/

QUEER PEOPLE
AND THEIR

KWEER
Giants
I

KAPERS.
hat

Birds That Talk.

Mec.

Beasts Hiat Think.
Insects

That

Flirt.

Sprites

That Dance.

WITH

TIIHIR

VARIOUS ANTICS ILLUSTRATED

By

palmer cox
Author
n|

Tiii.

hKowMtb.

TORONTO, ONT.

Kntkrkk according To Act ok

rAKi.iA.MiiNT

ui-

Canada, in thk vi:ar

iSSS,

hv

TALMER COX,
At
thi; Di;i'artm];nt oi' Ac.ricli.tlrh.

PREFATORY NOTE.
A FEW
of the pieces with the acillustrations, that

companying

were

so remarkably popular

when they
People,"

appeared under copyright protection in " Harper's

Young

"St. Nicholas"

and "Little Folks,"
charming juvenile

have, by the courtesy of the Publishers of those

magazines, been incorporated here
in

permanent form.

Hubbard Bros.

•• •

CONTENTS.

GRIM GRIFFIN, THB
GIANT.

PET IN THB HOUSE.

CHRISTMAS PUDDING.

KING AND CU)WN.

MICE AT TEA.

WOI,F ANT)

THE DOG.

BEAR IN WINTER.

MICE AND THE EGG.

TALB OP THE TIMES.

THE stork's new

suit.

THANKSGIVING DINNER.

THE EAGtE'S

GIFT.

//

«-

V
AVARICIOUS SPIDER.

THE NOISY MAGPIE.

AI.PHABET IN COUNCIL.

FUNNY MANDARIN.

WHEELBARROW

RIDE.

FAIRIES'

GIW.

THE MENDICANT.

I»OX

AND

TRAP.

CAT AND MOUSE.

THE BACK-YARD PARTY.

THE RUNAWAY

PAIR.

ELEPHANT AND DONKEY.

CHINESE ADVENTURE.

CALM-MINDED MEN.

SULTAN OF THE EAST.

A LESSON FOR YOUNG
MICE.

THE FOX IN OLD

AGE.

ADVICE OUT OF SEASON.

THE UNHAPPY

LION.

WSTENING TO THE
ROOSTER CROW.

A NIGHT ALARM.

COCK ROBIN.

THE NORMAN

KING.

^'

FAIRIES

AND CRUEL FARMER.

TURNING A

NEW

LEAF.

A DOMESTIC TALE.

WOLF AND BEAR.

TIJRKEY IN DANGER.

THE BANQUET.

"i^-timm^'

GOBBLER AND GANDER.

THS WASP AND

BEE.

MAIDEN AND KNIGHT.

THE WINDFAIX.

GUItEFUI. PAPOOSE.

A CHANGE IN THB
SITUATION.

BICYCI.E IN WOODS.

THE

DIALOGXTB.

THE LION AND THE
RHINOCEROS.

FAIRIES ON HORSEBACK.

4

i

BUGABOO

BII,I^

KING CAXJWFLOWER.

THE DOG AND

CAT.

.<^1

THB STYLISH

PAIR.

THE DARING MICE.

THE RATS AND THE
MEAL.

THE HEN'S ADVENTURE.

WHAT THE BUTTERFLY SAYS.

THE SPOILED GAME.

FAIRIES

AND

INSECTS.

bntertaining thb
cau.br.

GRIM GRIFFIN.
,^RIM

GRIFFIN was

a giant bold,

Who

lived beside the sea;
terror to the country wide,

A

From Galway

to

Tralee.

The farmers knew his heavy tread, Which seemed to shake the land,

When

coming from

his

castle

tall,

That overlooked the

strand.

At times he carried off their fruit, At times their stacks of grain At times he took the fattest brute
That grazed upon the
plain.

And

out before his
In

castle

door,

heaps lay hoof and honi; And piles of pods without the peas, And cobs without the corn.

But not alone

to

farmer's

goods

Was

Griffin's

acts

confined.

At

certain

seasons of the year,
his

To

fish

taste

incHned,

And when the Came toihng

hardy fishermen
near :he strand,

The

giant would disperse the crew

And
At
last

drag their net to land.
the men, of nothing sure
for

Forsook the coast

good,

"

And
His
fish

left

the giant to procure

as

best

he could.

Then

often with a mighty pole,
line

And

lengthy

to

match,

He sat beside the foaming tide,
His morning meal to
I^«^.3,:\

catch.

At

times he hooked a weever dark,

A

salmon or an
try his rod

eel,

And Would

next a grampus or a shark.

and

reel.

At length it chanced a hungry whale Was swimming by one day, The baited hook the monster took

And

gently

moved away.
the Giant laughed aloud,

"Ho, Ho!"
"I've

got no

common

bite.
is

The

line is long, the rod
I'll

strong,

have a
fish that

feast

to-night.
fin,

"

There's not a

works a

In river, lake, or sea,

However strong or broad Can prove a match for me

or long.

!

^^

,

Then rashly round his waist he wound The surplus line with care.
Determined should
his

hands give
still

out,

His weight would

be

there.

Now

as the giant

and the whale
tide,

Joined issue in the

The

screaminc^ birds around

them

flew

Describing circles wide.
But, weight and strain and boasting vain,

Were

all

of no

avail,

;

For off the rock he slid amain, Behind the rushing whale

Jlf^^/////^^''

And

Galvvay's coast

The

Isles

was miles behind, Arran past, of

When still the giant, like Was moving seaward
I'-r^.V-.-..

the wind,
fast.

^

t-^'S

Vf-

i.

-fiUMCH '"''^

Then people hastened

to

the

shore,

To view

the

pleasing sight,

;;

And

clapped their hands

till

palms were

sore,

And

shouted with delight.

"Ah, strong be line of silk or twine, That round the rogue is tied

And
"Let

strong be

tail

and

fin

of whale,
cried.

That take him hence," they
fish

with saw, and

fish

with sword,

Soon carve him up with care And dish him out upon their board.
In
slices

portioned

fair;

"That

and sculpin lean, The hermit-crab, and pike, The lamprey, and the lobster green.
shark,
gar,

and

May
"And

all

be served

alike.

there, five

hundred fathoms deep,

Below the rolling tide; The King of Herrings order keep,

And

at

the

feast

preside."

The sun went down, and home returned To roost on crag and tree, The weary birds, that many miles, Escorted Grim to sea.
But he no more returned to shore,

To make

the

farmers

fly;

Or stray along the rugged coast,

To

catch

his

morning

fry.

Yet,

sailors steering o'er the

main.

To

lands of rice and
miles

tea,

Report, a thousand

from land,

A
Upon
That

wondrous
an

sight

they see.

island,

bleak and bare.
giant
in

They mark a
flings

form,

around a baited hook,
storm.
tell,

In sunshine and

But whether truthful tales they As round the seas they go;

Or simply spin a sailor's yarn, The world may never know.
This hint remains for young and old.

To
Let

treasure

in e'er

the

mind

folks

be

so strong and bold.

They may
Like
Griffin,

a stronger find. they

may

strike a fish

They cannot bring

to

land;
of Fate
stand.

And find, too late, the line Too well the strain may

A PET
Who
At
kept, just
it

IN tup:
his

house.
name was Von Crouse^
in

There once was a man, and
for

pastime, a

pet

the

house;

was small, and could scamper and play, And seemed a great source of amusement each day. For many a time would Von laugh until sore, While watching it caper about on the floor.
first

He

called

the

pet

"Habit," and said,

"when

I

please

ni kick him outside with the Though people would argue, "

greatest of ease."
I

fear that

your pet
yet."

Will prove a heart-scald, ere you're through with him

t
But time rolled around, and the pet became strong, Its body spread wider, its nose, it grew long; It filled up the space every day more and more, At last would no longer pass out of the door, But rooted around in a boisterous style, And tumbled the bed and the stove in a pile.

No

longer a joy, or a pride, as at
But, classed as a

first,

Von And

demon, would rank with the worst. Crouse saw his error, though at a late hour,
then to eject

him he

strove with

all

power.

He

When

blamed himself roundly, and as people do. thus brought to sorrow, he blamed others, too One hardly likes calling the fault all his own, And shouldering the burden of censure alone,

;

;

;

coaxed and he cudgeled, but nought would avail The door was too narrow, the window too high, His pet was content in the mansion to

He He

pulled by the ears, and pulled by the

tail;

lie.

And

Habit " kept growing, and gave him no ease, But crowded him out of his home by degrees Deserted by friends, and derided by foes,
"

And And

cursing his

folly,

as one might suppose. such was the terrible
fate
oi'

Von

Grouse,

A

warning to all who keep pets in the house.

Beware of bad " Habit," though small in your
muzzle the fiend, ere the fangs are full size Ere home is uprooted, the mind tempest-tossed,
Oh,

eyes.

The

heart

petrified,

and the

soul, perhaps, lost.

A CHRISTMAS PUDDING.

HEN

Christmas bells are ringing sweet,

And people hasten through the street. To gather in a goodly store. That tables may be heaping o'er;
Fairy band, so legends tell. Prepare a Christmas feast as well. They boil their pudding, dear knows where,

The

But some place out in open And then on sticks, as best they may,

air,

—-

To some
The

retreat

the
rogues,

prize

convey.

then

once

Enjoy

'»"'*,

TIIH KING
Thi:rh

AND THE CLOWN.
a

lived

queer old kin^,

Who
And "dance
before

used to skip and swing,
the
fiddle,"

and

all

that

sort

of thinp^.

In

princely robes arrayed,

The games

of youth

he

played,
fair

And mingled

with the low buffoons at

or

masquerade.

His royal back he'd stoop

To
Or romp
in

chase a rolling hoop,

merry leap-frog with the wildest of the group.

At

last

a cunning clown

Got hold of mace and crown,

And

instantly the

people hailed him monarch of

the

town.

Because the crown he wore,

And
All took

royal

sceptre bore,

him

for the

romping king they'd honored heretofore.

His Majesty would rave,

And
But
still

bellow "Fool!" and •'Slave!"

the people

bowed and scraped around

the painted knave.

Well might

the

sovereign
cell,

yell,

And

threaten

prison

And

rope,

and

ax,

and gibbet;— but he could not break the

spell.

For

kincr

power away, and his sway, His was clown, and clown was king, until

So passed

his

subjects

their

dying day.

'^'Vr

THE MICE AT
Y
invitation, kind

TEA.

and free, went out one night to tea; Two mice The hostess met them with a smile, And laid their things away in style.

And soon With

the

was spread cheese, and bread; And when they gathered round the board, The cups of tea were duly poured. One took a sip, then shook her head,
table-cloth
crackers, toasted

And, setting down the cup, she

said,

While looking round,

as

in

a dream,
cream,
dear,

To
I'd
"

find

the

pitcher

holding

"Without a drop of cream,
rather

my

have

the

water

clear."

Too

bad," the hostess

made

reply,

"But yesterday the cow went dry; So now I do the best I can,

And
Until the milk
I
i

carry

out

another

plan:

turns once more

use more

than before.'
lenlaid her
bread
said,

The other guest Upon the plat "A single bite

and sadly
I

can not

eat

When

drink-

ing tea so
sweet."

awful

"Indeed! I'm
the

sorry
case."

that's

Replied her
sober
"That's all the ki
I

friend with
face.

tea I've got-

sweeten
" Is

the pot."

that the

way

you make )our tea?

Then you should come and visit me," The other cried. "It seems a sin

To put the tea and sugar in. And stir them up while boiling hot. Why, this is simply soup you've got."
With
"

flushing

face
I

the

hostess

spoke:
joke

Excuse

me

;

don't

see

the

\'ou can't give

any points

to

me,

Because,

my friend, I've crossed the sea, And learned the custom, if you
From them
that

please.

know

— the Japanese."

The nasty Japs " the other cried " I thought you had a little pride. What brought you there, I want to know.
"
!

The most outlandish place
In
all

to

go

the

world, to

seek advice.

Or

learn the art of cooking nice."
sat,

But while they

disputing there,

The

cat

came creeping
the
stair.

^JI^^tMM^,

,

.

,

X^Mjl'

she
listened

down

MBKKIIm^¥m^mi'\:.W^kJmVi\vi'
'"

to their chat

r
And

awhile,

hardly could

suppress a smile.

Said she

:

"I haven't ate a bite

Since two o'clock on yester-night;
Ill'B'lllfJ"'
i(i'i/'

In

fact, I

scarcely have the strength

iyi'lr'
/////I';-'

'^^
T(!']i'jl''

To jump a lounge or table's length; And yet, I'd almost do without, h*^*^^ ^^^^^ warm discussion out."
cat.

But when the shadow of the

Stole, like a cloud, across the mat,

The argument on
Their
little

tea

was dropped.

eyes from sockets popped.

And soon there was a lively race, To see who first could leave the place. One jumped across two kitchen chairs, And half-way down the cellar stairs;
Another skipped about, and ran Behind a box and copper
pan,

And

squeezing through with all her power, Escaped the danger of the hour.

The

one every effort strained Until the sink was safely gained.
third

And

lacking pluck to venture out,
for

Lay hid

days within the spout.
tea.

And

this all came about, you see. Through finding too much fault at

THE WOLF AND THE DOG.
CUNNING
wolf, while

roaming round,
bonnet found,

A

shepherd's cloak and

And

soon the garment, long and warm.

Was wrapped

around

his

shaggy form.

"Ha! ha!" laughed
he, "in this
'tis

plain,

A

closer look
I'll

>^MkM^-

at

sheep

gain;

And

well this branch, so nicely bent,
will

The shepherd's crook
They'll take

represent
i'.^

me

for the

guardian old,
in the fold
-

Who
And
The

pens them nightly
at

-

i-'V:

my

leisure,

I,

no doubt,
out."

fattest

lamb can sin^de

So feigning well

the shepherd's tread,

His hacking cough and stooping head

He moved

with

careful

steps

around,
flock

Until

a grazing

he found.

The sheep, with unsuspecting mind, Mistook him for their shepherd kind; And soon would all have victims

fell,

The

rascal

played his part so well,
not a dog's

Had

enquiring

eye
nigh.

Observed the stranger drawing

Between

the

flock

and wolf he
in

ran,

To

thwart him

his

cunning plan.
he,

"On

sheep,"

cried
to

"you might impose;
I

They

trust

eyes, but

to

nose.

A

shepherd's

dress, indeed,

you wear,
is

But

still

the
at

scent of wolf
the

there."

Then

trembling rogue
his

he flew.

And

from

paw

the symbol drew

I

Mv

ruse

has

failed!"

the

schemer

cried,

And

flung^

shepherd's dress aside; turning round, was glad to beat Then, To forest shade a fast retreat.
the

THE BEAR IN WINTER. HEN from the North the winds are
And
ice
is

keen,

When

on every stream mountain peaks and valleys low Are covered with the drifting snow; And Bruin, from his winter home. Is not inclined abroad to roam, But sleeps away the gloomy hour,

seen,

And
W^ill

sighs to hear the April shower,
leafless
tree,

That, pattering through the send the snow to find the sea;

^

;

;

Then, friends that are not so confined, But still possess a rovin*^ mind, That neither wind, nor frost, nor snow, Can hinder rambling to and fro That hunger stil' throughout the

year.

In

summer mild, or winter drear; Whose stomachs must be well supplied, Though snow should land and water
By
light

hide
far.

These creatures come from near and
of

moon

or twinkling

star.

With words of comfort to Upon their hibernating

attend,
friend;
fear

To

lift

his

heart

from

and doubt,

And learn how fat is holding out; To find if grease enough is there To last him till the fields are
Or,
if

bare;

his

bones

will

cut

the

skin

Before the thawing rains begin;

To brace him up with

courage strong

In case the winter should be long

To tell him snow yet clothes the hill. And ice lies on the river still
But
in

the

air
is

and

sky, they note

A
That

happy change
in will

not remote;

three weeks, or

may be

four,*

The

flocks
to

leave

the

stable

door,

No more

feed
fields

on corn or hay.
at

But through the

large

to

stray.

The bear
That strength
hide

is

thankful

for

it

all

And reassures them, great and small.
is

yet within his

To

last

him till the summer tide.
at this
>^^?

Well pleased
they
all

withdraw,

And

leave

him

i'^
^,^0e:Ms*!::^

^--^^**'—**i,^ suck his paw.

there to

;

;

;

THE MICE AND THE
Thrki-:

EGG.
night

hungry mice
see

set

out one
find
bite

To

what they could
of

Because they didn't have a

At home

any kind.
Their whole supply had given out

Hard
They

tiui^.,

were
door;
their

at

their
all

finished

bread and cheese

At

tea,

the night before.

So

left

and

rii/ht,

with sharpened sight,

They rummaged
all

around

To

their

surprise

and great delight

At

last;

an
Said

i^gg

they found.

Number One,
"

We've found

a prize
need,

;

But, though

we
in

stand

We cannot eat
Now how

it

where it lies

shall

we proceed?"

\Vc dare not
Said
"

roll

it

o'er

the

floor,"

thoughtful

Number Two,
cat,

Because the noise would wake the And that would never do."
" 1

have a plan." cried
"I'll
lie

Number Three
in air;

with

feet

Upon mc you can roll And I will hold

the
it

tgg

there.

"Then you may

take

me by
mij^ht

the

tail

And

pull

with
thus,

And

and main unless your strength should
treasure

fail,

The

we may

gain."

"A

Cried

happy thought," said Number One; Number Two, "You're right

;

A

fast

of four and

twenty hours
bright."

Has made our comrade

To

try

the

plan
o'er

they then began
the

And

a rugged road
other

Soon One and Two

drew,

To And

their

secure abode.

when, at last, all danger past, The banquet was begun. Each shook his head and sighing said, !" "That job was nobly done

Then Number One and Two would The wit of Number Three;

praise

And

say such fortitude and
to
see.

grit.

They never thought

Then Number Three would The stoutness of the pair;

praise

in

turn,

And
The

thus,
shell

betw^een

the

friendly group.
there.

was emptied

A TALE OF THE

TIMES.

NE

da;^the W'olf, the Fox and Bear Set out to find some clothes to wear;

For autumn winds were growing keen, And ice upon the pond was seen.

The Wolf was

first

to
fit

reach
as

a store,

And

such a

The

coat

was

out he wore! short, the trowsers wide, And in the wrinkles rats could hide.

mMEfOD:^

His jockey cap, from visor free, His cotton shade would shelter three; His shoes were made in different states, They were not style, nor even mates; Thus, duped and sold at every point. The Wolf seemed badly out of joint

Poor Bruin, further down the

street,
feet,
all,

Was

taken

in,

from head to

With shining Pinchbeck Watch and

He seemed ashamed

to

make

a

call.

K^

e."^

Old

friends

went by the other
all

side,

And

acquaintanceship denied

He

wished himself

in

darkest

den.

Away

from sound and sight of men.

The cunning Fox knew where

to

go,

And

called

on Mister So-and-so,
in

And

the

street or social

hall,
all.

Was much
r

admired by one and

And

ever after loved to

stride.

Along

the

avenue with pride;
collar,

His eye-glass,

cane and

tile,

Proclaiming well the dudeish

style.

THE OWL AND THE
H,
lively

BAT.
met on Beaver
Flat,

was the group of birds

that

The

night on which the hooting owl

was wedded

to the bat!

It

was a

sight, that

summer

night, to

see

them gather

there;
air.

vSome

came by water, some by

land,

and others through the

The eagle quit the mountain-peak, to mix with meaner
And, like a comrade, act the part of

fowl,

groomsman

to the owl

The friendly stork had hastened
It

there, with

long and stately stride;

was

its

happy privilege

to

give away the bride.

;

;

And when arrangements And in the centre stood
Then out
in front

were complete, a

circle

wide they made,
his shining \ead,

the pair, in finest dress arrayed.
|

advanced the crow, and bowed
declared

And

with three loud approving caws

the

couple wed.

Then kind congratulations poured from friends on every side, As thronging round the happy pair, they kissed the blushing bride. And soon the supper was prepared, for each had brought a share. The crow and jay had carried corn the eagle brought a hare
;

The curlew brought
a string of
fish,

just taken from the lake:

The

crane, a brace

of speckled frogs;
the buzzard brought a snake

The owl and active hawk procured
a dozen mice at least

The snipe and

rail

^A

brought water flies, to help along the

feast.

-"3 And when each bird upon the ground,
-?

enjoyed a hearty meal,

They whistled

tunes,

and sang their songs, or danced a lively reel,

Around Moved

the
like

green, with

stately mien, the

a

pair of lovers there,

dodo and curlew through dances old and new.
^nd toe
to
toe,

While

wintx

to

wine:

loud and joyous cries, The stork and raven danced as though
with

competing

for

a prize.

That

ni!>ht <^ood

feeling-

was

restored

between the hawk and jay, ho had not passed a friendly look or word for many a day

And

birds

that

always

went

to roost

before the shades of night

''^0&mS^m
Now
hoj)ped around
until the

upon the groun morning light.

Nor

felt

the

want

of sleep or rest,

but kept the fun alive;

And seemed

as

wide awake as bees, when some one
;^^j^i^5*i^

kicks the hive.

And people long

will

call

to

mind

the

scene on

Beaver
to

Flat,

The night on which

the

hooting owl was wedded

the

bat

THE STORKS NEW

SUIT.
suit,

HE
And

stork

put on
called

his

grand new

And
suits

his friends to see;
fit,

Remarking,

my

"Tis a splendid mate and me."
group began

At once the

friendly

The

clothes

to

criticise;

O'er every part and

seam they ran

Their sharp, discerning eyes.

One thought

the

collar

was too
long;

high,

And

this

or that was

Another thought it hung awry, The style and cut were wrong.

And

so

he cut and clipped about,
as

And worked

best he coukl;

I

He

gathered

in,

and loosened

out,

As

they advised

he should.
the

And when

change was

all

complete.

^^

P^LI^Ef?

COX

And dressed again was

he,

No

bird

that

ever stood

on

feet
see.

Was

such a sight to

THE THANKSGIVING DINNER.
"

Now, mother," said a turkey May I go out and play ?
*'

bold,

You know to-morrow may

And

be cold, snow-drifts block the way.

"The hens are scratching in the yard, The geese are in the swale, The doves are cooing on the roof, The ducks are round the pail."

"

My
"

darling," said the

I

You're growing fat have misgivings in my mind, And dare not let you out.

mother kind, and stout,

" 1

much

prefer

to

have you here
eye
is

Away

from

human

Thanksj^-iving clay

drawing near,

And

that's

the

reason why."

The good advice was wasted

all

Upon

her

wayward son
into

She turned her head

a

stall,

And

out the villain

nm.

Hut while he wandered

far

and
;

free,

The farmer sauntered by

**A finer bird than this," said he,

"Has seldom met my

eye.

"I look to have

my

brother Jim

Come
The
best

out with us to dine.
is

not too
will

good

for

him

This lad

answer

fine."

Not twenty minutes by

the
led,

clock

A

rambling
lay

life

he

Before he

across

the

block.

The axe above

his

head.

We'll

pass

the

execution
that

act,

The plucking
The dressing

he got,

that within

was packed,

And oven

roasting

hot.

And

see
all

him when
nicely
the
lies,

browned.

Upon
he

plate

To draw

the
all

praise

from

around,

For tenderness and
size.

And

next,

in

fancy

hear the click
at

Of knives and

forks

play;

And see the To where
Then mark

plates
that

returning c^uick
lay.

turkey

the

latest

scene of

all.

When
And

that rich

feast

was through,

children with their fingers small,
in

The wish-bone break

two.

(
\

THE EAGLES
Thus does
\\'hile

GIFT.
its

mind, sailing high before the wind,
Eat^le

the

speak

i:'

.ir^jiAmfi^^

With
That

presents
in

for

her babies
wait her

small
call.

the

tree-top

"Now And

while the chimes of Christmas ring

Santa Glaus makes haste to bring

His toys

to

scatter

far

and near
dear;
for

To
It

glad
bear

the

hearts
fittinjj^

of children

seems a
in

time

me

To

mind my babies wee,

Who, perched
Are

aloft

in

mornini^
the
gift

air.
I

waitin<^

for

bear.

A

mallard taken by the spring, No finer ever flapped a wing.

A

hare

surprised

in

woods above
a mothers
love.

Will

prove
turkey
fish

how deep

A

taken from her race Just as the farmer showed his

face.

A

that

jumped

to

meet the

rain.

And

ne'er will

try that

feat again.

A

banner bright that ever tells, The happy land where freedom dwells.

The

to()tinL(

horns, so

long and round,
well,

To send abroad their stunning sound, To rouse the birds and beasts as
That
in

the

vales

antl

mountains dwell,

And
Before
the

from his slumbers start the swain, sun has kissed the plain,

These
I

are the presents, great

and grand,

bring to

cheer

my baby

band."

THE AVARICIOUS
HE
livelong
night, without

SPIDER.
a pause
his

To wipe

his

brow, or rest

claws,

The spider planned his subtle scheme. And spun his web above the stream

On

every side flung out his guys To help support the weight of flies. With care each fibre was applied,

And
V'/va../-'.

every knot securely
the
J

tied.

Until

<^eometric
all

net

'/''''•":£'V'

m
And

Exhaust.

his

spinneret.

But when the sun looked o'er the hill, To laugh at those who slumbered still,

XvcMt

The

active

flies

began

to

swarm,

Their daily duties to perform,

The spider, in close ambush lay, Where he could view the coming
waited with an anxious air

prey;

The errand reward of skill and care. Soon, one by one, and two by two. The flies began to tumble through

0^;m^:4

The The The

caddis and
beetle

the
their
his

drao^on

fly,

Mosquitoes with
with

plaintive

cry,

drowsy
fields

strain,

weevil bound
to

for

of

i^^ain,

And hornets in Were introduced
Until
the

their

mad
trouble

career
here.

web shook on
struggling

the
to

tree

With

captives

be

free.

And

thousjh he mi«'ht have been content
the
like

With what The spider,

Fates

already sent,
kind,

some human

Possessed an avaricious mind. For still he sat and shook his head And stroked his beard and smiling- said, "Though hungry to the inmost core I'll wait until it tangdes more,

Nor

A

upon a dozen flies, thousand only satisfies." But while he pined with hunger
feast
Still

there,

waiting

for

a glutton's share.

The fast increasing weight and strain Began to rend the net in twain.

The main supports
that

reached about

On
At

either

side

were giving out
last

a general
ruin

spread

Across the web,

from foot to head,
Till with a

ing now,

The whole

boui/h

The spinner tangled in his nest Then fared no better than the rest. For down among the broken shreds,
Still

grasping at the flying threads,
find

To
The

that

all

avaricious

were loose as schemer fell
flies

well,

And
The
There

soon the
struggling
are

fish

put out of view and spider too.

spiders abroad

besides

those

on the web

With

far-reaching fingers

Who
In

and keen biting neb. harass and hoard till they suddenly fall
midst of their plans,
all.

the

and the grave swallows

;

THE NOISY
Once
Of the beasts
that

MAGPIE.
many
there,
fly

a magpie gave a party, and invited

roam

the forests

and the birds that

in air.

Long and From the

fine

was

the procession as the) journeyed to the feast

north and south they gathered,

from the west and from the

east.

'aT'

r-

w'i 3f'
i:

> '^f^r}:m\ if
^'X

.1

if

t
V-'

i

^.

^l

Even

insects

were included
fly,

in

the

invitation

grand,

And

the locust,

and

beetle, with their cousins,

were on hand.
in

When

around the tempting dishes they assembled

delight,
bright.

Every creature there was happy, every countenance was

But the guests had hardly settled down to business, with a mind

To

replenish

empty places

with whatever they could find, Ere the ma^Tpie marred the pleasure

she

commenced her noisy chat. About this she loudly gabbled,
and then chattered about that, Till the guests became uneasy (many wished her tongue vvas tied), While their discontented glances Were exchanged on every side.

They were
to leave
till

loath
their places

the feast

sit

was at an end. But they couldn't and listen
the
chatter
friend.

to

of their

remember an appointment must keep," remarked the coon " I am ailing," groaned the lion, and must say good-afternoon." Said the fox, " You must excuse me what I never did before, Leaving home in such a hurry,
" I
I

;

I

forgot to lock

my

door."

was thoughtless," cried the "coming out to eat and dance:
" I

spider,

;

;

I've a

thread

to

spin

this

evening
to

that will

reach across
together,

France."

Ana
And

at

last

all

rose

(down
in

their

bones and

bits

they flung),

every

way departed

to escape her noisy tongue.

Not a Not an

bird

but quit the banquet,
not a beast but
left

the

ground,

insect

but was crawling
the

to escape

awful sound.

So

the magpie learned a lesson

deeply wounded was her pride,
Standinir there amon<'- the dishes,

with the i^uests

all

scattered wide.

And no
So

later

invitations

could induce a friend to come
that bird,
it

is

reported,

ever afterward was dumb.

THE ALPHABET
NE
day,
in

IN COUNCIL.
met
free

secret

council,

The

letters

of the

alphabet,

To

settle,

with

a

debate,

This matter of important weic^ht

il
j'l'ill

lii'i

Which members of th" useful band

The

highest
It

honors should command.
affair.

was a delicate For
all

the

twenty-six were

there.

And

every one

presumed

that

he

Was

just

as

worthy as could be

While &, a

sort of go-between,

Was

seated like a judge serene,

Impartially to

hear the case,

Said S, arising from his
"

And keep good order in the place. seat, And smiling in his own conceit,
at

Now, comrades, take a glance

me, There's grace

in
;

every curve

you see And beauty
which
you'll

never

find In letters of the

broken kind.

Now

^^
1'

there

is

I,

straight
;

up and down

How

m
L,

incomplete

is

such a

clown
foot,

!

Without a

without a head,
curve, or

A graceful
and K, and

proper spread.

And

F

and

Who look
fell.

as tho'

on ice they
,

Or Z,

,

our
friend.

many - angled

j^yT
»

Who
a

forms,

indeed,
end.

fitting

l^J^
r

Such homely

letters, at the best.

Are

heaping

insult

on

the

rest."

At
feet,

this

there

was

a

'f7^

/7^--^^

sudden
cil

spring

To

around the coun-

ring.

And

every

letter,

down

to

Z,

I
th

Said such aspersions

must

not be.

"

No
in

personalities," cried they,

"Should be indulged
here, to-day;"

While &, good
Said A,

order to restore. Applied his

truncheon to the
"

floor.

One moment
all

will suffice
lies
;

To show
Suppose

you

where honor
no head,
brother

there were the

like

nie.

To

lead

way

for

B,

What would beOr who would
might go on unI

come of neighbor
ever think of
to the end.

C,

D?

And say

you

all

on me defeet.

pend."
Said,
is

Then O,
of
all,

arising to his

" I,

am most
below.
all

complete

;

No

waste material

there.

But just enough, and none to spare;
tails

No
I

horns
O."

above,

no
"

An

even-balanced,

perfect

Said E,
the

Though
Wellof-

may

beauty boast, In service

appear

most

;

nigh to every word
ten more than once

I'm called,
installed
requir'd.
I
;

And

While

some so seldom are

From serThen

^^T^
/^WLji
((^^ly^W/J^fz^P^
r^f

^^^^

^^^^ should

be retired."

/

irito

sundrygroups

they'd break.

To
Or

argue points, and
^^^^

Sigers shake,
theirTace,

K//L^^I^^
-^^-^c^-

^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^

Their plain

-=^*=

-^ -^

-^

opinions of the case.

*^

;

^ ^^
'%,

While

&

kept
till

ihumpini^^

he

wore

A hole half through
the

oaken

floor.

At
" I

last

he

cried,

plainly see

You'll never in the world agree,

Though you should stand

to

argue here,

And

shake your
let

fists

throughout the year.

Now,

me
first

tell

you,

plump and

plain,

From
'Tis

to last, you're all too vain.

true that some,

in

form ant

Tace,

Seem

suited for a leading place
But, whether

crooked,
straight,

or slim.

Of
%

graceful

curve, or balance
trim,

^
'^

The best of you,
from

A

to Z,

(On second thought

you'll

all

agree),

ithout support

would worthless
hand
in

be,

But when

united,

hand,

In proper shape

)ou form a

band

Of

strent/th

sufficient,

be

it

known.

To

shake a monarch from his throne.

So be

content,
rests

both great and small,
alike

For honor

on

all."

"He
"All
So,

speaks the truth," the
claims
for

letters cried;

private
&:

we'll

lay

aside,"

thanking

judgment
there.

fair.

The controversy ended

THE FUNNY MANDARIN.
HERE
Who
Of
was a funny mandarin
had a funny way,

sliding

down
the balustrade

A
With arms
At
risk
in

dozen times a day.

air

and streaming
and
brain.

hair,

of bone

Around and round

the

winding

He

slid

the

rail

amain.

The "surest" aim may miss
The
"safest"
ship

the

game,

go down,
will

And

one mistake
wisest

bring to blame
in

The

men

town

And

thus

it

ran, that

daring man,
fail,

Who

never thought to

,,-fyji.y^

CO^'
/^.^^ /H£^

At

last,

in

spite

of every plan,

Went gliding off the rail, And downward, clinging to his He shot with visage pale.

fan,

Tlin WHIiKL-B ARROW RIDE.

Down

the

lane

runs

Johnny,

Hopping
like

a sparrow,
Takin*^
sister

Susan
In

his
little

barrow.

Little

man

be

eareful

When
Trouble

wheeling round the bend,
lies

in

corners

You

surely

may depend.

!

!

Just

as

we

expected
out upon the road,
all

Spilled

After

the

warning,
the

Now

lies

precious

load.

Gather up the pieces. And lead your sister in, Early in life, alas

Our

troubles

do begin.

THE
HEN
the

FAIRIES' GIFT.

heard the

Kidderminster Fairies rumor going round,
Forester,

How the young and favor'd

who guarded game and ground, Was to wed the Florist's daughter,
one as good as she was
Tliey
fair,

^^^.*t:^^-

make a wedding-gift befitting such a pair. golden day of promise came, which saw the couple wed, Soon the When the solemn vows were spoken and the Parson s blessing said.
resolved to

Lo!

that

night the

Fairies gathered

from the East,

From
to

the

\orth

and

some land the

and from the West South they hastened youth possess'd.
over
rivers,

Over mountams,
through
Still

the fields

and

forests green.

of the Queen. was represented, all the occupations through. From the man who planned a building to the one who pegged a shoe, And they set to work in earnest, throwing jackets all aside. To erect a stately mansion for the husband and his bride.

they mustered by the hundred, at the

summons

Every trade

Twas a mighty undertaking, of .^uch magnitude indeed,
Nothing else but Fairy workmen could with such a task succeed. There they bustled without resting,
as
Till

thcnigh

life

itself

was

bet.

their

How

hands were blistered and their garments wringing wet, they sawed, and bored, and "boosted up" the timbers, through
little

the night,

How

they hammered, hammered, hammered, to get done morning Hght;
are chased,

ere

For the Fairies who from labor by the dapple dawn While their work is yet unfinished, are forevermore

disgraced.

Oh, what harmony existed

!

Not a breath was wasted
sion
f'll

ti.ere,
air.

Not an oath or harsh expres-

like

poison on the

Here the blacksmith and his helper made the solid anvil sound While they forged the bolts and braces that secured the structure round.
There the mason with his trowel kept the hod-men moving spry, the massive chimney tower'd twenty cubits to the sky, Till And the painters followed after with their ladders and their pails»

Spreading paint upon
}'

the

finish

ere

the

'

joiner drove his nails.

Even
their

cobblers
pincers,

with

-|

and

their awls

and pegs

J
-'

of wood,
sisting in

Were

as-

the enter-

^

prise

they
the
putty-roll

by pegging as could. There
will,

glazier with his

While

was working with a the plumber plumbed

the

building, without sending in his bill;

And

the sculptor with his mallet

by

the marble lintel stood, Till he chis-

eled the inscription

A REWARD

FOR BEING GOOD.

When no article was wanting for the comfort of the pair, I^^rom

the scraper at the en-

trance

to

the

rods

upon
the

the stair,

Then
little

wizened

millionaires, possess-

ed of wealth untold,

and coffers many rich donations roll'd And before the East was purpled by the arrows of the sun All the Fairies had departed, for the edifice was done.
Into
treasure-vaults

So

that

couple took possession,

and
or

in

all

the
xi

country round
riches,

There was none enjoyed

su'

such happiness
years
in

profound.
kin,

There they
Till

lived

for

comfort,

and then followed next of
a

dozen generations
lived

in succession

therein.

Many

walls
that

since

then

have tumbled,

But

in the dust lie stones and lime, mansion, built by Fairies,
still

defies

the

teeth

of Time.
roof,

W'inds

may howl around its gable, snow may settle on its Rain may patter, hail may batter,
but
it

towers weather-proof.

Gone
In the

are

days of Fairies, let folk tell you v hat they moonlight they assemble
to

not the

will.

perform

their

So be
For

careful,

oh,

wonders be cautious,

still.

what you
the
to

say, or think, or do,

Fairies
erect

be waiting a house for you.

may

THE MENDICANT.
BELL.
ING-a-ling, a-ding, ding!

MISTRESS.

"Who's

at

the

door?"

DOMESTIC.

"A
He
And

poor,

bhnd beggar-man,

with children half a score,

never saw a greenback,

never saw a house.
couldn't
tell

an elephant

from a meadow-mouse.

He
He

never saw the sun

rise,

never saw

it

set.

never saw^ the silver moon,
a
star

^

or planet yet.
birth,

Been blind from his

ma'am,

born and couldn't see,

And how he found the bell-knob
is

a mystery."

MISTRESS.

"His
All

lot

is

hard,

indeed, Jane;
all

to

grope about the land,

dark behind,

dark before, and dark on either hand.

But
Just

human face, or on a book to pore, Or, at the window stand and gaze into a fancy store. beggars can't have money now, my bank account is give the man a bone to pick, and tell him he must
never see a

To

low,

go."

;

;

DOMESTIC.

"My
And
So

mistress

sympathizes,

sir,

with one so sorely

tried,
;

gladly would she give the sight that nature has denied
at hand, to
;

But pennies now are not

answer each appeal,

here's a piece of beef, sir

'twill

serve you for a meal."

MENDICANT.
"

Oh, thankee,

mum, thankee

;

111

take your marrow-bone
better than a stone.

'Twill

do

to fight a mastiff

w ith much

Through one not half so handy, mum, the Philistines of yore, Got, as your Book will teach you, all they bargained for and more. And thanks to cow that bore the bone, and to the pot that boiled,

And
I'll

to

the

mistress,

and

to

you, the

doggy's

game

is

spoiled.
field.

walk the
this at

street in safety

now, the turnpike and the
staff,

For

once will be
I

my

my

weapon, and

my

shield.

And
I'll

should

reach a river's side and wish to leave the shore,

step on board a boat or barge, and this shall be
I

my

oar

And when

quit these earthly scenes, far happier lands to trace,
at

This bone, erected

my

head,

shall

mark

my

resting-place."

THE FOX AND THE
CUNNING
Her
"

TRAP.

Fox once thus addressed
pair,

infant

with hunger pressed:
are

Vou
to

see

my

eyes

not

so

blear

As
"This object spread
so
still

mistake what's

l)ing

here.

and

plain,

But shows
of

the

tricks

human
it

brain.

Observe
it

well,

proves

a trap,

All

set

and ready
the snap
to

lor

And woe
tail

either

or foot,

That

is

by chance
it

upon
"The
Will

out.
iAkdi

fox

that

stands

that

fixture

o'er

never enter burrow more,

Or from

the

roost,

in

outhouse low,
in

Drag down

the

fattest

the

row.

Beware of objects

that

appear
clear.

Upon

the

surface

smooth and

"Imh-

underneath,
vilest

as

often

found,

The
But

dangers

may abound.
that
bait,
fate.

lay

your paw upt)n

That moment would decide your

Not Not
Into

all all

the
the

sprightliness
art

of thews,
infuse

that

fears

the

mintl,

could

then

defend,
end.
its

Or save you from a woeful
That subtle
sprini^^

would

chans4;e

form,

As

swift

as

li<;htning
twij^^s

rends the storm.

The The

jaws, that
rise in

and leaves conceal,
.icel.

Would
Around

view as ringing
so
deftly

shining
this

links
tree,

passed
fast;

would hold you

Then

\ain

would be your bark or moan.
heart
is

The

hunter's

hard as

stone.

At morn he would beside you stand

With gun

or

cudgel

in

his

hand.

And
With

earth,

and trap and
of your
I

foliage

stain
brain.

blotches

scattered

To

pro\e what

am

saying
this

now,
bough,

Hut mark how soon

withered

Though lio;htly pressed A\ith nicest care, Will show the evil liirkinj^- there. The trap is sprung-! the daiv^er past,
So.

with

the

bait

\\e"ll

break our

fast.

"

Ah. native
crafty

cunnin^- spoils the plan

Of
In

e\il-niincled
for

man,

vain

us

they

mix

the

pill,
fill.

Arrange the

trap,

or nuisket

Keep

And

your e\es. and cool your head, shun the dangers round \ou spread.
clear
blessini;-

A

mother's
eat

on you

rest.

Now

your piece of chicken-breast."

THE CAT AND
A
Away
In
iTKHise

THi: MOUSE.

was chased,
in
its

;>!,!",':;'"
iliill!:(i!ii|ll|ll||,||i.

and

haste

from claws

to tiy,

use an empty bottle
placed,

That happened

to

be nigh.

Then

puss), peeping

through the neck,

Could scarce
suppress a grin

To

see
it

how calm
met her gaze,
safe
it

As

sat within.

She turned the bottle
upside

down

And shook

it

freely there;

But nothing could
induce the mouse

To

seek the open

air.

Then
S,Vl!l!!,ih|.'l,
,

lying

down

up(;n the floor

((Min
"
'

ilr

She reached a paw
to

take
the

her,

But

still

mouse
enoui^di,

had room

And
She raised the
overhead
\\ith
all

blessed the bottle-maker.

bottle

the strength

she knew,

And
a

in

thousand pieces small

The

port of safety
flew.

/^r ,v

.'^

^

P)Ut

while
filled

the

fragments
air,

the

The mouse
with
action
spry,

Ouick reached
another hiding-place.

And

scjueaked a glad

"good-bye.

A BACK-\ ARD PARTY.
NH
All

evening bright there was a sight

That should recorded
gazed
in

be.

wonder
things

—well
to
see.

they might-

Such

funn)'

A

neighbor's yard

is

smooth and hard,
block extends,

And through And there, came

the

lively rats

and mice,
friends.

With town and country
It

may have bc^n
They
celebrated

a weading scene
there,

A

birthday party, or soiree.

Enjoyed

in

open

air.

But

this

is

plain,

whatever

-train

Had brought the rogues that From loft and lane and bins of

way.
grain,

A

jovial

troop were

they.

The household
Is

cat,

so sleek
fed.

and

fat,

by the servants

And only leaves the rug or mat To find her crc:tm and bread.
So nought was there to harm The lively groups below
or scare

That danced and played in light and shade, Or rambled to and fro.

^

•»

.

j^»

No

slaves

were they to fashion's sway,

-

.

With

all its outs and ins: For some wore gauze or summer While others dressed in skins.

straws,
,:

Beside the gate, upon a crate That once held earthen ware, An old musician, throned

j.

in

state,

,

Gave many a pleasing air. He scraped and paw'd and chopped and But never seemed to tire,

saw'd,

;

;

Though

oft

his

bow would
strings

run as though

To

set

the

on

fire;

While at his side, in pomp and pride, A knowing mouse was stalled,

And

while the sets

he sharply eyed,
called:

The mazy dance he

"To To

partners

bow

the

first,

and now

those on

either

side,

Across and back, the lady swing,

:^^

Now

balance

all

"
!

he

cried.

^^^Xift
run.

Twas charmmg fun to see them And curtsey, V ^w, and wheel.
^*^

Or slip and slide and trip and Through some plantation reel. The
smallest

glide

mouse about
half

the house,
rat,

And most
Danced

destructive

an hour

with grace

and power

An

Irish jig at that

Upon a pan the dance began. And round the yard they pass'd,
But dancing
still for life,

until

The

rat

gave out

at last

The Highland

fling

and pigeon-wing.

The polka and

quadrille

The

waltz and schottish


bill.

^

everything

Was
The

found upon the
dance

latest
thr!<-

came from France,
or Spain,

From Germany

The most delightful hop or prance. Their programme did contain.

And people who could gain a view
Of
either jig or reel

Would

hardly grudge
the lively crew

A

little

corn or meal.

The moon was high And when again
and morning
Before they
quit their pi
nigh,

they're

in

the vein

To

pass a night

To
their

shake

paw and say "Goodbye,"

And

pass

in pairs

away.

DIVIDING

THE GAME.
of sharpest
sight,

WO

foxes

sly,

Set out

to

hunt one summer night,
hills,

Across the

around the swales.
rails.

And
They
traveled
free,

through the barnyard's gates and

and traveled
of

far,

Beneath the

light

moon and

star.

'

.

And
It

then,

as the

dawn of morninfj came,
rogues dividing game.
"

found
fox

>

One

had bagged a rooster stout

That seven years, or thereabout.

Had

sat

above the

rattling

horn
the

Of stabled cows, and

hailed

morn.
line,

One caught a duck Of heavy build and

of Russian
feather

fine,

And both at Had nabbed

once, with

even leap,
fast

a

snipe
to
be,

while

asleep.

No
One
But

easy job

it

seemed

Between the two,
the snipe

to halve the three.

claimed the rooster, one the duck.
still

was

there to pluck.

And each one thought To add the dodger to
So
there

it

was but
share.

fair

his

they

sat,

till

day was

ripe,

Disputing who should have the snipe.

Each quoting Law
Like lawyers
in

to

back his claim,

pursuit of game.

At

last,

a hunter passing by

Upon the And with
Soon
rid

robbers
his

set

his

eye,
true,

double barrel
country of the

the

two.

"

THE RUNAWAY
TTPON A
their

PAIR.

way, through country green,

loving pair
steed
is

may now be
fleet

seen,
ride,

The

whereon they

He knows

the

section, far

and wide,

The woods that The mountains

frown, the streams that flow
steep and valleys low.
fallen

He knows

where

timbers

lie

Across the creek,

now foaming

high.

He knows where branching cedars grow And hide the path that winds below.. No knight of ancient chivalry
E'er rode a surer steed than he.
;

No

spavined

foot,

no foundered knee,
the
tree.

i

But sound as apple on

'

The meadows wide they quickly cross, The pastures bare, the banks of moss, The rocks and w^oods they leave behind For Union now is in their mind.
,

>

.

'/

"A
" I

strange
think
the

affinity."

you cry;
as you, and
sigh.

same

But who can fathom love

affairs,

Or who account
Enough, a blessing
we'll

for ill-matched pairs ?

bestow.

And

watch them as away they go.

No
Nor

angry kindred need pursue.
alter
wills,

or

mischief brew.

;

The

loss

of friends or rich

estate

Will not make her forsake her mate; Nor threats of punishment or pain

Cause him

to

turn or

or

draw the
save.

rein;

So

those

who may
their

object

rave

May

calm

minds and language
.

-^>
-ifc

_ ''-^^^~

I
The wondering And close the
The
crow^ds

may

shut the

door,

blind and
to

sash

once more
leave the
fire

gossip ring
the

may

And
For miles
will

bjd again
at

retire,

shortly intervene

And

hearts

be joined

Gretna Green.

A'

THE ELEPHANT AND DONKEY.

A
J\

every step requirci! care Once met by chance a rural pair, Donkey with assurance filled,

HERE

•^-

And Elephant
The

of heavy build.

"

latter said, with manners kind, Here one alone can footing find, So let us choose the safest scheme

And And

singly cross the brawling stream.

You're nearest to the shore you see should, I think, give way to me. When I have cross'd the dangerous place Then you can soon resume your pace."

"Not so," the Donkey quick Who, blinded by his silly
Mistook the
traveler's

replied,

pride.
air

civil

Eor evidence of craven fear; And thus went on with haughty

tone,

"My time is precious as your own. And here I'll stand throughout the day Upon my rights, let come what may."
Now, angered at The Elephant
conceit

so great,
debate.

cut short

He
And

gazed a moment
cried,

in

surprise,

with

fire

in

his

eyes,

"Then mark how soon your foolish Will bring reward:" He made a

pride
stride,

And
The

reaching out his trunk, he gave Donkey such an upward wave,

High over head, through air he passed, some branches held him fast; And people passing by may see
Until

His bones,

still

hanging

in

the

t-ree.

;


A CHINESE ADVENTURE.

^^ HREE To \\

heathen
cross
the

men

set out
sea,

one day
Pi

China

Ah Hong Wun Ho, Gui Tong And daring Hup Si Lee.
not, of all

Lo,

But there was

the

lot,

V^
^r
,

A

single

one who knew
in

The proper way,

which to

sail,

Upon

the

ocean blue.
in

They may have paddled Or crossed a ditch or
But never ventured
far

a pond,

two.

beyond
water-lilies

Where

grew.

With such a

glaring,

sad neglect

Of

arts

that
prize,

sailors

Some

trouble

they

might well expect,
If hurricanes

should

rise.

The

first

was captain

of the ship.

He

kept an eye

ahead

;

The second played

the

part of mate,
the lead.

He

steered

and heaved

The third was boatswain, cook, and crew Which kept him on the go;

He

had

to

spread the
the

sail

aloft,

And make
And
all

tea below.
lake,

who've sailed upon a
sound.
he'd

A

river, sea, or

Would know

have

to

keep awake
round.

When

gales

were

shifting

There was

distress,
facts
is

you well may guess
I

Before^ the

show;

ocean

not always calm,

As

navigators know.

The tempests may
through forests play,

And

turn

the roots

on

high,

Or change their and nothing

tack
slack,
fly.

Across the prairies

And
_
'

havoc dread,

at

seasons spread,

ll^?

As

here

and there they roam
their
stay,
-

'^

But short
with

wood
is

or clay,
their

The ocean

home.

/

;;

The winds began, The ship went At times she pointAs often back

the

billows ran

up and down
ed out to sea,
to

town.

The

sea-sick
left
t:ie

captain

bow,
to
lie;

Between the decks

The
Let
all

boatswain,
tea,
fly.

busy making
the

canvas

And, oh

!

the mate,

the silly mate,

The worst

of

all

was he;

To

find

how deep
lay,

the water

He

leaped into the

sea.

Then mate and
and
captain,
to yell

crew,
too.

Began

and roar;

So people threw them out a line,

And
And
glad were they

hauled the ship ashore.

to

settle
rice

down,

To rats and To sip their tea

^^^

,^

^
of the

again

The dangers

and talk about main

THE CALM-MINDED MEN.

,

WO

sober,

philosophic men,

Once lived, the story goes. Between the marble Apennines,

And where
The

the

Tiber flows.

date at which they trod the earth,

down Upon some
Is

in black

and

white,

ancient manuscript
sight.

Now
^_
V

laid

away from

Twas
.

said

these

worthies could control

The passions, vile or vain, Which often wreck the human
If

soul.
.-

given scope or

rein.

Their fame had spread to other lands

Than
In

that

they called

their

own,
tongues,

foreign

climes and heathen

Their names were widely known.

>

And when

they

moved along
loud,

the street,
-

The acclamations

Would rise, as though two sceptred Were passing through the crowd.
In

kings,

spacious halls and

public schools.

Their painted portraits hung.

At once

to

honor them as men.
the

And

stimulate

young

;

In

that

dominion lived a prince,
thoughtful
in

A man of Who studied,
The
rest

mind

a searching way,

of

human

kind.

When men
Would To

for

virtues

were extolled,

.JLL-i

This student,

still in doubt, dive beneath the surface smooth, bring their failings out.

He

heard of those calm-minded men, Who smiled at every ill, And moved through life without complaint,

Though up

or

down
fine,

the

hill.

He

sent an

invitation

With compliments and
Requesting them

all.

.o

come and dine
hall.

At

his

palatial

The

invitation

reached their hand,
they broke the
seal,

And when

They smiled acceptance, for in truth They loved a savory meal.
Oh, whether high or lowly born, The scorned or pet of Fame;

The
H

florid priest, or

student pale,
the

The

failing

is

same.

In time they saddled up their steeds
f
.

And started on To make a journey
rested
the

their

way;
town,

to

the

Required a summer's day.

The farmers Or laid

And

stood to watch

Across the

The birds saluted From branches And monks looked

To

bless the

;

;

They took no water on

the

road,

No

wine,

no meat or bread That they could better justice do, To what the host might spread.

And

as the

sun went circHng round,

Their behs they often drew To ease the hunger-pain within,

-—

That seemed

to

gnaw

t,.jm through.

They needed

not a bitter draught
rein,

Before they drew the

To
The

help them relish any dish,
coarse
or
plain.
in

However
prince

received

them

a style

Befitting

men

of power,
cheerful

And showed them to a To wait the banquet

room

hour.
red,

Above some embers, glowing

A

caldron took the heat,
to

That might have served

stew a

calf,

With
While on
the

all

its

parts

complete.

table, sat in

sight

A

dish of oval

mold.

That could, beneath its cover white. The caldron's burden hold.

The guests, in waiting, sat one side. And felt their lengthy fast; And many a keen, enquiring eye.
At pot and
Said one,
" I

table

cast.

think
calf
" I

our host has got
in

A
The

sheep or
other said,

stew;"

think you'll see
in

A

pudding come

view."

A

pudding!
Their
eyes

At

that

magic word
like

shone

a

flame;
rise

For pleasing thoughts will ever At mention of the name.

;

;

A pudding
Of plums

!

with, perhaps, a
it

peck

within

rolled;

And quarts of yellow sauce To cover all like gold!
Oh, cheeks

prepared

may fade, and eyes grow dim

weak and lame; through ages, fresh and fair, The pudding charms the same.
limbs grow

And

But

still,

Sustained by such surmises sweet, They sat in waiting there;
Believing,
still,

the

dish

in view,
fare.

Contained the princely
But, meantime, in

another room,

sumptuous feast was spread soups and meat, confections sweet, Of And wines both white and red.

A

By

every plate a flagon stood, At every chair a slave To promptly pass, with nimble hand,

Whate'er the heart might crave.

And

here

it

was the

host's

intent,

They should at once repair; When it was proved they could, unmoved, Great disappointment bear.
_

>

"^

Ere long the prince returned and said, "Approach the dish and view, The tempting feast that's been prepared. For famous men like you."

Then forwu i to the table ran The men with anxious air; For each one strove to be the first

To
And

lay the

treasure

bare.

O, lightly blame their acts so rude,
pass
their
failings o'er;
fast,

The knock comes

heavy, hard and

When
One raised the cov-

hunger's at the door.
er

from the dish,
to

A

spoon the

other delves;
surprise,

But great was :heir It empty as

find

themselves.

Then said the prince
Through nations
But, doubting
If truth
still,

" Your

fame is spread
old;

new and
I

sought to prove^

indeed

was
disappointment,
patient blood
in
'tis

told.

No And
I

averred,
rile;

Your

can
w^ith

now,

keeping

reports,

look to see you smile."
rose
the

Then

two philosophers,
instant
there;

Upon the Though not a

Was
And
They
Until
it

sentence, or a sign. passed between the pair.
roll their sleeves,

both commenced to

tucked, and rolled, and drew;

seemed their shoulder blades Would come at last in view.

And

seizing

on the struggling

host,

They dragged him
*

to

the pot;
fire

Where, though the
,

was
still

extinct,

The water

was

hot.

They plunged him in the steaming bath, They soused him o'er and o'er;
Until
for

-^

'^

":;

__^

mercy loud he

called,

And

did

for

servants roar.

And

worse the usage might have been, But people rushing in,

Responding

to

the

master's
sin.

call,

Prevented greater

Now, when

the

two philosophers

reached the door to go, They turned, and thus addressed the host, In accents deep and slow.

Had

"We
To

leave

you now, but with
or that
is

regret;

When you
prove that

attempt again
this
so,
*

Beware of hungry men.

The temper

that

is

meek and
the

mild,

When

appetite's appeased;

May shame

mood
is

of tiger wild,

When
But,

one

hunger- teased."

"You

"Stay!" replied the noble princs, leave not as you came; A banquet has been spread within,

And

you'll enjoy the

same.

There may you eat and drink enough. No vengeance shall be sought; Although it cost me usage rough, I've proved what long I thought-

When

hunger enters
patience

in

the

nest.

Then

flutters

out;

No room

for

However

both within the breast, broad or stout."

So down

they

sat,

as

well

they might,
fast;

To

break their lengthy

And oft' And

the
oft'

silver

cup was drained,

the

plate

was passed.
couple took the road,
told,

And when
It

that

was by people

They knew not whether sun or moon, Or stars above them rolled.
But soon
the story got abroad,

And

circled far

and wide;
prince applied.

How
traveled
as

thev had failed to stand the test

The cunning
It
still,

rumors

will,

And

told against their fame;

They were not masters

of themselves,

Although they had the name.

So down
in

from walls,

schools

and

halls,

Came portraits To lie in dusty
By
spiders

once so prized; lumber lofts,
criticised.

'

THE SULTAN OF THE
I

EAST.

HERE
Who

was a Sultan of the East

used to ride a stubborn beast;
the

A

marvel, of

donkey-kind,
his

That much perplexed

owner's mind.

By turns he moved Then backed a rod

a rod ahead,
or so
instead;

And
I

thus the day would pass around,

The Sultan gaining

little

ground.

The

servants

on before would stray
their

And
'

pitch

tents

beside

the way.

And
The
Sultan

pass the time as best they might,
Until
tried:
their

master hove

in

sight.

many methods
dozen

He clicked, and And stripped a
Of
But
branches,
all

coaxed, and spurs applied,
trees, at least,

to

persuade the beast.

his

efforts

went

for

naught;

No
At

reformation
length,

coul'd

be wrought.
palace

before

the

gate
state.

He called And bade
By

the wise

men of the them now their skill
the

display

finding where

trouble

lay.

With solemn

looks and thoughts profound.

The men

of learning gathered round.

\

;

,

The

beast was
o'er

measured

with care;

They proved him by the plumb and square
The compass to
his ribs applied,

And

every joint

by rule

was

tried

But nothing could
the doctors find

To

prove him different

from his kind

Said they: "Your
It

Highness!

appears
is

The

beast

sound

from hoof to ears;

No outward

blemishes

we

see

To

limit action fair

and

free.

Each bone is in its proper place, Each rib has its allotted space; His wind is good,
his

sinews strong,

Throughout the frame
there's

nothing wrong.

In view of this, the fact is plain The mischief lies within the brain.

Now, we

suggest, to stop his tricks,
his

A
"
.

sail upon Of goodly

back you

fix,

size, to catch the

breeze
please."

,

And urge him forward where you
The Sultan
well
their

wisdom

praised;

Two

masts upon the beast were raised, And, schooner-rigged from head to tail, With halliards, spanker-boom, and sail. In proper shape equipped was he, As though designed to sail the seal

And when
..

the Sultan next bestrode

That beast upon a lengthy road,
V-'
;..

With

favoring winds, that whistled strong
swiftly

And And

urged the

craft along,

The people

cleared the track with speed;

old and young alike agreed

A

stranger sight could

From

not be found, side to side the province round.

;

A LESSON FOR YOUNG

MICE.

Y

children,"

said

the

knowing mouse,

"I've lived for years within this house.

Through
I I

winter's cold

and summer's
to
eat.
lie.

heat,

found

sufficient food

know

the

place
to

where cookies

And where
There's

look for cheese and pie;

not a corner, as you see,

About

the place that's strange to me.
the roof,
I'll

Speak of

tell

you where
bare;

A
I'll

shingle's

gone or

rafter
if

Speak of
tell

the

basement,

you
sill.

will,

you of the rotting
drain,
in

The

cellar

or

planking loose.
to use.

That you,

need can turn
I

So, take the kind advice

give.
live.

To
Oh, always move,

hold
dear,

in

memory

while you

my

children

As though you knew

the cat

was near

Each step with due precision weigh,

For

it

may

give your

life

away.

Far better have an extra share

Of
Or

caution, than

to

lose a hair.
in

And, though the cat be
close
at

the yard.

hand, be on your guard,

;

;

You'll

find

longevity depends

^

,

-

On

watching well both foes and
Ne'er venture off
till

friends.

you survey
to play.

The ground where you propose
See
In
case

that the holes are near at hand,

they

fall

in great

demand.

And

if

the cat

comes prowling

nigh,

Ah, then's the time you must be spry;

Now

don't be hoping pussy's blind,

Or hard

of hearing, slow, or kind;
think the years she has enjoyed,

Nor
For puss has both the

Have blunted claws so

oft'

employed,
i*;

way and

will
?

To

keep them

fit

for service

still

Oh, never think

she'll quit the

chase

Until you reach your hiding-place.
.

*

For when you judge her speed must
She'll turn

fail,

up nearest

to

your

tail

She'll strive to take

you by
cat
is

surprise.

Because the

counted wise.
foe severe.

And, as a prowling

Has not an

equal, far

or

near;

;

;

For, light as

Fancy dips her

oar,

Comes

pussy's footstep on the floor.

Now, when a hiding-place you
Contented there Let
for

gain,

hours remain
stars to ocean roll,

moon and
But
-

stick

you

steadfast to the hole.

For puss with

patient

mind

is

blessed.
test

And
Through wind, and
She'll
rain,

will

your greatest cunning

and

falling dew.
true.

keep her watch, a sentry
I

would

that, in

your youthful brain,

You

could these wholesome hints retain,

Because the time

will

come, no doubt,
will

When

little

cream

be about;

When

poultry, meat, or even
Is all too

fish,

high

for pussy's dish;

When
'

chirping birds and songsters

go

To
_-

regions free from ice and snow,

And
i

then the cat will turn her mind,

'rt

-,

'

With double

zeal,

some mice

to find."

THE FOX
*

IN

OLD AGE.
old,"

OW,

father,

you are growing
foxes said;
hair
is

The

little

"Your

turning dull and gray.
red.

That once was bright and

The

teeth

are

dropping from the jaws
to

That used

break the bones.

And what

were once your burning paws

Now
Your step
is

feel

as

cold

as

stones.

not so

sure,

we know,
days of yore;
often

As once

in

You

stumble as you go,

When
You'll

nothing

lies

before.

not be

eating turkey long;
us, father,

So
7

tell

please,

What you went through when young and
Ere we were round your knees."

strong,

The fox

to

answer them was slow, And from his almond eye He wiped a tear-drop with
Before he

his toe,

made

reply.

*'

I

dare not

tell

you, children dear.

The

struggles

and the strife; 'Twould make you shrink away and

fear

To

venture forth in

life.

;

;

;

;

;

Hy various paths we all must go, Though rough or smooth they be Some find the turkeys roosting low Some find them in the tree.
"
"

We move in
often

danger, day and night,
ills

Beset b) cares and

What

seems a harmless

bite,

May

hold

some poison

pills

once could stand a lengthy chase, active, young, and bold And gave the hounds fiill many a ra..e Across the country cold.
'

I

When

"

The yawning trap the silence broke

When
And
*'

least

I

thought of foes

with a vicious snap

awoke

Beneath

my

very nose.

sun was bright. And bagged the ducks and drakes; When unsuspecting farmers might

I've ventur'd, when the

Have reached me with
cunning now must take the place Of boldness, dash, and speed When eyes grow dim and legs grow slim. We must with care proceed.
" But

their rakes.

"But see! the moon her beauty flaunts Above the mountain's head
;

And I must find the rabbits' haunts, And you must find your bed.

ADVICE OUT OF SEASON.
( C

'X
-^

^
-

/T^
-*^
-

darlings,"
"

said

the

mother

bear,

./'-']

..

.

.

You should have And not have

passed the hive with care,
tried

to

bring

it

home,

.;

However sweet may be

the

comb

'4
I
"i.
-V
>'

\-.--

>j

I

thought you knew, as well as me,

What

dangers lurk behind the bee.

For not a thing

that

flies

or crawls, us
falls;

With

greater

venom on

And when you

think they're in

the
in

air,

They're holding revels

your

hair.
is

The sweeping paw The leap

all
air,

in vain,

in

or cry of pain;

^^^daK^0i::^mM£'{ coy
c-

For,

quicker than the smartest

fling,

Will come the penetrating
I

sting.

know

temptations try us
oft'

hard,

And

we
I

fail,

And

will

when off our guard, now inform your mind
kind."

On

matters of this special

;

;

**0h,

mother,

dear,

in

mercy pause,"
advice, an

Replied the cub, through swollen jaws;

"Your kind

hour ago,

Had

saved us much distress and woe.
sight.

My

nose would not be such a

My

eyes

could better reach the light;

My
But now youi
\,ords

mouth would not be

traveling round

To
Because

find the ear
place,

now

dull to sound.

seem out of
the

we understand

case
till

And
How,
fast,

could

sit

here

morning's sun.
the

Explaining

how

work was done.

we lost the charm and grace. And symmetry of form and face How, fast, the day was turned
The laugh
to
dull,

to

n"ght.

groan, the fun to fright

Oh! doubly

indeed,

is

he
spiteful

Who

meddles with the

bee."

THE UxNHAPPY

LION.
in
life;

A
When
"

LION thus mused on "A monarch am I
The
tiger,

his

station

of renown,
others,

and

who met me
to

in

strife,

No
roaring around
I jar

longer lay claim
in

the

crown.

search of
to

my

prey,

the

tall

trees

the
to

root;

The

hills

seem
the

nod, the

rocks

to

give way,

And
The
elephant, surly

stars

from their orbits to shoot.
as

and

large

a house,
the

Will shake to

his

toes at

sound;
holes
in the

The woodchuck, the Make haste
I
sit

weasel, the coney and mouse,
to their
vale.

ground.

on

the

hill
all

and look over the
give attention to
flash
is

And

me;
or switch
^s.

At

of

The country
But
this
is

^

my

eye

of
to

my

tail,

mine

the sea.

the

/
/
/
I

WJ^^k
MsiSi'

\

^^^^^^
^^^^'

^^'^^ S"^^"^^

to the

\
\
/

And

ever will

In spite of

my and my

|

JPW^^^
^^Hi^^^^^M^^
M^^^^^^^^^^^m:
^^Kl'''^* a
\;

^jK^^HL-

sadden
*^-^^'

my breast.

"^^ ^^°^"

^^^^'

I'm only a beast
"

I

^*

^^^ best."

And

one," cried

"who

ever

^H^PRSK^ A^gf^

^ monkey,
found,

is

Despised

like

thief

by

the

rest,

Who

hasn't

a friend,

all

the

continent round,

From

the

purpling east to the West."

The monarch

then uttered a sorrowful groan,

And

crawling away to his den.

He

buried his crown, and never was

known

To wear

it

in

public again.

; ;

;

V

»

LISTENING TO THE ROOSTER CROW.

HOUGH
Or
the
Still

the

night be
love
the
to

dark or
here

clear,

ground be white with snow;
I

listen

To
"

Rooster's

lusty crow.

Oh, the thrush may chant her hymn. With a voice so sweet and rare; Or the robin from the limb, Fill with melody the air.

"

Oh, the nightingale may cheer, And the lark its powers show
to

But more pleasing

mine

ear,

Is the Rooster's rousing crow.

Ah, 'tis lucky for the rogue That the barn is boarded tight And the button on the door Is above my reach, to-night.
"

"

Or, from there
I

amongst the hens, would haul him with a flurry

And

across

the

frozen

fields,

Would

escort
the

him
time
the

in

a hurry
-

But

When

may come around, farmer may forget
the

To

securely shut

door,

And
"

reward

my

patience yet.

So

let skies

be dark or bright,
crest,

Let the snow conceal the

r.

Of

the

hill,

And

mountain height, the blizzard do its best
or

While

I

And
Here

a foot to
the

have a heart to beat, come and go,
listen in

I'll

my

seat

^

To

Rooster's

lusty crow."

,

A NIGHT ALARM.

OW

what's

the

hubbub? what's the go?
the well
it

There's something in
I

below;

hear
round.

splashing

It's

not a frog, a hen, or

cat,

But something larger yet than It weighs an
:

that;

hundred
pound.
at

';

V

It

sinks

times,
like

but

rises

still,

Then

splashes,

a water-mill,
-

And makes a grunting
;*
,

^ \-

sound.

*
line.

Come

bring a lantern, bring a

For something's in this well of mine, And something
a

stout

and

big.

Now
The
.

hold the light and
object

let

us see
I

plainly;

mercy me

"fllir

It's

widow
pig'

Murphy's

I

^

Cock Robin.

Who
I,

killed

Cock Robin, where
I

the

lilies

grow?

said the sparrow, with
laid

my bow and
low.

arrow,

him

\

\

$

f:^^ Who'll make a shroud so costly and fine? t^-^Tulf-K?
I

said the beetle,

'.'j'liii

With my thread and needle, The task will be mine.

^?>
r^4}^''^w,^

Who'll dig a grave
I,

said the mole, will

I'll

yew-tree shade ? soon make a hole, dig the grave with my pickax and spade
in the

r-?-.

vii V\-

'

.

-c->

,,^_^.,^j^^..

\

\

Who'll
I

Palme p^ co>^

the bell in the chapel tower? said the daw, with my long claw, I'll toll the bell for half an hour.
toll

Who'll bear a blazing torch
I,

in

the

case?

said the

kite,

will

carry the

light,

And show

the

way

to the burial place.

^

Who'll bear the
I,

pall,

both careful and slow

?

said the stork,

With

a

measured

stride,

My

legs are long

•#f^^^ffS#^;
^ALMFf^ CO>!i

and

my

I'll

shoulders wide, bear the pall

to the plain below.

'^^'pU

)

,

9^ ^4=rr^
r^^.

Who'll sing a psalm as the hearse goes by ?
I
^-?,

g^j^

^j^^

thrush,
if

others will hush,

'>^^*^^^.'''H'^'

-^-

"^'vs^^^k^^

->^ 1 '^^'^^

^^^ ^^'^^

^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ bring tears to the eve. eye.

r>^^-^^A^lj5,^:i
^ALMe/i cox

^t)"e.

,X'^^^\ Who'll be the parson with
I,

faith

and

trust ?

said the rook,
will read

^iM^kA ^yM^>mfSmi^j.^
C^ ^^S-*^^'^%> ^^jm>^- >-'

from

„y book. "ashes to ashes and dust to dust"

I

Who'll mark the songster's earthy bed
I,

?

said
I'll

the

bat,

will

attend to

that,

carve his
'-"^

name on

the tree at his head.

f

L -

S%

/^At-Mei^

cox

"^^eoixj •r

^

Who'll keep
I,

it

green when summer
throue:h

is

here

?

<'.-<.

said

the
it

hare, will
screen

plant flowers

there,

^^^^
-^^==—

I'll

keep

many- a

year.

PAvr'iBf^ co^

•V--.V-

'

'*

"•

--'"

'^

4

Who
And

suffered

for

his

fault,

ere a

week

rolled

by

?

Who,

but the sparrow, that shot the
all

fatal

arrow,

roused the indignation of

creatures far

and

nigh.

THE NORMAN
ROM
a foreign

KING.

^x

X:

war returning

Rode the stalwart Norman king, With the captives and the plunder Such incursions used to bring.
Oft'

the

king surveyed the pageant

Winding through the deep defiles, Banners streaming, weapons gleaming,
Front and rear
for

many

miles.

"What," thought

he,

"though half

my

soldiers
.5

Are behind, in trenches laid; Well the treasure, slaves and glory,

Have

the

country's loss repaid."

But the king had long been absent,

And,

at

home,

his

subjects found.

That the country better prospered

While no monarch was around.

So

the

warring Norman ruler, When he reached his home at

last.

"

Heard no

joyful

demonstrations
people,
as

From

the
"

he

passed.
cried the monarch,

Where's

my welcome ?"
the shouts
?

"Where

and wreaths of bay?
the arches,

Where's the music

Where

That should bend above
"

my way?
I

Have

I

fought,

and have

battered

Gates and Pagan

temples

down,

To

return again, unnoticed,

Like a market-man to town

?

Tell me, Bishop, in

my

absence,
?

What

has

changed the people's tone

Are my subjects dead or That no welcome here
.;•.,

sleeping.
is

shown

?

"

Royal master," said the Bishop,
"

With you went
Those

the

fighting

kind,

'

"

destructive, non-producers,
in

•'
'

•'

Who
-lit

peace no
that

pleasure

find.

"Those
*•
4m-'*
••

rather

raze a castle,

Plunder

towns

and bridges burn,

;

;

Than

with
the

stubborn plows to wrestle,
lengthening furrow turn.

And

"These, who labored while you wandered,

Are inclined

to

peaceful

arts;

Prizing, rather,

home
in

attractions.
parts.

Than renown

distant

"Would

it

were your royal pleasure.
peace to
in
live

Now

in

and reign
cattle.

Taking pride

herds of

Fruited trees and fields of grain.
*'

If

some must have spears and
it

arrows,

Let

be your sovereign wish.

^'i'

That, instead of spearing neighbors.

They
"Let

resort

to

^^ spearing fish.

them shoot the wolves
and
vultures,
flocks

-^

That are preying on our

And
To
assist

the prancing charger harness, the

patient ox."

"What!" exclaimed
"

the

king
into

in

anger,
?

Turn

my

soldiers

swains

And, instead of sacking

cities,

Guide the plow on stony plains?

"Spend our days
Coaxing vines

in

peaceful

labor,

to

climb a string?

'3

;

;

Reaping rye or weeding onions,
111

becomes a Norman king!"

"Too much
Has

warfare,"
useful

said
toil;

the

Bishop,

retarded

While destroying Pagan temples. You've neglected Norman soil.

s

Teach your

soldiers arts of tillage,

Let the flags of war be furled
Better rule a peaceful nation

Than

to ruin half the world."

m%^'m&m

*'

Let the females," said the monarch,
"

Break the

flax
for

and trim the vine
breaking lances,

Men
"

were made
for

Not

herding sheep or swine.

By my sword, so keen and trusty, By the battle-ax I wield. By my shield and helmet rusty, ^" From the dews of foreign field;
"
:,

By the golden crown I wrested From a brother's hand, in gore;

:

Such a rogue, with robes Never crossed my path

invested,

bcfon^

I

"Mercy
In
If,

shall

not

preserving
his knees, his

upon With

be wasted, such a knave; he begged it,
here

nose
sol'

upon the pave.
'^'^^^y}
diers,

"Seize
Let

him,

Drag him

to

a

my

iih~

^j:.C^|7?ii,

on the instant, dungeon dark;

archers.

Use

the

rebel

on the morrow, for a mark!"

But the monarch's mind was troubled, Though his voice was bold and loud Like a sword the truth had pierced him, There among the listening crowd.
;

All night long he

tossed and

tumbled,

Sleepless, on the royal bed, For the Bishop's words kept running Ever through the monarch's head.

Better rule a peaceful nation

Than

to ruin,

rob

and kill

!

;

;

" ;

"Though
All
his

his

he sayings haunt
voice,"

cried,

"be

silenced,

.^^.

me

still

"Words by fellow-creature spoken, Never moved me so before;
And, though pleasure
I

have gathered,
roar

From
"Every
Shall

the battle's
soldier

din and

lay

and retainer, sword and spear aside

And

in

Shall

in

peace to rule the nation. future be my pride

brought the Bishcp, to light of day; And the soldiers, all astounded. Heard the solemn sovereign say:

So, the

mornmg
the cell

From

"Bishop, go your way in safety, Free from fetter, chain or lock;

Tame
"I will

the savage, save

the

sinner,

Gather daily to your
let

flock.

the

fierce

Egyptians,

Slumber in their tents secure Never more molest the Persian,

Or
"All the liberal arts shall

surprise
flourish,

the

swarthy Moor.

Every wicked custom

die;

None Or
"

shall
in

labor,

unrewarded.
lie."

cruel

bondage
to

Turn your thoughts

ploughing

acres,

Ye who have been ploughing
Train your hands to chopping

breasts
forests.

Ye who

traveled, cleaving

crests.

;

;

"

Names
Shall

of fighters,

thieves,

or wreckers,

no more with glory sound;
prizes
shall

But the

be showered.
thrift
is

Where
"

the
shall

greatest

found.

He

henceforth be
largest
field

most honored,
has

Who

the

mowed
load."

And whose

fruit

trees,

vines and bushes,

Bend beneath

the

greatest

Soon a wondrous change was
All

noted,

throughout the
the the

Norman
welfare

land

There

Monarch and the Bishop,
people's

For
In

planned.

the

field

the

soldiers

labored,

With
While
Oft'

a sweet conten;,ment blessed;
in

peace, as

once
led

in

warfare,
rest.

the the

Monarch

the

While
All

sound of drum or trumpet.
pageant and the roar

the

Of a martial demonstration, Stirred them not, as heretofore.

Weapons
Now, on

that,

in

many

battles.
foe,

Paralyzed the

Pagan

poles, in

corn-fields hanging.

Keep

aloof the

cawing crow.

And

in

wealth and population,

Never did a land increase
Like the

Norman

King's possessions,
f^^

'tm^

While he

fostered

arts

of Peace.

^'"•dff^

THE

FAIRIES

AND THE CRUEL FARMER.
One
night

some
a

fairies

sauntered round,
^
-'•/

Within

farmer's

pasture ground;

And

while

on rocks

and

hillocks green,
to

They paused
and view
running

rest

the scene.
sort

They held a
About
used
the
his

of

talk.

way he
stock.

;

Said one,

" I've

known

this

farmer long,

A man
On

and passion scrong. Whose heavy hand is quick to fall
of will
patient brutes, in
sty

or

stall.

The sounding blows, when to his cart H€ yokes the steers, would pain your heart. He plucks hts geese to sell the down, And they must wander through the town With but a feather, here and there. To shield them from the winter air."
Another

He
To To

But harder still sheep on yonder hill know his own, if they should stray other flocks or fields away,
said,
"

treats the

With

cruel

hand he takes a shears

And haggles notches in their ears. He pokes his pigs, and clips their tails, And in the nose sticks rusty nails, To make them squeal, whene'er they start To practice at their special art.
To-night
we'll
tell

these

creatures

dumb,

How
We'll

they can

tyrants

overcome;

speak about the wrongs they bear.

The galling yokes and scars they wear; Remind them of the power they hold, And stir them up to action bold. The coward heart still beats behind The hand that strikes the helpless kind; And should these creatures make a show Of bold resistance to his blow,

;

;

Through

fear,

he maysell

be glad to

To

neighbors that
will

use them well;

So each one do

the best he can,

To

save them from

this cruel

man;

Let one go whisper to the mare,

Another

to the pig repair

It listens

with attentive

ear,

The

counsel of a friend to hear
let

To

sheep and cows

some proceed,

A

hint

is all

the goat will need; the donkey's

While more

mind

enrich.
to

With cunning ways

shun the switch/

Now

here

and
the

there,

with one

intent,

Around

grounds the Fairies went.
their

Some stirred the geese from To talk about their painful And spoke of down in pillows
That
still

repos(

woes,
pressed,
i,C'

upon

their backs

should

rest.

And some

enraged the chafing boar,

Against the ornaments he wore.

"That nose," said

they,

"was

sure'

-

made

To

turn the sod, like plow or spade;

But nasal

rings,

designed to stay,

Now
., Tr " If

bar your pleasure, day by day."

And
ij courage could

others

whispered round

till

morn,

"""^\
fear,"

^

About the use of heel and horn;

supplant your

They reasoned with the patient
'*

steer,

You have

the tools,

and have the might.
kite."

To
To
"

toss

him higher than a
the force,

goats and gentle sheep they

said,

Yor have

and have the head, 'm.'^mmmi^
the
flesh

To

bruise

or break

the

bone;

Then why submit to stick Then when regard to The Fairies sought

or
all

stone?"

was

paid.

the

forest

shade

When next the surly farmer strode Among his stock, with whip and goad, He noticed mischief lurking nigh,
In
tossing

horn and rolling eye.

In heads that turned where heels should rest,

And

heels that turned where heads were best.

; ;

The ready

goat, with

courage large,
for a

Was

gauging distance

charge

The donkey's heels flew round like flails; The heifer danced upon the pails.

The ox and horse, in front, combined The geese, the sheep, and pigs, behind
In vain his whip he flourished round,

For still unmov'd they held theirground,
Till

forming

fast a circle wide,
in

They hemmed him

on every

side.

"Some scoundrel
,5"^

in the night," cried he,

;w

"Gave Or else,
drop the else could make
with

liquor

to

my

stock,

I

see;

the cider-mill they've drained

Of

every

tank
these
this

con tain ed.
creatures
surprise
rise, "
?

What And greet me

wild

He

called for aid

w^ith

lusty

yell,

For serving men, To help him beat

and wife as well;
the
self a

stock,

until
still,

He proved
m..

himhigh, or

master
all

But one, ere long, At jumping

found
dodging smart.

his art

Was
To

scarce enough when billy's mind measures was inclined. active
for

Another found some cause

fear

In shining tusk, that flourished near;

While round the yard, with injured pride, The boss himself was forced to ride;

And To

all

were soon compelled to beat calmer fields, a swift retreat.

:

;

Where

safer

quarters
to

they could find,
stitch

-

And

time

plaster,

and bind.

.

The

farmer wiped his dripping brow. And thus, addressed his' partner now
"

Good

wife,
.11

I

long have thought to
thriving
city

sell,

And

some

dwell.

Where we no more may have
Of hooking cow,
or kicking

the

care

mare;
only found

Where
'

sheep

and pigs are
selling

In markets,

And
,U—

by the pound meet the eye, Until upon your plate they lie.
fowls

but seldom

;

;

; ;

While you have ever used your voice
Against

my

judgment, or
will

my

choice;

But now no counsel

avail

At once I'll advertise a sale, And make a sweep of everything That lifts a hoof or flaps a wing; The kind with horn, the kind without.

The kind with The big and

bill,

the kind with snout;

little,

high or low,

Shall, unreserved,

by auction go."

The sale was called upon the ground. The people came for miles around And some bought single, some by lot, While some bid hard, but nothing got. The sheep went here, the donkey there,
In other walks
Until
the

the

goat and mare;
sold,

whole concern was
the

And
\

other hands

stock controlled.

So

all

were glad enough to

find,

A

pleasant home, with

masters kind*
care,

Where cows receivAnd lived upon Where pigs could Or root the grasSo geese, in pride,
Until they needed

^^^^^^m^,

ed the kindest

^».-^V1*V -^r^

the best of fare

stand to eat a

fill,

sv sod at will;
their feathers wore,

them no more
ored on the land,
a gentle

While such as

lab

Were guided by

hand.

TURNING A NEW LEAF.
N
New-Year's Eve, a band of brothers,

The
,
_

bear, the

wolf, the

fox,

and

others,

Of every

nature,

bad and good,
a darksome wood.

Assembled
It

in

was, indeed, a stirring sight.

That dreary,
.

cold,

December

night,

While limbs were weighted down with snow,

And

frost

was bridging streams below.
see them come, from
far

To

and

near,

To

hold

a friendly meeting here.

As Bruin seldom moves
While snow
is

around.

lying on the ground.

The

other beasts,

who

well can face
race.
lair

A
Of

wintry blast, or lengthy

In force
their

assembled near the
respected

Brother Bear.

From
The
Like

silent

cedar

swamps profound.

rabbit
shaft,

came, with lightsome bound.
projected by the bow,

He shoots, On feet by
For

where'er he cares to go.

generous nature planned

either

snow

or

summer

sand.
for

The hardy

fox

had tramped

weeks.

O'er frozen fields and mountain peaks,

^--

-

.<:*

Or
-" ~:~"

sat for

hours on crusted snow,
the barn-yard scenes below.

To view

l_^

And

there

the

Had

ran

And

through forest dark, with howling bark. eyes, that seemed to throw a ray
wolf,
for

miles,

To

light

the

rover on his way;

Enduring heat and cold the same,

He

took the seasons as they came,

And

little

cared what scarred his hide,
supplied.

If

but his stomach was

%.

When beasts of every shape Had gathered round, in
The shaggy

ana

hue,

,

order due,
accents, spoke:
to

bear the silence broke.

And

thus, in

solemn

"The year now drawing Has brought its share
It

a close

of joys
the
fold

and woes:
best

saw us

feasting on
farmer's
too,

The
It

thrifty

possessed;

saw

us,

with aching head,

_
~~r; "
"

Go, lame and supperless, to bed; And now, beneath this wintry bower,
It

seems

to

me

a

fitting

hour

;

For us

to

mend our ways;
in
life

in

brief,

To

turn

another leaf
a creature of us
fault,
all

There's

not

But nas some
/

however small,
here,

That we should leave behind us

Upon the As for

threshold
myself,
I

of the

year.

I

stand aghast.

When
I I

review the
still

summer

past.

fancy

hear the cry

Of

children, as
I

bounded nigh;

The squealing
I

pig,

and bleating sheep
often hear,
fast asleep;

when

1

And
I

tho',

perhaps,

I'm not the worst,
here discard

my

#(>?'

faults the first.

No more

the

farmer's
calf,

sheep

I'll

rend,
friend

Or hug

the

like

bosom

No more
I'll

beneath the starry sky,

drag the porker from the sty; The fruit of field, and yellow grain,
In
future
shall

my
in

life

sustain.'

^

Then, next

order to

the

bear.

The wolf
"
I,

refnarked, with

humble

air,

too,

might speak of troubled sleep,
sheep,

Of night alarms and worried

;

;

Of tender

kids,

or frightened steed,

Of

traveler's

bones,
treed.
...

and hunter

My

faults

are

many

as the stars.

My

virtues fewer

than

my

scars
I

I feel

that

should not be last

To mourn my

i
it

actions in the past.

And

here resolve,

no more to prey

On

other things

that cross

my way."

,

He ceased, and sinking in his place. Behind his paws concealed his
The
rat that breakfasted

face.

on

pie.

And lunched on cheese, And speaking meekly through
Did thus

now gave

a sigh.

his nose.

his leading sin disclose:
little

"Though

blood

in fact I shed,

While picking up

my
I

daily bread.

Some

faults

exist,

frankly

own

My
I've

thievish

ways
new,

are widely known.

nibbled bags and boxes

through,

And

ruined carpets, old and

When

hunger gnawed within

me

more,

Than

I

at

barriers

before.


;

You'll

see

by scratches on

my

tail,

How

near

my

lite

was pussy's
1

nail

But, through stout heart and hopeful soul,

struggled on and reached the hole.

/'AL.'^eti

cox

For striving once the

bait

to

get,
still

And

leave

the

trap

nicely set

A

trick

that

fools

alone would

dare
life
I'll

A

broken nose through

bear.

;

;

But better nose than neck should

crack,

Which would have gone had I been slack. But when you speak of good reform, feel the heart within me warm I

And
^

though folks leave the pantry door
open,
nightly,
I

Wide
I'll

evermore,

Hereafter,

when

reach the place,

pass

it

with averted face."

Then, with a dry

and wheezy squeak,

The weasel next
"

began
" is

to

speak

My coat," said he,

clean and white,

Which mi^ht imply But when you l<now
You'll

a conscience bright;

my

life,

I'm sure

think

me
man-

anything but pure,

Whilst

midnight
the

Around
I

hung her sable pall, ger, mow, and stall,
the

crept

beneath
the
chick-

rooster

bold,

And
I

killed him, as

the hours he told

ate

ens
I

in

the
to

shell,
tell

And did such things
I

shame
I
'11

promise. there-

fore,

begin

At once, a better name to win." The skunk, the coon, and badger gray, All stood in turn and had their say; But when the fox rose in his place.
All eyes w^ere fastened on his face,

For he was known,

to great

and

small.

As
" I

master-villain

of them
" I

all.

would," said he,

could restore

The

poultry to the yards once more,

;

Which,
I

in

season passed away, have purloined by night and day.
the

No more

they'll

roost in

drowsy row,

Their bones lie underneath the snow; Their downy coats have served to line The robin's nest in beech and pine The mother duck will lead no more Her young along the weedy shore;
I

stripped
left

the

pond of
for

all

the breed,

And

never

a fowl

seed.
Giles,

The Widow
Is

below the

mill,
still.

looking
!

for
I

her goslings

Poor soul

never set

her stand,

With anxious

face and shading hand. But I regret the part I played That evening, by the alder shade.

And Farmer Dobbs can What took the fowl he
The'WiclowGilej.
-.rir;'
i

He

never tell fed so well. For weeks and weeks, at eve and morn. stuffed her crop with wheat and corn.

And

sent

his

invitations out.

To
-

aunts and

uncles, miles about.

For old and young

And

come, betimes, pick her bones, at Christmas chimes
to

But,

thanks

to

me.

upon
their

that

day,
lay;
lot

'Twas pork that on But had it been

platters

their

happy
or

To

taste that tur-

key, cold

hot.

found her He paused, and with a trembling paw. Removed a tear-drop from his jaw,

As round They would,

the table there

they

sat.
fat."

indeed, have

Then
.

said

:

" I, too,

within the year,

Saw

hopes deferred, and days of fear. I've touched the poison
with

my nose, I've heard the trap beneath me close,
I've
felt

the breath

of straining hound.

Upon my haunch at And past my
I've heard the

every bound;
ears,

with lightning speed,

whizzing lead proceed. But, through the year now drawing nigh, To lead a blameless life I'll try."
there,

And

beneath the swaying

trees.

As round them played

the whistling breeze.

And
;

from the sky, the queen of night

-.^

Looked down upon the pleasing sight, With many a vow and promise true. They all resolved to start anew; And, let us hope, in after days They followed peaceful, honest ways; vr:^' That guns, and snares, and traps severe,
^.

Were

not required

throughout the year.

A DOMESTIC TALE.
The
night was
dark,

and

house In peaceful slumber lay;
all

the

The

cats

had gone

to

make a

call

On

friends

across

the way,

;

from the corner of a room, Where all could. entrance find; A band of cunning mice
?

When

appeared,

With

mischief in their mind.

All wearing masks, as though
to hide

Their features from a foe; In single order, one by one. They ventured from below.

By
As

signs and whispers they

advanced.
burglars

move around
Prepared to turn and leave the place, Upon the slightest sound.

As

must commanders have, them to the fray; To So one, more daring, moved in front.
soldiers

lead

And

pointed out the way.

But bread and cheese were under keys, The cake and pie the same;

Alone, a tallow candle stood,

"

„^^— That

scarce

had

felt

the

flame.

The hungry band

here

made a
flew,

stand,

And

soon

to

action

And

from

its

socket-pedestal

The

graceful

column drew.

On

heads, and backs, and shoulder-blades,

Where

best

the

burden

lay,

;

With

smiling

face,

and rapid
the
the
all
,.

pace,

They bore

prize

away.

And

when, at
.^
^

last,

load

was
form

cast.

Where
.

could

in

shape,
to

_...^.,.

And

each one got a certain spot

;

At which

sit

and

scrape,

Then, kings around their royal board, Arrayed in jewels bright, With crowns of gold and wealth untold, Might envy their delight.
'

.

,

THE WOLF AND THE BEAR. one HE Bear was feeling
ill

fall;

So neighbor Wolf made haste To tell what best would suit

to call,
his case,
face.

And

bring the

color

to

his

Now

Doctor Wolf was shrewd of mind

A

sharper of the

sharpest kind
his

And when

eyes had travelled o'er Old Bruin's tempting winter store. Said he: "Your pulse is low indeed:

A

change of

life

you sorely need.

A

trip

across

the

ocean blue
failing

Might brace your

strength anew;

Or Greenland's

A

climate might impart smoother action to your
But,
living
high,
I

heart.

plainly see,

Is

what

will

dig the

pit

for

thee.
style,

Unless you chang'^ your present
You'll

hardly see

the

summer
and

smile.
fling

Take good Your

advice,
salted

aside
dried.

pork and mutton
feet

The

pickled

and sausage give

'

To

those who'd

rather die

than

live.

Of
-'

roots

and herbs your meals prepare, For health is found in simple fare." It seemed to give the Bear

delight,
live aright;

To

learn

the

way

to

^^^&^H -^^t^M-^^J^

"J^-v^a

oo

off the

crafty
his

To

tell

How
:

Doctor ran friends about the plan; Bruin now would feast no more

On

stews,

and

roasts, as

heretofore;
to

But

freely scatter

the

wind
kind.

Provisions of the

choicest

;

No sooner had the bats of night Commenced their wild, uncertain flight,
Than, from the mountain and the glen, From rocky lair and earthy den.

The

beasts came trooping, great

and small,

To

give the ailing Bear a

call.

With bags and baskets

well supplied,

And
•"^

apron-strings securely tied,

They gathered round to get their share
Of food that might be
scatter'd there.

Now Bruin had a humorous vein,
As
well as even-balanced brain;
:

And when he heard the ra He raised the sash, and,

and

rout,
out,

peeping
to

A

sober face he tried

show.

While

thus he hailed the crowed below.
"

Said he,

With pain occurs the thought,
have
lost

You

all

your

rest for

naught
will
still,

For,

truth

to

tell,

depart

you

With bag and basket empty \ As I've decided to pursue

My

former course the season through,
diet

And change my When gone my

by-and-by.

present large supply."

A

moral here, uncovered, shines

l"or those

who

read between the lines;

The brightest hopes will often fade. However well the plans are laid.

;

s^-

THE TURKEY
While
.

IN

DANGER.
care,

turkeys roosted on a fence,
.
.

,'^

A

fox

approached with

And soon
within

her basket
lay

The

largest

gobbler
there.

Then,
as

the Christmas

times

were nigh,

The

fox

went
ofif
I

in

glee

Her youngster

trotting

by her

side,

The

smallest

one of

three.

It

made with her

that early start

To

exercise

and

run,

To

take

some
learn

lessons

in

the

art,

And

how work was

done.

"You're growing

old," the youngster said, "I saw you limp, to-day;

'\

But when you're hunting game, I You've not forgot the way."
•'

see,

'Tis true," she said, " of late I've

had

Rheumatics

in

my

toe;

But

I'll

To any
*'

not take the second place fox I know.

There may be some with quicker

ear,

With
But

sharper sight another;

there's

not one

can bag a fowl

As
«»T'

nicely as

your mother.

I've

often

heard your father say,
I

When
He

was young and

free,

never saw a fox could clear A panel fence like me.
I

think

and smile Upon me, sweet and fond;
I

see

him

sit

When
Of
"

he observed
goslings

how

quick,

I

could

strip

the pond.

He

said

I

far

excelled

himself,

«.

Though he was widely famed.

And by

the farmers, far

and For many years

near,
v/as

blamed.

He
It

died at

last,

while breaking
hill,

fast,,

Behind yon rocky

makes me sad

to

think your dad,
pill.

Mistook that awful

May

palsy shake the guilty hand,
the

That did
Ere
I

dose provide;
inside out,

Which turned him almost

could reach his side.

Oh, never touch

^

To
Until
its

aught,
nature,
rightly

your nose, my dear, however grand, full and clear,
understand.
trouble in

You
I've

seen more Than I can AVhere rash advance, Brought sorrow
There's
not an

my

day

now
or
in

explain,

games
their

of chance,

train.

hour passes by,
plans are
tures,
laid,

However
But suffering creaRegret some
O, child of mine.

low and high, they've made. move

And shun the Beware of guns, But with in"•p*'

avoid the trap, tempting pill; that never snap
tent
to
kill.

Nor

blindly be

enticed

astray,

By

pleasures spread around;
sport,
if

To

be the

not the prey,

Of

every yelping hound."

;

"

I'll

bear your counsel in

my

mind,"
I

The baby fox. replied; "And think of thee whene'er
Temptations
at

see,

my

side."

"That's good," the smiling dame remarked, "Advice is vain indeed.

Unless the
Is
"

soil

whereon
for

it

falls.

mellow

the seed."

That's fine discourse," the turkey thought,

As

there he
"

lay

in

fear;

Had
I

I

with

caution

thus been taught,

hardly would be here.
I,

A

fool

was

to

sit

and doze,

Upon an

orchard

fence;

Within the reach of every nose That cared to drag me thence.
But,
if

from here

I

ever

rise.

Which I will scarcely do The chance I'll prize, to be more

wise,

And

start

in

life

anew.
farm can boast,

The

tallest post the

Will not

my

wishes meet;
I'll

But, in the tr^^ each night

be,

And
I'll

there myself secrete.
kin,

trust

to

neither kith
the

nor

Nor on

dog

rely;
spire,

And

I'll

should I roost upon a keep one open eye."

Thus, while they moved upon their way,
'

To

gain the forest green,

.

They reached a

place where
laid

Were
•••

cedar along between.

rails

To mount a An

fence

has

never been
to

easy thing

do,

When

those

who

climb convey a load,
rising,

..^
'

That must be

too.

,

}-'

:

But, nothing

daunted

by the

sight,

She, step by step, arose; At times employing elbow joints, As well as all her toes.

;

;

But as she reached the topmost rail, And paused, her breath to win

The

turkey, taken

with a cramp,

Began

to

lurch within.

The

fowl was not arranged with care, According to its mind The head was down, the heels The tail was left behind.

in air,

The
"^^^as

balance lost in such a place,
basket, fox

not so quickly found;

So down went
All
rolling

and

fowl.

on the ground.

The

first upon her feet, what could she do ? But The basket opened to the fence,

fox was
then,

The

turkey

first

was through.

Away

they go,

now

high,

now

low,

The ditch and logs they cross; The turkey missed his spreading But fear made up the loss.

tail,

The

fox

had sprained an ankle-joint, When from the fence she rolled; And now, although she strained a point, Against her speed it told.

The

highest

rail

the youngster found.
the chase to view.

From which

And

cried, ''Alas!

'tis

gaining ground,

I'm dreadful hungry, too."

Twas

heel

and

toe,

Around

the

and grab and rocl^s and

go.
trees;

And

lucky was that fowl to know His feathers pulled with ease.
at

Their coming out
Still
left

"clutches stout,"
to run;

him

free

Had

rooted fast, no doubt, His gobbling days were done.
the barn

they been

Now
His
'

The turkey, when Though out of summoned all
reached

was nigh, wind, and weak.
his

And
rise

^^

strength

to

fly,

^^>^

the highest peak.
the graceful flight

was not
birds of
style

Of

eagle breed;
is

But grace or

valued

light,

When
It

safety

lies in

speed.

bore him from

the reaching paw,

And
Pxidi left

from the

shining teeth,
ing
his

him look-

down

in awe,

Upon

foe beneath.

The fox one moment viewed the fowl, Then turned her from the scene And never ran so mad a rogue.
Through
field or

forest green.

But never since

that

time of
the
tale.

fear,

At

least

so runs
that

Has man

or beast

turkey found
rail.

Asleep

upon a

;

THE BANQUET.
(a

tale of the jersey meadows.
"Come, be
stirring," said the fly,

To

the

gnat, reposing

nigh
is

"There's a banquet near at hand, or deceptive

mine

eye."

.

'T

am
for

with you! count

me

in,"

Said his hearer, with a grin;
" I

have fasted

a week, and

am

getting rather thin."

"Tell old messmates where you go,"

Whined mosquitoes from below;
"And,
to bring the

whole brigade along, our bugles we
'T'll

will

blow."

not tarry here alone,"

Cried the beede with a drone;

"And, though clumsy on
Said the

the wing, at

a feast

I'll

hold

my

own."

fly,

"Then come with me,
you
all

And,

ere

long,

may

see,

What

is

now

before

my

vision

spread, as plain

as plain can be;

"

See, a

cow has caught her
sHver of a
rail,

tail,

In

the

As

she crossed the panel fence that surrounds the cultured vale.

"We

can bite and

we can

bore,
o'er,

We

can

leech

her o'er and

And

not suffer

from that scourge,
so annoying, heretofore.
So,

away before the blast, Flew the insects, thick and
Till

fast,

they darkened up
the sky, as

though clouds
past.

were going
Oh, the portly and the spare.

And

the starving

ones were

there.

That, from either
are

man

or beast,

not slow
to claim their share.

Many

species were arrayed.

Do

not seek iheir class or grade,

For your books on ento-

mology can give you little aid.

From From
They were coming,

the hollows, from the

hills,

the streams that turn the mills.

they were

humming, and were getting ready

bills.

When came dawn
Lo, the

of morning
lying

fair,

cow was
the

there, aloft
in air.

With her horns among

buttercups, her hoofs

But the story
Till

is

not done,

a climax has been won.

And

that

cow was

well avenged, ere the day

was

scarce begun.

For she drank,

as

it

would seem.
stream.

From

a

poison-tinctured

Where some

Paris

Green had

baffled the potato-beetle's scheme.

Through

the night the bossy died,

From

the dose the brook supplied.
to

And communicated bane

those

boring through her hide.

But we've nothing more

to

do,

With
Tis the
tribe
in

the cow, her case

is

through,
pursue.

consternation that

my muse must now

She'll

have work enough on hand,
that

To
As
they
left

describe

tortured

band,
the land.

in

all

directions to

go staggering through

camp, And complaints from every scamp, As each member found he had his share of dizziness and cramp.
in

There was trouble

the

And
Or

if

ever there were
unqualified
act.
it

cries,

surprise,
flies.

Or repentance

for

an

was there among those

How they blamed the busy friend, Who enticed them to this end, How they wished
that all their rackikig pains

might

in

the

villain

blend.

How

they watched
in

to see his
their

throes.

And

part

forgot

woes,
first

As

they noticed
that

he was the
to

upward turn

his

toes.

What a griping time was there. What a sawing of the air, What a grasping
at
their

stomachs, as

they tumbled in despair.

Oh, the chafing of the claws, Oh, the working of the jaw^s, Oh. the stiffening up of joints,

and the wondering
It

at

the

cause.

would weary every

ear.

All the facts at large to hear.

How

they dropped

among

the daisies, never after to appear.

And
From

the

people

livinj^

round,

Thus escaped
a single pest of
Oft' as
air,

tlie stinj^

or sound hid the ground.

till

the

snow-flakes

on through

life

we wend,

In

disguise our gifts

descend,
in the end.

And, what seemed a sad misfortune, proves a blessing

M^
THE GOBBLER AND THE GANDER.
Said a Gobbler
to a

Gander, with a proud, disdainful glance.
in

As

they met one afternoon,

a farmers yard by chance,
that
in
I

•'You're the

most ungainly fowl

meet throughout the day,

As you
And,
I

waddle, waddle round,
to tell the truth,

your slow, ungraceful way;
if I

my

friend,

looked as bad as you,

would seldom walk abroad, but would hide myself from view."
"

Said the Gander to the Gobbler,

Oh, you needn't swell with pride.
tail

Just because your legs are long and you spread your

ro wide,

For, in spite of
I

all
I

your

airs, I

am

smarter

still

than you,

can swim, and

can dive, something you can never do."

Then

the Gobbler turned away, with a visage red as flame.

In a stack of barley straw to conceal his head in shame.

'PALMeft

COA

THE WASP AND THE
In

BEE.

a garden
bright

sweet and

fair,

Once a
Held a

and busy

pair,
, .

on a lily. "Mr. Wasp." remarked the Bee,
puzzle me,
either

brief conversation

.

"Your manceuvers

You must

be a lazy rogue, or

silly."

"In the school where

"'

*

/

you were

taught,

Was

the

fact

before

you brought,
is

That our time

equivalent to

money?

Now

for

days and days we've met,
mignonette.

'Mid the pinks and

But you never seem
to

carry

any honey."

Said the

Wasp

:

"

You make me smile,
outspoken
style,

With your

blunt,

You have many

things to I must declare; For a thousand sunnv hours You've been pumping at the flowers. And you never dreamed of poison being there.
learn,

"From
Soon your

the

phlox and

columbine,

Bleeding-heart and
treasury
of

eglantine,
fill;

honey-comb you

:

While
-

I,

coming

in

your wake,

From
the

the

self-same

blossoms take
gill.

All
"

rankest sort of poison by the

Let
I

me

whisper in your ear

have found while roaming here

Over garden, over orchard, over field. That the fairest growth of flowers,

Which adorn

these

haunts of ours.
often
yields."

The most deadly kind
"Bless

of poison

my

sting!"

exclaimed the Bee,

^-

"Every day we live to see Will some wonder carry with it, I suppose. W^ho would think a nauseous drug Could be stored away so snug,
In the
heart
it

!

of such a blossom as a rose?"
flew

And, with that

away.

To

a

field

of blooming hay.
clover to alight;
set to

On

the

buttercup and

While the Something

Wasp
suited

out to find
his

mind,

And was

soon

in

a camelia out of sight.

:

THE MAIDEN AND THE KNIGHT.
A FAIRY TALE.

HE
Who
And

day was

lost,

when from
a valiant

the

fight
'

Young Hanvick
fought
till

rode,

knight

every bridge was crossed,
lost.

every hope and standard
himself,

The King
Before the

upon the
his

field,

Lay dead, beneath

battered
fray

shield,

Knight forsook the

And

rode to rescue
fair,

Lady May
degree,
bride
to

A

maiden

of high
his

That night she was

be,
less,

Had fickle fortune And crowned their
She must not
in

scorned them
legions

with success.
remain,

her

home
him

Where

sack and

pillage soon
for

must reign;
to
fly

But time was short

And

save her from the danger nigh.

As Harwick bore her from the Hall, The foes were shouting round the wall; As through the park away they rode,

A

blazing pile the

castle

glowed.

Where shall they fly? Behind them rose The shouts and clamor of their foes. The North Sea, half a league before,
Disputed boundary with the shore.

;

!

;

;

Could they but reach the Norway coast, They would avoid the conquering host;

But vain the wish, no ship

is

near,

No

upon the marge appear Now something more than strength of steed Must serve them, in their hour of need.
boats

Oh, wonder-working

fairies,

Hail
fail.

When human

arts

and

efforts

And hope departs, ye To introduce your
Now, from

choose the hour
mystic power.
c^f

the shadow
fairies

the

wood,

A
W^ho.

band of

came, and stood
fair,

Before the Knight and maiden

<

r^
In

much perplexed, were standing there. So sudden came the troop around. They seemed to issue from the ground The wondering couple, all amazed.
silence
in

on

the

comers gazed

And,

the

midst of their distress,
a smile

They hardly could

suppress,

To

see

the

strange and
''n

motley crew
flew

That round them

a

moment

A

few had beards, unkempt and wild,
child.

While some were beardless as a With dimpled cheeks and spzirkli ng That told of youngsters early wise; A jacket here was black as night, Another there was red, or white,
.

eyes.

L

Mr!

'^' PALNien cox

^
While some were many colors dyed, Or spotted as the leopard's hide

;

;

Sonvc

\v.inU\l

luUh

.i

vo.ii

.uul
.\\u\

\as(.
>i^|ft'
jf*-

VVhilo

some had
.ill

tlicso
jovi.il.

\.uU\\

tlir

vrst;

Hut

wrrr

kccw
vxIum

.md
iiin

sprv,
o\
lly.

^J^ A^^

'Si

Aiul

lriinn\Cil

U>

> Y*

>T\*i\i^>«^SV,''*i''

N»>\\,

one who
tin\

srciiutl
ainI
ol

to Ix^ the (iiKxn,
in.iiUlc

*

w/jj3>Sr>>*.^^p^^ f
^?>4iiA«i^«'''
)

With
'^'^^^

w.inJ
h.it

j^iccn.

^^*'^'''
"•-"
^
.'

siaiKt

nMuu

nioKI.

'^^^flflllfl^l A"^

;s> -^

.\iUhiNsr«l
"^-'il^^><^

Ihr

p.nr

m

l.ni^u.iv;!'

hoh

T

iPP^^
l%l.#
xT-,.'
*«!l*.

''^''^''^

^-lU'inl
^'^'^'^

kni-ht

.uul

l.ulv

l.iir.

I

7
'^V,
.>^*';

.^*'^"

l*>ilvinrs
([iiil

to

our

tare,

^'^ r

Ami you

uiay saliK
the
aul
ol
oi\

this
oi-

shore

W itlunit
^^''^1

s.nl
\\\v

oar.

*

^^ '^

vji^ s!

.^"

ha\i^ you
trt>ni

Norway

straud,

T^

»

\

Awav
Nor
''^^'

|Hisrrutious luuul
uia^ie

tear

llu1-

powii-

wr

uirhi,

^A^
;-"*

t^'^^'

A"^ ^^

<

nc\x

\\l

was case
hallad

rc\ ealcil,

In

storv oKI.
'^^''"*-'

or

new,
true."

li ^-•- IV \ \
frni^
«,<^^

-

^^

lairies

w lou^ed the i^ood and

^

What
-^'"'*^^

nioN ed the el\ es to eross their
protler
aid,

way

%if*

Zi.
It

we eannot

say.

nui;iu

have been

the niaitlen's sigh,

Or
For

tear that '^listened in her eye;

notliiuij

can a
its

tairv
s\

see,

That sooner wakes
But
fairly

mpathy.

^

Tf -*«. Z^.M

w;is

the

otter

made,

Nor was

the

answer long delayed

;

^:

.•^^. -Sf*\-

"

(

)|i,

\\il(li

(>i

clvr, wh.ilcVi

you
llicc

he,
;

\\v

tlUsI

nlli

k((|»m^;
.111'.

.ill

In
(

iMnploy
liiil

wll.ll
IIS

\nll

lii.iv

(illiflKltHi,
l.iiid."

j^iiidc

linin

this

WKlcInd
;iii(l

t^

>M

.

Jt

She

rc.K hc(l Ik
l<>
I

r

w.ind
ol

jniidicd the
hriidit

Kliij.dlt,

And
In
W'iHi
lie
«

Ills

siiil

.iiiiMii

Appeared
Hiving
ail

to

in<

ll,

.iiid

l.idc

away
j^ray
l'>n^,

s\V(!rpiiiL;

win^s, .ind
.iiid

(catlicrs

he. lis

talons
.iiid

stood,

c.i^lc

svvilt

strong,

IV('par(<l,

amoni;

the

(

loiids

to

(ly,

Or
SIk:

SI. Ill

the sun with

^-^:r-~

inal( lilcss

eye,

toiuhcd thc^
•'^^^

jf^ fS^^^
"'"

lady,

<nii(k
(

as

tlioii^dit,

Aiiollici

%.^
^VT'

"

."-

^

woiirjious
of

li.iniM:

was

wroutrlit.

Instead of

ioIks
<

silken

fold,

Instc.id of ^<ins ;ind
In pl.u
'I
(•

li.iins
lo(

ol ^old,
Ii.iir,

of

shinint;

ks of

he j)luina^fc of the swan was there!

With

j^racehil

mien, and

look

sedate,

She stood
l*|-e|)ared,

l)esi(le

her royal

mate;

with him, at

om c

to hr.ive

Tin: howling winds, or fo.imin^^ u.ive.

Tlie

fairy
i)()th

waved her wand
rose,
like

.irouiid,

And
They
So,

eirelin^^
])irds

from

the

j^Tound;
kind,

But though
still

they were in

possessed
to

the

human mind;
fast

wing

wing, across the sea,

1 heir

course was taken,

and

free.

"

;

;

"A
"

pleasing sight,"

the

fairy cried, side,

Behold them journey, side by
tenderness and trust
you, a
loving
is

What
I'll

there,
!

warrant

pair

For hours, above
Still

the dashing spray.

flew the

swan and eagle

gray.

At times they skimAt times among the

med
the

the ocean blue,

clouds

they

flew;

But whether thro' Or thro' the foamStill,

darkened sky,

side by side.

ing spray they fly, they kept in place,

With equal speed The eagle proves When by
And
But
pass

and equal grace, no laggard bird,
the dri\ing tempest stirred

The swan can spread her
the

pinions white
its

arrow

in

flight

;

tho' that night

they did their best,
rest,

And

crossed the deep without a

Nor turned
That old
Yet,

aside from straightest line
captains

sea

could

assign.

when
fairy

arrived on Norway's shore,

The

band

was

there
in

before

1

But how those elves

strangest guise,
is

Had

reached

that

coast,

but surmise,
they
rode,

Perhaps,

upon the
unseen
sea,

winds
in

Or scudding cloud
Doubtless,

haste

bestrode

by man, they flew
through ether blue;

O'er

surging

Or, ran

around the sea

entire,

Like currents of

electric

fire.

But

this

is

certain,

all

were

there.
pair.

And

waiting for the coming

The queen, approaching, wavec* her wand.

And

touched them, as they reached the land.

Oh, happy change! at once away

Goes curving beak and

feathers

gray;

The

scaly talons

fade

from sight;

He stands again in armor bright! And ere he turns, to view with pride,
The
trusting

creature

by

his

side.

Away goes

plumage, white as snow;
feet

The spreading

and pinions go;
bill

The lengthy neck and yellow Have vanished, at the fairy's
Again she stands a maiden
In

will.

there.
fair.

form and face exceeding

"

Then," said the
are
first

fairy,

"

marvel not
spot.

That we

upon the

The

charger never shook a heel.

Nor locomotive

turned a wheel,
air.

Nor
That

feathered
can,
for

creature

split

the

speed, with

us

compare.

"

;

;

The

wind, with

all

its

puff

and blow,

We

leave behind, as

on we go.

As meteors shoot through empty space, So fairies move from place to place, With speed that one can only find
In
creatures

of the

spirit

kind.

'Twas meet

that

we should reach

the shore

Your former natures to restore. Or else, forever you would
But objects
for

fly.

the

hunter's

eye.

Now, though we

travel

east

and west,
the
best;

We
And
Have

love our

native

land

So back again we all must speed, For others may assistance need
fairies,

since the world

was new,

lent their aid to lovers true
till

And
Will

always,
still

creation's

end,
!

be found, the lover's friend

THE WINDFALL.
N
a westward reachin^^^ railroad,

Over

plain

and mountain

laid,

Journeyed once a woeful member

0{
Out

the

famous tramp

brii^ade.

at knees,

and out

at elbows.
his tin,

Gone

his credit,

gone

His defence a hea\y cudgel,
His adherents next
his skin.

Gnawing bones, by dogs abandoned,
Sleeping under stacks of hay.
Stealing rides and haunting dairies,

Moved

this

nomad, day by day.

Baby-feared and dog-detested,

'*''-'

Shunning

water, soap

and

light.

Buried pride and blunted

feeling,

Nothing sound but

appetite.

Those who saw him,
Slouching round

in the evening,

their

barn-yard go,

Doubted much

if

in the

morning,

They would

hear their rooster crow.

While he tramped across the mountains,

Where
As
Wild

eternal Hes the snow,

the night
the

was darkly closing, wind commenced to blow.

Soon

the rain, in

torrents

pouring,

Broueht the slush about the knee.

And

the
Split

lightning stroke
in

descending,
tree.

twain

his

shelter

Fearinir

such another summons, Might do more than singe his Down a narrow^ gulch he bolted

hair,

Seeking better shelter

there.

Soon a cave
But

the

wretch discovered
stones,

Formed by over-hanging
in

terror

backward bounded

On

beholding

human
o'er

bones.

Then a change came

his visage

And

his

fears

began

to

lull,

saw a bag of gold-dust
iderncath
the

grinning skull.

Years before some
famished

miner

Lay and perished
there
alone.

With
for

his

treasure

a pillow
couch,
the

And

his

flinty stone.

There

lay pick,

and pan, and

shovel.

Worn And the

with years of rust away.
well-filled

buckskin showing
in
his

Mines were paying

day.

Snow had

covered bones and treasure,

Safe from sight the seasons through.

But the recent heavy

freshet,

Brought the cave again

in

view.

Wrong

to

take

e'en
for,

what another
high or low;
this

Has no use

But perhaps

hard-pressed brother
not so.

Now

in

question, thought

Bending low beneath the

windfall,
lay,

In which shining thousands

Moved

the

traveler

for

the

railroad

When

the

storm had passed away.

Now
Or
In

no more
to

to

ride
like

on bumpers,
a beast.
travel

burrow,

the

haystack, but

to

Like a nabob of the East.

Thus

the

storm of rain and lightning
tried

That beset and

him

sore,

While it seemed to seek his ruin, Drove him straight to Fortune's door.
This
truth, in

is

than fiction stranger,
picture
it,

Truth

and
like

in

rhyme.

Some may doubt Knows the party

but this ranger
a

dime.

In that far-off sunny region.

Where

the

people delve for gold.
oft

And

the

earthquake
sins

reminds them

Of

their

so

manifold,

He who
With
his

tramped

is

now

in

clover;

Like a prince he hves at ease,
pleasure-boats
his

and

horses,
please.

And

servants,

if

you

W^^s^
Vain would be the task now closing, Vain your patience, vain my line,

Did no moral thread imposing.

Through

the

homespun
lowers,
falls,

fabric

shine.

Know
Or

the

darkest

night
luck

that

the hardest

that

Oft but

ushers brightest hours.
richest

Oft the

fortune

calls.

When

misfortunes

round you gather,
pile

Crowding, crushing,

on

pile.

Sink not under, brave them

rather.

Think upon

this

man and

smile.

^ -.„,',.

;

THE GUILEFUL PAPOOSH.
Whhrp: wild The youthful
Sierra's
forests wave,

heir

of Piute

brave

Sat by the station, lone and bare,

While stopped the

train a

moment
his

there.

With hands From side

across

stomach lacked,

to side he wrunsj;-

and rocked,
ith

And

filled the

passengers w
for

dread,

So loud he screamed

meat and bread.
cry,

One, judging by that awful

Would

think the child

must

eat or die

;

And
-pALt,t<^

few

who heard
the loud appeal.
to the "squeal."

cox

Unmindful listened
.^^'-

IZZ^^

A
From

dozen baskets open yawn.
every lunch a part
is

drawn

And down

about the youngster's knees,
bread,

Descend enough of

and cheese.
legs,

And cake, and pie, and chicken And sandwiches, and hard-boiled To fill a bucket heaping o'er,
Then onward moves
But
L:

eggs,

the

train

once more.

ah,

deceit,

so often

found

In pale-face tribes the world around,
not a stranger to
the

brain
plain.

Of Red Men on

the western

;

The

truth,
it

unvarnished,

must be
old
play,

told,

A
Had

trick

was, the parents

taught him well the part to And thus he bellowed every day, While they kept back from public eyes

And much

urchin won the prize. they praised that babe of guile As, squatting there in Indian style, /^-^es They put beyond the reach

Until

the

of

flies

^

The

chicken legs and berry pies,

The

cake and

and slices wide, The sandwiches, and all beside Then heavy sighs of sorrow drew And wished another train was due.
cheese,

^

A CHANGE

IN

THE SITUATION.
HHRI'L was a
little

sickly kid,

That grazed along the way, And children as they went to school

Would

pelt

him every day;
the road,

Or chase him up and down

Until he'd run and hide,

And there, with fear, would stand and As long as one he spied.
But winter came; the kid was kept Within the stable door;

shake,

And when He was
The

the

summer smiled
no more.
their

again

afraid

children,

on

way

to

school,

In wonder did

espy

Him,

prancinc:

0"t upon
in

the
eye.

mad,

With mischief

his

"

Last year." said he,

"about
I

this time,

was a scrawny
with stones,

kid,

And when you
I

pelted

me

ran

away and

hid.

But time,

at last, as poets say,
fair,

Arranges matters

And
aloui^^

giv^es,

with strength and years,
heart
to

A

do and

dare.

The

bran, the beans,

the juicy hay.

And shelter from Have not been given me in vain, For now I'm strong and bold.
The year on you
has scarcely shown,

the

cold.

And
Tis

little

,

«

change

I

note;
tell,

But, as your books,
different

perhaps, will

with a goat.

You

see,

I've

got

a pair of horns,
like

Am
And
if

bearded

a Turk,
or two,

you want
I'm

a
for

toss

ready

the

work.

'

I

know
I

you're
well

awful

fond

of fun;

remember,

still,

Your hearty lau^^h, when from my back, The stones flew clown the hill.

The

scars

they

made you
is

yet

may

see,

Where
For even

skin

shinini:

bare:

winter's

ieni;thy

months,
'

Could not

restore
last,

the

hair

I

Though
That
Still,

time, at
cruel

may

hide the marks

^^^^^^..^^^^

hands bestow;
will
live

in

the

mind

y^m/BSKS^^s^

the wronjr,
<jo."

Though seasons
Those children Such sport would
And,
in

y^flPH^HP^^^

come and

then began to think

hardly please;

thepres-

ence of that goat,
ill

Felt wondrous

at

ease;

For

fear

was seen
In

V^^^^gP^^gi^"/

every

\^^^^f^after,

In pallid cheeks,

^

y

in

every eye,
hair.

bristling
in

H^-^^"^ and

the

knees

That smote each other
So, ever
to
their

there.

school

They went another way,

And

daily

learned, that

nature gives
its

The

poorest thing

day.

THE BICYCLE
O
easy task,
it

IN

THE WOODS.

seems, to guide

The

Bicycle

through forest wide,
roots
are

Where crooked And mossy
But, oftentimes, as

reaching out,

stones

are

spread about.

stories

go.

The woods present a

lively show.

The The
fox,

wolf,

the

porcupine and hare.

the catamount and bear,

May

there be found
at

dead of

night,

On

wheels that yield
such great delight.

No

student from
the

college

free,

No No

salesman from

his

rice

or

tea,

clerk released from dusty room.

Where judges
Than do

sit

witn brows of gloom,

Could greater joy or pleasure know
those beasts, as round they go.

What though a fall may check the fun. And end at once a rapid run ? What tho' some heels should sudden rise To points reserved for ears or eyes?
This only serves to kindle zeal

To

yet control

and guide the wheel.

ft

Thus

let

them sport

as

best
till

they may,

A

happy band,

morning gray;
training

For, while

thus

through the

trees,

The

farmer's

sheep

may

graze at ease,

And

ducks and geese

may
birds

rest

their

legs,

And

lay the

farmer's
the
^

breakfast eggs. forsake
their
nest,

So

let

To

cheer the

one who

rides

the best,

Or hover round with mournful The one who falls and breaks

tones
his bones.

;

THH DIALOGUE.
HE.
"

Oh, here you come, with empty hand,

Though gone

for half the night,

While hungr)' babies round me Without a single bite.

stand.

Your eyesight must be getting dim, Or else your courage small, Or you'd have reached your home ere this, With something for us all.

Have you been

feasting by yourself, •Secure from tooth and nail? And now return from empty shelf,

To
He.
" It

tell

a woeful

tale?'

seems

that all the dear,

Fates,

my

Against us are combined

A
I've

harder night to find a bite, I cannot call to mind. seen hard times

upon

the

sea.

stormy weather, When lockers were not opened once For days and days together.
In

wild and

And when, upon
In
winter's

the

western plain
storm.

blizzard

The
But

folks

To

were forced to burn their grain keep their bodies warm.
town, where stores abound,
distress
is

here, in

And no

nigh.

A
I

place

where

less

was lying round,
eye.
face,

Has never met my
stole

about with anxious
barrel,

By

box and

bin,

There's

not a

corner round
has not been

the
in."

place,

My
She.

nose

Was

there

No

no cake or cheese around cupboard door ajar?

?

; ;

No meal

or

candles

to

be

found
are."

?

A
He.

worthless

mouse you

"The cupboard's bolted at the top, And buttoned down below;
There's nothing open but the
trap,

Wherever

I

may

go.

The
The

servants ate the piece of cheese

Their mistress
crackers

left at

tea
food,

went

for
left

baby
for

There's

nothing

me."

She:

"Was
I

there

no

crust

of bread,

I

pray?

No cake of soap to cannot think, whate'er you say, That you have done your best."
test?

He: "The
I

bread

is

locked within a box,

That seems

as

hard as stone;
I

broke a tooth before

left

The plaguy
I

thing

alone.
live

think the

people here must

Like Indians on the plain, For sight or scent of such a thing

As

soap,

I

cannot gain.
in

The beans
y^

are

a covered pot,

That's either brass or steel
cat
is

The

lying on a sack.

That holds the barley meal.

When
I

saw her stretching there, So spotted, large and sleek, hardly was three feet away,
first
I

And

scarce suppressed

a squeak.

I

rather think
I

And

she's shamming, watched her half an hour, thought a false composure

too,

lay.

Upon

her visage

sour."

She:

-

"Are you

a

mouse, and
floor to

know

the

house,

From

garret
afraid

ground,
raid.
?

And

still

to
cat's

make a
around

Because the

If I

could

leave

my

babies
care,

here,

Without a mother's
I'd

And

have a bagful, never fear, eat my supper there."

He: "I'm

not the craven that you
stinging language

think;

Your
I'll

spare,

V/ith bravest mouse, in barn or house,

very well
for taking

compare."
risks.

She:

"We
But

mice are made
Else,
if

why

are
lose

we

so

spry?
us,

A

your life for noble death you die."

you

He:
"

Look on
That

these scars that o'er
hint of nail

me

run,

and
look

knife.
like
life ?

And

tell

me,

do

I

one

Afraid to risk his

Think you

this
tail

split

and haggled ear
of skin,

And

bereft

Bespeak a mouse who all the year Abides the hole within ?

Does not

this

circle,

red

Where Remind you of W^hen home
I've

hair will sprout
that

and raw. no more.
I

night of awe,
trap

the

bore

?

taken chances, scolding mate,
rant

Though now you

and

rail,

I've nibbled from the trap the bait, While lookers-on turned pale."

!

She
'Your
babies'
cries
is

ring
their

in
fate,

your ears;

Starvation

Unless you can do something more Than simply stand and prate.

What
With
If

care

we now
on
reason

for

dangers

past,

For

scars

tail

or

brow

?

better

might you brag you were bleeding now.
look
into

How

can you

those eyes,

Or on

those

sunken jaws.

Or note each pointed visage here, And folded keep your paws ?"

He
"While
I'll

I

to

drag a leg have power,
hear

stay to

If

I'm

not back in

no more half an hour.

Put crape upon the door."

;

THE LION AND RHINOCEROS.
LION
To
_
once had vainly tried cross a river deep and wide For sickness had beset him sore, Had shrunk his form and stilled his
fear the chilling flow,

roar,

And made him
That tumbled
to

the sea below.
<

'.t\

An

Who

old rhinoceros, at last, throuo^h the water often passed,

"Ji^M

And

did

of friendship

nothing
seat

lack.

Gave him

a

upon

his

back;
started
o'er,

Then, with the

lion,

To

leave

him on

the distant shore.

;

Now,

other beasts, from

either

side.

The

novel spectacle had

spied,

And
Or,

kept the earnest wish

alive,

The old rhinoceros would dive when he reached the current strong.

That through the channel swept along,

Would

And

overboard his burden throw. rid the country
of their
foe.

But when upon the distant strand, They saw the thankful lion stand. With scarce a hair upon him wet, And safe to chase or govern
..

yet,

In anger every creature yelled,

A

meeting on the spot was

held.

And

plots

against

the

beast were

laid,

Who

dared to give the lion
cried,

aid.

"If he's a fish," one speaker Let him beneath the water bide; With clams and muscles
at

his

toes,

And
And

eels
at

and leeches
crawlinij!"

his nose,

not

come
a

round us

here,

To

aid

rogue

that others fear.

If he's

He
/

indeed a beast of prey, should on land contented And not be keeping us in
.

stay,

doubt
plated
lout."

Which way

to

class

the

Thus things went on, from day to day. At last they made a bold assay; Combined to give, in minutes few, The old rhinoceros his due.
But while the fight was under wav, And dark and doubtful seemed the day, The lion, now both sound and strong, As luck would have it came along.

A

moment

there

he viev/ed

the

fight,

And

quickly guessed

the

motive right;

"This mean, combined

attack,"

said

he,
for

" Is

what he gets

aiding me.


My
sturdy friend
of former

day

Must have support without delay. Though working well among his foes, With stamping feet and tossing nose,

He needs assistance And one good turn
With
that

from a brother,
deserves another."
fray.

he bounded to the

And

soon confusion marked
throat

his

way.

The roar that from his Made creatures tremble The howling band was

arose

to their toes.

forced to yield.

And And

them masters of the field; ever after, side by side. The couple journeyed far and wide, Friends, tried and true, as friends can be, Who live by force and robbery; While other beasts, by night and day.
left

Took

care

to

give them right of way.

; ;

THE
As To
rest

FAIRIES
their

ON HORSEBACK.
leafy bowers,
till morning hours from dusty swings, from folded wings

songsters hid in

tongues

And bats came forth To shake the cramps
The
Fairies

sought some enterprise That promised fun and exercise.

For some had
all

rested

the day,

W^here thickest grew
the hazel spray,

And more

had been concealed
like thieves,

Beneath the shade of
mullen leaves.

;

;

;

;

Some plan," said To gain ere long
"

one,

**

we must

contrive

a country drive;

The farmers all have been assessed, The summer roads are at their best The snapping whip and rattling gear Around on every side we hear." Another spoke " Of late my mind Has been to such a scheme inclined
:

me depend
With daring
act,

to

play

my

part.

And

aught the

and ready art, work in hand may
the

claim,

Or, strip

me

of

Fairy name.
plays.

Where yonder brook through clover
At
least

a dozen

horses

graze
service long are tame,

Though most through And come at mention

of their

name

A

few are wild and

full

of

fear,

And frenzy as the mountain deer, And promise those who gain a seat a lively treat, Upon their backs,
The With
village harness

shop
for

is

stowed
road
serve our need

saddles ready
bridles,

the

And

that

will

And bring To Buzzard Mounto

terms

the wildest steed,
tain

Peak

we'll ride,

Then canter down

the other side,

And coming
round the

homeward
base

Leave horse and trappings

in

their

place."

;

;

Next evening,

as

one may suppose,
nature knows,

Who
The The

well
stretch

the

Fairies'

of ground that lay between

saddler's

shop c^nd pasture green,
Presented

such a
stirring
It

sight,

filled

with wonder
birds of night.

Some Some

brought the horses to the store
to

the
this

field

the

saddles bore

Believing

the

surest

way

To guard

against a

long delay.

;

;

They found the Outnumbered far
But strapped

saddles at eomniand
the

steeds
in

on hand.

them on

every ease,

Without the least rei^ard to plaee, Till hip, and baek, and shoulder-bone Could boast a saddle of their own.

When every mouth had found a And oirts were drawn to tii^htest
They
vVW.i"
^ iJU.

bit,
fit.

hurried up and

In search of aid to

down the track. mount the back;
found,

'Some

takino,

when a chance they

Advantai^e of the risimr ground;

While others from a stone or stump. Or friendly rail would take the jump

And And
In

those

who

latest

clambered there
to spare.

found no satldle room
at

Without a murmur,
swinging
stirrups,

the

side
in

rode

pride.

^

Now
Or As

pacing, trotting, jogging slow,

racking wildly, off they go
zig-zag up the lane
controlled
the
rein;

Some moving
this,

or

that,

Wliile through each head the question passed.

W^hich ditch would have the load at

last;

And frogs that rose on To sing their songs at
W^ent down
In
at

either side

even-tide,

once without debate
of the

expectation

weight.

As when Napoleon's
So
bravely o'er
the

Lct^ions poured

Across the Alps, with flame and sword,
steepest grade,

Advanced
the

/
Fairy cavalcade.
"U

While overheatl
in
fl(

cks arose,

The

startled

buzzards,

owls and crows,
Believing,

^

^?i^

as

they screaming

flew,

4^^

%
^^^

>^^^^v
That war had broken out anew,

And
The

every

moment looked
and

to

see

bursting shell
sjjlintered tree.

The mountain foxes, peej)ing From clefts and burrows

out

heard the rout

And

thought a judgment

at their door.

For

stripping roosts
the night before.

l^ut

little

time the

riilcrs

ftniml

To
Some
tried

view
to

the seenes that lay arouml.

keep
in

their seat

vain,

——^^-——"""""-"
-^j^

Some

trusted ehildlike

-^^ .#^
""^^"^
if

to the

mane.

4

And many

wished

&C~?k
,\;;\V^^'«t

'~^
\

^^

the horse hail hair

As long and shaggy
For

as the bear,

lighter labor then

would

fall

To

those

whose chance

of hold

was

small.

riic

Peak was
Hut

trained, tluii

true to |)lan
l)c\i;an
;

The

steep deseeiit the troop
j^reater

dan^^Ts
that

still

attend

The

risky

ways

downward bend.

And soon mishaps anion^ the crew Were neither far apart nor few. Some creatures in their eaj^cr state,

To

reach again the pasture gate

;

With

and stumbles down the road Themselves, as well as riders, throwed
slips

Then, over

all,

excitement reigned

Till lost positions

were regained.
still

But Fairies
^
,,,

through every care
air.

Preserve the same good-natured

And

nothing

in the trouble line
fine,

Can overthrow their temper Or draw the slightest word

of blame

On leading spirits in the game. And though that mountain ride was rough. And all were lame and sore enough
When, training homeward round the base, They reached at last the starting-place,
Yet
all

^

declared their

That

trip,

mind would hold as years around them rolled,
last the

And

said the exercise they found

That night would

season round.

When
"

morning opened wide her door

All things were resting, as before.

The The

saddler's stock

was hanging

still.

beasts were grazing on the

hill.

And

but for tracks along the road
travel

That recent heavy

showed.

No

signs were there that gave

away
of night,

The secret that with Fairies lay. The wondering beasts and birds
Alone could
tell

the tale aright.

BUGABOO
There was
Resided
in

BILL,
jriant,

THE
top

GIANT.
Pill,

an old

named Bugaboo
of a
hill;

PIngland, on

A

daring

marauder,
as

strong as a moose,

Who
He'd

lived

on the best
his

that the land eould produce.
sit

by

castle

and gaze on

the

plain,

While farmers were reaping and thrashing their grain.

And
"

say, as

he

noticed

the

ripened

crop

fall,

Twill soon be the season
to

give

them a

call.

The yield will be Nor a grasshopper

great,

not a weevil

in

sight,

near, nor
in

the sign of a blight.

We

people are
in

blessed

this

part of the

Isle,

Wales they are And when came the hour
For over

^8.

starving the while."
to

J^^^^^

levy his

tax,

When corn was in cribs, and ^tflf^^CSuK

^^^ barley in sacks,

When

the

fruit

was

all

gathered, and ready for sale

Were

poultry and cattle

—then

down, without
old
to

fail,

Would come, uninvited, And carry a load

Bugaboo
his

Bill,

home on

the

hill.

;

— —

;

The

farmers had often declared they would stand And guard their possessions, with weapon in hand. In bands they would muster, with mattocks and hoes,

With

sickles

and

pitchforks, his

march

to

oppose

But when the great giant came down in his might, 'A club in his hand neither limber nor light, They'd fling away weapons and scatter like deer,

To hide behind And leave him
Or
pick out
the

walls,

or

in

woods disappear,
and
the
rye.
sty.

to

carry

off barley

fattest

old

pig in

Thus

things went on yearly, whate'er they might do, From bad to far worse, as still bolder he grew; For none could be found who had courage or skill
Sufficient to

cope with the rogue on the

hill.

At length one remarked, who had studied his race "No giant so strong but he has a weak place

He'Uhave some short-coming, though ever so tall; You've tried many plans, but have failed in them all
His club
is

too large,

and your courage too small.
to

Now

tr>^

a

new method— invite him

dine:

Bring

forth temjjting dishes and flagons of wine.

And let skilled musicians perform soothing airs To smooth down his tcmj :x and banish his cares And when he grows drowsy, as surely he will,
We'll easily manage
this

Bugaboo

Bill."

The

plan was adopted

;

when next he came down

To

take his supplies from the best in the town, They brought him fat bacon, roast turkey and quail.

;


;

;

;

With flagons of sherry and beakers of Good beef in abundance, and fruit
In short, every dish
that

ale

was sweet could tempt him to eat
that
to
to

Well pleased was the i;iant So frank and forbearmg,

see

them so

kind,

pardon

inclined

was nice To poultry, to pastr)', and puddings of rice, To wines that were potent to steal unaware; From limbs that were large all the strength that was there
helped himself freely to
all

He

that

;

While 'round him nuisicians were Sonic turning a crank, antl sonic A poet read sonnets composed

raiii'^ccl

in

a

rinir,

scraj)ini;'

a

string.

for the day,

A
Until

sinj^er
all

sanj^
air

ballads,

luToic

and

j^ay,

the

was

replete

with

a sound,

That softened the

feelini^s

and enmity drowned.
for half
.i

The
I

task

was not easy;

tlay

loii.i(

hey treated the ^iant

to

music

antl

soni;;

The piper played all the sweet airs that he. knew The fiddler seemed sawini^ his fiddle in two, With tunes from the Shannon, the Tiber and Tync, And tunes from the Danube, the Seine and the Rhine; The organist worked as though turnintj^ a mill, Hut still wide awake remained lUiijaboo l>ill.

At last he grew drowsy, confused was his mind With feasting and drinking, and music combined. And when he had sunk in a stupid rej)ose,

A

monster balloon was brought out by

his foes.

; :

;

Said one, as the ropes to the giant they tied
"

We gave him a feast, now we'll give

him a ride

For tho' by good rights the old robber should die, His life we'll not injure, but off let him fly;
"

The wind's blowing south by sou'east, as you
he'll
if I

see.

So, over the channel, soon w^afted
He'll

be;
right,

make

a quick passage, and,

guess

Will take

his first lesson in

French before
that

night."

Then up he was

hoisted,

by winds
that

were strong,

By

gas that was buoyant,

and ropes

were long;

And south by sou'east, like a
Across the broad channel,

sea-bird he flew.

and passed
But whether he landed
in

their

from view.
in Spain,

France or

In Turkey or Russia, or dropped in the main.

They never
But though

discovered, and littk they cared

In what place he alighted, or just
his old castle
visits

how

he fared
'

long stood on the

hill,

-

,j^^t^jM^

They had no more

from Bugaboo

Bill.

I

KING CAULIFLOWER.
'^^^\

OLD
He

Cauliflower was

a king
ruled o'er land and sea;
till

who

took a penny from the
of his
great
in

treasury,
his

And
To make

with the

money

hand,

he ran about the town,
a purchase of a pint of pea-nuts roasted brown.

The king was
as

not,

monarchs

go,

decidedly severe.
But,
in

financial

matters,
.

he, perhaps,

was

rather near.

He

haggled with

old

women
Italian,

at the corner of the square,

Then found a dark

who

did stammer
stare.

and did

The monarch overawed him,
w^ith
,
.

his

flowing

ermine gown.

His gold-enameled

sceptre,

and

his

diamond-studded crown;
sacrifice,

So he took
And,

the

proffered

penny, at a

no doubt,
out.

afraid of royal anger, the pea-nuts

measured

;

" "

And when he brought them to his room it was the king's intent, To eat the pea-nuts in the bed before to sleep he went. To this the queen objection made, and very well she might,
For he was well along in years, and late it was at night; Then said the crabbed Cauliflower " Am I not a king ? And may I not do what I please, and swallow anything? O, have a care, my queenly dame, my wish is law, you know, And, if I do but say the word, your saucy head may go
: !

Then quick
But
I

the fearless

queen

replied: "Go, frighten slave or fool.

So

would have you understand that here 'tis I who rule somewhere else, and may they cost you dear. For, were you fifty times a king, you'll not be munching here Then, out upon the steps o^ stone, in silence sat his grace,
take your pea-nuts
!

And

ate

the

pint of roasted

nuts before

he

left

the

place.

;

;

THE DOG AND THE
DOG
and a Pussy, one
fine
trip

CAT.
afternoon,
in

Set off on a pleasure

a balloon;

Oh, pussy was
'^

sleek,

and her eyes they were green,
cat

And

she was

the

prettiest
short,
all

ever seen
hair,

While Ponto was proud, with
You'd think
that

glossy

the

prince

of

doggies w^as there;

So

great

was the wonder of old and young people,
sailing, clear

When

up they went

over the steeple;
surprise.

And great was the clamor and shouts of To see the brave couple send back their
They
sailed
to

"good-byes."
the
right.

the

left,

and they sailed

to

And

rose

high and higher, in wildest delight;

Now Now Now
To

over the

mountains,
all

now

over the vales,

over the water,

dotted with sails;

moving

quite
life

gently,

now up
birds

with a bound,

frighten

the

out o

flying
at

round
plain,
rain.

Now Now

able
lost

to
in

glance away

down

the

a cloud that was
it

loaded with

But while they were sporting,
Sailed rather too
close
to

chanced the balloon

a horn of the
all

moon, and
tight.

And

soon they were dangling,
to

tangled

Exposed

the

rays of

its

silvery light.

^^#r;«.;^\^

/

Then people

ran

round

in

a great screaming throng,

To catch at the ropes And brought down the
That greeted the
For never
before,
like

that

were dragging along;

basket, then loud

was the shout

pair
in

from the boat stepping out;
the

country or town.

Had And

creatures

these

won such fame and renown.

long they were treated with kindest regard,

Enjoying the freedom of every one's yard,

While cream

of the

sweetest,

and meat

that
air.

was

rare,

Was

free

to

them alwavs as water and

THE STYLISH
LD
Bruin dressed him
for

PAIR.
the
ball,

With With low-cut

slippers, swallow-tail
vest,

and all, and white cravat,
stove-pipe
hat;

And

latest

fashion

Then, turning to his partner fair, He thus addressed the Lady Bear.
"Corne, dress yourself without delay,

And

to

the

dance we'll
now,

take our way;

There's not a cloud
east or west.

Much larger summer
o'er

than
vest;

my

So we can saunter
the
land,

And

never fear a storm
at

hand.

Put on the gown you wore that hour

When
The
The

first

my

heart con-

fessed

your power;

bonnet, too, that took
night
I

my

eye.

saw you tripping by, And vowed to claim you as my own, Before another week had flown.
I

never

feel

so
I

truly great

As when And

walk beside my mate. how wretched they must be. Who single live, compared with me.
think

;

;

How much

I

pity those

who

groan,
life

Beneath the cares of

alone;

Without a

partner, true

and

tried,

Their worth to praise, their faults to hide. Far better, underneath the clay, Be hidden, on their natal day,

Than on
With none
V
t(»

to

dissolution

wend,

cherish

or

defend."

I'

'

••/'.

:0^

His lovin<4- mate
smiled sweet

and wide.

And

heard his

compliments
with pride

For more she
prized her

partner bold

Than

pork,

or mutton,

f^.^^^^^
She
to

young
ran
in

or old.

her wardrobe

haste.
'

And
' '

soon was dressed with finest taste They made, indeed, a striking pair. As through the woods they journeyed

there.

Her visage wore its sweetest smile, Her bonnet showed the reigning style, Her looped-up gown of navy blue,
Left both
,

her shapely

feet

in

view,

..

^

And

might he survey with pride, The graceful creature by his side
well

.-'\}J

\%

^^^XMlRd"^

As,

arm

in

arm,
all

they walked

along.

Observed by
But,

the
oft'

wondering throng.
a cloud

ah

!

how

can

mar

The

lustre

of the

bri^rhtest

star.

How
Can

soon a cold and cruel shower
spoil

the

pleasures
full

of the

hour!
fair,

\
Alas! deception, lurking in For while they strayed

and

Was

the

summer

air;
free,

and chatted

A

storm was rising from the sea, And, long ere they could reach the ball, The drenching rain began to fall.

With

extra

force,

it

pelted

down

And soaked the swallow-tail and gown, And changed the hat and bonnet fine. To objects that no more would shine; And while, a sheltering spot to gain.
The couple
ran,

through wind and

rain.

Now
•«•

rushing here and

diving there.
the pair.

.

>

The dance went on without

;

THE DARING

MICE.

Some mice in council met one night, And vowed by this and that,
That they would arm
themselves for
fight,

And

brave the tyrant
:

cat.

Said they

"

Why

longer

fear her

power ?

Tis time our strength
to try

We'll hang her by
the neck this hour,

Or

in the effort die ?"

Two

pistols

and a

carving-knife,

A

rifle

and a

rope.

Were

instruments
of war enough

To justify
So with

their hope.

the Captain
in the front,

The hangman
in the rear,

They

started out
to search for puss

Without a thought
of
fear.

Through silent halls and broken With cautious step and slow,

walls,

And

furtive

glances
to

right

and

left,

From room

room they

go.

Now

pausing by a

nook or

sill,

Where

trouble might

be found.

Now

crowding close and closer still,
trifling

At every

sound.

But when before an open door

The cat appear'd in sight, The very instruments
they bore

Seemed paralyzed
with
fright.

The Captain shrinking
in the van,

The hangman
crouched behind.

The

pistol-shot

and rifleman

Had

but a single mind.

In

doubt and dread they turned and And lucky mice were they,
find

fled.

To

a

hole

so

large

that

all

At once could run away.

THE RATS AND THE MEAL.
NE
summer's
night,

when

all

was

still,

And

motionless

the wheel,

Some rats ran And stole

through the village a bag of meal.

mill,
_..<»*'^

No

place

was

that

for

And

settle

them to stop every claim,
Eor pussy on the scene might pop And spoil their little game.

f»IMt^ COX

And

cunning

rats

To

are never slow, choose the safest plan;

So some behind, and some before, And some beside it, ran.
and
to
nail,

And

hurry-scurry, tooth

They dragged

it

the

door,

And
'

then,

upon
the

their shoulders,

soon

Awav

treasure

bore.

But how a

lit-

tie

step aside-

A
Or

little
little

hand

May

change

pause of fear, not well applied, a whole career.
en'd from the room

Now as they hastAlong a
nar-

row

plank,

The heavy

load
the

And

to

went in the flume, bottom sank.
with the bag of meal,
loose their hold,

And downward,
Ere they could

With many a little The thieves

squeak and squeal,
together rolled.
the sack were pin'd

Some underneath And struggled
All
felt

minutes there,
ing need of wind,
reach the
air.

the press-

Ere they could

So

then

for life

they had to swim,

But when they reached the shore, They dried themselves around a fire, And vowed to steal no more.

.

THE HENS' ADVENTURE.
hens forsook their nests,
for

Three

settinc^

in pleasant

summer weather,
out together;

And, searching
All

a

needful

bite,

they started
field,

Through pasture land and stubble
struggling for the
locust

they ran a mile or more,

prize

that

hopped along

before.

Sometimes they climbed across a fence, at times they crowded thro', Now one, more active than the rest, would lead the other two; At times the race was neck and neck, with expectation high,
But when almost within
their

reach,
in

away again

he'd

fly.

Five minutes only could they spare,

which to scratch a meal,
zeal.

No
It

wonder, then, the race they ran was carried on with

seemed

a

woeful waste of time

to

follow such a

sprite,

But hope was large and hunger keen, and nothing

else in sight.

At length a pond before them

lay,

and

into

this

he

flew,

And swam

across

its

surface smooth, and that they could not do.
to

But ere they had a moment's time

ponder on

their

woes,

From

out his burrow in
rascal, that

the

ground, a cunning fox arose;

A

daring

had long been plundering up and down,
in

And

always kept the price of eggs and chickens high

town.

His Christmas lasted

all

the year;

for eight

days out of nine,

Though traps were fixed and poison mixed, he would on poultry dine. Now, faster than they had gone forth, when urged by hunger's pain, They homeward ran, for horrid fear now spurred them o'er the plain. The fox was close behind their tails, but, let him yelp or growl,

And do
Yet not

his

utmost

in

the race, he

could

not

catch
/*s.

a

fowl!

until

the frightened hens in barn

and
|

stable flew,

And

And

dogs "bow-wowed!" and children from chase the rogue withthen the rooster stamped around, And did for hours scold,

l'*^*^^^ screamed,

j

'^^^^['V
(

drew;

i

\

i-l

Because these poor old biddies found that all their eggs were cold.

WHAT THE BUTTERFLY
H ROUGH
I

SAYS.

all

the

sunny,
to

summer days
rest

wander here and
hardly ever stop

there,

«£&

And

A moment
And
The
bees,

anywhere.
to
see,

There are so many things
time
is

rather

short with

me.

with

many
arts

cares

oppressed.
to
their nest,

Do

all

their

employ

To

gather treasure

That they will ne'er enjoy. For man or beast will seize the comb And eat them out of house and home

;


o'er

It

makes mc sad when clouds come

To

hide

the

«^olden
'twill

sun,
for

Because

shine

me

no

more
run;
the

When some few weeks have And little joy comes with
That hides
I
its

hour

face

and brings the shower.

only have a month or two, And time soon runs away

..

When
-^^..^y-^..-^

one

is

seeing something new,

-

%

Or sporting every day

And how the little people try To catch me as I flutter by!
But
I

know what
not to use
It's

they want

me

for

It's

me

right;

not to give

me sunny
sprinkled
pin

fields,

With

daisies

white;
the wall
that
is all

But

just to

me on

To show their friends, and

1

A SPOILED GAME
One
day,

by chance, while roaming round,

>A

h()lU)\\

tree

old

Hruin

found,

!

That stood beside

the

grassy mead,
of sheep were

Where

flocks

wont

to

feed,

"Well,
As,

this

is

luck, indeed," said

he,

pausing there, he viewed the tree. " Concealed within this trunk, find I'll A splendid chance to suit the mind, And, from my hidini^-place, behold

The

fattest

sheep that leave the

fold.

.-

---

-^

\'W

ill

'

-

.

'-i^'

z-^!-/^/-:/^

COK

No

W

lengthy race round stumps or trees ill be required, for here, at ease, I'll bide my time and keep my place
Until

they graze around the base, Then, paralyze the flock with fear.

And

live

on mutton half the year."
the
tree to
try

So, in

the

game.

He

promptly squeezed his burly frame.

;

And

smiled a smile from

ear

to

ear,

At thought
But

of rarest

pleasure
of care

near.

plans, in spite

and

skill,

Are

often

non-productive
thus
it

still;

And

happened with

the

bear,

Whose

prospects

seemed so

bright

and

fair

For, in that hollow, large and round,

A
had been

swarm

of bees a

home had

found.

And, through the summer months,

Both loyal

to

their

cause

and queen;
And,
the
tier

on

tier,

sweets had stowed
their

Around

improvised abode

So now, when
shaggy

Bruin's

hide,

At once

the

air

and

light

denied.

The murmuring

tribes

were

nothing slow

To

issue

from the depths
below.

The
to

strange eclipse

now behold
foretold.

That almanacs had not

It

didn't

take

old

Bruin

long

To

learn

that

something must be wrong.

Thermometers he needed not

.:-._-

To soon

convince him, that the spot

Was

ninety-nine

degrees
this

too
line

hot.

Far quicker than

is

penned,

He
.- ,
" • -

tried

the
filled

temperature to

mend;
and
fright,

And,
^

with wonder, pain

He

scrambled up as best he

might.

Just

how he dragged,

or

how

he threw

His body out, he hardly knew;

But

in

some sure and sudden way
grass

He
Escorted by
the

reached
the

the

without delay.
briars
flew,

Then through

brush
crew.

and

spiteful

''f
••
.

"^

While mating

birds

their

nests
left

soon lined

With

tufts

of hair he

behind.

The

flocks,

from neighboring hillocks green,
delight surveyed
the
in

In great

scene.

The

playful

lambs stood

a crowd.

And hopped, and skipped, and And sober sheep of solemn
, ..

laughed aloud;
style,

That ne'er before were known

to smile,

'

'

v.

Now

held their sides, and
lautrhed
until

wagged
face

the head,

And

each

was

red.

;

FAIRIES
NP2 morn,
in

AND THE

INSECTS.
hours,

summer's

bri^^htcst
all

Sweet Flora, goddess of

flowers,

Above

the

garden waved her hand,

And
*'

called

around a
"

F"airv

band.
fair.

Protect," said she,

those blossoms
that
fill

From plundering tribes From every quarter,

the

air.

here they come.

With whirring song and hungry hum.

From pink to pink, from rose to rose, The active bee, unwearied, goes; The beetle on the crocus falls, And in the bell the emmet crawls.

We might o'erlook the gaudy host.
Whose lease of life is brief at most And butterflies in mercy spare,
W^ho no defensive weapons
bear,

But, by their actions none the best.

They
So,
all

set

examples

for the

rest;

alike

must

feel

the smart,

Of severed head

or bleeding heart.

Around the opening blossoms stand, With ready weapons in your hand;

And

deal your blows on every head,

-i,-!.

That ventures nigh a bush or bed. The peevish bands you must engage

^^^....u^:,

Are nothing slow
They'll

a war to wage;

And

shower dangers thick and fast, test your mettle to the last. Beware the emmet's poison breath, And beedes' arms that hug to death.

;

; ;

And

in

the

fight,

I

Beware

the

bee,

charge you well, and hornet fell

For

swift

and vicious thrusts they deal, That soon can make the strongest

reel."

According

to

her

strict

command,

W^ith ready weapons, stood the band,

Around

the flowers,

and hurled the
'
.

thieves,
'
.

By

thousands, from the trembling leaves.

As day

advanced, and up the sky

The sun was rolling, hot and high The insects, thick and thicker flew, And fiercer still the battle grew.
.

"

:

.

-

The hornets
With
crippled legs

fell

with broken

stings.

and tattered wings; The beetles tumbled round the beds. With aching backs and dizzy heads;
\Miilc enunets,

maddened by

the blows.

Attacked, alike, their friends and foes;

And

tlii!-^,

unceasing, raged the

fight,

Till closed

around the shades of night

Then

baffled

bees
cs

fled

in

disii.ay,

The

hornets

dra*x<ied

themseb

awav

The The

beetles

crept

to
to

mossy
earthen

walls,
halls,

ants

retired

And then the bat of evening rose, To guard the flowers through sweet repose.

ENTERTAINING THE CALLER.
Uneasy, on the parlor
chair,

The

caller waits his lady fair;

Who

is

preparing

— nothing

slow,

With him

to dance, or play to go.

While

children, ever

sweet and dear,
gather near;
cravat,

About

the

caller

To

see his watch, arrange

To

read his book and try his hat,

To

entertain

and climb about.
temper
well,

And

try his

no doubt.

-"*'''^'<i>^*y,f,4m*A^-i^

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