of expression deve oped by Unlque Medla lnc. and used in ils maps v) the exclusive right
and the exclusive jurisdiction to control "the look and feel" in respect to all of its artwork, and in respect

tothetradedressineachofitsproducts;andv)thereservationofa

oftsrghls.toa

olitsmapproducls.

tsBN 978-0-921 33-850-5

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