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SURE-FIT
CONCENTRIX

Sure
Fire
Interviewing
Techniques

Objectives
By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:
1. formulate behavioral and situational
questions
2. prepare and conduct competency-based
interviews
3. practice the four phases of successful
interviewing
4. identify the ethical and unethical interview
practices
5. know when to use panel interview
6. explain how to remain objective and avoid
interview pitfalls
7. read favorable and unfavorable non-verbal
cues
8. practice rating and evaluating interviewees

GENERAL OUTLINE
I. Why Behavioral and
Competency-Based
Interviewing
II. The Behavioral /
Competency-Based
Interviewing Model
III. Interviewing Essentials

Why Behavioral and


Competency-Based
Interviewing

Why Behavioral and


Competency-Based
Interviewing

TOPICS:
A. Structured versus Unstructured
Interview
B. Cost of Ineffective Interviewing
C. Common / Traditional
Interviewing Pitfalls
D. Advantages of Behavioral vs.
Traditional Interviewing

Why Use Behavioral


Interviewing?
Reveals the past behavior of
the interviewee
Predicts interviewees future
performance
Hard to fake answers
Focuses on specific
competencies required by
job.
Easy to verify

Structured versus Unstructured


Interview
Structured Interview
All candidates are asked the
same questions in the same
order.
All candidates are evaluated
using a common rating scale.
Interviewers are in
agreement on acceptable
answers.

Unstructured Interview
Candidates may be asked
different questions.
A standardized rating scale
is not required.
Interviewers do not need
to agree on acceptable
answers

Cost of Ineffective Interviewing


Typical costs:
Basic recruitment activities cost
Salary and benefits covering the period of
time the poor performing individual was
employed
Training / Orientation Costs
Productivity Losses
Lost customers / market share

Cost of Ineffective Interviewing


Other related costs:
Negative effect on co-workers
morale and productivity (difficult
to measure but can be very
significant)
Legal fees, severance pay
Additional recruitment and
training fees which must be
repeated with a new hire

Behavioral vs.
Traditional Interviewing

Traditional
Interviewing
Questions focuses on:
specific skill sets and past
performance
job responsibilities
the role of an individual in an
organization
easily described achievements

Behavioral
Interviewing
Questions focuses on:
a prospective employees
personality and value set
(rather than solely on their
skill sets)
prospective employees
responsibilities
integrated performance within
their organization
leadership characteristics and
traits.

Advantages of
Traditional Interviewing
Easier to implement.
Interviews can be one-on-one
or in groups.
Questions can be
spontaneous. No need to
formulate customized
questions carefully.
Sample questions are
available in numerous sources
for free.

Advantages of
Behavioral Interviewing
Provides a broad assessment of
an individuals personality and
skill set
Results can be easily quantified
Allows prospective employees
to be more relaxed during the
interview process
Hidden information more easily
obtained

Advantages of
Behavioral Interviewing
Less chance of prospective
employee steering their
answers to what they think the
interviewer wants to hear
Uncovers positive and negative
personality traits
Better indication of how an
individual will fit in your
organization

Sample Traditional Interview Questions


What are your strengths and weaknesses?
What major challenges and problems did you
face? How did you handle them?
Describe a typical work week.
Tell me about your last job.
Your examples _________________

Sample Behavioral Questions


Can you give me an example of when you
came up with a clever way to motivate
someone?
Tell me about an important goal you've set in
the past and how you accomplished it.
Give me an example of a colleague/
vendor/ customer who was hard to
communicate with and tell me
how you handled it.

Sample Behavioral Questions


Think about a problem you might have had in being
decisive, and tell me how you handled it.
Describe a time when you had to communicate some
unpleasant feelings to a supervisor.
What's been your experience of dealing
with poor performance of subordinates?
Provide an example.
In your current position, what sort of
decisions do you make without
consulting your boss?

Sample Behavioral Questions


Can you think of any major obstacles you had to
overcome in your last job? How did you deal with
them?
What types of things have made you angry, and how
did you react to those situations?
You've told me a lot of your strengths for
this job. But I need to get a balanced
picture and get some knowledge of where
you might need some improvement.
Describe for me a time when you
made a mistake that illustrates
your need to for improvement.

GENERAL OUTLINE
The Behavioral
/ CompetencyI. Why
Behavioral and
Based Interviewing Model
Competency-Based
Interviewing
II. The Behavioral /
Competency-Based
Interviewing Model
III. Interviewing Essentials

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The Behavioral / CompetencyBased Interviewing Model


TOPICS:
A. Features of Competency Based
System
B. Assessing Jobs Based On
Competency Requirements
C. Deciphering the Job Description
D. Setting Job Competency
Requirements and Levels
E. Developing Competency-Based
Interview Instrument

Competency-Based
Recruitment System
Provides validated, fair and unbiased standards to
assess applicant competencies
Improves the transparency of the selection process
Contributes to the effective and efficient selection
process
Reusable selection tools
Clear and transparent criteria for feedback

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What is a Competency?
A competency is a particular
quality that an organization has
decided is desirable for
employees to possess.
During interviews and
assessment processes
competencies are used as
benchmarks that assessors use
to rate and evaluate candidates.

Typical Key Competencies

Teamwork
Responsibility
Commitment to career
Commercial awareness
Career motivation
Decision making

Communication
Leadership
Trustworthiness &
Ethics
Results orientation
Problem solving
Organisation

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Sample Competency-Based
Questions
Pages _____

Identify the Competencies that the


following questions are trying to measure:
1. Tell me about a time you made a quick decision you
were proud of.
2. Tell me about an important goal you've set in the
past and how you accomplished it.
3. When you had to do a job that was particularly
uninteresting, how did you deal with it?
4. Tell me about a time when an upper level decision
of policy change held up your work. How did you
handle it?

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Identify the Competencies that the


following questions are trying to measure:
1. Describe a situation in your last job where you could
structure your own work schedule. What did you
do?
2. Describe a situation in which you felt it was
necessary to break company policy or alter
procedures to get things done.
3. Give me a general description of your
responsibilities in your current or last job.
4. Tell me about something you've done in your job
that was creative. Think of a specific example. Tell
me exactly how you handled it.

8 key steps in developing a


structured interview
1. Conduct a Job Analysis
2. Determine the Competencies to be Assessed by
the Interview
3. Choose the Interview Format and Develop
Questions
4. Develop Rating Scales to Evaluate Candidates
5. Create Interview Probes
6. Pilot-Test the Interview Questions
7. Create the Interviewers Guide
8. Document the Development Process

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Assessing Jobs Based On


Competency Requirements
SIMPLY STUDY THE FOLLOWING SOURCES:
Performance appraisal critical elements
Position descriptions
Classification standards
Task statements
Interviews with subject matter experts
(e.g., high-performing employees,
supervisors)
Organizational charts

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Deciphering the Job Description


Identify the job tasks and responsibilities.
Identify the competencies required to
successfully perform the job tasks an
responsibilities.
Identify which of those competencies are
required upon entry to the job.

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Choosing the
Interview Format
Past = Behavioral
interview questions
Future = Situational
interview questions

Interview Questions should be


Reflective of competencies derived from a job
analysis
Realistic of the responsibilities of the job
Open-ended
Clear and concise
At a reading level appropriate for the
candidates
Free of jargon

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What is a Behavioral
Interview?
Behavioral based job
interviews are based on
learning how the
interviewee acted in
specific employmentrelated situations. The
logic is that past
behavior will predict
future performance.

Behavioral Interview
Format and Questions.
The primary purpose of the behavioral
interview is to gather information
from job candidates about their actual
behavior during past experiences
which demonstrates competencies
required for the job.
The underlying premise is the best
predictor of future behavior on the job
is past behavior under similar
circumstances.

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Writing Behavioral Interview


Questions with SMEs
Convene a group of approximately 6 or 7
subject matter experts (SMEs).
These SMEs should be experienced, highperforming employees or supervisors who
possess knowledge of the job at the level of
the position to be filled.
Typically, SMEs are at the journey level or
higher.

EXTRACTING THE REQUIRED COMPETENCIES FROM


SMES (DEPT HEAD)

1. Clarify the competencies from the dept


head/SME
2. Get a JD / JA to validate the required
competencies
3. Get a PA to validate

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Pointers in Writing Behavioral


Interview Questions with SMEs
SMEs familiarization of competencies
SMEs to write interview questions.
o Each question measures a competency
o Questions follow STAR format
Use of superlative adjectives in the questions
(most, last, worst, least)
Need for buffer of questions

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Situational Interview Format


and Questions
In contrast to the behavioral interview,
the questions in a situational interview
are based on future-oriented behavior.
Situational interview questions give
the candidate realistic job scenarios or
dilemmas and ask how he/she would
respond.
The underlying premise is a persons
intentions are closely tied to his/her
actual behavior.

Writing Situational Interview


Questions with SMEs
SMEs who have extensive knowledge about
the job.
SMEs to review the competencies (and their
definitions)
SMEs write examples of effective and
ineffective behaviors (i.e., critical incidents)

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Writing Situational Interview


Questions with SMEs
Arrange for a separate group of SMEs to read each critical
incident
SMEs identify the competency the incident best illustrates.
- must confirm if critical incidents can be linked to the
specific competencies
SMEs rewrite the retained critical incidents in the form of
hypothetical situations.
- demonstrate the correct competency.
- as real as possible / reflective of the job.
SMEs develop more questions than needed as buffer.

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Developing a Rating Scale


Setting Job Competency Requirements
and Levels

Decide on one proficiency-level


range for all competencies
(e.g., a range of 1-5 with
5 being the most proficient and
1 being the least proficient).
Create at least three proficiency
levels, but aim for five to seven
levels.
Label at least three proficiency
levels (e.g., unsatisfactory,
satisfactory, and superior).

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Behavioral Interview Models


SBOT (Also Known as STAR or EBOT)
SBOT has the following structure:
Situation (Situation/Task/Event)
What was the situation, task, event, etc?
Behavior (Action)
How did you handle it?
Outcome (Results)
What was the outcome?
Timeframe (Date)
When did it happen (recent is better)?

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Developing Questions The STAR and


the SBOT Models
1. The situation/task/event is important because it
explains why the behavior/action took place
2. The behavior is important because it explains
how the behavior/action took place
3. The outcome is important because
it helps determine whether the
behavior/action was effective or not
4. The timeframe is important because it
lets us know how recently the
behavior/action was used
All of these factors are necessary for a
complete behavioral interview.

The STAR Approach


Interview Example
Situation: Give an example of a
situation you were involved in that
resulted in a positive outcome.
Task: Describe the tasks involved in
that situation.
Action: Talk about the various
actions you took.
Results: Explain the positive results
that directly followed because of
your amazing actions and decisionmaking skills.

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Example of a STAR Answer


Situation: During my internship last summer, I was
responsible for managing the social media
accounts.
Task: I noticed that the company didnt have many
Twitter followers and their fan page had very little
activity on it. I wanted to find a way to strengthen
their online presence.
Action: I began participating in Twitter chats,
promoting helpful links to articles, and updating
the about sections with keywords, among other
things.
Result: Within a couple of months, our following
on both sites had more than tripled. Our Twitter
page now has more than 1,000 followers.

ARRANGE TO SBOT/STAR APPROACH


1. Describe for me the steps you had to make to
answer peoples objections on some idea that you
are selling.
2. Give me an example of a time when you had to
persuade people to do something they really didn't
want to do.
3. Tell me how the people who opposed your ideas
reacted to your ways of handling them.
4. Tell me the different tactics you did to convince
people who disagree with your ideas.

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Identify the SBOT in this answer


Q: Describe a Time Where You Had to Train a coworker with
a critical Task.
My coworker Bill needed to make a presentation to a
potential customer about Widgets300, a new product. Bill was
unfamiliar with the product and came to me for advice since I
was considered an expert on Widgets300.
Over the course of five days, I trained Bill on Widgets300.
At the end of the five days, I asked Bill to do a dry run of his
presentation to me to make sure that he had mastered what I
taught him.
Bill presented to the potential customer and was able to
answer all of their questions about Widgets3000. The
customer decided to buy the product and is now very pleased
with their relationship with our company.

8 major personality types that


companies look for
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Boss
Superstar
Expert
Good Citizen
Team
Juggler
Self Developer
Problem Solver

WRITE A BEHAVRIOAL
QUESTIONS TO UNCOVER
THE APPLICANTS
COMPETENCIES IN THE
FOLLOWING PERSONALITY
TYPES.

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Write Situational Interview Questions

Effective Incident Form


Ineffective Incident Form

GENERAL OUTLINE
I. Why Behavioral and
Interviewing
Competency-Based
Interviewing
Essentials
II. The Behavioral /
Competency-Based
Interviewing Model
III. Interviewing Essentials

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III. Interviewing Essentials


TOPICS:
A. Planning the Interview
B. Interview Etiquette
C. The Four Phases of Any Good
Interview (Opening, Info
Gathering, Info- Giving, Closing
D. Interviewing Techniques:
Conducting the CompetencyBased Selection Interview
E. Panel Interviews

Planning the Interview


PRACTICAL DETAILS
PLANNING THE QUESTIONS

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Practical Details
1.
2.
3.
4.

Interview time and date


Interview room
Access requirements
Options if people are unable to
attend
5. Panel members and roles
6. Interview time and date

Planning the Questions


Traditional Questions
Competency-Based Questions
Behavioral Questions
Situational Questions

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Interview Dos and Donts


Dos

1. Review the candidates resume and other


assessment files before the interview.
2. Start the interview on time.
3. Tell the interviewee how long the interview will
take.
4. Notify the interview that you will take notes.
5. Introduce your self properly (handshake).
6. Ask relevant questions only.
7. Eye contact.
8. Give the candidate an idea about the company and
the job responsibilities.
9. Answer relevant questions.
10. End on time.

Interview Dos and Donts


Donts
1. Avoid asking questions that may be offensive
(eg, marriage, sexual orientation, etc).
2. Avoid questions about race, religion, politics, etc.
3. Dont stare.
4. Dont write notes on the resume.
5. Avoid interruptions such as texting or answering
phone calls and other mannerisms.
6. Avoid having the candidate to wait for too long

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The Four Phases of Any


Good Interview
1. Opening
- Rapport building

2. Info Gathering
- Getting background information
- Traditional questions
- Behavioral and situational questions
- Note-taking

3. Info- Giving
- About the job, company, office, boss,
team

4. Closing
- Thanking

Panel Interviews
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

They're more objective


You have a chance to think more about the candidate's
You don't make instant judgments
It's a great way for subordinates to meet the candidate
without the typical awkwardness
you'll also see more of the candidate's true personality.
It saves time.
It allows weaker interviewers to be involved
The assessment is more accurate and consistent

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When to use Panel Interview


For target positions that require collaboration
with other teams/department.
When key stakeholders need to be a part of
the panel
If you want to ensure objectivity and
democratize the selection process
To save time

Skills Practice on
Competency-Based Probing
Questions
Describe the interview situation
Position
Candidates profile
Anticipated questions from the
candidate

Interview Structure
Your planned Behavioral Probing
Questions

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Guidelines for Taking


Notes
Tell the candidate up-front
that you are going to take
some notes
Use a clip board or
portfolio
Dont record information
that is already available
Avoid taking word-forword notes

Guidelines for Taking


Notes
Don't take notes on non-job related
information - even if it is
volunteered
Use the SMS technique
Write key words not conclusions
Make note taking only 10% of your
interview activity
Eye-contact most of the time.
Immediately, take 5 minutes to
record conclusions

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Rating the CompetencyBased Interview


Arrival of the Candidate
Late
Too early

Rating the CompetencyBased Interview


Rating Each Candidate
Standard rating form
Rating scale
Behavioral Questions
Situational Questions

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Rating the CompetencyBased Interview


Documenting the Interview
Process
Note-taking
Recording
Video-Taping

Common Interview Errors


and Bias

Snap Judgment:
Contrast Effect:
Too Much too Little Talking:
Negative Emphasis:
Halo Effect:

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Common Interview Errors


and Bias

Pressure to Hire:
Stereotyping:
Non-Verbal Bias:
Similar to Me Error:

Behavioral Cues
Body Language
Palm and hand gestures
(open palm, closed, in pocket, folded
arms, hands rub)

Hand to face gestures


(mouth guard, nose rub, eye rub, neck
scratch, collar pull)

Head gestures (nod, shake)


Mouth and breathing
(rate of breathing, dry mouth)

Position shift and feet fidget


(crossing, fidgeting, twitching toes,
shuffling feet)

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Behavioral Cues
Facial Expression
Eye contact
Fleeting
Suppressing
Fake/genuine smile
Facial muscles

Behavioral Cues
Speech Patterns
Speed
Tone
Pitch
Volume
Inflection

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Evaluating Interviewees
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Relevant Experience
Skill Set
Professionalism
Knowledge of Position
Personality & Fit

Decision Analysis for Selection


1. Determine the must criteria (non-negotiable).
2. Determine the want criteria (optional).
3. Eliminate the candidates who fail in any one of the
must criteria.
4. Assign relative weights to each of the wants
criteria.
5. Determine the score of each remaining candidate
against wants criteria.
6. Rank them according to score. The highest scorer is
the best balanced choice.

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Sample Decision Analysis for

Selecting the Best Candidate


SELECTING THE BEST CANDIDATE FOR OD SUPERVISOR POSITION
CANDIDATES
"MUST" CRITERIA
teambuilding facilitation
designing OD interventions
Relevant
facilitation skills in MDP workshops
experience, skill
Skills in administering a climate survey
set, knowledge of
Knowledge in Balanced Scorecard
position
Experience in competency-based system
Fluency in both Tagalog and English
"WANT" CRITIERIA
creative / innovative
teambuilder
professionalism,
teamplayer
personality, fit
quick but accurate decision-maker
determined to succeed
analytical
excellent interpersonal skills
patient and calm during crisis

Proficiency
level

A. Garcia
W. Tan
F. Ronin
B. Diaz
5
GO
GO
GO
GO
5
GO
GO
GO
GO
5
GO
GO
GO
GO
4
GO
GO
GO
NO GO
4
GO
GO
GO
3
GO
GO
GO
5
GO
GO
GO
WEIGHTS SCORE
Wtd Scr SCORE
Wtd Scr SCORE
Wtd Scr SCORE
Wtd Scr
0.2
8
1.6
7
1.4
6
9.6
0
0
0.1
8
0.8
8
0.8
7
5.6
0
0
0.1
8
0.8
8
0.8
7
5.6
0
0
0.15
6
0.9
5
0.75
9
8.1
0
0
0.1
7
0.7
8
0.8
9
6.3
0
0
0.1
6
0.6
6
0.6
9
5.4
0
0
0.15
8
1.2
7
1.05
7
8.4
0
0
0.1
6
0.6
8
0.8
7
4.2
0
0
1
7.2
7
53.2
0

GIVING FEEDBACK TO CANDIDATES


It is good practice to give unsuccessful
interviewees feedback.
Familiarize your self first with the
candidates documentation and the
outcome of the decision
When starting the discussion check that
the candidate knows the outcome
Tell them how much time you have if
this is limited.
Open the discussion by asking them
what they want from the feedback.

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GIVING FEEDBACK TO CANDIDATES


Ask them for their self-assessment
what they believe they did well and less
well.
Begin your responses by reminding
them what key criteria you were
looking for.
Remember to balance the less positive
information with the more positive
Allow them to ask questions
Assign giving of feedback on
psychometric tests only to those who
are qualified and eligible

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