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B AY A REA L IBRARY

AND

I NFORMATION N ETWORK

B AY N ET N EWSLETTER
V OLUME 2, I SSUE 3/4

S PRING /S UMMER 2016

B AY N ET A NNUAL M EETING 2016
This past May saw the most
recent installment of the
BayNet Annual Meeting. The
meeting included the usual
fantastic assortment of snacks
provided by a catering company connected with our outgoing President Rachel MacNeilly.
The meeting itself was, as
usual, hosted in the beautiful
San Francisco Public Library’s
Main Branch. While people
mingled and snacked, connections were made and current
issues in librarianship were
discussed.
After several minutes of this,
the attendees were ushered
into the auditorium where
some housecleaning was done
in the form of voting for empty
BayNet Board seats. Brian
Edwards was voted in as VicePresident/President Elect. He
is Branch Manager of the
Albany Library branch of the
Alameda County Library System. Erica Watson became the
Board Secretary, as well as
assorted other library liaisons

(for full listing, see the BayNet
Website https://baynetlibs.org/
about/executive-board/).
The main event, however,
came after the voting (and
another brief visit to the snack
tables): A Day in the Life of a
Special Librarian. This event
involved a group of four speakers: Peggy Tahir, Education
and Copyright Librarian at
UCSF; Mark Mackler, a librarian for the California
Department of Justice in the
Attorney General’s Law Library; Taryn Edwards, Librarian and Member Relations and
Marketing Specialist for the
Mechanics’ Institute of San
Francisco; and Meredith Eliassen, Special Collections
Librarian at San Francisco
State University. This diverse
body of librarians attempted
to give aspiring Special Librarians a taste of what things
are like in their particular
fields.
Peggy Tahir discussed how the
librarians support clinical
services at UCSF, including

Photo by Bob Gorman

Step one was for Chevron to
choose which elements to preserve and which ones to simply degauss and recycle. Chevron historian John
Harper thoughtfully made

those decisions.
The elements had come into
the archives from all over the
world. They included media
from companies
that Chevron had merged
with: Texaco, Gulf
Oil and CalTex. Digital Revolution spent three weeks onsite at the Chevron Archives,
bar coding each asset and
creating an inventory list of
the chosen media.

BayNet’s 2016
Annual Meeting!

How to Information and Communicaiton Tech
are being used in
Nigeria

Building an inhouse Digital Repository

Tips for keeping
shared tech clean

Library-Hospitalist partnerships, residency training programs, and affiliate library
programs.
Mark Mackler discussed the
Attorney General’s Law Library and went into wonderful
detail about some of the questions and research projects
they have worked on in the
last few months.
Continued on pg 2.

D IGITAL R EVOLUTIONS P RESERVES C HEVRON ’ S M EDIA
There are many challenges in
digitizing a media collection
that spans 4 decades. Such
was the case for Digital Revolution in digitizing Chevron’s
vast media library.

S PECIAL POINTS OF
INTEREST :

The collection included fourteen different video tape formats, five audio tape formats,
three film formats and 35mm
slides. The videos included
PAL tapes from overseas.
They were digitized in their
native format in order to
maintain quality. We cleaned
and scanned over 50,000 feet
of film in high definition 2K
resolution.
Continued on pg 2

I NSIDE

THIS ISSUE :

B AY N ET A NNUAL

1

P RESERVING

1

ICT IN N IGERIA 3
A RTICLE FROM
THE A RCHIVES

4

Digital Reposi- 5
tory in-house
Keeping tech
clean

5

B AY N ET N EWSLETTER

P AGE 2

A NNUAL M EETING

CONT .

Taryn Edwards discussed what
the Mechanics’ Institue is (the
oldest library on the west coast
designed to serve the public, as
well as the oldest continuallyoperating chess club in the US!),
and how they came to exist the
world over.

tory of educational innovation at
SFSU.

Meredith Elliasen covered what
she does as a Special Collections
Librarian and University Archivist (which are different things,
by the way), and how she uses
early history to chronicle a his-

What followed was a series of
Q&A that went on for a little
over half an hour. The audience
was engaged and full of questions for the presenters. If you
feel like you missed out and
want to catch the next BayNet

C ONSCIOUS

The presentations were all great
and you can see the full thing on
San Francisco Public Library’s
YouTube channel: youtube.com/
SanFranciscoLibrary.

C HEVRON

Digital Revolution recommended
making two levels of files:

THAT THE
WORK WE DO
TODAY WILL

Video & Film: Pro Res 422 for
the preservation archival format
and H264’s for easy office use

USED
DECADES
FROM NOW ,
[ OUR ] GOAL
IS TO GET
THE BEST
QUALITY
POSSIBLE

Audio: .WAV files for the preservation archival format and
MP3’s for easy office use
Conscious of the fact that the
work we do today will still be
used decades from now, Digital
Revolution’s goal in preservation
is to get the best quality playback possible. Oxide-based
tapes: ¾” Umatic, 1” Reel, Betacam video and some audio reel
tapes in particular gain moisture over time. Therefore, we
“bake” those tapes to get the
moisture out before playback.
Otherwise, the tape can get
stuck in the machine or the
oxide can rip right off of the tape
as it is played, causing “sticky
shed.” As ¾” Umatic tapes decompose there can be a fine
layer of oxide dust that forms on
the length of the tape. As the
tape plays in the machine it will
cause a catastrophic playback
head-clog. After baking the ¾”
Umatic tapes, for many of them,
we hand-cleaned the entire
length of the tape with a moist
alcohol cloth before playback.
We also had to perform tape
repair and transplanted dozens

UmaticRepairA-19 by
ubarchives on Flickr

Written by Editor Collin Thormoto

Good Evening
San Francisco by Peter

CONT .

OF THE FACT

STILL BE

Event, keep your eyes on our
website baynetlibs.org for the
most up-to-date news concerning librarianship in the Bay
Area.

of tapes into new shells. The
most common tape repair happens when the glue that holds
the recording part of the tape to
the leader dries out and comes
apart. The case needs to be disassembled and the tape spliced
back together. In order for some
tapes to track properly the tape
itself needs to be transplanted
into a new shell. Especially with
¾” Umatic and VHS tapes, the
moving parts in the shell can
dry out and cause the tape to
not roll properly causing poor
playback results.
Some of the Gulf Oil tapes had
mold build up and rusty parts
from being stored in a damp
environment. When working
with moldy tapes, Digital Revolution bakes them and then
hand-cleans them. Then we
transplant the tape into a new
shell. All but one Gulf tape
played back. It was too decomposed to salvage.
Most tapes have not been played
in years. Therefore, they can
tighten up or have sticking
points. In order to loosen them
up and get a more even playback
we fast forward and rewind each
one before digitizing. If a tape is
so decomposed or damaged that
we believe we will only get one
good play from it, we capture it
on first playback.

In working to get the best possible playback Digital Revolution has:
Machines with manual tracking,
skew functions and adjustable
audio output capabilities. We
also have multiple machines of
each tape format so if we are not
getting good playback on one
machine we can try others that
may play a particular tape better.
As we digitized Chevron’s assets
we also updated an Excel
spreadsheet with metadata for
each element.
When we were finished with
phase one of digitizing Chevron’s media collection
we had over 40 terabytes of
data. We made two sets of hard
drives and a set of LTO data
tapes for long term archiving.
When we were satisfied that we
had a digital replica of the media collection, we degaussed and
recycled the tapes.
Written by Paul Grippaldi CEO
of Digital Revolution

V OLUME 2, I SSUE 3/4

P AGE 3

I NTEGRATING ICT
With trend towards globalization, nations are investing heavily on knowledge economy,
where knowledge is considered
as significant factor in generating wealth, employment,
growth. Education is the key
ingredient to this new economic
order. Today, Nigeria faces the
challenge of transforming its
fast growing population into a
“human capital” to become a
knowledge-based economy as it
is obtainable in developed countries like USA, UK and China.
The society has become more
computer literate over the past
few decades, and as technology
advances, society’s reliance on
computing systems has increased. Science, technology,
and innovations are key factors
for economic growth and the use
of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) is the
enabler in technological progress and productivity. Economic competitiveness depends on
the strategic adoption of ICT.
The key role of ICT had been
recognized by the Nigerian government through the Vision
2020. It was targeted directly
towards specific development
goals like ensuring basic education for all and lifelong learning
among others (Kwache, 2013).
The lack of the availability of
hardware remains to be the
most pressing and persistent
problem. Relative to student
population, the computer-tostudent ratio is dismally low as
1 computer is for 10 students
which doesn’t promote efficiency
and smooth delivery of information. Access to computers is
limited to those taking computer
education subjects. Almost half
of the Secondary schools in Nigeria do not have computer
maintenance due to lack or low
budget and unstable electric
supply. Though, there is provision by the government in its
agenda to tackle these challenges, all to no avail as most released funds are misappropriated.

IN

N IGERIAN P UBLIC S CHOOLS

It is laudable to hear that most
secondary school in the country
have been supplied by Computers by Petroleum Trust Fund
(PTF) yet half of the students
claimed that they do not use it
(World Bank, 2010). Almost half
of the teachers never attended
ICT-related trainings nor possess skills in using and teaching.
Trainings/workshop which are
geared at providing computer
literacy like basic operations,
word processing, and spreadsheet is not readily available.
Critical applications using educational games, Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI), simulations registered lower usage.
Most of the teachers do not use
ICT in the classroom. The growing trend among students is
very significant as most visit
social networks such as twitter,
facebook, instagram e.t.c and
navigating the internet to source
out information for assignments
and usage in their daily activities as most students are more
computer literate than the
teachers as it is obtainable in
Nigeria.
The Benefit of ICT Education in the secondary school
curriculum
The inclusion of ICT Education
as one of vocational subjects at
both levels of the secondary
education suggest the importance of computer studies not
only to secondary education but
to the overall development of the
secondary schools children
(Federal Republic of Nigeria,
2004; Kwache, 2013). The assistance of a computing technology
during the teaching-learning
process is crucial. Incorporating
the teaching of computer in the
secondary school system of education is necessary in order to
create familiarity with various
computer assistant applications
at a younger age, particularly
within a classroom environment.
This added benefit means that
an e-mail system can be setup or
a discussion board where students experiencing any difficulties with their work can either
have the option to ask the teach-

er discreetly for assistance or
alternatively can discuss issues
with their peers to solve problems interactively. Similarly, a
course website can be created in
order to provide information for
future students who are thinking of signing up to a certain
class. This will allow the students to gain a comprehensive
understanding of the course
outline and what is required of
them during the duration of the
course and how the course can
be accessed (Hodorowick, 2000;
Kwache, 2013). Furthermore,
different types of learning material or teaching aids can be accessed from the internet, which
can be used to make classroom
activities more interactive. This
system allows for flexibility to
teaching style with the added
bonus of promoting responsiveness to the variations of teaching methods that are available
and that have been promoted by
a computer system.
As noted Kwache (2007) are
the challenges faced in its
integration:
1. Government Attitude:- The
attitudes of the various arms of
governments in and outside
schools towards the provision
and deployment of computer and
its related outfits such as internet in our schools is rather slow
and in some instances absent

A N E - MAIL
OR
DISCUSSION
BOARD CAN
BE SET UP
WHERE
STUDENTS
CAN ASK THE
TEACHER
DISCREETLY
FOR
ASSISTANCE
OR CAN
DISCUSS
ISSUES WITH
THEIR PEERS

2.Lack of qualified teachers and
ICT technical staff in almost all
the public schools despite mass
production of National Diploma
Graduates from our polytechnics
and universities who could be
employed for such jobs.
3.Misappropriation of Public
Funds:- Leaders and policy implementers do not allow them to
release fund for the procurement of computer and computer
technology related facilities as
well as training personnel that
will support and mange ICT
equipment in schools
4.Currency devaluation:- With
the current global economic
Continued on pg 4

Detail of Miti Minga Secondary School, Kenya by
teachandlearn via Flickr

N EWSLETTER T ITLE

P AGE 4

N IGERIAN S CHOOLS CONT .
meltdown and devaluation of
Nigeria’s currency couple with
our leaders unwillingness to
release fund, the procurement of
computers and ICT infrastructure has become difficult and in
most instances unaffordable

T HE
INTRODUCTION
OF COMPUTER
TECHNOLOGY
WITHIN THE
EDUCATIONAL
PROCESS IS
UNAVOIDABLE

5.Inconsistent and erratic power
supply:- The irregular supply of
power coupled with the non
affordability of generator by
most public schools contributed
immensely to the deployment of
computer and ICT related infrastructure.
Conclusion
The introduction of computer
technology within the educational processes is unavoidable, as
Internet and e-mail facility are
necessary to support teachers
and students work in school.
The students and teachers
should be encouraged to use the
internet and e-mail facilities by
connecting computer laboratories to internet; this is to en-

hance better communication
skills and to improve on previously acquired ones. Provision of
adequate funds to procure computer systems and Classes
should be enabled with internet
connectivity for students to communicate with people and gather information from around the
world, thereby increasing their
motivation to use higher-level
analytical skills in their school
work and learn growing trend in
the world globally.

Kwache, P.Z (2013). An evaluation of the role of computer studies in promoting secondary education today: A case study of
Jimeta Metropolis, Adamawa
State. Discourse Journal of Educational Research, 1(1):9-18.

References

Written by Dada Kayode Sunday
John

Federal Republic of Nigeria
(2004).National Policy on Education, 4th Edition.
World Bank (2010). Report
www.worldbank.com

Osin, Luis (1988) Diez años de
Enseñanza Asistida por Ordenador a Escala Nacional
(diseño, evaluación y perspectivas), in: Tecnología y Educación, II Congreso Mundial
Vasco, Madrid: Narcea.
Kwache, P.Z. (2007). The Imperatives of ICT for Teachers in
Nigeria Higher Education. Merlot Journal of Online learning
and Teaching, 3(4):13.

A RCHIVES : P ROFILE OF T HE A LAMEDA C OUNTY L AW L IBRARY
Curious about recent legislation
affecting copyright law? Think
you’re driving a lemon? Parents
struggling with health care
issues? Losing sleep over a
neighbor’s barking dog?
Before you seek a lawyer’s help,
try an old legal friend in
the East Bay community.
The newly relocated Alameda County Law Library
is a special public library
poised to respond to all of
these questions and more.

Historic Flight Trans
Pacific, SADSM Archives
via Flickr

The Alameda County Law
Library recently held a
reception to celebrate its
move to a new location. On
January 24, library staff
and trustees welcomed
more than 200 guests to the
main Law Library at 125
Twelfth Street in Oakland. A
1924 Gothic revival style building at the corner of Twelfth and
Oak was renovated to provide a
spacious and well lit facility
that provides free access to legal

reference works for the judiciary, state and county officials,
members of the bar and residents of Alameda County.
The San Francisco architectural
firm of Robinson, Mills & Williams preserved much of the
original exterior of the building
while creating an interior functional space for the collection
and the latest technology. The
first and mezzanine (second)
floors form the Library. The
third floor is office space rented
for income and the fourth floor
became the new County of Alameda Conference Center.
The two-level 30,000 square feet
Library which is located near
the Oakland Museum has a
main reading room which is
paneled in rich cherry wood. The
cherry wood carrels, study tables, library shelving, reference
and circulation desks were all
specially crafted by Oakland’s
Creative Wood Products. Floorto-ceiling windows on two sides

allow natural light into the first
floor and the open balcony area
of the second floor.
There are now twelve public
terminals that have been networked to provide access to the
online catalog and many CDROM products. Future growth
space has been allotted at many
patron workplaces for additional
computer terminals. The Library offers Lexis and Westlaw
for a modest fee. This public
services is provided by reference
librarians who assist in suggesting research techniques. Sorry,
legal advice is NOT given; however, library staff will direct
patrons to resources to read. A
document delivery, fee based
service is also available.
By Leo Bald
Originally featured in the
Spring 1996 BayNet Newsletter
View the full archives on our
website baynetlibs.org

V OLUME 2, I SSUE 3/4

P AGE 5

B UILDING A D IGITAL C OLLECTION R EPOSITORY I N -H OUSE
In 2014, the Patchogue-Medford
Library decided to enhance,
expand, and unify our digitization efforts. The result
was Digital PML, a digital collection repository that we built
from scratch and completely
within our library walls.
For many years, we have been
committed to digitizing our rare
and eclectic local history materials to increase community access and to support genealogical
and historical research. For
digital collection repositories
and online exhibits, libraries
have many great free and opensource software options, including GreenStone, Fedora Commons, ResCarta,Omeka and DS
pace to name just a few. We took
these as a starting point for our
design.
The Design
Repository software for digitized
materials has four functions:
1.To store the digital files on
physical data storage media
2.To associate and store metadata with the digital files
3.To search the metadata
4.To present the digital files
over the web and on a patron's
electronic device of choice.
With this in mind, we designed
Digital PML to consist of four
modular components: a file storage layer, a metadata layer, a

search layer, and a presentation
layer.

TechSoup for Libraries
Helps the Final Result

The Components

The final system took seven
months from conception to
launch, and our only monetary
expenditure on software for the
project was a money-saving
installation of Adobe Acrobat
provided by, and thanks to, the
TechSoup technology donation
program. We use Acrobat as our
main optical character recognition (OCR) software to extract
words from our scanned items.
Secondarily, we also use it to
consolidate multipage PDF files
into one-page PDF files where
necessary and to watermark
PDF files.

The file storage layer stores the
digital files and, when requested, makes those files available
to the presentation layer. For
each digitized item, it houses an
uncompressed TIFF file and, for
public viewing, either a compressed, tiled, pyramidal, multiresolution TIFF file or a PDF
file.
The metadata layer stores the
metadata for each digitized item
and, when requested, makes
that metadata available to the
search and presentation layers.
We chose to design and implement a relational database for
the metadata using MySQL.
Once an item is scanned and the
resulting digital files are stored
in the file storage layer, metadata for the item is entered into
the database using MySQL
Workbench.
The search layer searches the
metadata that is stored in the
metadata layer. We chose
Apache's Java-based Solr for
this task. Solr provides both
classic Boolean search capabilities and the "Google search experience." It also gives us plenty
of options for more search functionality in the future, including faceting, "more like this"
suggestions, query completion,
and spelling correction.

vault by
David D’Agostino

Digital PML currently contains
more than 400 digitized items
and counting. And many exciting future digitization projects
await us, offering many more
opportunities to increase our
community's access to our local
history materials while preserving those materials for future
generations.
To say the least, there's so much
more to tell about the choices we
made and experiences we had
while designing and implementing Digital PML and about our
ongoing experiences in populating it.

“W E DESIGNED
D IGITAL PML
TO CONSIST OF
FOUR MODULAR
COMPONENTS ”

By Gary Lutz, Reference and
Adult Services Librarian at
Patchogue-Medford Library

K EEPING S HARED T ECHNOLOGY C LEAN
My first shift at a volunteer-run
library within a transitional
housing center went so well. It
had been a while since I worked
a desk shift, so I was fearful
that I'd be out of practice. But
the patrons were great, I was
able to easily locate items in the
collection, and I got a fun array
of questions.
Two days later, however, was an
entirely different story: I was
sick. And not just sick with a
little cold, but eight-hours-ofcomplete-agony sick in which I

spent more time in the bathroom than my bed.
During my recovery, I saw a
message posted in the housing
center's internal volunteer message board with the subject line:
"NOROVIRUS OUTBREAK?!" I
considered all of the things I had
done in the library that day:
moved chairs, picked up headphones, pulled DVDs, fixed the
TV, put away headphones,
shelved books, threw out old
magazines … and not once did I
use hand sanitizer.

To prevent future outbreaks, I
crowdsourced some tips from
other librarians on how they
keep their technology and spaces clean — especially during flu
season. Sharing headphones, in
particular, seems to be the biggest germ spreader, and therefore, many libraries no longer
lend them out.
Lysol wipes also are a popular
tool in the library sanitizing
arsenal.
"Part of our cleaner's weekly

Clean Sweep by
Steve Powell

B AY A REA L IBRARY AND
I NFORMATION N ETWORK

As a multi-type library association, BayNet represents librarians
and information professionals from all varieties of organizations.
Our mission is to strengthen connections among all types of San
Francisco Bay Area Libraries and Information Centers, and to
promote communication, professional development, cooperation,
and innovative resource sharing.
If you would like to know more about what we do, contact us via
email at baynetlibs@gmail.com

J OIN BAYNET ONLINE:
WWW. BAYNETLIBS. ORG

BUSINESSES
Want to advertise in the BayNet Newsletter? Contact Collin
Thormoto at collin.thormoto@gmail.com for rates and details.

SUBMIT A STORY:
HTTP://BAYNETLIBS.ORG/NEWS/
SUBMISSION-GUIDELINES/

T ECH CLEAN CONT .
duties include wiping the keyboards. We will also pay attention; if someone seems really
"coughy" or "sneezy," we go and
spray some Lysol on the chairs
and table tops, then Lysol wipe
down the keyboard and mouse.

Public Library (Arizona)

— Julie Elmore, Oakland
City Columbia Township Library (Indiana)

— Gladys Leeper, Pike County Library (Arkansas)

"Our Friends of the Library
purchased earbuds. Patrons can
buy them for $1.50. The Friends
only make about $.50/pair, so
it's really more of a service than
an income generator. I like
knowing that we aren't sharing
viruses or head lice.
"We keep sanitizer available for
patrons and staff at the front
desk. We have court-ordered
community service workers
serving in the library, and they
wipe down all the keyboards/
mouse, etc. with Lysol wipes on
a regular basis."

Joyce Baker, Coolidge

"Before the patrons use the
computers, they have to use the
sanitizer, and I wipe the headphones and desk down each
day."

"We require patrons to bring
their own headphones or earbuds. We sell inexpensive ones
at cost for $2.00 for those who
need them."
— Leah Krotz,
Belleville Public Library
(Kansas)
After receiving such fantastic
tips, I put in a suggestion to the
volunteer coordinator for Lysol
wipes and hand sanitizer for
the reference desk. So far, it
has been working out pretty
well!
By Ginny Mies at TechSoup for
Libraries

RSVP: baynet.wildapricot.com/event-2282093