The swath of land between

Colorado Boulevard and Claremont
streets, and between 9th and 11th
Avenues - known to its neighbors
simply as 9th and Colorado - has been
a sort of island that people have large-
ly driven around. All that may change
in the coming years, with redevelop-
ment plans now set for the site.
Comprising roughly 30 acres,
Shea Homes has been working with
the Colorado Boulevard Healthcare
District, local community groups, and
city planners to develop a concept for
the site. In February, they released a
general development plan that would
see the location transformed into “a
true mixed-use development, com-
prising commercial, residential, and
retail, integrated on almost every
block,” according to spokesman
Marcus Pachner.
“It’s taken multiple years, work-
ing with the community to develop
this master plan,” Pachner explains.
“Surrounded by six strong neighbor-
hoods, it’s always been an island that
people simply drove around. The
challenge has been to make the neigh-
borhood permeable, and to do that,
we’ve re-established the street grid.
Albion Street will now go through
from 9th to 11th, and the whole proj-
ect will have a very urban format.”
“We’re also saving a number of
buildings on the site, and through
adaptive reuse they’ll retain a smaller
footprint, which lends itself to small,
local retailers.”
One of the biggest concerns of the
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With News of the Heart of Denver
Hilltop • Belcaro • Bonnie Brae • Glendale • Country Club • Cherry Creek
Volume 8 Issue 5 May 16, 2008
P
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3
5
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Lowry News
p. 22
The Cherry Creek News
& central denver dispatch
*
*
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see CARBON REDUCTIONon page 7
9th and Colorado set for
transformation
by the Cherry Creek News
Lowry’s Hangar No. 2
reclaimed with new vision
surrounding community has been sav-
ing some of the area’s local landmarks
- particularly the Nurses’ Dormitory, a
large brick building located centrally
on the site - along with the quad-
rangle and the Bridge, which many
view as the site’s main feature. Each
of these would be preserved under
the current plan - and the bridge
itself could be transformed into a resi-
dential structure. For these reasons,
the plan has already received support
from Historic Denver.
The critical care tower and VA
Hospital would remain at the site.
“9th Avenue is the border
between two Council districts,”
laughs Pachner, “so I’ve been jok-
ing with Councilwoman Robb and
Councilwoman Johnson about whose
district these folks will actually live
in.”
The project is currently before a
number of city agencies, who will be
commenting on the plan and evaluat-
ing it for everything from sanitation,
density, and design to traffic, parking,
and impact. It will also receive com-
ments from the Colorado Boulevard
Healthcare District at a meeting on
May 1st. After that, the development
moves forward to rezoning, and with
title transferring to Shea on January
1st, Shea is hoping to begin work
immediately afterwards.
As yet, the project remains
unnamed - but if you’d like to take a
stab at it, Shea is invited suggestions
on their project website, sheaneigh-
bors.com.
With an overflowing City Council cham-
ber, two measures to re-zone Denver neigh-
borhoods for only single-family homes ended
their nearly two-year odyssey. With the pace
of scrape-offs increasing on what seems to be
a weekly basis, the Denver City Council began
two public hearings to consider whether to
keep two areas of West Highland and Sloan’s
Lake predominantly single family, or to allow
scrape-offs for the construction of duplexes
and triplexes. The import of the re-zonings
went well beyond two neighborhoods. The
core questions was whether the city would
act to protect neighborhoods as envisioned
by the city’s master plan, Blueprint Denver.
The public hearings began at 6:30 P.M. and
concluded at 2:15 in the morning. When the
council finally passed both measures by 11-2
margins, the clock had struck 3:15 A.M.
The 11-2 margin was misleading. A legal
protest meant that the council had to pass
the re-zonings with ten votes, and with two
staunch opponents, Councilwoman Jeanne
Faatz and Councilman Charlie Brown, the
opponents had only to garner two votes to
scuttle the proposals. With tough questions
from the council as a whole, and significant
discomfort with the process and the potential-
ly adverse impacts upon some property own-
ers, as the evening stretched beyond midnight
into the early morning, tension mounted and
the outcome was in doubt.
The passage means fewer scrape-offs in
two limited areas of North Denver. The vote
was a repudiation of the Planning Board that
overwhelmingly rejected the rezonings, and
that many critics see as tilted in favor of devel-
opers who are less-than-committed to the con-
cept of neighborhood stability at the core of
Blueprint Denver. For neighborhoods across
the city that have been working on small area
plans, the rezonings represent a victory, and
a renewed commitment to Blueprint Denver
by the City Council. The rezonings presage a
fight over a massive zoning plan update effort
that will likely have similar impacts across
Denver. And not insignificantly, the passages
are a bittersweet victory for North Denver’s
councilman Rick Garcia, who has been at the
center of a storm over scrape-offs and the
city’s response for three years.
Initially, in private, Garcia had rejected
the mandatory rezonings in principal, hold-
ing that the change in development rights of
individual property owners was too great a
burden. But Garcia agonized over the changes
that neighbors were facing, particularly on
blocks where multiple scrapeoffs were trans-
forming the essential character of the area,
subjecting neighbors to impacts and lessen-
ing the salability of their own properties.
Garcia was working hard on a compromise
solution to the very end, pushing proponents
Rezonings set stage for
Zoning code update battles
Inside the
Cherry Creek
News &
CeNtral DeNver
DispatCh
• Teach for America
in DPS page 7
• Mommie Diaries page 18
•Improving our Financial IQ
page 17
• Humanitarian Tsunami page
14
• Jaida’s gift page 21
After a
c ont ent i ous
r e d e v e l o p -
ment proposal
was scuttled
last year that
would have
seen Lowry’s
h i s t o r i c
Hangar No.
2 radically
transformed,
a second plan
is now being
proposed by
development
group IRG that will see retail, self-
storage, and office space integrated
into the current structure under an
adaptive re-use model.
The sale of the hangar had been bro-
kered by the Lowry Redevelopment
Authority (LRA) on behalf of the
Wings over the Rockies Museum,
who believed that they needed the
sale of the building in order to take
on new improvement projects and
exhibits, and remove liabilities, both
HANGAR 2 PROPOSED SITE PLAN
Cherry Creek News & Central denver dispatCh
Last month we observed some
of the key problems besetting the
nation’s financial sector. In the past
four weeks, things have continued to
worsen, as banks, hedge funds and
trading companies have deleveraged.
But things have gotten even worse
in our “foundation” - the energy sec-
tor that powers our cars, heats our
homes, and motivates our manufac-
turing.
Oil prices have hit record his-
toric, inflation-adjusted highs, and
gasoline is well above three dollars
a gallon nationwide. Many readers
of our pages know of “peak oil,” the
concept that global oil production
would “peak” and thereafter decline.
That notion is one founded in geol-
ogy, not economics or wishful think-
ing. Evidence abounds that we have
reached some sort of peak “plateau,”
with oil production hovering in 84-86
million barrels of oil produced. That
flat supply is one part of the story
of high oil prices, but it isn’t the sole
cause.
For a moment, let us call the ever
tighter supply of oil (tighter because
demand grows, particularly in India
and China, while European demand
slightly shrinks, and American con-
sumption is relatively flat) the “funda-
mental” reason for higher prices. But
fundamentals don’t explain the whole
picture -- it costs Saudi producers as
little as $6 to get a barrel out of the
ground. Analysts say the demand/
supply picture should account for $80
barrels of oil, not $110. Why the 25%
premium? Part of the story is specula-
tion. Stocks, as an asset class (a basket
of investments), are essentially flat
over a ten year period. When the Wall
Street Journal reported in March that
the S&P 500 was in a decade-long
holding pattern, many took note. But
savvy big investors have watched
stocks with long-term concern and
switched much of their money into
commodities, notably oil. The fancy
name for that is asset class rotation,
but the simple result is that more buy-
ers for oil in the commodities futures
pit mean higher prices paid by you at
the pump.
The second issue is inflation, which
folks, notably the Federal Reserve,
will tell you is in check. But in fact,
the Fed has been printing money at a
breakneck pace. More money means
higher prices for everything valued
in dollars. Monetary policy is mak-
ing the price of oil higher by the day.
Observer Peter McKenzie says the Fed
has been creating money at the rate
of 17% a year, an astonishing growth
rate. McKenzie and others argue that
the Fed reinflated the economy after
the tech stock crash, 9-11, and now the
housing crash by pumping vast sums
into the economy -- now the chickens
return, with higher prices at the pump
and at the supermarket.
Price, however, isn’t the whole of
the energy nightmare.
In late 2007, Saudi production was
8 percent lower than the peak level
reached in 2005, despite the fact that
oil prices had risen roughly $20 per
barrel since then, according to the
Worldwatch Institute. This means that
Saudi Arabia is no longer a swing
producer — one that has the ability to
change the price by altering its out-
put. That doesn’t mean that American
energy policy isn’t still based upon
begging the Saudis to increase pro-
May 16, 2008 Page 2
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The Origins of Economic Distress:
Apex and Foundation
duction to curb pricing, despite the
evidence that it won’t, and can’t, have
any apparent effect.
And big oil companies are going
out of business. That’s right, they are
self-liquidating, even with gargantuan
profits. Exxon Mobil is buying back at
an astounding rate, Exxon spent 60%,
or $29 billion, of its cash flow, buy-
ing its own stock in 2006, more than
any other company in the Standard
& Poor’s 500. It has eliminated 16%
of its shares in the past five years.
Big oil, together, have spent $52.4 bil-
lion in stock buy-backs in the past
year. The industry isn’t spending that
money looking for new sources of
oil— largely because it doesn’t think
it will find much. Matthew Simmons,
an energy investment banker who has
made millions for oil companies, told
CNBC viewers that the sector is in liq-
uidation, slowly but inevitably going
out of business. Simmons isn’t alone.
Bloomberg reports: “Investor-owned
oil companies -- along with govern-
ment-owned producers outside the
Organization of Petroleum Exporting
Countries -- are only a few years away
from going into decline. By 2011 or
so, these companies, including Royal
Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc in the U.K.,
France’s Total SA, and ConocoPhillips
in the U.S., will no longer be able to
increase their production, says Charles
Maxwell, an analyst at Weeden & Co.
By 2014, their output will begin a long
decline, says Maxwell, who has been
involved in the industry for 50 years,
mostly as an analyst. “They’ll be in
liquidation,” he says.
The long and short of it? The big
companies that have provided the
vast majority of our energy aren’t
going to be doing so in the forseeable
future. The world we know as energy
consumers will soon be very, very dif-
ferent. And there are few crystal balls
for seeing the future accurately.
So what can you do?
Conserve, conserve, conserve. At a
basic level, recycle, reuse, and attempt
to reduce your daily energy consump-
tion. That’s tough if you drive a big
SUV miles to work every day, but
recognise that $9-$10 a gallon gas,
the current price levels in Europe, are
coming your way.
If you are an investor, get active.
Demand the companies improve their
financial returns by creating efficien-
cies. And while renewable energy
stocks - companies in solar and wind
power - are currently overvalued,
investing in them in the long run will
help your nation immeasurably.
Encourage politicians to support
sane monetary and fiscal policy—
driving real interest rates to zero may
be counterproductive for the majority
of America households. Concurrently,
we must balance the federal budget
very soon. Our national indebtedness
is driving the dollar down, and reduc-
ing our ability to be economically
flexible. Call your Congressperson,
and demand they articulate an energy
policy that incorporates the reality
of monetary and fiscal policy. They
might want to address global warm-
ing, too. America needs a vocal con-
stituency for a reality-based energy
policy today. We can’t wait for tomor-
row.
Get informed. The complicated
issues that interrelate finance and
energy are not rocket science, but they
require some effort to understand.
But if you’re not informed, you proba-
bly won’t see the bus until it hits you.
The consequences for your children
are worse yet...
More on Energy and the Economy at
thecherrycreeknews.com.
—Guerin Lee Green
The Cherry Creek News
Cherry Creek News & Central denver dispatCh
May 16, 2008 Page 3
Every Sunday 3pm - 6pm
June 1st - August 24th
Every Sunday 3pm - 6pm
June 1st - August 24th
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George
Washinton
takes fifth in
national
court contest
The George Washington High
School mock trial team this weekend
took fifth place out of 44 teams at
the National High School Mock Trials
Championship in Wilmington, Del. It
was the first time a Denver Public
Schools team ever competed at nation-
als.
The GWHS team went to nation-
als because they won the state title
in March, after competing against 22
other teams from across Colorado at
the 23rd Colorado Bar Association
High School Mock Trial Tournament,
held in Fort Collins at the Larimer
County Court House.
“The team did really well, espe-
cially considering they were still in
their IP finals last week while most
of the other teams had arrived a cou-
ple days earlier for scrimmages,” said
Carolyn Gravit, director of Public Legal
Education for the team’s sponsor, the
Colorado Bar Association. “Since this
was the team’s first year at nationals,
we were extremely excited that our
Denver team did so well.”
The eight-student team from George
Washington High School missed prom
to face off on Saturday against 44
other teams from the United States,
Commonwealth of the Marianna
Islands, Guam and South Korea. The
team has been building momentum
since this year’s seniors were fresh-
men.
“We showed up in Delaware late
Thursday night, went to dinner and
then worked until 4 a.m.,” said GWHS
senior Conner Phillips. “Then we
waged evidentiary war for two days
against students from Maine to South
Korea.”
This year’s mock case was a corpo-
rate law case that involved a Fortune
500 company. Students worked as law-
yers and witnesses, debating a hos-
tile takeover of a Delaware corpora-
tion by another company. National
teams were ranked by real judges for
the ways they each handled the same
mock court case. Judges surveyed the
high school teams for their courtroom
abilities and legal prowess.
At mock trial competitions, teams
prepare for both sides of the case and
don’t find out which side they will
take until they step into the court-
room. Students perform all roles. They
are judged on how well they know
the case, question witnesses, advo-
cate their side of the case, make and
respond to objections, as well as how
well witnesses play their roles, and
dramatic speaking and persuasive
argument skills.
The 25th annual champion-
ship awards were presented by
the Honorable Ruth Ann Minner,
Governor of the State of Delaware
and the Honorable Myron T. Steele,
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
of Delaware. “High school students
who participate in the CBA mock trial
program are given a rare opportu-
nity to learn about the substance and
the processes of the law, and to have
their performances critiqued by expe-
rienced trial lawyers and judges,” said
Administrative Law Judge David P.
Cain.
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Cherry Creek News & Central denver dispatCh Page 4 May 16, 2008
At the first sign of spring, my
neighbors are out in their yards,
aerating, fertilizing, and planting
lovely flowers. At the first sign of
spring, I am out in my hammock,
eating, drinking and reading trashy
novels. Don’t get me wrong. I love
yard work. I could watch you do
it all day. But my philosophy is,
yard work is hard work, and while
hard work hasn’t
killed anyone yet,
I’d hate to be the first
casualty. Why take such an unnec-
essary risk when I can spread the
wealth and stimulate the economy
simply by hiring a lawn service?
It’s worked well for me in past
summers. Once a week, three guys
with mowers and weed whackers
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More Teresa
Keegan online at
thecherrycreeknews.com
toil in my yard for a half hour and
it’s done. They make money. I avoid
dirt, sweat, bee stings and visits
from code enforcement.
But this year is different. The
economy is tanking. Recession
looms. My disposable income fat-
tens oil company prof-
its. There is no cash for
lattes, massages or a
weekly lawn service. I
must bite the bullet and
do the job myself. One
problem: I lack equip-
ment, knowledge and
talent in this area. The
only thing I’ve ever
successfully grown is a
credit card balance. Left
to my own devices, I
despoil green living
things. It’s happened
before. What to do? Seek
advice from people wise
in the mysterious ways
of yard maintenance.
So I paid a visit to
the local big-box garden
store and was amazed
at the throngs of people
filling their carts with
plants, trees, shrubs,
fountains and all man-
ner of rocks, bricks and
paving stones. I had no
idea so much could be
done with one’s outdoor
space. I approached a
salesman and explained
my predicament: can’t
afford yard help, no tools
of my own. He point-
ed out the equipment I
would need just for start-
ers: mower, edger, weed
trimmer and spreader.
Next, hand tools: rake,
hoe, spade, shovel,
pruning saw. I priced all
these items and shook
my head in dismay. He
explained that properly
grooming lush green
grass involves pesti-
cides, herbicides and
plenty of water. I freely
confessed I could sacri-
fice a virgin on my front
lawn and it would still
wither and die within
hours. He agreed that
lawn care in our semi-arid climate
is a challenge. Perhaps, I told him,
rather than spend a small fortune
on equipment, with no guarantee
of success, I should just plant dollar
bills in my yard. At least it would
be green.
The salesman suggested I give
up on grass and try Xeriscape
instead. That way, I could improve
my outdoor area and eliminate
water waste by the judicious use
of stone or brick walkways and
wooden decks or patios instead
of turf. I could plant groundcover
and drought-hardy plants. I could
place fences, trellises and gazebos at
strategic locations and add colorful
landscaping rocks, thereby beau-
tifying my yard while still being
environmentally conscientious. Yes,
I told him, I could do that, but for
the price of all that material, I could
scrape off my house and rebuild it.
The salesman agreed that this alter-
native too would be expensive.
Discouraged, I left the store,
went home and surveyed my yard,
trying to come up with my own
much cheaper version of a low-
maintenance landscape. Perhaps I
could splatter red paint over part
of the yard, put up yellow tape and
call it a crime scene. Can’t mow,
mustn’t contaminate the evidence.
Or I could dig a big hole, visit my
butcher and pick up some bones,
scatter them in and around the hole,
and now it’s an archeological site.
Dig in progress. Do not disturb.
I might just visit a junkyard and
haul off a door-less refrigerator or
rusted bed springs and turn them
into planters. Maybe spray-paint
my overgrown hedge and call it a
mural. The possibilities are endless.
—Teresa Keegan

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May 16, 2008 Page 5
continued from page ONE
Hangar, cont.
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The venerable Gates Tennis Center
has undergone a much needed update
and renovation after more than 30 years
of serving Denver’s tennis players. In
celebration of the occasion, Denver
Mayor John Hickenlooper will play
mixed doubles with Joan Birkland,
one of the greatest female athletes
in Colorado history and founder of
Colorado Sportswoman of the Year.
Junior players from the Center will
challenge the pair.
The dedication of the updated
Center and new clubhouse - the Joan
Birkland Pavilion - will take place on
Wednesday, May 14 from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
at 3300 E. Bayaud Ave. across from the
Cherry Creek Shopping Center. The
tennis match will follow a presentation
at 6:15 p.m.
The Mayor and Birkland will be
joined by District 10 Councilwoman
Jeanne Robb, representatives from the
United States Tennis Association, proj-
ect partners, donors and more than 200
invited guests.
The Gates Tennis Center was gifted
to the citizens of Denver by the late
Charles C. Gates in hopes of provid-
ing the absolute highest quality public
tennis facility for people of all ages,
abilities and backgrounds. In order
to ensure its long-term sustainability,
Gates arranged for the Center to be
managed by The Park People, a pri-
vate, non-profit dedicated to Denver’s
parks and recreational amenities.
Through this model, the Center has
run for 33 years with virtually no city
funds.
Gate Tennis rennovations
unveiled
necessary to keep the museum sol-
vent. Redevelopment plans for the
site were stopped, however, when
vigorous community opposition ral-
lied against the move, and Denver’s
Landmark Commission refused to
drop the site’s historical designation
and protection.
“It’s dramatically different,” says
Councilwoman Marcia Johnson,
speaking of the new proposal. “When
they got sent back to the drawing
board, they really took it seriously.
I think it should be a great added
amenity for the people living there -
and I’m also happy that Wings feels
it meets their needs for economic
sustainability. And, it isn’t going to
impact the parking situation dramati-
cally.”
According to a Project Summary
released by the Buchanan
Yonushewski Group, “It is the devel-
oper’s intent to create a mixed-use
development within the hangar as
well as provide certain site improve-
ments. The simplicity of the new uses
to be contained within the hangar
will allow the majority of the exist-
ing hangar structure to remain as is
thereby preserving its historic char-
acter within the community. The site
will be rezoned to a PUD to accom-
modate the proposed uses. The proj-
ect will consist of three primary uses:
retail, self-storage and office.”
Besides the large, grey, convex
roof, Hangar No. 2 features two large
brick buildings - known as “wing”
buildings on either side of the main
hangar. The goal is to create a new
shopping and dining experience, uti-
lizing these buildings while building
new storage space and access road
on the interior of the huge hangar
structure itself.
The existing southern wing build-
ing will be adapted to house approxi-
mately 22,500 square feet of retail
space that will extend into the hangar
proper. It is anticipated that the proj-
ect will house 10 to 12 new businesses.
The existing second floor of the wing
building will be removed to provide
dramatic ceiling heights for the retail
areas. A new “street” is planned, run-
ning parallel to the wing building for
the full length (over 300 feet) of the
hangar, and it will be designed to cre-
ate an outdoor experience for patrons
- complete with dining patios, street
furniture, decorative paving, street
lighting, and appropriate landscap-
ing. The south façade of the wing
building will be renovated to provide
a retail character while maintaining
its historic context with the hangar.
The retail will be owned and oper-
ated by Larimer Square Management
Corp, one of Denver’s premier retail
operators.
The interior of the hangar will be
utilized to create over 260,000 square
feet of 4-story, air-conditioned self-
storage. The facility will allow cus-
tomers to drive into the hangar and
load/unload their storage items in a
covered, conditioned environment.
This facility will provide Lowry resi-
dents with a convenient, central loca-
tion for their storage needs.
The northern wing building will
be adapted to house approximate-
ly 9,000 square feet of small office
tenant space, or other retail uses.
Convenient parking will be provided
to the west of the hangar.
In addition to the above uses, the
site will be reconfigured to provide
more than adequate parking for the
retail, self-storage and office uses.
The remainder of the site will be re-
landscaped, and additional over-flow
parking provided for the Wings Over
the Rockies Museum.
Says Christine O’Connor, one of
the activists who fought for the han-
gar’s protection during last year’s
redevelopment plan, “it appears
that Hangar 2 will by-and-large be
preserved. The spectacular windows
will be preserved, the roofline will
be preserved, and we continue to
hope that the Neutrality Star over the
south wing will be preserved or even
featured in future development. This
pair of hangars provide a vital con-
nection to Lowry’s history, and can
be seen from miles away.”
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Page 6
May 16, 2008
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Central denver dispatCh
& Cherry Creek news
p.O. BOx 460142, denver, COlOradO 80246
phOne: 303.458.7541
• The Central Denver Dispatch & Cherry Creek News
is published MONTHLY free of charge to its readers. It
is mailed to more than 8000 residences in Denver, and
nearly 300 area businesses.
• The Central Denver Dispatch welcomes news releases,
calendar events, photos and letters.
• Send releases and other information to
submit@thecherrycreeknews.com
We do not accept press releases or calendar materials
by fax.
More advertising information, along with additional
editorial content, can be found on-line at:
www.thecherrycreeknews.com
Letters to the editor must be signed. We reserve the right to
edit letters and other contributions for space. Publisher assumes
no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts or art. We
attempt to verify all matters of fact but hold contributors liable
for the content, accuracy and fairness of such contributions.
The Cherry Creek News is a legal, independent newspaper
of general circulation in Hilltop, Crestmoor, Belcaro, Bonnie
Brae, Glendale, Virginia Vale, Cherry Creek, Lowry and
surrounding neighborhoods.
For advertising information, call 303.458.7541. Discounted rates
for new advertisers with special promotions.
Guerin Lee Green, Publisher and Editor
Laura Douglas, Managing Editor
continued on page 7
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May 16, 2008
Page 7
Blueprint Denver sustained in re-zonings
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and opponents into mediation, and twice
amending the bills to give property owners
more time to act with their own properties.
The final form of the measure gives property
owners to the end of the year to pursue devel-
opment, and existing multi-unit buildings are
fully protected - results of a broader bill just
passed by the Council, and both essentially
compromises pushed by Garcia. In the end,
however, Garcia pushed the rezonings to a
Council vote. Pointedly, as Garcia’s colleagues
noted, he did not lobby them on measures so
key to his own district, acknowlegding that
the issue was a watershed one for the city and
the conflicting, substantive interests involved
were ultimately at play in any broad change of
residential zoning.
For the proponents, including the princi-
pal applicants - neighborhood activists Jude
Aiello and Steve Kite - the evening marked the
end of a two-year struggle in which success
often seemed impossible. For the opponents,
which included many from the neighborhoods
as well developers with money at stake, the
defeat seemed a surprise. They had put much
stock in technical legal arguments offered by
Dan Markofsky, issues that seemed of little
impact upon the City Council or their attor-
neys.
What City Councilman Paul Lopez called
“the Fourth of July, early,” the debate was
marked by impassioned testimony on both
sides, some good arguments, and some legal
sophistry. Nearly eighty people signed up
to testify on the measures, and necessarily,
with some of the testimony being repetitive
and often off-topic. Many opponents of the
downzoning, particularly some who were not
even affected directly, brought in issues not
entirely germane to the issue - the plight of the
developmentally disabled, the water source
for Sloan’s Lake, and neighborhood concerns
far distant from zoning. Many realtors and
developers, not from North Denver, testified.
They were balanced by neighborhood activists
from groups across the city who recognized
the bellweather nature of fulfilling Blueprint
Denver’s promise to protect neighborhoods.
It began with the city’s Community
Planning and Development department’s rec-
ommendation for rezoning. Peter Park, the
city’s head of planning and development,
lauded his staff’s efforts, saying the zoning
proposals met “all of the criteria for review
and consideration. He called the existing zon-
ing a “mismatch with Blueprint Denver, the
city’s master plan.” Park said the issue boiled
down to keeping a single family neighbor-
hood from becoming a multifamily one.
Diedre Oss, the city staffer who has
worked upon the rezoning said the areas were
over 80% single family detached homes (the
West Highland area in question is 87% single
family homes), the core reason planning and
zoning recommended the rezonings to pre-
serve character of the neighborhoods.
Oss said that under ultimate buildout
conditions, an additional 134 zone lots could
expand, the potential addition of 134 new
duplexes and tri-plexes in the area. That would
reduce single family homes to just 37%, what
Oss termed a “threat to the neighborhood.”
Oss said that R-1 zoning effectively preserved
the neighborhood, and quoted Blueprint
Denver as saying that “areas of stability are
overzoned.”
“The most effective approach is to reduce
zone district development capacity,” said Oss,
in recommending that Council pass the mea-
sure.
The testimony stretched on for hours.
Opponent Markofsky argued that the zoning
application was not complete, that the listing
of owners was flawed. Krista Chisholm said
the rezoning “isn’t going to fix the ugly home
on the neighborhood.” South Denver architect
Peter Pappas said that debate was about the
future, and that change did not represent “a
threat to the neighborhood.” Dan Hoops, a
long-time opponent, attacked the process rhe-
torically: “is this how you recommend plans
be created?“
Proponents attacked the size and form
of the new duplexes. April Butler called the
neighborhood “truly under siege.” Four homes
demolished on her block were replaced with
ten units, with Victorian and Arts and Crafts
bungalows bulldozed. Elizabeth Wheeler cited
139 single family homes already demolished in
North Denver, a count that grows weekly, and
channeled her Italian immigrant grandmother
with a cry of “Basta!” - enough. Many multi-
generational neighborhood residents decried
the scrapeoffs. Steve Kite urged the Council to
“keep the commitments of Blueprint Denver.”
John Lanternman, a planner and consultant to
developers, called the neighborhood a beauti-
ful symphony, marred by discordant notes:
with “multifamily development... eroding the
existing character” of the area.
Realtors clashed on the proposal. George
and Betty Luce of Nostaglic Homes said “not
all realtors are against neighbors,” and Betty
Luce produced home sales data that showed
home pricing in R-1 areas outpacing that in
R-2. Opposed was Realtor Kathleen Genereux,
who built one of the most widely criticized
duplexes directly on Sloan’s Lake, and has
been a consistent supporter of the scrapeoff
potential of R-2 zoning.
In the end, however, the Council sided
with the proponents, apparently moved by
the argument that protecting the existing mix
of homes in the neighborhoods with rezon-
ing fulfilled the spirit and letter of Blueprint
Denver. Despite charges from Councilman
Charlie Brown that the planning department
hadn’t been fair, the lengthy process, agreed
to be flawed, seemed to convince a majority
of the council that rezoning was critical in
protecting two “predominantly” single family
neighborhoods.
With opponents threatening lawsuits, the
matter may be far from settled. But the public
phase of the debate, as tortured as it has been,
has been closed.
Teach for America came to North
Denver’s Skinner Middle School,
bringing with it not only new resourc-
es for the struggling Middle School
but high expectations as well. Four
Teach For America teachers are at
Skinner this year, and another is
expected next year. Principal Nichole
Veltze, who was at Skinner when the
new teachers arrived, is a product of
the program as well.
Teach for America describes itself
as “the national corps of outstanding
recent college graduates and profes-
sionals of all academic majors and
career interests, who commit two
years to teach in urban and rural
public schools and become leaders
in the effort to expand education-
al opportunity.” According to Teach
for America (TFA), its mission is to
“build the movement to eliminate
educational inequity by enlisting our
nation’s most promising future lead-
ers in the effort.”
TFA hopes to accomplish this by
recruiting fresh college graduates
from non-traditional teaching back-
grounds through a highly competitive
process, and placing them in urban
classrooms and surrounding them
with a ton of support. That support,
which includes continuous training,
a strong peer group, and an assigned
staff person to look over their shoul-
der, far exceeds what Denver Public
continued from page 1
Teach for
America
transforms
Denver school
see ELITE on page 8
Cherry Creek News & Central denver dispatCh Page 8
May 16, 2008
Schools (DPS) provides first-time
teachers. And while DPS’ typical
teaching hires have student teach-
ing experience and specific education
in teaching, they aren’t surrounded
by the weekly support or extensive
goal-setting done by TFA.
TFA has a reputation of provid-
ing “shock troops,” with a “teach
different” approach that can spur
results in schools. Matthew Dennis,
a Skinner TFA’er from Michigan,
said the TFA training complements
Skinner’s “professionional develop-
ment focus,” a thought echoed by
his tight-knit group of TFA teachers.
But Dennis says there is pressure to
show the “growth we need to make,
because of the support we have.”
That extensive support includes
in-classroom observation geared to
provide the teaching newbies objec-
tive feedback, as well as professional
learning communities and frequent
weekend trainings. Jessica Silliman,
from Kent, Washington, set a “big
goal” for her reading classroom—
getting a two-year increase in reading
levels— with students that have fallen
behind, and hadn’t been advancing a
single grade level in a year. Silliman
describes TFA’ers as competitive and
eager, noting that goal-setting gave
them a tool to measure their class-
room performance against. “Skinner
is on the upslope,” says Silliman.
“The staff is committed to student
achievement, and we’re doing pro-
fessional development we didn’t do
a couple of years ago.”
Kevin Brehm, a science teacher
who hails from the Philly area, is
“super impressed by the staff and
administration at Skinner.” He says
he knows he is making progress in
the classroom, with objective mea-
sures. “We don’t have to cross our
fingers” and wait for CSAP results, he
says. The Teach for America approach
meshes well with DPS Superintendent
Michael Benett’s Denver Plan, which
introduced new report cards this year
along with more benchmark testing
during the school year, with a focus
on providing real-time data to guide
classroom instruction and interven-
tions.
Jocelyn Essler migrated from
Minot, North Dakota with Teach for
America. Essler, whose impressive
classroom the North Denver News
visited in February, called TFA par-
ticipation at Skinner a “seamless
integration,” a better fit than in
some other schools across the country
where TFA teachers have sometimes
been met with resentment by teach-
ers and administrators.
As for Skinner itself, Dennis says,
“We’ve got a good school— good
staff and good administration.” This
“concept only works if everyone else
is on board.” He believes Skinner
can succeed if it “finds that audience
(in the community) that is willing to
listen.”
Teach for America is contributing
to a changed environment at Skinner,
and if school performance continues
to show improvement, that should
change community perceptions about
the school, which is currently criti-
cally underenrolled. If a substantial
portion of families currently choicing
away from Skinner return, Teach for
America will be able to claim a role
in turning around the fortunes of a
school that many had written off.***
Elite teaching program
challenges Middle School
continued from page 7
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Cherry Creek News & Central denver dispatCh
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It’s a pretty common occurrence
for me to talk about the concept of
Dinner and a Movie, but it is usually
done so in the context of finding a
location to eat before you go see a
film. Well, today we are going to
cut out the middleman and liter-
ally discuss din-
ner AND a movie
as we explore
Neighborhood Flix
Cinema & Café,
lovingly shortened
to Flix on Fax by
the locals.
Flix on Fax
is an Independent Movie theater
featuring not only traditional Indy
films, but often giving the opportu-
nity for local film makers to show-
case their work in a public arena.
On the evening of my most recent
visit we saw “Hermann Hermann,”
a full-length feature that was filmed
here in Denver with the whopping
budget of $700. Clearly the people
attending this theater aren’t looking
for the traditional big-box Cineplex
experience, which is good since they
would be disappointed if they did.
This applies not only to the mov-
ies, but to the dining and snacking
options as well.
When you walk into the lobby of
Flix the first thing you will notice is
that you are actually standing in a
multi-purpose space: theater conces-
sions, dining room, and bar. Yes. Bar.
At the concession stand you won’t
find Milk Duds or
licorice. Instead you
have a menu of appetiz-
ers, salads, sandwiches, and entrees.
The only true nod to traditional
movie fare is the bottomless tub of
popcorn.
When you
place your
order you
also indicate
whether or not
you are going
to eat in the
dining room
or the theater.
Yes, the theater. If this is your
option, your selections are served
on a heavy plastic tray that will fit
into the cup holder of your theater
seat. You slip it into place, swivel
it in front of you, and voila ... an
upgraded TV dinner. And in theory
this sounds great.
The drawback comes when you
consider some of the menu options.
I, for one, am not too keen on the
concept of eating anything with
gravy or sauce in the dark. If you
have a stacked sandwich or some-
thing that will need attention in
lifting or dipping, this is going to
distract you from the movie a slight
bit. On the other hand, if you have
something you want to share with
your companion, say the large tub
of popcorn, how nice to have a cen-
tral, shared tray so that one of you
isn’t constantly reaching toward the
Dining Detective: Flix
on Fax
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groin of your neighbor!
Eating from trays can also be a
bit distracting to the people around
you. Stabbing at pasta or scraping
up Chicken Pot Pie gravy is going
to catch the peripheral vision more
readily than the occasional piece of
popcorn. It seems that the patrons
recognize this, too. I would estimate
that less than 5% of the people in the
theater actually use the meal trays.
Most arrived early and enjoyed their
food in a more leisurely fashion in
the dining room.
I would also be remiss if I didn’t
discuss the quality of the food. It
needs to be understood that this
is a theater first, a dining experi-
ence second. Most of the items are
thawed and microwaved rather than
lovingly made onsite. So remember
this before you toss down $11 for a
Pot Pie or $9 for pasta with chicken.
For theater food it’s refreshing. For a
dining experience it’s a TV dinner.
Still, if you are in a hurry to catch
the early show and you are abso-
lutely starving, I have to say that
having the option of a nice chicken
sandwich instead of theater nachos
(if you add jalapenos, that’s a veg-
gie, right?) is a very nice alternative.
Oh, and did I mention they had
a bar? At Flix you can request your
drink in a plastic cup so that you
can bring it into the movie with you.
That’s a nice adult bonus.
There is also an earth bonus. Flix
has an advanced recycling program
where all containers are separated
out of the trash at the end of the
night. Given the current push for
“green” living, the desire to offer
more nutritious edibles, and their
efforts to support local artists in
film, Flix seems to be ahead of the
curve. ***
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Cherry Creek News & Central denver dispatCh Page 12 May 16, 2008
Udi’s Bread Café
Udi’s Bakery has been a familiar
fixture in the Denver area for the last
three decades, growing from a sand-
wich cart in the 70s to the city’s big-
gest producer of locally-made artisan
bread and granola.
What the average Denverite may
not know is that Udi’s now has a res-
taurant, where they prove that they
can make more than just bread. A lot
more.
Please try the bread pudding
($5.50), if you try nothing else over
here. Swimming with vanilla cream,
topped with large chunks of toasted
walnut, served at your table bub-
bling-hot… this delectable dish is at
once a necessity on chilly mornings,
and a respite from your nightmares of
too many bread puddings past: those
cold, flavor-free cubes with too much
sugar syrup, brandy, or both. Forget
them all. You will as soon as you have
that first bite.
The hummus ($4.50 small, $10
large) is a delight, too: freshly made,
just the right flavor balance, and com-
plemented beautifully by the malti-
ness of the Rustico bread. The sweet
potato fries ($5) are rather like those
I’ve tried anywhere else, but they’re
pleasant and balanced with just the
right amount of salt.
The eggs Benedict ($9) has an
orange twist to its Hollandaise sauce,
and a couple of other twists: wafer-
thin Black Forest ham instead of
Canadian bacon andb biscuits instead
of English muffins. The biscuits were
a little soggy—probably an unavoid-
able hazard in eggs Benedict-- but
the ham was an excellent touch: not
only more tender but less salty than
its more familiar counterpart. The
(appropriately enough) “Stapleton”
egg sandwich ($3.75) with egg, tomato
and Swiss cheese on grilled flatbread,
is the perfect meal for busy people:
simple, substantial, carb-and-protein
balanced, and even easy to eat one-
handed while walking or driving. The
French toast ($4.50 small, $7.50 large),
made with Udi’s signature Challah
bread, is the softest French toast I’ve
ever eaten, and scores extra points
with me by coming with real maple
syrup. I would like a bit more fruit
topping on it, though.
Udi’s Café has a more impres-
sive array of sandwiches than you’ve
found in your local mom-and-pop
coffee shop, or your local Vitamin
Cottage. The California BLT ($8.25),
one of their newer offerings, is rich
with avocado and is generous with its
thick, crisp bacon. The apple walnut
chicken salad sandwich on cranberry
walnut bread ($8), has a less creamy
texture than its sister at Paradise
Bakery, which may be a drawback to
some but a welcome feeling of light-
ness to others. The panini made with
Black Forest ham ($8.25) uses cave-
aged Gruyere cheese, which punches
up the saltiness but also gives the
sandwich a bit more personality than
Swiss would.
To top it off, Udi’s serves Dazbog
coffee, another local… and who
wouldn’t smile at this partnership?
An Israeli guy with his sandwich cart,
two Russian guys with their coffee
shop. Keepin’ it local. Which is what,
in my mind, makes Udi’s Café stand
out against a Panera, a Paradise or an
Atlanta Bread. It’s all about local.
—Frances Hardzinski
Wouldn’t you also
want the latest in
mammograms?
You have a digital phone,
digital camera and a
digital music player.
The latest in technology for your overall health.
Faster, simpler and in beautiful surroundings.
You don’t want to settle for second best when it comes to your
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Make an appointment today because taking care of yourself never
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To schedule an appointment, call 303-778-5815.
porterhospital.org
Copyright © 2008 Centura Health

3003 E. Third Avenue, No. 201
Denver , Colorado 80206
Phone 303 399 8111

Fax

303 399 8112
5/6/08
PAH031_AD_PHONE_5X152.indd
CHRISTINE
JASON
PHONE AD DIGI MAMMO
N/A
JENNIFER
CHERYL
MARIE
Note:
Mechanical @ 100%
5” X 15.2”
Cherry Creek News/Central Denver
Dispatch
Fiery @ 90%
Revisions / Notes
PAH031_AD_PHONE_5x152.indd 1 5/13/08 9:43:47 AM

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