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Carbon Steel

Application Material Group

1.1 1.2 1.3


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product range, please order
a copy of our current tooling
catalogue.

For correct tool selection


and operation, please
also refer to our Product
Selector CD.

DORMER 2006
All rights reserved under the Dormer
registered trademark. Although every
effort has been made to ensure the
accuracy of the information contained
herein, no responsibility for loss or
damage occasioned to any person
acting from action as a result of any
material in this publication can be
accepted by the editors, publishers or
product manufacturers.

www.dormertools.com

Further useful technical


information can be
found in our brand
new 2005 Technical
Handbook.

Dormer Tools
Shireoaks Road
Worksop, S80 3HB
UK
T: +44 (0)1909 534700
F: +44 (0)1909 534701
dormer.uk@dormertools.com

<200

<250

Structural Steel/case carburising steel

Plain Carbon Steel

1.2

1.3

230Mo7, 050A12

060A35, 080M40,
4360-50B

080M46, 080A62

Magnetic Soft Steel

Structural Steel/case carburising steel

Plain Carbon Steel

1.1

1.2

1.3

BS

<120

Magnetic Soft Steel

1.1

Application Material Group (AMG)

Hardness
HB

Application Material Group (AMG)

SS

long

1550, 2142, 2172

USA

G10600

G10100

G12120

EN 10 025 - E295

1024, 1060, 1061

135, 30

EN

EN 10 025
- S235JRG2

Leaded Steels

middle/long

extra long

Normal Chip
Form

1312, 1412, 1914

1160

<850

<700

<400

Tensile
Strength
N/mm2

UNS

1.1191, 1.0601

1.1012, 1.1053,
1.7131

1.1015, 1.1013

Werkstoff
Number

S45C

S10C
S12C

Leaded Steels

JIS

CK45, C60

St37-2, 16MnCr5,
St50-2

Rfe60, Rfe100

DIN

Examples of Workpiece Materials - Categorisation into Application Material Groups (AMG)

General Information

Classification of workpiece materials


Application Material Groups
Introduction to Carbon Steels
Machinability of Carbon Steels
Hints when machining Carbon Steels
AMG 1.1
AMG 1.2
AMG 1.3
General Hints on Drilling
Drill Feed Chart
Drill Selection
General Hints on Tapping
Drill diameters for cutting taps
Tap Selection
General Hints on Milling
Milling parameters
Applications
Milling Feed Charts
Milling Cutters Selection
Table of cutting speeds

2
4
5
6
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
16
18
19
20
20
24
26

General Information

Contents

General Information

Application Material Groups


Application Material Groups (AMGs) are designed to
assist in the selection of the optimum cutting tool for a
particular application.
Dormer classifies materials into 10 major Application
Material Groups. Each major group is divided into subgroups on the basis of material properties, such as
hardness and strength, and chip formation. This booklet
concentrates on sub-groups 1.1 1.3 Carbon Steels.
Examples of national designations within each sub-group
are shown on page 2.
This booklet contains a selection of tools that are rated
excellent for machining Carbon Steels. Please see the
Dormer catalogue or Product Selector for the full range,
or contact your local Dormer representative or Technical
Helpdesk if you need further advice.

Carbon steels or unalloyed steels are materials made


up of iron and carbon. The percentage of carbon has
a dramatic effect on the properties of the material and
therefore on the uses for which it is suitable.
Carbon steels may be classified into 3 major groups:AMG Type of steel

% of
carbon

Properties

1.1

Magnetic soft steel


(mild steel)

Low
0.03
0.25%

Ductile and
easily cold
worked

1.2

Structural steel/
case carburising
steel

Medium
0.150.40%

Wear
resistant

1.3

Plain carbon steel

High
0.4 1.2%

Wear
resistant and
tough

General Information

Introduction to Carbon Steels

General Information

Machinability of Carbon Steels


In general terms, as the carbon level increases, the
hardness and tensile strength of the material also
increase. The low carbon grades often have very small
additions of sulphur or lead to give free machining
properties. Without the addition of these elements,
steels with carbon levels below 0.3% tend to smear the
cutting edges (built-up edge), resulting in short tool life.
Manganese is also added (up to approximately 1%) to
some grades to improve mechanical properties, but
this will reduce machinability, particularly on steels with
carbon levels over 0.3%. For information specific to each
sub-group, see pages 7 - 9.

Hints when machining Carbon Steels

These sub-groups of steel materials are extensive,


which makes it important to find out the properties of
the material to be machined. Use the Dormer Product
Selector to find the correct AMG classification, which
in turn will help you to find the correct tool for the
application.
In general, a non-alloyed or low-alloyed material
is soft and sticky. Use sharp tools with positive
geometries.
Tool steels can be hardened to various degrees.
It is important to be aware of both material grade
and hardness in order to select the correct tool
configuration for the application.
For Carbon Steels, about 0.2 0.25% Carbon
provides the best machinability. Above and
below this level, machinability is generally
lower.

Typical Composition
This group of steels is characterised by low carbon levels.
They are magnetic at ambient temperatures and are very
ductile. Typical carbon levels are below 0.25%.
Special grades are produced with additions of sulphur or
lead to promote free machining properties. Due to their
very low carbon content, these steels do not respond to
heat treatment.

Examples of uses
They are used in the manufacture of drinks cans and car
bodies, and as low duty constructional steels.

General Information

1.1
Magnetic Soft Steel
Hardness <120 HB
Tensile strength <400 N/mm2

General Information

1.2
Structural Steel / Case Carburising Steel
Hardness <200 HB
Tensile strength <700 N/mm2
Typical Composition
This group of steels is similar to 1.1, except that the
physical properties are higher, and manganese and
carbon levels are generally higher. Medium carbon steels
(eg. 0.5%) have a good balance of ductility and strength.
Within this group of steels are low carbon carburising
steels, which respond to surface hardening when heated
in carbon-rich gas.

Examples of uses
Typical applications are rails and rail products, couplings,
crankshafts, axles, bolts, rods, gears, forgings, tubes,
plates and constructional steels.

Typical Composition
This group of steels covers steels which can be heattreated. Generally, they have higher hardness and tensile
strength, compared to AMG groups 1.1 and 1.2, but
significantly less ductility.
These higher carbon steels (over 0.4% carbon) have high
resistance to wear but low ductility. On these materials,
machinability in the annealed (softened) state reduces as
carbon content increases.

Examples of uses
Typical applications are cutting tools, railway lines, razors
and wood-working tools.

General Information

1.3
Plain Carbon Steel
Hardness <250 HB
Tensile strength <850 N/mm2

General Hints on Drilling


1. Select the most appropriate drill for the application,
bearing in mind the material to be machined, the
capability of the machine tool and the coolant to be
used.
2. Flexibility within the component and machine tool
spindle can cause damage to the drill as well as the
component and machine - ensure maximum stability
at all times. This can be improved by selecting the
shortest possible drill for the application.
3. Tool holding is an important aspect of the drilling
operation and the drill cannot be allowed to slip or
move in the tool holder.
4. The use of suitable coolants and lubricants are
recommended as required by the particular drilling
operation. When using coolants and lubricants,
ensure a copious supply, especially at the drill point.
5. Swarf evacuation whilst drilling is essential in ensuring
the correct drilling procedure. Never allow the swarf to
become stationary in the flute.
6. When regrinding a drill, always makes sure that the
correct point geometry is produced and that any wear
has been removed.

10

11

F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

10

12

15

16

20

25

30

40

50

mm/rev 25%

0.094 0.172 0.250 0.325 0.400 0.533 0.800 1.000 1.100 1.175 1.200 1.200

0.068 0.124 0.180 0.220 0.260 0.317 0.430 0.550 0.700 0.700 0.700 0.740

0.056 0.103 0.150 0.180 0.210 0.250 0.330 0.420 0.480 0.533 0.550 0.580

0.049 0.089 0.130 0.150 0.170 0.200 0.260 0.330 0.380 0.418 0.430 0.450

0.038 0.069 0.100 0.115 0.130 0.153 0.200 0.250 0.280 0.310 0.320 0.340

0.026 0.048 0.070 0.080 0.090 0.107 0.140 0.170 0.200 0.223 0.230 0.240

0.030 0.110 0.180 0.202 0.225 0.260 0.330 0.390 0.420 0.450 0.460 0.520 0.560 0.580 0.605 0.63

0.028 0.101 0.165 0.186 0.208 0.240 0.305 0.360 0.385 0.419 0.430 0.485 0.525 0.545 0.568 0.588

0.026 0.092 0.150 0.170 0.190 0.220 0.280 0.330 0.350 0.388 0.400 0.450 0.490 0.510 0.53 0.545

0.024 0.084 0.135 0.152 0.170 0.197 0.250 0.298 0.315 0.349 0.360 0.405 0.445 0.465 0.485 0.503

0.021 0.076 0.119 0.134 0.150 0.173 0.220 0.265 0.280 0.310 0.320 0.360 0.400 0.420 0.44 0.46

0.020 0.066 0.102 0.116 0.130 0.150 0.190 0.228 0.243 0.271 0.280 0.320 0.355 0.375 0.398 0.418

0.019 0.056 0.084 0.096 0.109 0.126 0.160 0.190 0.205 0.231 0.240 0.280 0.310 0.330 0.355 0.375

0.018 0.050 0.073 0.084 0.095 0.109 0.138 0.165 0.178 0.202 0.210 0.248 0.275 0.295 0.32 0.343

[mm]

1.1
1.2
1.3

Excellent
Good

A022 A520

R022

R520

0.50
- 16.00

3.0
- 13.0

3.0
- 17/32

3.0
- 16.5

35K
32K
25I

57M
47M
40K

75V
65V
65V

100X
90X
90X

12

A002

A510

A553

A554

R002

1.0 - 16.0 3.0 - 14.0 5.0 - 20.0 5.0 - 30.0 3.0 - 14.0

47J
40J
35F

57M
47M
40K

85L
70L
60L

85L
70L
60L

75U
65U
65U

13

R510

R553

3.0
5.0 - 20.0
- 14.25

100W
90W
90W

150V
135V
135U

R570

3.00
- 5/8

135V
120V
110U

1.1
1.2
1.3

General Hints on Tapping


1.

Select the correct design of tap for the component


material and type of hole, i.e. through or blind, from
the Application Material Groups chart.

2.

Ensure the component is securely clamped - lateral


movement may cause tap breakage or poor quality
threads.

3.

Select the correct size of drill (see opposite). Always


ensure that work hardening of the component
material is kept to a minimum.

4.

Select the correct cutting speed as shown in the


tap selection pages, the catalogue or the Product
Selector.

5.

Use appropriate cutting fluid for correct application.

6.

In NC applications ensure that the feed value


chosen for the program is correct. When using a
tapping attachment, 95% to 97% of the pitch is
recommended to allow the tap to generate its own
pitch.

7.

Where possible, hold the tap in a good quality torque


limiting tapping attachment, which ensures free
axial movement of the tap and presents it squarely
to the hole. It also protects the tap from breakage if
accidentally bottomed in a blind hole.

8.

Ensure smooth entry of the tap into the hole, as an


uneven feed may cause bell mouthing.

14

Drill Diameters for Cutting Taps Recommendation tables


METRIC COARSE THREAD

M
1.6
1.8
2
2.2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
27
30

Pitch
mm
0.35
0.35
0.4
0.45
0.45
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.75
0.8
1
1
1.25
1.25
1.5
1.5
1.75
2
2
2.5
2.5
2.5
3
3
3.5

Max.
Internal
Diam.
mm
1.321
1.521
1.679
1.833
2.138
2.599
3.010
3.422
3.878
4.334
5.153
6.153
6.912
7.912
8.676
9.676
10.441
12.210
14.210
15.744
17.744
19.744
21.252
24.252
26.771

DRILL

DRILL

Diam.
mm
1.25
1.45
1.6
1.75
2.05
2.5
2.9
3.3
3.8
4.2
5
6
6.8
7.8
8.5
9.5
10.3
12
14
15.5
17.5
19.5
21
24
26.5

Diam.
inch
3/64
54
1/16
50
46
40
33
30
27
19
9
15/64
H
5/16
Q
3/8
Y
15/32
35/64
39/64
11/16
49/64
53/64
61/64
1.3/64

METRIC COARSE THREAD


FOR ADX/CDX
TAP
M

Pitch
mm

DRILL
Diameter
mm

4
5
6
8
10
12
14
16

0.70
0.80
1.00
1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.00

3.40
4.30
5.10
6.90
8.70
10.40
12.25
14.25

Drill diameter can be


calculated from:

D = Dnom- P
D = Drill diameter (mm)
Dnom = Tap nominal
diameter (mm)
P = Tap pitch (mm)

RECOMMENDED DIAMETERS WHEN


USING DORMER ADX AND CDX DRILLS
The above table for drill diameters refer to
ordinary standard drills. Modern drills such
as Dormer ADX and CDX produce a smaller
and more accurate hole which makes it
necessary to increase the diameter of the
drill in order to avoid breakage of the tap.
Please see the small table to the left.

15

DIN

Other thread forms available. Please see Dormer catalogue.

E348 E349 E206 E257 E375 E376 E350 E351 E213

M3
- M10
1.1
1.2
1.3

M12
- M30

25
25
22
22
18
18
Excellent
Good

M3
- M10
40
40
32

M4
- M30
40
40
32

M6
- M10
40
40
32

16

M12
- M20
40
40
32

M3
- M10
25
22
18

M12
- M30
25
22
18

M3
- M10
40
40
32

ISO
E264 E460 E461 E402

E001 E003 E049 E050 E051

M12
- M30

M3
- M24

40
40
32

M6
- M10
40
40
32

M12
- M20
40
40
32

M3
- M30
30
30
25

25
22
18

17

M3
- M24
25
22
18

M3
- M20
40
40
32

M3
- M20
25
22
18

M6
- M20
40
40
32

1.1
1.2
1.3

General Hints on Milling


1.

Where possible, use climb milling (down milling)


for longer tool life. Climb milling allows easier chip
disposal, less wear, improved surface finish and
lower power requirements compared to conventional
milling (up milling).

2.

Always use a cutter in good condition.

3.

Use well-maintained machine tools with sufficient


power.

4.

Use correct clamping system according to working


operation and type of tool.

5.

Check for damage or wear on the tool shank or in the


holder itself.

6.

Use the shortest cutters recommended for your


application and work as close to the machine head
as possible.

7.

For optimum productivity, use coated or Solid


Carbide cutters.

18

Milling parameters
1.

Identify the type of end milling to be carried out


- type of end mill
- type of centre

2.

Consider the condition and the age of the machine


tool.

3.

Select the best end mill dimensions in order to


minimize the deflection and bending stress
- the highest rigidity
- the largest mill diameter
- avoid excessive overhand of the tool from the tool
holder.

4.

Choose the number of flutes


- more flutes - decreased space for chips increased rigidity - allows faster table feed
- less flutes - increased space for chips decreased rigidity - easy chip ejection.

5.

Determining the correct cutting speed and feed rate


can only be done when the following factors are
known:
- type of material to be machined
- end mill material
- power available at the spindle
- type of finish.

19

Application
Slotting

Roughing

Ball nose

Finishing

For details on how to use the feed charts in the tables


which follow, please see below.

20

21

1,5D
0,1D

1,5D
0,25D

D
0,8D

0,5D
D

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

25

28

30

32

36

40

0,010 0,015 0,023 0,029 0,039 0,051 0,071 0,086 0,100 0,114 0,129 0,143 0,113 0,129 0,107 0,114 0,122 0,137 0,133

0,009 0,014 0,021 0,026 0,035 0,046 0,064 0,077 0,090 0,103 0,116 0,129 0,102 0,116 0,096 0,103 0,110 0,123 0,120

0,007 0,011 0,016 0,021 0,028 0,037 0,051 0,062 0,072 0,082 0,093 0,103 0,081 0,093 0,077 0,082 0,087 0,099 0,096

0,008 0,012 0,018 0,023 0,031 0,041 0,057 0,069 0,080 0,091 0,103 0,114 0,090 0,103 0,085 0,091 0,097 0,110 0,107

0,023 0,031 0,032 0,039 0,045 0,051 0,058 0,064 0,064 0,049 0,048 0,049 0,048 0,050 0,051

0,026 0,034 0,036 0,043 0,050 0,057 0,064 0,071 0,071 0,054 0,053 0,054 0,053 0,056 0,057

0,004 0,007 0,012 0,015 0,022 0,026 0,039 0,054 0,065 0,076 0,086 0,087 0,086 0,089 0,095 0,098 0,097 0,095 0,097 0,097

0,004 0,008 0,013 0,017 0,024 0,029 0,043 0,060 0,072 0,084 0,096 0,097 0,096 0,099 0,105 0,109 0,108 0,106 0,108 0,108

mm
mm/z 25%

22

3-4

0,5
1

2-3

1
0,5

0,5
1

1
0,5

1,5
0,1

3-4

3-4

1,5
0,05

>4

A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

0.002

0.003

0.002

0.001

0.6

0.001

0.001

>0,5

0.004

0.003

0.002

0.8

0.004

0.003
0.009

0.007

0.005

0.005

0.003

0.002

0.004

0.017

0.013

0.009

0.010

0.008

0.005

0.030

0.015
0.003

0.030

0.020

0.015

0.010

0.002

0.001

S150, S302, S308, S250

0.025

0.020

0.013

0.015

0.012

0.008

0.040

0.040

0.030

0.033

0.025

0.017

0.020

0.015

0.010

0.055

0.055

0.040

0.035

0.040

0.030

0.020

0.025

0.020

0.013

0.085

0.065

0.040

0.045

0.035

0.023

0.040

0.030

0.020

0.100

0.075

0.050

0.075

0.045

0.050

0.065

0.020

0.045

0.015

mm
mm/z 25%
10

0.055

0.065

0.050

0.035

0.050

0.040

0.027

0.120

0.090

0.060

0.090

0.060

0.025

12

0.065

0.080

0.060

0.040

0.065

0.050

0.035

0.140

0.110

0.075

0.110

0.075

0.030

14

0.080

0.090

0.070

0.050

0.080

0.060

0.040

0.150

0.120

0.080

0.120

0.080

0.035

16

0.090

0.105

0.080

0.055

0.090

0.070

0.050

0.170

0.130

0.090

0.130

0.090

0.040

18

0.100

0.120

0.090

0.060

0.105

0.080

0.055

0.200

0.150

0.100

0.150

0.100

0.050

20

0.110

0.130

0.100

0.070

0.120

0.090

0.060

0.220

0.170

0.120

0.170

0.110

0.060

23

1,5
0,1

1,5
0,25

0,5
1

1
1

3-4

3-4

2-3

2-3

A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C

0.015

0.010

0.007

0.005

0.004

0.002

0.007

0.009

0.006

0.004

0.008

0.007

0.005

0.006

0.020

0.013

0.018

0.025

0.012

0.022

0.016

0.019

0.015

0.012

S022, S033
4

0.010

0.009

0.006

0.012

0.011

0.009

0.030

0.027

0.023

0.038

0.034

0.028

0.014

0.013

0.007

0.017

0.016

0.013

0.038

0.034

0.028

0.047

0.042

0.036

0.016

0.015

0.011

0.021

0.019

0.016

0.051

0.046

0.038

0.063

0.057

0.048

0.025

0.023

0.013

0.031

0.029

0.024

0.051

0.046

0.038

0.063

0.057

0.048

10

0.034

0.032

0.019

0.043

0.040

0.033

0.070

0.063

0.053

0.088

0.079

0.070

mm
mm/z 25%

12

0.041

0.038

0.027

0.051

0.048

0.040

0.084

0.076

0.064

0.106

0.094

0.080

14

0.048

0.045

0.032

0.060

0.056

0.046

0.099

0.088

0.075

0.123

0.110

0.090

16

0.055

0.051

0.037

0.068

0.064

0.053

0.113

0.100

0.085

0.141

0.126

0.107

20

0.055

0.051

0.042

0.068

0.064

0.053

0.141

0.125

0.107

0.176

0.155

0.134

C126

C167

C502

C414

C246

C908

C929

z2

z2

z2

z4-5

z4-6

z4-6

z4-6

1.0 - 30.0 6.0 - 16.0 6.0 - 16.0 6.0 - 30.0 2.0 - 32.0 6.0 - 40.0 6.0 - 30.0
1.1
1.2
1.3

az

133A
106A
93B

1.1

Excellent
Good

50A
40A
35B

50S
40S
35T

100G
80G
70H

24

121S
96S
84T

1.1

93H

1.1

121M
96M
84N

1.1

S150

S022

S033

S302

S308

S250

z2

z2

z3

z3

z3

z4

0.4 - 1.0 2.0 - 20.0 2.0 - 20.0 2.0 - 20.0


180B
180B
150B

140B
140B
115B

140B
140B
115B

200B
200B
130B

25

10.0
- 20.0
153B
153B
100B

3.0 - 20.0
260B
220B
175B

1.1
1.2
1.3

az

26

mm
1,00
1,50
2,00
2,50
3,00
3,18
3,50
4,00
4,50
4,76
5,00
6,00
6,35
7,00
7,94
8,00
9,00
9,53
10,00

3/
8

5/
16

1/
4

3/
16

1/
8

inch

Tool
Diameter

Metres/Min.
Feet/Min.

2546
1698
1273
1019
849
801
728
637
566
535
509
424
401
364
321
318
283
267
255

26

16

1592
1061
796
637
531
500
455
398
354
334
318
265
251
227
200
199
177
167
159

3138
2122
1592
1273
1061
1001
909
796
707
669
637
531
501
455
401
398
354
334
318

32

10

4775
3183
2387
1910
1592
1501
1364
1194
1061
1003
955
796
752
682
601
597
531
501
477

50

15

6366
4244
3183
2546
2122
2002
1819
1592
1415
1337
1273
1061
1003
909
802
796
707
668
637

66

20
98

30

40
130

50
165

60
197

9549
6366
4775
3820
3183
3003
2728
2387
2122
2006
1910
1592
1504
1364
1203
1194
1061
1002
955

12732
8488
6366
5093
4244
4004
3638
3183
2829
2675
2546
2122
2005
1819
1604
1592
1415
1336
1273

15916
10610
7958
6366
5305
5005
4547
3979
3537
3344
3183
2653
2506
2274
2004
1989
1768
1670
1592

19099
12732
9549
7639
6366
6006
5457
4775
4244
4012
3820
3183
3008
2728
2405
2387
2122
2004
1910

70
230

22282
14854
11141
8913
7427
7007
6366
5570
4951
4681
4456
3714
3509
3183
2806
2785
2476
2338
2228

REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE (RPM)


7958
5305
3979
3183
2653
2502
2274
1989
1768
1672
1592
1326
1253
1137
1002
995
884
835
796

82

25

PERIPHERAL CUTTING SPEED

Table of Cutting Speeds, <10mm


80

25465
16977
12732
10186
8488
8008
7176
6366
5659
5350
5093
4244
4010
3638
3207
3183
2829
2672
2546

262

28648
19099
14324
11459
9549
9009
8185
7162
6366
6018
5730
4775
4511
4093
3608
3581
3183
3006
2865

296

90

31831
21221
15916
12732
10610
10010
9095
7958
7074
6687
6366
5305
5013
4547
4009
3979
3537
3340
3183

330

100

35014
23343
17507
14006
11671
11011
10004
8754
7781
7356
7003
5836
5514
5002
4410
4377
3890
3674
3501

362

110

47747
31831
23873
19099
15916
15015
13642
11937
10610
10031
9549
7958
7519
6821
6013
5968
5305
5010
4775

495

150

General Information

27

mm
11,11
12,00
12,70
14,00
14,29
15,00
15,88
16,00
17,46
18,00
19,05
20,00
24,00
25,00
27,00
30,00
32,00
36,00
40,00
50,00

3/
4

11/
16

5/
8

9/
16

1/
2

7/
16

inch

Tool
Diameter

Metres/Min.
Feet/Min.

229
212
201
182
178
170
160
159
146
141
134
127
106
102
94
85
80
71
64
51

26

16

143
133
125
114
111
106
100
99
91
88
84
80
66
64
59
53
50
44
40
32

287
265
251
227
223
212
200
199
182
177
167
159
133
127
118
106
99
88
80
64

32

10

430
398
376
341
334
318
301
298
273
265
251
239
199
191
177
159
149
133
119
95

50

15

573
531
501
455
446
424
401
398
365
354
334
318
265
255
236
212
199
177
159
127

66

20

716
663
627
568
557
531
501
497
456
442
418
398
332
318
295
265
249
221
199
159

82

25

40
130

50
165

60
197

860
796
752
682
668
637
601
597
547
531
501
477
398
382
354
318
298
265
239
191

1146
1061
1003
909
891
849
802
796
729
707
668
637
531
509
472
424
398
354
318
255

1433
1326
1253
1137
1114
1061
1002
995
912
884
835
796
663
637
589
531
497
442
398
318

1719
1592
1504
1364
1337
1273
1203
1194
1094
1061
1003
955
796
764
707
637
597
531
477
382

REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE (RPM)

98

30

PERIPHERAL CUTTING SPEED

Table of Cutting Speeds, >10mm


70

2006
1857
1754
1592
1559
1485
1403
1393
1276
1238
1170
1114
928
891
825
743
696
619
557
446

230

80

90

2579
2387
2256
2046
2005
1910
1804
1790
1641
1592
1504
1432
1194
1146
1061
955
895
796
716
573

296

2865
2653
2506
2274
2228
2122
2004
1989
1823
1768
1671
1592
1326
1273
1179
1061
995
884
796
637

330

100

110

3152
2918
2757
2501
2450
2334
2205
2188
2005
1945
1838
1751
1459
1401
1297
1167
1094
973
875
700

362

4298
3979
3760
3410
3341
3183
3007
2984
2735
2653
2506
2387
1989
1910
1768
1592
1492
1326
1194
955

495

150

General Information

2292
2122
2005
1819
1782
1698
1604
1592
1458
1415
1337
1273
1061
1019
943
849
796
707
637
509

262