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Theme: Philippine HEIs: Responsive to

Extension Quality Standards


October 27-29, 2014
Co-sponsored by: Mindanao University of Science and Technology
and
Technological University of the Philippines
1


EXPANDED PAEPI MISSION
Extension is one of the important trilogy of functions of higher education institutions. Vis--vis instruction and in light of recent technological advancement, extension complements and fills in the gaps left by instruction specially for those who, for multifarious reasons, can not access formal instruction to gain individual transformation.
Extensionists are employed in both government and non-government institutions to
become agents of change. As agents of change, extensionists should process the appropriate
knowledge, attitudes, skills and practices to effectively perform. Capability building if extensionist to meet the challenging tasks of changing people and communities
becomes a
continuous process. Furthermore, extensionists as agents of change must think and act as
professionals and should be well-versed in the acceptable theories and practices of their job.
To formalize the theories and principles of extension and integrate these into actual practice, PAEPI envisions to elevate extension to the level of discipline so that its practitioners,
the extensionists, become well-equipped in the science and art of extension and to become
wholly integrated professional extensionists. The demand is great for an
extensionist who
is a true professional in the execution of his duties and functions in the work environment. In
the task of meeting this demand, PAEPIs mission is to bring
extension the level of discipline and as a profession by continuous research and capability building that will contribute
significantly to the development of professional extensionists with tested practices grounded
on acceptable theories, principles, approaches, methodologies and techniques of community
extension.

PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS


1. Capability Building in Extension
Annual Conventions, regional and provincial seminar, institutes and clinics, partnership with
HEIs in offering diploma and graduate course in Extension Management, distance education
and short term course in selected extension areas are conducted.
2. Research
Relevant and responsive researches undertaken through partnerships with other research and
educational institutions and funding agencies.
3. Consultancy
Strengthening extension programs of partner institutions.
4. Special Projects
Development, conduct and evaluation of community projects aligned with PAEPI vision, mission, goals and objectives.
5. Publications
Publish newsletter, souvenir programs, monographs, handbooks, pamphlets & other materials
on extension.
6. Institutional Linkages
Establishes partnerships and collaborative activities with institutions and agencies for attaining
the PAEPI vision, mission, goals and objectives.


STRATEGIES/ APPROACHES

Policy advocacy
Trainings
Membership expansion
Appropriate technology promotion, transfer and utilization
Twinning and linkaging
Resource generation
Participatory planning and consultations, Values orientation
Media Advocacy
Social mobilization

MEMBERSHIP
Membership is open to all extension program implementors and institutions/
organizations with extension agenda.
1. INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP:
Regular members: P400 and 200 for annual dues
Honorary members
Sustaining members P1,000
Lifetime members- P1,500
Associate P200
2. CHAPTER MEMBERSHIP:
Institutional Chapter min 15 members representing 3 units in same agency
P250.00; Municipal/City Chapter: min 20 members representing 2 agencies/
institutions P350; Provincial Chapter: min 25 members representing 3 agencies/
institutions P450;
Regional Chapter: min 35 members representing 3 recognized chapters P550.00
3. INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIP:
P1,500 for new members and P500 annual dues

Once a PAEPI member, always a PAEPI member. This principle of


membership has been implemented ever since PAEPI was registered as a
non-stock, non profit professional association

THE PAEPI LOGO/SEAL

The triangle represents the Philippines as a strong republic through the PAEPI
way reaching all its corners and islands. Its yellow background color manifests a brighter
future for the country.

THREE SILHOUETTE WITH A BIG HEART EACH:

The three person-silhouettes represented by a big heart, head and arm show
each and every individual or group, government and non-government associations,
educational institutions, officials and members of the PAEPI voluntary making
themselves EXTENSIONISTS willing to carry out the mission, vision and objectives of the
association in all the three main islands of the country that is LUZON, VISAYAS and
MINDANAO irrespective of their culture and tradition, race and religious affiliation with
more emphasis for the indigenous people and/or marginal sector of society who need
most the services of the EXTENSIONISTS. The three big hearts manifest the service to
others before self principle. This is the key players of the association.

THREE EQUAL SECTORS OF THE CIRCLE WITH GREEN BACKGROUND:

The three equal sectors each represents the 3Es in PAEPI like the EXTENSIONISTS, the END-USERS, and the EXTENSION PROGRAM. The first sector EXTENSIONISTS
the service and training provider and the source of the social transformation. He/she is
referred to as the Extensionists with a heart. He/she voluntarily joins the organization
more importantly for service to others, especially to the less privileged and indigenous
people and/or the marginal sector of society. The second sector END USERS-the
beneficiaries of the association objectives and programs. These trained in a specific trade
or skills they have learned and developed for their own and others for economic upliftment. The third sector EXTENSION PROGRAM this is the lifeblood of the association
without which, the association will die a natural death. The Extension Program spells out
the continuing existence of PAEPI and defines the welfare benefits it provides to both the
EXTENSIONISTS and END USERS in particular and the ASSOCIATION in general.

THE OUTSIDE AND INSIDE CIRCLES REPRESENTED IN YELLOW ROPE:

The big and small endless ropes tightly bind the PAEPI beneficiaries the endusers in a strong, loving and caring relationship for the welfare and interest of the entire
membership of the program with emphasis on the legal foundation, institution and by
laws wherein the association has been established.
In between the big and small rope circles is a space where the words PHILIPPINE
ASSOCIATION OF EXTENSION PROGRAM IMPLEMENTORS, Inc. is inscribed.

MALACAANG PALACE
Manila

MESSAGE
My warmest greetings to Philippine Association of Extension Program
Implementors Inc. as you hold your 4th Biennial Convention.
The global issues that have affected our industries and economy have brought you
together to create meaningful results in education and sustainable development. By
facilitating access to information and working in solidarity to innovate new
techniques in science and technology, you reinforce our efforts to realize our
shared vision of a prosperous and inclusive society. May this event fortify your
resolve to tread on the straight and righteous path and bring about lasting positive
transformation to our people.
We in government count on your partnership to ensure that the thirst for knowledge
and a culture of self-reliance are materialized and harnessed to bring about our
dream of a prosperous and equitable Philippines. May you continue to respond
effectively to the challenges in your milieu and broaden your contribution to our
countrys revitalization.
I wish a productive and meaningful convention.

BENIGNO S. AQUINO III


MANILA
27 October, 2014

Republic of the Philippines


OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
Commission on Higher Education

Message
Warm greetings to the Philippine Association of Extension Program Implementors
(PAEPI) as it holds its 4th Biennial Convention and Board Meeting at the Mindanao
University of Science and Technology on October 27-29, 2014.
Since its founding in 1989, the PAEPI has conducted national seminar workshops
on extension program management. The workshops have so far taken up such topics
as Resource Sharing for community Development, Technology Dissemination,
Gender Education for Science and Technology, People Empowerment,
Entrepreneurship, Resource Mobilization for Poverty Alleviation, and Social
Transformation for Global Competitiveness.
This years convention revolves around the theme, Philippine HEIs: Responsive to
Extension Quality Standards. It hopes, among other objectives, to generate
awareness about the seriousness of global issues and their impact on the
environment, and to identify opportunities for extension work arising from this
economic and environment crisis.
The PAEPI is in an excellent position not only to disseminate relevant information
and craft strategies for community development but also to harness the resources of
various higher education institutions as it plays a key role in people empowerment for
sustainable development.
Indeed, at no other time has the call for greater involvement among organizations
such as the PAEPI become more urgent, in light of the pressing socio-economic
needs that the country now confronts and hopes to answer with firm and decisive
steps for a more progressive nation.
Mabuhay!

Republic of the Philippines

CITY OF CAGAYAN DE ORO

OFFICE OF THE CITY MAYOR

MESSAGE
M y warmest greetings to the Philippine Association of Extension
Program Implementors, Inc. (PAEPI) as you hold the 4 th Biennial
Convention and Board M eeting, with the theme: Philippine HEIs:
Responsive to Extension Quality Standards.
This convention is both timely and essential as you tackle a wide
range of pressing issues and concerns focusing on the deteriorating
state of our global environment.
Your valuable contributions to the international communitys
efforts to address critical global issues affecting our environment is
indeed a challenging yet fulfilling task. We really appreciate your
professional expertise to help protect and preserve Mother Nature.
As you map out plans and strategies aimed at enhancing your
field of endeavors, I wish you all the best and may you have a fruitful
and productive gathering here in our City.
To all guests and delegates, welcome to Cagayan de Oro,
dubbed as The City of Golden Friendship, The Emerging City of
Tomorrow and the countrys 2 nd Most Competitive City today.



OSCAR S. MORENO

City Mayor

MINDANAO UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY


Claro M. Recto Avenue, Lapasan, Cagayan de Oro City,
9000 Misamis Oriental

MESSAGE

Message

The 4 th PAEPI Biennial Convention is a fascinating and worthwhile project worthy


ofreplicationbyotherorganizationsbecauseitisanavenuewhereresearchers,education
practitionersandextensionistsmostimportantly,candiscusspertinentissues,trendsand
concerns regarding the upscaling of extension services policies and standards of the
Higher Education Institution in the country. The organizers of this undertaking aimed to
unite the extension workers for best public service, that is, unselfishly extending to the
communitiesandorganizationsevenindustriestheexpertisefoundintheacadem.

It is in this juncture, that I would warmly congratulate everyone involve in this


event.M ayyoucontinuetofullyrecognizethesignificanceofextensionservicestobeable
to make a difference inother peoples lives. There is nothing impossibleif all involved in
extension stand with one objective and with the guidance and grace of our Lord, Jesus
Christ.

M abuhayPAEPI!

DR.VICTORIASUM ANPAN

PAEPIVicePresidentforM indanao

10

Republic of the Philippines

TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Ayala Boulevard, Ermita, Manila


Website: www.tup.edu.ph

Message
I extend my warm welcome to the officers of Philippine Association of Extension Program
Implementors Inc. (PAEPi), its sponsoring institution, Mindanao University of Science and
Technology and the delegates to the 4th PAEPI Biennial Convention with the theme
Philippine HEIs: Responsive to Extension Quality Standards.
Indeed this is a laudable undertaking aimed at uniting the effort and forces behind any
extension programs and reinforcing the need for greater cooperation among the various
sectors of society to fulfil the mandate of the academe in fulfilling and developing our
institutions community extension programs as a strategy to respond to the needs of the
marginalized, depressed, deprived and underprivileged sectors of the society.
On this note , I hope that this conference will build a strong partnership between academe,
government agencies and the community in developing strategies for a sustainable extension
programs that will allow people empowerment especially along the ideals of environmental
protection and building quality standards beneficial to all extension workers.
In behalf of the Technological University of the Philippines, the founding institution of PAEPI, My congratulations, and I look forward in seeing PAEPI succeed in all of the future
undertakings.
Again Mabuhay.

Valentino J. Angeles
President
PAEPI, 2013-2014

11

Republic of the Philippines


AKLAN STATE UNIVERSITY-IBAJAY CAMPUS
College of Hospitality and Rural Resource Management
Ibajay, Aklan

Message
Warm greetings to all PAEPI Officers and Extension Advocate, and welcome to the
4th PAEPI BIENNIAL CONVENTION hosted by Mindanao University of Science and
Technology (MUST), Cagayan De Oro from October 27-29, 2014.
Guided with our theme, Philippine HEIs: Responsive to Extension Quality
Standards- presents a wake up call and a major challenge to our profession as Extension Advocates: - creating simple initiatives, empowering communities,
touching
lives and capacitating challenges. This is to realize the value of our efforts
working together with our mentors, stakeholders and leaders in promoting Extension
Quality Standards of our respective university in the region.
On behalf of the PAEPI Officers and members, my heartfelt thanks to Dr. Ricardo E.
Rotaras, President of Mindanao University of Science and Technology for hosting
and endorsing 4th PAEPI BIENNIAL CONVENTION to the Presidents and Heads of
State Universities and Colleges in the Philippines.
My sincere appreciation also to Dr. Victoria Sumanpan, Co-Convenor and PAEPI
Vice President for Mindanao, Prof. Valentino J. Angeles, the PAEPI National
President, Board Members and Regional Representatives, who work hard in the
success of our convention.
May this convention bring success in our region for advancement of our community
outreach activities towards quality standards extension program.
Cheers, Its More Fun in the Philippines, More Fun in Extension and More Power to
PAEPI Family.

ROBERTO L. SALADAR, PhD


Chairman, Board of Directors PAEPI, Inc.

12

13

14

Day 1: 27 October 2014


8:00 - 9:00 am

REGISTRATION

9:00 - 9:45 am

OPENING PROGRAM

Interfaith Invocation
Philippine National Anthem

Welcome Remarks
Hon. Oscar S. Moreno
Mayor, Cagayan de Oro City

Presentation of Participants
Dr. Victoria Sumanpan
PAEPI, Vice President for Mindanao

Inspirational Talk
Cong. Rufus Rodriquez
Introduction of the Keynote Speaker
Dr. Nenita D. Palmes
Vice President REAS, MUST

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

DR. RICARDO ROTORAS


PASUC President & President of MUST

Theme: Philippine HEIs Responsive to Extension Quality Standards


9:45-10:00 am

Health Break :

10:00-10:15

Conference Objectives and Orientation


Prof. Lorenzo Isla
PAEPI Board Member

Master of Ceremonies: Dr. Joe Mark Libre and Dr. Ma. Angeles Hinosolango
MUST

PLENARY LECTURE I
1015-12:00nn

Plenary Session Lecture

Dr. Raoul Geollogue


Payment for Ecosystem Services as a National Strategy for
Forest Conservation and Poverty Reduction
Dr. William Medrano
Strengthening Extension in State Universities and
Colleges and Higher Education Institutes
Moderator: Dr. Hermogenes M. Paguia, PAEPI Treasurer
12:00-1:00 pm

Lunch Break

15


PARALLEL
SESSION
PM Session

1:00 - 1:15 pm

1:15 - 1:30 pm

Parallel Session I

Parallel Session II

CLIMATE CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENT

PACKAGING OF APPROPRIATE
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER
(AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND PROTOTYPE)

Session Chair:
Dr. Susanita Lumbo
PAEPI Region 4

Session Chair:
Dr. Roberto Saladar
PAEPI Region 6

A CONTINUING CALAMITY RESPONSE PROGRAM (CCRP) OF AN INSTITUTION OF HIGHER


LEARNING

ADOPTATION OF DEVELOPED TECHNOLOGY


BASED RECOVERY AND RECYCLING MACHINE:
A PROJECT UNP RESEARCH AND EXTENSION

By: Nichol R. Elman, Ph. D.


From: Siliman University

By: Manuel A. Bajet, Jr.


From: University of Northern Philippines Vigan City
Ilocos Sur

ADVOCACY AND PUBLIC AWARENESS


CAMPAIGN ON CLIMATE CHANGE AMONG HEIS
IN ZAMBOANGA PENINSULA

COMMUNITY-BASED COASTAL RESOURCE


REHABILITATION AND CONSERVATION
THROUGH AQUASILVICULTURE IN DAVAO DEL
SUR

By: Fredelino M. San Juan


From: Western Minadanao State University
1:45 - 2:00 pm

CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION AND


MITIGATION CAPACITY BUILDING:
A COMMUNITY EXTENSION CON RESEARCH
PROJECT
By: Dr. Miriam C. Mani and Tomas T. Faminial
From: Romblon State University

2:00 - 2:15 pm

2:15 - 2:30 pm

By: Roel A. Sabang and Mariano E. Antigo


From: Palompon Instititute of Technology
DEVELOPMENT OF MAGALLANES TILAPIA
(TILAPIA MOSSAMBICA) TOCINO PROJECT: ITS
PROCESSING, VERIFICATION, COMMERCIALIZATION AND UTILIZTION

By: Bella Chita M. Monilla et al.


From: Marinduque State College

By: Vivien L. Chua, Ed. D & Francisco R. Carillo, Jr.


From: Sorsogon State College

INTEGRATED COMMUNITY ENHANCEMENT


THROUGH A CLIMATE RESPONSIVE EXTENSION AND MANAGEMENT (ICE CREAM): A
DOCUMENTATION OF CHALLENGES, LESSONS
LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES

FISH PROCESSING SKILLS TRAINING FOR THE


HOUSEWIVES OF FISHER FOLKS IN BATAAN:
AN ANALYSIS

REDESIGNING AN EXTENSION PROGRAM IN


RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE
By: Prof. David N. Almarez
From: Iligan Institute of Technology

2:45 - 3:00 pm

DEVELOPMENT OF AN INNOVATIVE
REFRIGERANT RECOVERY/RECYLING MACHINE

CREATING DISASTER-AWARE AND RESILIENT


RESIDENTS IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF MOGPOG:
AN EXTENSION PROJECTOF MSC SCHOOL OF
ENGINEERING

By: Michael Arieh P. Medina et al.


From: Central Mindanao University
2:30 - 2:45 pm

By: Augie E. Fuentes et al.


From: SPASMP

STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DISASTER RISK REDUCTION AND MANAGEMENT


(DRRM) IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF SOGOD,
SOUTHERN LEYTE: BASIS FOR POLICY DIRECTION

By: Dr. Felisima E. Tungol and Dr. Yolanda B. Simbul


From: Bataan Peniunsula State University
MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES OF OCCIDENTAL
MINDORO STATE COLLEGE (OMSC) IN ATTAINING EXTENSION PRODUCTIVITY
By: Mary Yole Apple Declaro-Ruedas
From: Occidental State University
POWER TRANSFORMER WIRE ESTIMATE
By: Angelo B. Dalaguit and Mary Ann L. Dalaguit
From: Cebu Technological University San Francisco
Campu

By: Veronica L. Reoma and Aileen L. Estrera


From: Southern Leyte State University
3:00 - 3:15 pm

HEALTH BREAK

16


PARALLEL
SESSION
PM Session

3:15 - 3:35 pm

Parallel Session I

Parallel Session II

CLIMATE CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENT

PACKAGING OF APPROPRIATE
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER
(AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND PROTOTYPE)

Session Chair:
Dr. Susanita Lumbo
PAEPI Region 4

Session Chair:
Dr. Roberto Saladar
PAEPI Region 6

MAINSTREAM CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH


AGROFORESTERY SYSTEM DESIGN FOR
WATERSHED RESTORATION IN CAGAYAN DE
ORO-BUKIDNON LANDSCAPE AFFECTING
RIVERINE SYSTEM AFTER FLASHFLOODS

RUNOFF AND SOIL LOSS ON DIFFERENT CROPPING SYSTEMS WITH PIGEON PEA AS HEDGEGROW
By: Melchora V. Abonal and Fe. B. Perlas
From: CBSU

By: Dr. Oliva P. Canencia


From: Mindanao University of Science and
Technology
3:35 - 3:50 pm

3:50 - 4:05 pm

4:05 - 4:20 pm

DISASTER RESPONSE THROUGH EMERGENCY


COMMUNICATION SYSTEM (DIRECS)

SCHOOL GARDENING AS STRATEGY TO PROMOTE ENVIRONMENT-FRIENDLY TECHNOLOGY

By: Alex Maurel


From: Mindanao University of Science and
Technology

By: Angelita J. Prado


From: Don Mariano Marcos State University

CAPACITY STRENGTHENING OF PILOT LOCAL


COMMUNITIES IN CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY IN
RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION
AND DISASTER RISK REDUCTION

BUILDING HOPE BEHIND BARS: A PRELIMENARY STUDY ON THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS AT THE BATAAN DISTRICT
JAIL

By: Dr. Victoria O. Sumanpan


From: Mindanao University of Science and
Technology

By: Bernadeth B. Gabor et al.


From: Bataan Peninsula State University

PROMOTING AWARENESS AND ENHANCHING


KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS CLIMATE CHANGE

ZENER DIODE TESTER

By: Regina Bautista and Aida Bergonia


Occidental Mindoro State College
4:20 - 4:35 pm

By: Benjamin R. VIllafae and


Anastacio T. Del Pila, Jr.
From: Palompon Institute of Technology
S&T BASED FARM ON SABA PRODUCTION IN
ORION BATAAN
By: Zoila M. Duque
From: From: Bataan Peninsula State University

4:35 - 4:50 pm

Open Forum

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY-BASED FARM OF


COFFE THROUGH REJUVENATION
TECHNOLOGY
By: Romualdo B. De Guzman, Jr. and
Hermogenes M. Paguia
From: Bataan Peninsula State University

4:50 - 5:20 pm
5:30 pm

Open Forum
FELLOWSHIP DINNER

17

PARALLEL SESSION
PM Session

Parallel Session III

Parallel Session IV

CULTURE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

CAPABILITY BUILDING AND GOVERNCE

Session Chair :
Dr. Nichol Elman
PAEPI Region 7

Session Chair:
Dr. Hermogenes Paguia
PAEPI Region 3

1:00 - 1:15 pm

ADOPT-A-BARANGAY PROJECT IN BARANGAY ENHANCING FARMERS SCIENTIFIC


DITA, CUENCA, BATANGAS
APPROACHES AND PRACTICES: THE CASE OF
FARMER-SCIENTISTS TRAINING PROGRAM
By: Redentor A. Janaban
By: Simeona C. Seminiano
From: Technological University of the Philippines
From: University of the Philippines Los Baos

1:15 - 1:30 pm

BUSOG, LUSOG TALINO (BLT) FROM CONCEPTION TO ITS PRESNT STATUS


By: Joemil G. Galve
From: John B. Lacson Colleges FoundationBacolod Inc.

1:45 - 2:00 pm

2:00 - 2:15 pm

2:30 - 2:45 pm

2:45 - 3:00 pm

3:00 - 3:15 pm

By: Fidelito D. Lagos


From: Marikina Polytechnic College

CEBU ACADEME NETWORK (CAN): REHABILITATION OF THE MAJOR RIVERS OF CEBU


THROUGH EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE
DEVELOPMENT

CHALLENGES AND OPPURTUNITIES, ENHANCING AND INHIBITING FORCES FOR SUSTAINABILITY: TOWARDS A CONSUMERS COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT MODEL

By: Lesly Comiso-Magalso


From: Cebu Academe Network

By: Roberto A. Estoconing


From: Siliman University

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT OF


The COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS - GRADUATE
PROGRAM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE ROTARY CLUB OF METRO EAST TAYTAY

COMMUNITY-BASED APPROACH IN PROMO


TING AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION IN
OCCIDENTAL MINDORO

By: Rosalie Galiga and Mona Purganan


From: Technological University of the Philippines
2:15 - 2:30 pm

ASSESMENT OF THE TECH-VOC COMMUNITY


EXTENSION PROGRAM OF THE MARIKINA
POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE: BASIS FOR POLICY
DIRECTION

By: Susanita G. Lumbo et al.


From: Occidental Mindoro State College

CULTURE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT:


Implication to development of culture and practice

DEVELOPMENT OF A SOLAR FISH DEHYDRATOR

By: Josefina T. Dizon et al


From: University of the Philippines Los Baos

By: Dr. Aileen B. Esmeralda


From: Carlos Hilado Memorial State College

DEVELOPMENT AND DELIVERY OF CULTURALLY-SENSITIVE ALTERNATIVE AND EARLY


EDUCATION SYSTEM OF EDUCATION SYSTEM OF EDUCATION FOR MANGYANS

EMPOWERING PEOPLES LIVES IN SAN JOSE


OCCIDENTAL MINDORO THROUGH COMMUNITY BASED DISASTER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

By: Merlyn M. Paunlagui


From: University of the Philippines Los Baos

By: Harold Q. Bautista


From: Occidental Mindoro State College

EFFECT OF NON-FORMAL EDUCATION (VIA


STORY SHARING) TO THE 4TH, 5TH, AND 6TH
GRADE PUPILS OF STA. FILOMENA INTEGRATED SCHOOL

CONSTRUCTION OF A BOTTLE GLASS


CRUSHER

By: Mario Dimatulac Lucido


From:Laguna State Polytechnic University

By: Prof Joseph Ulep et al


From: Technological University of the PhilippinesTaguig

HEALTH BREAK

18

PARALLEL SESSION
PM Session

Parallel Session III

Parallel Session IV

CULTURE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

CAPABILITY BUILDING AND GOVERNCE

Session Chair :
Dr. Nichol Elman
Region 7

Session Chair:
Dr. Hermogenes Paguia
Region 3

3:15 - 3:35 pm

EFFECTIVENESS OF KITAM WA AG-ARAL: AN


ESKWELA SA SELDA: A JAIL-BASED MODEL
EXTENSION ACTIVITY OF THE TEACHER EDU- FOR ALTERNATIVE LEARNING AND DEVELOPCATION DEPARTMENT
MENT OF INMATES IN ODIONGAN DISTRICT
JAIL
By: Angelina C. Paquibot
From: Occidental Mindoro State College
By: Fanny F. Arsenio et al.
From: Romblon State University

3:35 - 3:50 pm

EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MADRASAH SA


BASAK AS AN EXTENSION PROGRAM AMONG
MERANAO RICE FARMERS IN LANAO DEL
SUR

By: Dr. Felicisima E. Tungol and Dr. Yolanda B.


Simbul
From: Bataan Polytechnic State University

By: Leo M. Aguanta and Judith d. Intong


From: Mindanao State University
3:50 - 4:05 pm

ENTREPINOY KIDS

PRESCHOOL EDUCATION PROGRAM: EMPOWERING FILIPINO ADULT LEARNERS

By: Rhesty R. Biares et al.


From: Partido State University
4:05 - 4:20 pm

FISH PROCESSING SKILLS TRAINING FOR THE


HOUSEWIVES OF FISHER FOLKS IN BATAAN:
AN ANALYSIS

By: Ana Marie V. Fernandez


From: Cebu Normal University

ESTABLISHING A CENTER FOR CONFLICT


RESOLUTION AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT IN
THE WESTERN MINDANAO STATE UNIVERSITY-COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES: A HOLISTIC APPROACH FOR TOTAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

THE 2 IN 1 PLUS MARICULTURE FARMING SYSTEM1 (A LIVELIHOOS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR COASTAL FAMILIES)
By: Valentino V. Prado
From: Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University

By: Adrian P. Semorlan


From: Western Mindanao State University
4:20 - 4:35 pm

4:35 - 4:50 pm

4:50 - 5:20 pm

EXTENSION PROGRAM: ADOPT A BARANGAY


PROGRAM

WOMENOMICS: WOMEN EMPOWERMENT


THROUGH SUSTAINABLE AND PARTICIPATORY
EXTENSION SERVICE DELIVERY

By: Buenaventura T. Caluscosin II and Cristina G.


Guerra
From: Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University

By: Calyd T. Cerio et al.


From: Partido State University

GETULIO COMMUNITY BASED RURAL TOURISM (GCBRT): A SUC COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP

FISH PROCESSING SKILLS TRAINING FOR THE


HOUSEWIVES OF FISHER FOLKS IN BATAAN:
AN ANALYSIS

By: Lilian Diana Parreno and Nenita Morada


From: Guimaras State College

By: Dr. Felicisima E. Tungol and Dr. Yolanda B.


Simbul
From: Bataan Polytechnic State University
Open Forum

19


Day 2: October
28, 2014
8:00 10:00 am

Plenary Sessions
Dr. Ambrocio Cultura II
Potentials of Renewable
Energy in Extension Projects and Programs
Dr. Ruperto Sangalang
CHED, Commisionaire
CHED Extension Standards
OPEN FORUM

10:00 - 10:15 am

Health Break
Parallel Session Continuation of Paper Presentations

10:15 - 12:00 nn

10:15 - 10:30 pm

Parallel Session I

Parallel Session III

Parallel Session IV

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN


AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY

CULTURE AND COMMUNITY


DEVELOPMENT

CAPABILITY BUILDING AND


GOVERNCE

Session Chair:
Prof. Lorenzo Isla
PAEPI Region 4

Session Chair:
Dr. Romeo Carasi
PAEPI Region 1

Session Chair:
Dr. Victoria Sumanpan
PAEPI Region 9

EFFECTS OF THE INFORMATION, COMMUNICATION AND


TECHNOLOGY EXTENSION
PROGRAM OF OCCIDENTAL
MINDORO STATE COLLEGE
TO THE DEPARTMENT OF
EDUCATION-OCCIDENTAL
MINDORO
DISTRICT
TEACHERS

HEALTH EXTENSION PROGRAM AMONG BUHID TRIBE


AT SITIO BATO-SINGIT,
BARANGAY MANOOT, RIZAL,
OCC. MINDORO

SERIES SEMINAR ON RESPONSIBLE PARENTHOOD AND VALUES EDUCATION AS AN EXTENSION RPOGRAM OF BPSU
ORANI CAMPUS AY 20132014: AN ASSESSMENT

By: Marciel Salvador-Bautista


From: Occidental State College

By: Merlita P. Dela Cruz


From: Occidental Mindoro State
College
10:45 - 11:00 pm

ICT CAPACITY BUILDING TO


DEPED EDUCATORS AND
LEARNERS IN PARTIDO
THROUGH MOBILE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CLASSROOM (MITC) PROGRAM

KAYAKAPP [KAPWA AY YAMANG KAAGAPAY SA PAGTATAGUYOD NG PAROKYA


By: Marites M. Rio
From: University of Rizal System

By: Hazel Jean C. Pesino et al.


From: Partido State University

11:00 - 11:15 pm

NANUDAN KO, MANUNUDAN


MO: A COMPUTER LITERACY
AND TRAINING PROGRAM
By: Jojie M. Rodreguez et al.
From: Partido State University

By: Dr. Felicisima E. Tungol and


Dr. Yolanda B. Simbul
From: Bataan Polytechnic State
University

PROBLEMS, CHALLENGES AND


OPPORTUNITIES OF EXTENSION SERVICES OFFICE IN
SELECTED SUCS: BASIS FOR
DEVELOPMENT OF TRAINING
ENHANCEMENT PROGRAMS
By: Renelyn M. Adaundo
From: Marikina Polytechnic College

MATERNAL AND CHILD


HEALTH PROBLEMS IDENTIFIED: BASES FOR OUTREACH
PROGRAM IN BARANGAY
MANGARIN, SAN
JOSE,OCCIDENTAL MINDORO
By: Marciel Salvador-Bautista
From: Occidental State College

SUMMER SKILLS ENHANCEMENT WORKSHOP IN TECHNOLOGY AND LIVELIHOOD


EDUCATION (TLE)
By: Ma. Ian P. De Los Trinos and
Karen K. Foronda
From: Technological University of
the Philippines

20

Day 2: October 28, 2014


10:15 - 12:00 nn

11:15 - 11:30 pm

Parallel Session Continuation of Paper Presentations


Parallel Session I

Parallel Session III

Parallel Session IV

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN


AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY
Session Chair:
Dr. Susanita Lumbo
PAEPI Region 4

CULTURE AND COMMUNITY


DEVELOPMENT

CAPABILITY BUILDING AND


GOVERNACE

Session Chair:
Dr. Lorenzo Isla
PAEPI Region 4

Session Chair:
Dr. Hermogenes Paguia
PAEPI Region 3

PROMOTING ORGANIC
VEGETABLE FARMING IN
LOOC, ROMBLON THROUGH
THE FARMERS INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY
SERVICES (FITS) CENTER

PROFOUND UNDERSTANDING OF FUNDAMENTAL


MATHEMATICS PROFICIENCY ENHANCEMENT
AMONG GRADES V AND VI
MATHENMATICS TEACHERS
OF PUBLIC ELEMENTARY
SCHOOLS IN CAGAYAN DE
ORO CITY A TRAINING
WORKSHOP
By: Penelyn L. Acal
From: Mindanao University of
Science and Technology

ASSESSMENT OF THE DUKASYONG PANTAHANAN AT


PANGKABUHAYAN(EPP) Training Course

ASSESSMENT OF THE
EDUKASYONG PANTAHANAN AT PANGKABUHAYAN (EPP) TRAINING
COURSE

ASSESSMENT OF READINESS
TO INTEGRATE HALAL FOOD
PRODUCTION IN THE AGRICULTURE AND ALLIED SCIENCES CURRICULA OF SELECTED HIGHER EDUCATION
INSTITUTIONS IN MINDANAO,
PHILIPPINES
By: Dimaporo-Tawantawan, Indihra B.
From: University of the Philippines, Los Baos, Laguna

By: Juniel G. Lucidos


From: Romblon State University

11:30 - 11:45 pm

PHILIPPINE NATIONAL AQUASILVICULTURE PROGRAM:


MANGROVE REHABILITATION
PROJECT IN CAMARIES SUR

By: Alma R. Basmayor


From: Partido State University
By: Dr. Saturnina P. Aberin
Sagnay Campus, Nato, Sagnay, From: Mindanao University of
Camarines Sur
Science and Technology

11:45 - 12:00 pm

CO-OPTATION OF INDIGENOUS AND MODERN FARMING PRACTICES AMONG


TBOLE FARMERS IN LAKE
SEBU, SOUTH COTABATO,
PHILIPPINES
By: Evelie P. Serrano
From: University of the Philippines, Los Baos, Laguna

By: Juana M. De la Rama


From: Mindanao University of
Science and Technology

FACULTY ORIENTATION AND


PARTICIPATION IN COMMUNITY EXTENSION SERVICES

Open Forum

By: Cesar P. Gulang


From: University of Cebu

Open Forum

12:00 - 12:20 nn
12:00 - 1:00 pm

LUNCH BREAK

1:00 - 5:00

GENERAL ASSEMBLY & ELECTION OF OFFICERS

Day 3: October 29, 2014


8:00 - 10:00 am

Position Paper ;

Dr. Victoria Sumanpan


Mindanao University of Science and Technology

Upscaling of extension Standards and Policies for Global


Competitivesness.
Dr. Eleanor Galvez
Pamantasan Ng Lungsod ng Maynila
Development of a Standard Tool to Assess Quality
Performance of Faculty in Extension Service

10:00 - 10:15 am

Health Break

10:15 - 12:00 nn

CLOSING PROGRAM
Dr. Susanita G. Lumbo
Masters of Ceremonies
1:00 - 5:00 pm CULTURAL/ FIELD EXPOSURE

21

CLIMATE CHANGE AND


ENVIRONMENT

22

ACONTINUINGCALAMITYRESPONSEPROGRAM(CCRP)OFANINSTITUTION
OFHIGHERLEARNING

NICHOLR.ELMAN,Ph.D.
SillimanUniversity

ABSTRACT

Typhoonshavebeenvisitingthecountryeverynowandthen,liketyphoonSendongthatheavily
hit some areas in the Visayas and Mindanao in 2011. The Northernpart ofNegros Oriental was hit bya
killerearthquakesometimeonFebruary6,2012.InRegionVIIistheprovinceofBoholwhichwashitby
the7.2magnitudeearthquake.Lately,typhoonshavebegunshiftingtrackandhittingareasintheVisayas
and Mindanao not normally frequented by storms. On November 7, 2013 Eastern and Western Visayas
and part of Palawan was devastated by the super typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda). Thousands of lives of
Filipinos were lost and homes, commercial and industrial buildings were destroyed, as well as the
socioeconomicenterprisesorlivelihoodsoftheaffectedones.

The vision of Silliman University is to become a leading Christian educational institution


committedtototalhuman developmentforthewellbeingofsocietyandenvironment.Thus,Silliman
Universityhasbeeninspiredtoactcollegiallyandcollectivelyknowingthattherecentcalamitieshadleft
tensofthousandsofinhabitantsinvariouscommunitieswhohavesufferedthedevastationuntiltoday.
Silliman University has always been conscious of the struggles of these affected individuals thus the
administration has pooled its available human and material resources in order to proactively put their
actstogetherinasustainingcalamityresponseprogram.

SillimanUniversityasanHEImustinstillintheheartofeverystudent,facultyandstaffandalumni
to be conscious of their individual social responsibilities of touching lives out there in love and service.
One of the missions of Silliman University is to instill in all members of the university community an
enlightenedsocialconsciousnessandadeepsenseofjusticeandcompassion.

The program objectives include a continuing psychosocial intervention, technical assistance,


servicelearningactivitiesandprovidingimmediatedisasterrelieftoaffectedcommunities,andreinforce
the Universitys climate resiliency in its logistical preparations, precautionary measures, infrastructure
designanddevelopment,andinformation,educationandcommunicationapproaches.

The Methodology and Approaches include the following:1.Scholarship and Financial Relief to
continueraisingpublicawarenessandsupportfordevelopmentforpossiblefinancialrelieftodeserving
calamity victims, among others. The Development Mobilization program encompasses the a. Psycho
social intervention, such as technical assistance and stress debriefing; b. Enterprise Recovery, such as
livelihood development or income generating projects. Capacity building program through social
educationandtechnicaltraining.LegalAssistance,providinglegaladvicestopoorlitigantsneedyincourt
litigationthatinvolveslandissuesinthecalamityareas;conductlegaleducationandadvocacytoinspire
poorlitigantstobehopefulofbeingprotectedbylaw;d.HealthEducationandNutritionprototypea1st
48HrPack,foreverreadymechanismtoimmediatelymobilizeresourcestocomeupwithemergency
foodpacks.EngineeringPrototypingforprototypestosuittheneedsofthecommunitiesaffectedby
calamities.StockpilingRelieftocoordinateincollecting,packingandrepackingofrelief

23


goodsintimesofemergencies.QuickResponseandRescuetobuildupitscapabilitiestowarddisaster
riskreductionandzerocasualty.PublicAssistanceandSafetyConcernsanactofvolunteerismamong
safety personnel on stockpiling relief, clean water preparation and distribution, disaster risk reduction
and management and rescue operation; i. ResourcingSilliman University appropriated 3percent of its
auditedannualincomestartingfiscalyear,20132014towardstheprogramtobuildnetworkandpoolof
donorsandfriendsand/oralumniaspotentialresources.OccupationalSafetyandHealthConcernsto
institutesafety&healthmeasuresthataresustainable,andK.CampusBufferingestablishingamecha
nism whereby physical infrastructures on campus could serve as buffer zones or units in times of an
unlikelyeventofemergencies.

Theuniversityhasinstitutionalizedaclimatechangeresilienthousingfacilitiesutilizingcontainervansto
withstanddevastatingearthquakes,typhoonsandfire.Italsoservesasevacuationshelterduringcalami
ties.

24


ADVOCACYANDPUBLICAWARENESSCAMPAIGNON
CLIMATECHANGEAMONGHEIsINZAMBOANGAPENINSULA

FredelinoM.SanJuan
CollegeofForestryandEnvironmentalStudies
WesternMindanaoStateUniversity
7000ZamboangaCity,Philippines

fredelino@yahoo.com
09198403562

TopicArea:ClimateChangeandEnvironment

Abstract

The Environmental Education Act or RA 9512, Climate Change Act of 2009 or RA 9729 and
Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act or RA 10121 mandates and encourages
participation of various sectors of society to address climate change and most particular Higher
EducationInstitutionsorHEIs.

The extension activity on advocacy and public awareness campaign on climate change in
ZamboangaPeninsulaisaninitiativebytheCollegeofForestryandEnvironmentalStudiesoftheWestern
Mindanao State University, Zamboanga City through the support from the Western Mindanao State
UniversityAdministration,incoordinationwiththedifferentHEIsandinpartnershipwithPAGASAlocal
station,DOSTPhilvocsZamboanga,MinesandGeoSciencesBureauoftheDepartmentofEnvironment
and Natural Resources. The main purpose of this extension activity is to enhance the knowledge and
levelofawarenessamongHEIsinZamboangaPeninsulaconcerningclimatechange.

The College conducted advocacy campaign; through seminars, workshops and trainings and
Information Education Campaign and Communications in the different HEIs in the area, to include the
distributionofposteronClimatechangeinthedifferentsecondaryschoolsinthecity.

A seminarworkshop and consultation with participants from the different HEIs in Zamboanga
Peninsula was also conducted whereposter and DVDs on climate change weredistributed toserve as
IECmaterialsinthedifferentHEIs.LinkageswereforgedamongHEIsandsigningofcovenantforthe
implementationofactivitiesthatwouldminimizetheeffectsofandclimatechangeatthelevelofeach
HEIs. As an output of the workshops it has been agreed upon that integration of climate change
conceptsinthedifferentcurriculumwilllikewisebeincorporated.

ThisendeavorpavethewayforthedifferentHEIsintheRegiontobeawareoftheimportancein
understandingthenatureandcausesofclimatechange,andhowtomitigateitsimpactsonhumanlives
and help prepare the different sectors for any disaster and be more resilient to climate changes with
betteradaptationpractices.

_______________________________________________________________________
Keywords:Advocacy,Awareness,ClimateChange,Reduction,EnvironmentalEducation

25


CapacityStrengtheningofPilotLocalCommunitiesin
CagayandeOroCityinResponsetoClimateChange
AdaptationandDisasterRiskReduction

Presenter:Dr.VictoriaO.Sumanpan
Director
MUSTExtensionServicesDivision
vos1223@yahoo.com.ph

Abstract


TheAustraliaNationalUniversity(ANU)forgedaMemorandumofAgreement(MOA)amongthe
governments of Misamis Oriental and Cagayan de Oro City and the academe. One SUC included is
MindanaoUniversityofScienceandTechnology(MUST).Theprojectsobjectiveisstrengtheningofthe
Local Government Units capacity in response to climate change and disaster risk reduction. The
methodologyoftheprojectstartedwiththeTrainingofTrainerswhoaremembersofthefacultyofthe
university.Afterthat,theMUSTExtensionDivisionorganizedthetrainingforlocalcommunityofficials
ofthethree(3)pilotCDOBarangayswiththetrainedtrainersusingthemodulesfromANU.Inlecturing,
thetrainersusedsomelocaldialecttobemoreunderstoodbythetrainees.Thereweretwo(2)venues
namely:theMUSTandthetownofTalisayan,MisamisOriental.Resultsoftheprojectweresolidifiedby
theapprovedproposalfromtheAustraliaNationalUniversity(ANU)entitledCommunicationSystemfor
EvacuationthroughEarlyWarningDevice.BarangayIponaninstalled5sirenstoserveasearlywarning
deviceintimesofcalamitiesparticularlyflooding.Thebarangaywasabletopurchase5unitsofSirenand
other materials needed for the installation process. The civil works and installation of the devices has
been substantially completed to date. Monitoring of the projects implementation is also continuously
donebytheMUSTExtensionServicesDivisionandtheCollegeofEngineeringandArchitecture(CEA).A
drill was conducted in the barangay to test the functionality of the siren together with the training of
disaster risk reduction prevention. Barangay constituents knowledge on preemptive evacuation and
disaster prevention was increased. For sustainability of the project, it is also recommended that
monitoringandmaintenanceshallbeundertakentoensurereliabilityofitsfunctionalityintimesofneed.
Also, other pilot barangays shall implement the project proposals submitted to satisfy what has been
agreedintheMOA.

26


CLIMATECHANGEADAPTATIONANDMITIGATIONCAPACITYBUILDING:
ACOMMUNITYEXTENSIONCONRESEARCHPROJECT
Dr.MerianC.ManiandTomasT.Faminial,MABA

ABSTRACT

The Climate Change has impacted tremendously almost all aspect of human life. Production and
businessindustryhavetothinkseveraltimesbeforeputtingupaninvestmentinparticularsites.Allof
us are potential victims of the foreseen effect of climate change phenomenon. Thus it is timely to
resolveactionsthatwouldaddresstheanticipatedcatastrophetoatleastmitigateitsimpact.
This project evolved from a research study that established the validity and acceptability of the 6
module Instructional Materials for Environmental Education (2004). The Environmental Education
Training package was the core of the proposal submitted to the Local Government Academy s
nationalsearchforbestfundableproposalsin2009.Thesaidproposalwasadjudgedasoneofthefive
winnersgrantedwith500,000pesosforitsprovincewideimplementation.

Theprojectwasimplementedinthe17municipalitiesofRomblon,participatedbyallelectedofficials
from the Barangay and Municipal level and nongovernment organizations, School heads, Church
organizationsandothersectoralrepresentativeslikeIndigenouspeople,womengroup.Theorganizer
used the Community in Vitro and in Vivo Development Approach in managing the resourcelimited
project.The500,000grantfromtheLocalGovernmentAcademy(LGA)grewto2.5Msourcedoutfrom
thecounterpartsofparticipatingagencies.

The concrete output of the project which was successfully implemented in the 17 municipalities of
Romblon are; the Municipal Environment and Disaster Risk Reduction Plan, the Clean and Green
program,theestablishmentofMRFinthebarangaylevel,andotheruniqueinitiativesonmitigation
andadaptiontoclimatechangephenomenon.Mostofall,theheightenedawarenessoftheRomblo
manonontheissueofenvironmentanddisasterpreparednessaremanifestedintheirlifestyle.

Keywords:BLGU,LGU.LGA,CommunityInVitroandinVivoDevelopmentApproach.

27

CREATINGDISASTERAWAREANDRESILIENTRESIDENTSINTHEMUNICIPALITY
OFMOGPOG:ANEXTENSIONPROJECTOFMSCSCHOOLOFENGINEERING
Monilla,BellaChitaM.Mendoza,MelanieM.Molato,AnaFeN.
MarinduqueStateCollege,PanfiloM.MangueraSr.Rd.Tanza,Boac4900
Marinduque,Philippines(042)3322028,anne_nunez14@yahoo.com

Marinduque, an island province is mountainous in which the road connecting the different
municipalitiesarecutalongmountainsides.Theprovincewasrankedseventhamongthetenprovinces
identified by Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) last 2005 as prone to landslide and other
geotechnicalhazards.

Likewise, Marinduque has a lone government Higher Education Institution, Marinduque State
College in which Extension is one among the four fold functions. Considering the condition of the
province,C.S.MonillaetalpreparedextensionproposalentitledDisasterPreparednessoftheMunicipal
ityofMogpog:AnExtensionProjectoftheSchoolofEngineeringtoenhancetheskillsandknowledgeof
the public regarding disaster. This project consists of five phases such as Phase I Assessment on
DisasterManagement,PhaseIIInventoryofProperties,PhaseIIIPublicAwarenessonDisaster,Phase
IVPlanningforDisasterPreparednessandMitigationandPhaseVPublicDisseminationonDisaster
PreparednessandMitigation.

TheabovementionedproposalwasapprovedbytheBoardofTrusteesofthecollegeasperBOT
Resolution No. 58, s. 2005 and MOA Signing between Marinduque State College, NonGovernment
Organizations and Government Organizations as cooperating agencies was conducted. Researches
were conducted for Phase I and Phase II while faculty members of the School of Engineering were
grouped into three and assigned to the different barangays to educate the residents on Disaster
AwarenesstoaccomplishPhaseIII.ThisinformationdisseminationwasdonethroughPublicAssembly
last AY 20062007 to AY 20082009 from 5:30pm to 8:30pm during weekdays. Participants were
oriented on the different types of hazards, its effects to the lives and properties and coping mecha
nismsoncetheyencounteredanyofthehazard/disaster.

Basedfromtheresultoftheinformationdissemination,theparticipantsarerequestingforthe
actualdrillrelatedtotheknowledgetheyobtainedfromtheseminars.

Atpresent,researchesrelatedtoDisasterMitigationinpreparationforPhaseIVofthisprogram
whichisneededintheimplementationofPhaseVPublicDisseminationonDisasterPreparednessand
Mitigationarebeingconducted.

28

DisasterResponsethroughEmergencyCommunicationSystem(DiRECS)

AlexMaureal
almaureal@must.edu.ph

Abstract

This paper explores publicprivate partnership in establishing PROACTIVE solutions by providing rapid,
portable emergency communication system to areas isolated by calamities. The concerted efforts of
PASUCheadedbyMUSTexperts,CHED,hostSUCsandPrivateTechnologyProvidersweresuccessfully
demonstrated in the aftermath of a disaster by establishing DiRECS (Disaster Response through
Emergency Communication System) while facilitates rescue, relief, rehabilitation and recovery in the
Philippinecontext.

DiRECSwaspilottestedinareashardlyhitbytyphoonYOLANDAwithinternationalnameHAIYANin
theCityofTacloban.DiRECSwasabletoprovide;1.)mainofficetoCHEDRegionalandsatelliteoffices,
State Universities and Colleges (SUCs), private Higher Education Institutions and other government
disaster coordinating agencies, 2.) dedicated communication channel for DiRECS database system that
contains: HEI student database and HEIs consolidated assessment reports of damages, 3.)
communication services open for the public like provisioning of telephone line and wireless internet
access (WiFi), and 4.) Charging station for laptops and mobile devices using photovoltaic system for
DiRECS.

DiRECShasbeeninstrumentalinprovidingtheneededcommunicationservicesandhasbeenreceived,
utilizedandappreciatedremarkablybythevictimsandsurvivorsoftyphoonYOLANDAinLeytesuch
thatthereisarecognizedneedtorollouttheprojectnationwide.

29


INTEGRATEDCOMMUNITYENHANCEMENTTHROUGHACLIMATE
RESPONSIVEEXTENSIONANDMANAGEMENT(ICECREAM):
ADOCUMENTATIONOFCHALLENGES,LESSONS
LEARNEDANDBESTPRACTICES

MEDINA,MICHAELARIEHP.
CASAS,JUPITERV.
PATRICIO,JOSEHERMISP.
PUNO,GEORGER.

CollegeofForestryandEnvironmentalScience
CentralMindanaoUniversity
UniversityTown,Musuan,Bukidnon8710
earth_initiative@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
In response to the problems associated with climate change, the College of Forestry and
Environmental Science of Central Mindanao University instituted the ICE CREAM program. This
program is primarily concerned with increasing the resiliency of its partner community, the local
government of Dologon, Maramag, Bukidnon. The program has three components: a) the MANGO
program or Management of Natural Resources by Grassroots Organizations, b) SAGO or Solid Waste
Management as Green Opportunities, and c) Durian or DRRM through the Utilization of Research,
Information,andNetworks.

Generally the program aims to enhance the capability of the participants as well as the
community in order to adapt to the effects of climate change thereby reducing risk and providing
developmentopportunitiestoindividualsinthelocalgovernmentunitofDologon,Maramag.

Utilizingapartnershipdevelopmentframework,severalparticipatorytoolswereusedinorderto
identify existing problems and alternative solutions in the community related to climate change. A
Memorandum of Understanding was then executed between the Barangay LGU and the University
Administration in order to formalize the partnership. A feature of the MOU was a counterparting
agreementintermsoffundingfortheactivities.

Thepartnershipwasabletoaccomplishthefollowing:
1)developmentofthebarangayurbantreepark,2)establishmentofthebarangayforestnursery,3)
development of a barangay solid waste management plan 4) community flood hazard map, and 5)
several capability building programs on community greening, solid waste management, and disaster
riskreductionandmanagement.

Itisconcludedthatthefollowingarethenecessaryfeaturesforthesuccessoftheprogram:a)
needsbased,b)communitybased,c)climatebased,andd)partnershipbased.

30

MainstreamingClimateChangethrough
AgroforestrySystemDesignforWatershedRestoration
inCagayandeOroBukidnonLandscapeAffecting
RiverineSystemafterFlashfloods

Dr.OlivaP.Canencia*,
Dr.RichmundD.Palma,
For.VicentaV.Ansigbat,
Engr.GinaLacang,
For.RogelTulang,
RemediosTamang
RonelaEnguito

*Director,ResearchandDevelopmentDivision
MindanaoUniversityofScienceandTechnology
Email:bing_cans@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Agroforestrysystemisagoodmitigationandadaptationmeasuresforclimatechangeduetoits
unified system involving land and water management practices that simultaneously addresses
biophysical, geological, ecological, environmental, sociocultural and economic components as well as
diversityandinteractionthatleadtoagreatfunctional,structuralandorganizedsystem.

This study is focused mainly on the installation of an Agroforestry System Design among
smallfarmholdersasamitigationandadaptationmeasuresinthechangingclimatealongthewatershed
areas. The relevant data generated were the vulnerability index of river watershed, through GIS,
biophysicalgeologic characterization, and socioeconomic survey of the smallfarm holders and
appropriatemethod of agroforestry system design forthe installation of thepilotarea. Other relevant
data were Carbon Sequestration, physicochemical properties of soil and water, hydrological data,
meteorology,FGDsandotherAgronomicData.

General findings revealed that the selected agroforestry system based from the data on GIS
vulnerability assessment, soil and water quality and social feedback, the ALLEY CROPPING SYSTEM is
consideredbestmitigationandadaptationmethodintheproductionofagroforestrycrops,wheretrees
act as hedges and agricultural crops are planted in multistory system. The estimated carbon stocks in
treesorwoodyvegetationishighercomparedtoperunitarea.Thediscretepatchesoftreesandshrubs
can stock carbon higher of above ground biomass. Necromass in agroforestry farm is negligible. Alley
croppingdominatedwithfruittrees,palmandrubberwhichnormallydonotgrowasbigasforesttrees,
haslessercarbonstock.Thestudyrecommendsfurtherforwiderutilization,adaptation,andexpansion
of field areas for agroforestry system design to mainstream climate change and to be able to attain
strongsustainabledevelopmentandcommunityresilience.

Keywords:Mainstreaming,ClimateChange,Agroforestry,Watershed,Landscape,Bukidnon,CagayandeOro

31


REDESIGNINGANEXTENSIONPROGRAMINRESPONSETOCLIMATECHANGE

By:

PROF.DAVIDN.ALMAREZ,DM
MSUIliganInstituteofTechnology
Mobile:09175082453;email
address:dnalmarez@yahoo.com.ph

This paper presents the transformation of an extension program from its initial focus of
participatory community development to environmental intervention in response to contextual
challengesresultingfromclimatechange.Itisadescriptivestudyofa9yearinterventionprogramin
BayugIsland,an82hectaredeltaattheestuariesoftheMandulogRiverinIligan.DuringTyphoonSen
dongonDecember16,2011,theentireislandwasinundatedandmanyinhabitantsperished.Amongthe
fewsurvivors,manyendedinresettlementcamps.

Originallyestimatedat122.50hectares,itshrunkintoitspresentsizeduetoerosionthatallowed
seawatertoadvancemorethan100metersinlandintwodecades.In2010,aportionofitsmunicipal
waterswasdeclaredMarineProtectedArea.InFebruary2011,theBayugMangrove,Rehabilitationand
ReforestationProjectofMSUIITwaslaunched.Inninemonths,21,000propaguleswereplantedalong
its coastline. A seaweed plantation project was also established to provide alternative livelihood for
fisherfolks.

After Sendong, Bayug Island was declared as no build zone. Power and water reconnections
were not permitted. But extension service volunteers of MSUIIT returned in February 14, 2012 to
continue their extension activities. On April 26, 2013, a City Ordinance establishing the Bayug Island
AquamarineParkwasapproved.

With the support of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, at least 65,000propagules
were planted and six aquasilvi projects were establishedas of July 2014. Interventions in Bayug Island
aredesignedtomitigatetheimpactsofClimateChange.However,typhoonslikeSendong(2011),Pablo
(2012),Zoraida(2013)andAgaton(2014)weregreatimpediments.Butforextensionservicevolunteers,
these are temporary setbacks that compelled the improvement of strategies for climate change
adaptation. Successful marketing of the program, both local and international is instrumental in
sustainingagrowingconstituencyofsupportersfromvarioussectors.

Keyterms:aquasilviproject,climatechange,mitigation,sustainabledevelopment

32

StatusofImplementationoftheDisasterRiskReductionand
Management(DRRM)intheMunicipalityofSogod,SouthernLeyte:

BasisforPolicyDirection

VeronicaL.ReomaandAileenL.Estrera
ScienceResearchSpecialistII&Councilor,chairon
Environment,LGUSogod
SouthernLeyteStateUniversity(SLSU)Sogodcampus
andLocalGovernmentUnitofSogod,SouthernLeyte
SLSU,Sogod,SouthernLeyte6606

Abstract
ThestudywasconductedonthestatusofimplementationandpolicydirectionofDisaster
RiskReductionandManagementintheMunicipalityofSogod,SouthernLeyte.Thisisspecificallyto
identifytheissuesandchallengesgoverningtheimplementationofDRRM,distinguishthekeyplayers
andstakeholdersintheimplementationofDRRM;andtoproposeaDRRMframeworkandpolicyin
order to facilitate anticipatory governance in the municipality.The methods used were, stakeholders
analysis, Strength, Weakness, Opportunities and Threat (SWOT) Analysis, Key Informants Interview
(KII),andFocusGroupDiscussion(FGD).ADRRMteamwasestablishedrepresentingvariousagencies
focusingmoreondisasterpreparation.Theframeworkandpoliciesproposedwereincludedduringthe
2012meetingthatwasstatedintheMinutesofthemeetingofthemunicipaldevelopmentcouncilofthe
municipalityofSogod,SouthernLeyte,heldatSogodGymnasiumonOctober29,2012.ResolutionNO.
579S.2012wasapprovedandendorsedtotheProvincialDevelopmentCouncil.Theresolutionwas
fortheadoptionapprovaloftheCY2013DRRMframeworkincludingbudgetof5%asstipulatedinRA
10121ofthemunicipalityofSogod,SouthernLeyteprovisiononhiringofnewpersonnelasDRRMOfficer
wasnotapprovedinsteadchangedtodesignateapersonwithpermanentpositionatthemunicipalLGU.

____________________
Keywords:anticipatorygovernance,disasterriskreduction,framework,mitigation

Authorscontactnumber:Globe09154823224/Smart09998995571
email:vlreoma@gmail.comLandline/telefax:0533823264

33


PROMOTINGAWARENESSOFANDENHANCINGKNOWLEDGE
ANDATTITUDETOWARDSCLIMATECHANGE

Bautista,ReginaV.
OccidentalMindoroStateCollege
SanJose,OccidentalMindoro5100
Philippines
reginaavillanueva@yaho.com.

Bergonia,AidaE.
AssistantProfessorIII
OccidentalMindoroStateCollege
SanJose,OccidentalMindoro5100
Philippines

Climatechangeisnowwidelyrecognizedasthemajorenvironmentalproblemfacingtheglobe.
It is a growing crisis with economic, health and safety, food production, security, and other
dimensions.Climatechangeisafundamentalthreattosustainabledevelopmentandthefightagainst
poverty. However, some people have low knowledge, while others might not even aware of its
existence.

StateUniversitiesandCollegesinthePhilippinesaremandatedtoincorporateclimatechangein
theperformanceoftheirfunctions.Theinstructionprogramandtheresearchandextensionagenda
of many colleges and universities now include areas on climate change. Cognizant to this, the
BusinessEducationDepartmentorganizedandconductedextensionrelatedactivities.TrainingNeeds
Assessment(TNA)wasconductedbythefacultymembersandselectedstudentsasprimemovers.

Relevant trainings and seminars were conducted to disseminate information and educate the
communities of Occidental Mindoro on climate variability and climate change, and climate change
adaptation. The Business Education likewise, held training on natural way of farming and organic
fertilizerproduction.Thiscouldbepotentiallivelihoodactivitiesforthefarmersandothergroupsof
women.Theimportanceofbiodiversity,itsimplicationsbothhumansandthenaturalworldwerealso
discussed.

Someproblemsandconstraintswereencounteredduringtheprocesssuchaslimitedspacefor
thevenueandthepowerinterruption.However,theseweremaskedbythebenefitsgainedbythe
participants. The participants were informed and thus empowered. The information and benefits
gainedbythecommunitypeopleshowedsensitivityoncaringforclimateandprotectingbiodiversity
toensureoursurvival.Fromthenon,theybecameourpartnersinthisadvocacy.

34

INFORMATION AND
COMMUNITY TECHNOLOGY
IN AGRICULTURE AND
INDUSTRY

35

NANUDANKO,MANUNUDANMO:AComputerLiteracyandTrainingProgram

ProjectLeader:Rodriguez,JojieM.,andCoProjectLeader:Abante,

AdrianP.,Delfino,ArielN.,Tabardillo,RosemarieA.,Tuprio,KrisC.,Vergara,

JohnChristianR.

PartidoStateUniversity
SanJuanBautistaSt
Goa,CamarinesSur,4422

ABSTRACT

The following specific objectives of the program are: a) prepare young kids about the current
trend in information technology; b) impart with the kids the advantages and disadvantages of this
technology; c) level their skill and knowledge about computer technology to kidswho study in private
school;andd)sharetheknowledgelearnedofcollegestudentfromclassroomdiscussion.

The program is composed of three (3) projects (phases) divided among Grade IV VI pupil
beneficiaries. Phase Iwasparticipated by grade IV pupils. This phase discussed the introduction to
computer system, basic computer parts, basic trouble shooting and basic computer operation. Phase
IIwasgiventogradeVpupilswhocompletedphaseI.Thisphasefocusedonkeyboardingskillwiththe
used of Word Processor program. The beneficiaries was given series of lectures and keynotes on the
properuseofkeyboardintypingdocumentssuchasletters,invitation,progressreportandotherdata.
Properformattingwasalsodiscussedtoproduceaprofessionallookingdocuments.Creatingpres
entationusingPresentationSoftwarewasalsodiscussedinthisphase.PhaseIIIaccommodatedallpupils
whofinishedthefirsttwomodules.Programintroducedinthisphaseincludessimplemathe
maticalcomputation,charts/graphs,databaseandtablesusingaspreadsheetprogram.Likewise,making
simplenewsletterusingpublisherprogramisalsoincludedinthemodule.

In all phasesseries of hands on activity was given to pupil beneficiaries to practice and evaluate
whattheylearnedfromthediscussion conducted.Evaluationwasalsoadministeredtotesthowmuch
theyvelearnedaftereachoftheconcludeddiscussion.Pupilswhoaccumulatedmorethan3absencesfor
theentiretrainingperiodwasdroppedfromthelistandcannotavailthephaseIIandIIIoftheprogram.

Morethan50beneficiarieswastrainedandpassedallthe3phasesandwasgivenacertificateof
completion. The College in partnership with Rotary Club of Goa Partido learned that the project
conveyed big impact on both beneficiaries and implementers. Pupils who completed the module
enhancedtheircomputerskillsandturnouttobereadyforagreaterchallengewiththeimplementation
of K 12 program. Finally, a more competitive pupils was produced with this committed extension
projectconductedbythecollegeaswellasimpartedthebusinessstudentsofPartidoStateUniversity,
thus,producingarippleeffect.

36

EFFECTSOFTHEINFORMATION,COMMUNICATIONANDTECHNOLOGY
EXTENSIONPROGRAMOFOCCIDENTALMINDOROSTATECOLLEGE
TOTHEDEPARTMENTOFEDUCATIONOCCIDENTAL
MINDORODISTRICTTEACHERS

MERLITAP.DELACRUZ,MPA

ABSTRACT

The Occidental Mindoro State CollegeInformation Technology Department implements various


extension activities that help to enhance teachers knowledge, skills and competencies in ICT among
DepEdTeachersfromthethree(3)districtsofSanJose.

This paper aimed to analyze the impact of the ICT extension program of the Information
Technology Department on the DepEd Teachers from School Year 20102013. Frequency count
percentageandweightedmeanwereemployedtomeasurethedatagathered.

In addition to, the impact analysis revealed that majority of the DepEd teacher respondents
appliedwhattheyhaveacquiredduringthetrainingthatenhancedtheirstrategiesthatwillredoundto
thestudentsdevelopment.

Finally,allinterventionswereeffectivelyimplementedbecausetherespondentswereverymuch
willingtolearnnewinsightsthatwillbeadaptedtotheirworkenvironment.

37

ICTCAPACITYBUILDINGTODEPEDEDUCATORSANDLEARNERSINPARTIDO
THROUGHMOBILEINFORMATIONTECHNOLOGYCLASSROOM(MITC)PROGRAM

Authors:Pesino,HazelJeanC.and
FacultyofInstituteofInformationTechnology
School:PartidoStateUniversity,SanJuanBautista
St.,Goa,CamarinesSur,4422,Philippines

ABSTRACT
Partidoisthe4thCongressionaldistrictofCamarineswithten(10)municipalitieswithinthemountainous
andcoastalareaofSouthEasternpartofthePhilippines.PartidoStateUniversity(PSU)withcampuses
onthemunicipalitiesofthedistrictendeavortodeliverextensionservicesinconsonancetovisionand
mission.InstituteofInformationTechnology(IIT)ofPSUenvisionPartidobasiceducationteachersand
studentsasanICTenablededucatorsandlearners.

MobileITClassroom(MITC)programwasconceptualizedbyPSUIIT,withthesupportofDepartmentof
ScienceandTechnology(DOST),andPartidoDevelopmentAdministration(PDA).Thisaimstocapacitate
Partido DepEd teachers and graduating elementary and secondary students to basic computer
operationsandkeepatpacewiththelatestinInformationTechnology.Specifically,thisendeavorto;(1)
Conduct MITC training to different public schools in Partido district, (2) Assess the knowledge of
participantstothebasiccomputeroperationsbeforeandafterthetrainings,and(3)Determinetheeffect
oftrainingstoteachersparticipantsrelativetoteachingtasks.

Methodologyhadbeendonethroughthefollowingproceedings.Partnerimplementersandstakeholders
met for Planning & Conceptualization.Inception Meeting and MOA signing to establish agreements and
stipulatestherolesofeachparticipatingagencytotheproject.ImplementationwasdoneinMITC,afully
airconditionedITclassroombus,repletewith22unitsoflaptopcomputers.MITCbusgoestodifferent
school beneficiaries for the trainings. Monitoring of the project was made by giving pretest and
posttest.Evaluationofprojecthadbeenmadeafterthree(3)yearbyasurveyontheuseofbasicknowl
edgeimpartedbytheMITCproject.

In2010to2012,MobileITClassroomtrainingshadbeenconductedtoFortytwo(42)publicschools
around Partido. Teachers showed 30.33% and 94.33% pretest and posttest percentage of passing rate.
Studentsillustrated20.0%and63.33%pretestandposttestpassingpercentage.Theseexhibitsatisfactory
evidence of learning to basic knowledge of computer operations.Useful training modules from MITC
program had been assessed as to usefulness to teaching tasks of teacher participants. Presentation
software showed as the most useful module, followed by the Internet and the Word Processing,
SpreadsheetandComputerBasicmodules.
The Mobile IT Classroom program was successfully conducted to Public schools in Partido. Basic
knowledge in computer operations had been imparted to the participants. Modules of training were
usefultoeducatorsandlearners.

38

PromotingOrganicVegetableFarminginLooc,Romblonthroughthe

FarmersInformationandTechnologyServices(FITS)Center

1
JunielG.Lucidos*,2AnaS.Fajanilan,and3ElsaT.Torres

1
Research,Extension,andTrainingOffice,
RomblonStateUniversity,Odiongan,Romblon
2

CollegeofEngineering,RomblonStateUniversity,
Odiongan,Romblon

FarmersInformation&TechnologyServicesCenter,Looc,Romblon

*Correspondingauthor:juniel_lucidos@yahoo.com
Abstract

One priority program of the government is the promotion and application of organic farming

wherein it will provide safe and healthy foods for the Filipinos. The DOSTPCARRDD through the
Southern Tagalog Agriculture and Resources Research and Development Consortium (STARRDEC) in
collaboration with Romblon State University and the municipality of Looc established the Farmers
Information & Technology Services (FITS) Center with the focus commodity on organic vegetable
farming. This is to address the needs of farmers, students, and the community as a whole in the new
information,technologies,andresearchesrelatedtovegetableparticularlyPakbetandalsopromoting
organicfarminginthecommunity.Inordertopromoteorganicvegetablefarminginthelocality,theFITS
Looc lead in production of vermicast and vermitea which is used in series of trainings and seminars
conductedindifferentvegetableproducingbarangays.ProductionanddistributionsofIECmaterialswas
also conducted. The establishment of organic technodemo farms and farmers field schools (FFS) was
conductedtoshowinactualthebenefitsandimportanceoforganicfarming.TheLGUleadbytheMayor
fullysupportedtheprojectwhereinsheallottedabudgetfortheconstructionofadditionalvermiculture
bed and the procurement of 10 additional vermiculture tea brewer to be used by the community. The
FITSLoocexperienceinorganicagricultureprojectisonethemostsuccessfulprojectsimplementedin
theprovinceofRomblonduetostrongsupportandsenseofownershipoftheLGUandthecommunity
in close partnership with the academe. The FITS center is one of the major source of information on
organicagricultureinthemunicipalityofLoocandservesasashowcaseoforganicagriculturetoother
adjacentmunicipalities.

AdditionalKeywords:LGULedExtensionApproach(LEA),OrganicAgriculture,FITS

39

APPROPRIATE
TECHNOLOGY PACKAGING
PROTO-TYPING AND
TRANSFER

40


ADOPTIONOFDEVELOPEDTECHNOLOGYBASEDRECOVERYAND
RECYCLINGMACHINE:
APROJECTUNPRESEARCHANDEXTENSION
ManuelA.Bajet.,Jr.

ABSTRACT

The University Research Office addresses research outputs in the form of new knowledge or
discoveriesanddevelopedtechnologies. TheoutputswouldbeturnedovertotheExtensionServices
Office for dissemination in the case of new knowledge, or for technology Transfer. From here, the
variouscircleofcoordinationandconsultationbetweenthetwinofficescontinue.Inpartnershipwith
the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) in Region 1 and the Technology Application
Promotion Institute, technology innovations to Micro Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) was
introducedthedevelopedMechanizeRefrigerantRecoveryandRecyclingMachineandadopted.

Lectureanddemonstrationwereconductedandattendedbytheaccreditedrefrigeration
shopownersinRegionI,technicianandinstructorsandstudentsinRefrigerationandairconditioning
course. Brochure had been prepared for the manipulation. The developed Mechanized Refrigerant
RecoveryandRecyclingMachinewasbeingdisplayinIsabela,Pangasinan,andLaoagCityforthedif
ferentdisplayactivityoftechnologydevelopedsponsoredbytheDepartmentofScienceandTech
nologyandNorthernLuzonClusterRegion1,2andCARoftheDOSTintheinventionandexhibitsinthe
year2010,2011,2012and2013.Further,theresearcherwiththehelpoftheExtensionOfficeStaffofthe
Universitymadelectureinthedisseminationinthemanipulationandexplainingthegoodeffectinmiti
gationglobalwarmingtothepublicinthesaidactivities.Thediagramindevelopingthesaidma
chinewasgivenfreetotheinterestedparty.ItwasalsopublishedintheResearchEducationalDevel
opmentTrainingInstitutejournalvolume8.Further,itwasorallypresentedattheAsianConfer
ence for Academic Journals and Higher Education Research on August 1720,2011 held at Cagayan De
OroCityandgarneredDiamondaward.

Keywords:AdoptionTechnologyBasedRefrigerantRecoveryandRecyclingMachine,UNPExtension
Office

41


COMMUNITYBASEDCOASTALRESOURCEREHABILITATIONANDCONSERVA
TIONTHROUGHAQUASILVICULTURE
INDAVAODELSUR

AugieE.Fuentes,MarilynLlameg,
GodofredoLubat,
MichelleElemino,RegieD.Patagoc

ABSTRACT

The project was geared towards communitybased mangrove conservation and rehabilitation
empowering the organized community as manager and warden of the resources providing them
appropriate livelihood through aquasilviculture a proper utilization of the resource ecosystem
strengthening and capacitating them by providing appropriate education, proper training and skills a
toolinsustainabledevelopment.

Theresearchresultsshowedatotalof377coastalhouseholds(143malesand120females)who
had availed of the benefits from the project. These households were spread to eight municipalities
(with19barangaysandonecity).

Thecommunitieswereabletoplant636,000hillsofmangrovescoveringatotalof212hectares
along the coastal stretch of Davao del Sur. With the total number of hills planted, the community
membersinvolvedintheprojectwasabletoearnatotalofP2,226,000.

On the other hand, of the total planted, as of the last monitoring period there was a total of
346,149 fully grown mangroves and with these achievement, the households were able to earn
additionalincomeofP865,372.50.

42


DEVELOPMENTOFMAGALLANESTILAPIA(TilapiaMossambica)
TOCINOPROJECT:ITSPROCESSING,VERIFICATION,
COMMERCIALIZATIONANDUTILIZATION

VivienL.Chua,Ed.DandFranciscoR.CarilloJr.
Babes_1902@yahoo.com
SORSOGONSTATECOLLEGE
MagallanesCampus
Magallanes,SorsogonPhilippines

Abstract

Thepersistentdemandforthetilapiasupplyinthemarket,promptedthisdevelopmentalstudyof
introducingtheMagallanesTilapiaTocinoproductwhichofferedmanyadvantagestotheresourcepoor
farmerswhocouldraisethetechnologyforhisfamilyaswellastotheentrepreneurwhocouldproduce
it for profit. The said project was divided into four parts namely: Technology Generation, Technology
Verification, Technology Adaptation and Technology Dissemination. Results showed that the
development of the Magallanes Tilapia Tocino had generated an innovative technology by processing
the locally grown freshwater Tilapias in pond and developed ingredients. It helped answer the
inbreeding problem caused by climate change and has utilized the aqua culuture by products into a
moreprofitablebusinessventure.Afeasibilitystudythroughanalysisofthereturnandinvestmenthas
proventheviabilityoftheproduct.Verifiedandacceptedforthehealthconsciousindividualssinceitwas
found to be a good source of protein, vitamin C, and iron with an extremely liked taste and odor for
familyconsumptionandforcommercializationpurposes.Shelflifewasrecordedtolastforsixmonths
oncesealedandfrozeninapolyethylenebag.Auniquepromotionandmarketingstrategywouldhelp
further strengthen the marketability and commercialization as well as utilization of the development
technology.Theproductwasecologicallyfriendlysincenowastewasleftbehind.Thevisceraservedas
animalfood,whilethefinsandscaleswereutilizedasorganiccomponents.

43

FishProcessingSkillsTrainingfortheHousewivesofFisherFolks
inBataan:AnAnalysis
(Dr.FelicisimaE.Tungol;Dr.YolandaB.Simbul)

Alivelihoodprojectforthehousewivesoffisherfolksbeneficiarieshadbeenapprovedandfunded
bytheBPSUGenderandDevelopment(GAD)intheamountofP224,280.00.Trainingonfishprocessing
suchasbonelessbangus,smokedfishmaking,fishdrying,fishfillet,gourmetandthelikesinseven(7)
batches was conducted by food processing experts from BPSU Orani Campus in support to the
program. Right after each batch of trainees had finished their training, the processing materials are
being awarded to them and they are granted a soft loan of 2,500.00 each for their business starting
capital. The soft loan is given at zero interest rate payable within five (5) months at 500 pesos per
month.AMemorandumofAgreementsignedaccordinglybythepartiesinvolved.

Bataan is primarily agricultural in nature comprised of farm lands as well as coastal areas and
havingacoastlinelengthof177km.PhilippineNationalAquasilvicultureProgramundertheBureauof
Fisheries and Aquatic Resources had seen the importance of taking good care of our coastline. The
Mangrove Rehabilitation Program under PNAP intends to uplift the lives of the fisher folks within
Bataan.

In so far as the fisher folks harvest the matured fishes from the aquasilviculture ponds, the
housewivesconcernishowtosellthem.Oversupplyoffishharvestwouldsometimesleadtowasteor
non income. Thus, the BPSU Orani Campus conceptualized the skills training in line with Fish
Processing.TheexcessfishharvestfromthePNAPfundedprogramwillbeprocessedtoearnadditional
incomefortheirfamily.

Atotalofsixty(60)housewivesofthefisherfolksweretrainedinlinewiththesaidfishprocessing
withthedurationoftwelvemonths(12)fromJune2013uptoMay2014.Theycamefromthetownsof
Samal,Orani,Limay,BagacandHermosa,allintheprovinceofBataan.

44


MANAGEMENTSTRATEGIESOFOCCIDENTALMINDOROSTATECOLLEGE(OMSC)

INATTAININGEXTENSIONPRODUCTIVITY

MaryYoleAppleDeclaroRuedas
ScienceResearchSpecialistI
OccidentalMindoroStateCollege
SanJose,OccidentalMindoro

ABSTRACT

Extension is one of the fourfold function of higher education institutions (HEI) in the
Philippines together with instruction, research, and production. A function set HEIs apart from
basiceducation.

TheExtensionUnitofOMSCenvisionstobethesupportdeliverysystemsandservicesforthe
effective implementation of relevant pool of information and activities that will propel the
community towards sustainable development. However, among SUCs most extension programs
aredemanddrivenandaccreditationdriven.

ThiscasestudyaimstoassessOMSCsextensionperformancefrom20032013.

The RDE Unit adopted the PDSA cycle for effective extension management. The status of
extension activities had showed an increasing turnout. Among these, agricultural related
extensionfarexceededothertopics.Majorityoftheseextensionswereinstitutionallyfundedas
partoftheaccreditationrequirements.

The method demonstration, conduct of training and seminar, use of ICT and leaflets, and
integration of modern and indigenous knowledge were the extension modalities always
employedindeliveringextension.

OMSCs challenge is to continuously develop the faculty and students competence,


performance and accountability for extension, strengthen the interphase of extension with the
otherSUCfunctions,establishnetworkwherefundsfromdifferentsourcescanbechannelled,and
institute monitoring and evaluation component in the extension system to focus on delivering
marketinformationtofarmersandfishers.

Keywords:Extension,extensionproductivity,communitydevelopment

45


POWERTRANSFORMERWIREESTIMATE

Dalaguit,AngeloB.*andDalaguitMaryAnnL.

CebuTechnologicalUniversitySanFranciscoCampus,
SanFrancisco,Cebu,Philippines6050Email:loloy2ann@yahoo.com

Abstract

Thisstudydeterminedtheweightofwiretobeusedinpowersupplymaking.Thisstudywasan
experimental research using the laboratory technique and procedure to gather data. There were two
designs with three treatments each, preparedand subjectedto analysis. Thedata were gathered and
treatedstatisticallyusingtheTwoWayAnalysisofVariance.

There were three treatments formulated for design number one. The treatments were:
treatmentnumberonewithanareaof11/8inchby11/8inchandoutputvoltageof6volts;treatment
numbertwowithanareaof11/8inchby11/8inchandoutputvoltageof36volts;treatmentnumber
three with an area of 1 1/8 inch by 1 1/8 inch and output voltage of 110 volts. For design number two,
anotherthreetreatmentswereformulated:treatmentnumberonewithanareaof1/2inchby1/2inch
andoutputvoltageof12volts;treatmentnumbertwowithanareaof3/4inchby3/4inchandoutput
voltageof12volts;treatmentthreewithanareaof1inchby1inchandoutputvoltageof12volts.

Theresultofthetestofsignificantdifferencesintheeffectiveness,efficiencyandperformance
ofthedifferenttreatmentsshowednosignificantdifferenceonwindings,temperature,voltage,sizeof
theironcore,current,power,numberofturns,turnspervoltandforceappliedinwinding.

Based on the findings the following recommendations were presented for consideration:
conductfurtherstudiestoincludetheweightoftheironcoreandusedigitalweighingscaleinfinding
theweightofwire.

46

RUNOFFANDSOILLOSSONDIFFERENTCROPPINGSYSTEMSWITHPIGEONPEA
ASHEDGEROW

MelchoraV.Abonal1andFeB.Perlas2
CollegeofAgricultureandNaturalResources,CBSUAand
ResearchDivision,CBSUA,Pili,CamarinesSur

ABSTRACT

Field experiments were conducted at selected areas in Camarines. The objectives were: to
determinetheeffectofpigeonpeaashedgerowcropondifferentcroppingsystemsonrunoffandsoil
loss and some soil chemical properties. The cropping systems used were the following: Study 1: sweet
potatosweet potato and ricecassava cropping system. Study 2: continuous coconut and adlaisweet
potato cropping system. Three treatments were established under different cropping systems: the
controlornopigeonpeaashedgerow(T1),earlymaturingvariety,ICPL88034(T2)andmediummaturing
variety,ICP7035(T3);andlikewiseonadlaicroppingsystem:thecontrolornohedgerow(T1);medium
maturingpigeonpea,ICP7035(T2)andvetivergrass(T3).Datawascollectedforfiveerosiveevents.

Resultsshowedthatthehighertherainfallintensity,themoresurfacerunoffandthelesserthe
percentcover,thegreatertheoccurrenceofsoilloss.Thedifferentcroppingsystemsontherateofsoil
loss are pronounced.The difference among treatments means are highly significant. The control or no
hedgerow had more occurrence of soil loss while the lowest were noted on the areas planted with
pigeon peas. There were no significant differences noted on early and medium maturing pigeon pea
variety and on vetiver grass. This meansthat pigeon pea is effective in reducing soil loss and it can be
comparable with vetiver grass in reducing soil erosion. The results were consistent for two cropping
seasons. Nitrogen content of the soil increases except for P, K, and Zn after harvest and pH is within
tolerable level. Based from the results, the researchers concluded that pigeon pea as hedgerow is
effectiveinreducingsoilerosion.

Keywords:surfacerunoff,soilloss,percentcoverandrainfallintensity

47

S&TBASEDFARMONSABAPRODUCTIONINORION,BATAAN
ZoilaM.Duque,M.S.A

ABSTRACT

Sabaorcardabavarietyisoneoftheimportantfoodinthecountryespeciallyforruralhouseholds
and is increasingly being recognized as a commercially traded raw material for various food and
nonfood industrial products. The cultivation of saba is a common enterprise among farmers in the
upland areas of Orion, Bataan, it has been considered as important commodity being cultivated and
produced in the municipality. To develop the commodity and to increase the area devoted for saba
production, the establishment of S&T based farm on Saba Production and Processing is tangible
program that will serve as show window and model for farmers, entrepreneurs and stakeholders on
improvedsabaproductiontechnology.

Theobjectivesoftheprogramareto(1)establishanS&TbasedfarmonsabaproductioninDaang
Pari,Orion,Bataan,(2)showcasetheproductionofsabausingimprovedtechnologiestoaminimum
of30farmersandotherstakeholders,(3)documentandpackagethegoodagriculturalpracticesfor
sabaproduction,and(4)determinetheeconomicbenefitsofS&Tinterventionsonsabaproduction.

After the 3 year period of the project implementation, it is expected to come up with the
following: (1) packaged the improved management practices and technology for saba production; (2)
conducted POTs onsaba growers;(3) adopted the Science and Technology Interventions by 30 saba
growers in the locality. Themethodology involved identification of Saba production site and practiced
thetechnologyinterventionincropmanagementsuchasfertilizerapplication,desuckering,debudding,
stemandmatsanitationandharvesting.Thedatagatheredwereyieldandqualityanddiseaseincidence.

The first cycle demonstrated a growth period. Banana trees were rehabilitated since no new
suckerswereplanted.

Thesecondcyclewasnotcompleteddueto100%damagesofcropsbroughtaboutbytyphoonPedring
&Quiel.Butitwasnotedthatalmost72%ofthecropswerealreadyingoodfruitingstage.Theschedule
for field day is already set but was postponed. With this, the objectives of the program were not yet
attained since only establishment of STBF Saba production site was done. On the third cycle, slow
growthwereobservedduetoveryhotclimatethenwhenrainyseasoncame,theplantswerehitagain
by typhoon leaving the plants with irregular size of bunches maybe due to environmental stress. At
present,around20%oftheplantswerealreadyonitsfloweringstage.

Basedfromtheaforementionedobservationsandpartialresults,theprogramissuccessfulduring
thesecondcycleifwithoutconsideringnaturalcalamity.

48


SCHOOLGARDENINGASSTRATEGYTOPROMOTE
ENVIRONMENTFRIENDLYTECHNOLGY

PRADO,ANGELITAJ.
DONMARIANOMARCOSSTATEUNIVERSITY
SAPILANG,BACNOTAN,LAUNION2515
PHILIPPINES

Abstract

The utilization of school gardening as a strategy to promote environmentfriendly technology is


consideredaqualityassuredundertakingwhenappropriateapproachesformtheprimecomponentsof
the mechanisms to attain the goal. These are the determination of attributes of extension agents
engaged in the undertaking; the required support from administration; and by proper use of available
timeandplace.

TheBSEcurriculumoftheDonMarianoMarcosMemorialStateUniversityhasidentifiedthehigh
schoolcommunitiesasthedemonstrationfarmsorextensionvenuesofthe4majorsoftheprograms
to complement the curriculum. The majors are: 1) the Information and Communication Technology; 2)
Industrial Arts; 3) Home Economics; and the 4) Technology and Livelihood Education. The expected
outcomesincludethecompetencybystudents,thecapacityandvaluesofthefacultyandtheparentsto
absorb the desired skill of adoption with the ultimate goal of sharing to other beneficiaries. This
commandsthenecessaryattitudesandvaluestofulfillthedesiredoutcomes.

Therewere3governmenthighschoolsintheprovinceidentifiedeachofthemshallattainagiven
commongoal.OfthefourmajorsofTechnologyandLivelihoodEducation(TLE),AgricultureandFishery
Artswasfirsttestedusingstudentsandparentsasthemainactorsandactressesinthemaintenanceofa
school garden. The organic farming technology was introduced to grow vegetables where botanicals
wereintroducedasbiologicalcontrolsinintegratedpestmanagementpracticesandproducingorganic
fertilizertonurturetheirplants.

Initial results showed that 2 of the 3 schools adopted organic technology in varying degree of
strategyandoutcomewhileonefailedtocopeupwiththeexpectedresultduetomissingelementsin
theschoolenvironmentparticularlytheneededresources.

Resultsarrivedattheconclusionthatusingschoolgardeninginpromotingtechnologyiseffective
utilizingtheexpectedattributesofbothextensionagentsandclients.

49

ScienceandTechnologyBasedFarmofCoffeethroughRejuvenationTechnology
RomualdoB.DeGuzman,Jr.,HermogenesM.Paguia

ABSTRACT

TheScienceandTechnologyBasedFarmonCoffeeRejuvenationProjectwasimplementedto
revivetheoldcoffeeplantationofPagasa,Orani,Bataan.Rejuvenationofoldcoffeeplantationwas
aimed to increase yield and income of the coffee growers, at the same time,the promotion of
appropriatetechnologytocoffeegrowersofBataanasoneofthefocuscommodityintheareaby
comparingittotheculturalpracticesoftheidentifiedMasasakangSiyentista(MS)farmer.

MagsasakangSyentistainthepersonofMr.FelicianoDelasAlaswasidentifiedasoneofthe
implementer of the project together with the monitoring team; a. FITS manager, b. Technology
expert and, c. Focal person. Inception meetings and forum were conducted before the project
implementationtoensuretheproperformulationplansandoperationoftheproject.

Twohundredcoffeeplantswererejuvenatedwiththeusedofchainsawandwascomparedto
twohundredcoffeeplantsunderfarmerspracticewithoutanyintervention.Theactivitiesofboththe
STBF technology and farmers practice were compared after the second and third year cycle of
production.

TheyieldonthesecondyeartheSTBFproject,abouttwohundredfifty(250%)percentincrease
andonthethirdyearcyclewithanincreaseofmorethreehundred(300%)comparedtothenormal
harvestedberriesunderfarmerspracticesfromthecycles.Intermsofnetincome,STBFprojectwas
more than 11.25% for the second year and 30.34% for the third year cycle greater than the farmers
practice.

Based on the findings, coffee rejuvenation technology or STBF project potentially reduced
production cost, increase yield and income of coffee growers (MS). Monitoring and evaluation,
projectcoordinationalsocontributedonthesuccessoftechnology.Adaptersincreaseswhenthereis
a demonstration farm to ensure their acceptance towards the technology being promoted. At the
sametimefourcoffeegrowerswasidentifiedadapteroftheprojectduringtheharvestfestival.

50

ZENERDIODETESTER
BenjaminR.Villafae&AnastacioT.DelPilar,Jr.

ABSTRACT

Electronics circuit in any appliances and gadgets are made up of many different components
assembledtogether.Oneofthesecomponentsisazenerdiodewhichiscommonlyusedinpowersupply
circuitstoperformstabilizationofsupplyvoltages(Grob,1982).Manydomesticappliancesandgadgets
likecolortelevision,DVDplayer,audioamplifiersystem,andothersimilarconsumerproductsareusing
zenerdiodeasanimportantcircuitcomponentparticularlyforvoltageregulationandcircuitprotection
deviceliketheovervoltageprotect(OVP)circuit.Moderntechnologyhasenabledthedevelopmentof
highprecision test equipment such as analog and digital multimeters. However, the price of this
productisbeyondthecapacityofordinarypractitioners(Gecain,2005).Asaresponsetothisneed,the
researchers decided to develop an innovative Zener Diode Tester using locally available and recycled
materials.Thoughitissimpleandlowcost,yet,itcanperformspecialfunctionsneededbyelectronics
technologystudents,instructors,technicians,andhobbyistintheirfieldofwork.Thus,thepurposeof
thestudywastodesignanddevelopanacceptableZenerDiodeTesterthatcanbeusedbyelectronics
technology professors, and students of PIT for an enhanced delivery of the instruction. Furthermore,
thisstudyaimedtotestthecapabilityoftheZenerDiodeTester,andtodetermineitsacceptabilityin
terms of design, performance, and safety as perceived by the electronics professors and electronics
technology students of PIT. Results of the study reveal that the device was evaluated based on the
three (3) criteria indicated in the evaluation sheet, with the data interpreted as follows: On the
evaluation results by the electronics technology professors, safety got a very high mean (M=4.60) or
very acceptable, followed by performance (M=4.55), then, the design had a mean of 4.50 or very
acceptable.

Findings, then, of the study affirmed that the ZenerDiodeTesteris highly acceptable in terms of
design, performance, and safety; and would, therefore, answer the need of electronics technology
professorsandstudentsofPITasareliabletestinstrumentthatcanbeusedtochecktheconditionof
diodesparticularlyzenerdiodesanditsbreakdownvoltagerating.Forthis,supportandencouragement
ofthecollegeisneededfortheproductionofadditionalunitsofthezenerdiodetesterformaximum
utilization, then, the innovative features of the device must be further improved to extend its range
beyond30Vinordertomakeitmorecompetitive,andimprovisationofothertestinstrumentssuchhigh
voltage tester and frequency meter should also be given focus for the sake of quality instruction in
electronicstechnology.

KEYWORDS:Electroniccircuit,Zenerdiode,Powersupplycircuits,Electronicstechnology

51


TheEffectivenessoftheSkillsTraining/TechVocExtensionProgramsoftheBataan
PeninsulaStateUniversityMainCampusattheBataanDistrictJailfrom20102013:
AnImpactStudy

BernadethB.Gabor,MAEd1,ElizabethA.Joson,Ed.D.2,NomerN.Varua,
MAEd31InstructorIII,BPSUCollegeof
IndustrialTechnology;Chair,BPSU
CommunityBasedExtensionPrograms2Former
DirectorofExtensionServices,
BataanPeninsulaStateUniversity,CityofBalanga,
Bataan3InstructorI,BPSU
CollegeofArtsandSciences;TechnicalStaff,BPSUOfficeofExtensionServices

ABSTRACT

Thisstudyassessedtheeffectivenessoftheskillstraining/technicalvocationalextensionprograms
oftheBataanPeninsulaStateUniversityattheBataanDistrictJailfrom20092013.Itlookedintothelevel
ofadministrativecapabilityoftheBPSUExtensionOfficeintermsofleadershipcapability,personneland
staffcapability,andfinancialcapability,extentofparticipationofthedevelopmentpartnersinextension
services,leveloftheprogramoutputs,andtheeconomicandsocialimpactsoftheprogramsconducted.
The influence of administrative capability, participation of clients and implementation of the program
was also determined. In order to attain the objectives of the study, the descriptive survey method of
researchwasused,employingmean,frequencycountandpercentages,standarddeviation,andPearson
ProductMomentofCorrelationasstatisticaltools.Onehundredthirtyeight(138)detaineerespondents
participatedinthestudy.ResultsshowthattheadministrativecapabilityoftheBPSUExtensionServices
Office in terms of executive leadership, personnel capability, and financial capability, the extent of
participation of the development partners in extension services are Very High; the extent of
implementation of the extension programs in terms of mission, goals and objectives and execution of
thecriteriaintheselectionofserviceareaforExtensionServicesProgramaswellastheprogramoutputs
of the BPSU Extension Services Office in terms of Skills Training and Livelihood are also rated Very
High.Intermsoftheeconomicandsocialimpactsoftheprograms,amajoritybelievedthattheywere
notemployedasaresultoftheskillslearned,somewereabletoimprovetheirhousesasaresultofthe
incomederivedfromtheincomegeneratedafterthetraining,andsomewereabletobuyappliancesasa
resultoftheincomegeneratedfromtheemploymentasaresultoftheskillslearned.Therespondents
perceived that their social status have improved in terms of selfesteem, health and nutrition, and
environment. The perception of the respondents on the implementation of the BPSU extension
programs yielded a significant positive relationship and that the respondents perceived that the
implementationofBPSUextensionprogramsisdirectlyinfluencedbytheextentofparticipationofthe
development partners. Finally, the respondents perceived that the economic and social impacts of the
BPSUExtensionProgramsaredirectlyaffectedbythelevelofprogramoutputsintermsofskillstraining
andtechnologytransfer.

Keywords:Impactstudy;universityextensionservices;extensionprogrameffectiveness

52

CONSTRUCTIONOFWASTEGLASSBOTTLECRUSHER

Prof.JosephUlep
Engr.JofelD.Suan
Engr.RexmelleDecapia
Prof.NoeDomanais

ABSTRACT
This project is purposely designed to help waste management program and bottle recycling system. The
constructionofWasteGlassBottleCrusherisintendedtoincreasethespeedoftransportationofsolidwastebyre
ducingthevolumeofthewasteglassbottlebyupto78%fromitsoriginalvolume.Thiswillgiveachancetothejunk
shops to earn extra income, help recycling companies save fuel and energy and help in maintaining a clean and
healthyenvironment.

TheWasteGlassBottleCrusherequipmentconsistsofrotaryandstationarybladescoupledtoa2HPmotor.
Theventofthemachinewillserveastheinputandwillguidetheglassbottlethroughtherotaryblade.Thestrainer
beneathwillcontroltheoutputsizeofthecrushedglassbottle.

WasteGlassBottleCrusherwilllessenupto80%ofthevolumeofwasteglassbottlewiththeminimumout
putof5mmsquare.Thiswillalsohelptheacademe,government,industryandtheenvironmentinvariousaspects.It
insuresthesafetyandefficiencyofwork.

53

DEVELOPMENT OF AN INNOVATIVE REFRIGERANT


RECOVERY/RECYCLING MACHINE
Roel I. Sabang
Mariano E. Antigo

ABSTRACT

Asaptlyobserved,theequipmentthatwouldminimizetheemissionsofozonedepleting
refrigerantstothelowestachievablelevelduringtheservice,maintenance,repair,anddisposalofappliancesis
arefrigerantrecoveryandrecyclingmachine.Ifonelooksintorefrigerationandairconditioningtechnology,
refrigerantsarealwaysused.Asfoundout,refrigerantsareharmfultotheenvironmentifnotproperlyhan
dled,sotheneedforthiskindofmachinethatwouldcatertorefrigerantrecoveryandrecycling.Thus,this
studyaimedtofabricatearefrigerantrecoveryandrecyclingmachineutilizingrecyclablematerialsfoundinthe
InstituteandinthelocalityofPalompon,Leyte.ItaimedtominimizeatmosphericemissionsofODStominimize
environmentalimpactongloabalwarming;then,toexpandmarketopportunityforusedrefrigerant,andre
duceenvironmentalcompliancecosts;and,lastly,toreducetheneedfornewrefrigerantandincreasethelife
timeofrefrigerationequipmentduetocontaminantremoval.Methodologiesincluded:thefabricationofthe
RefrigerantRecoveryandRecyclingMachineusingrecycledmaterials,thepreparationofquestionnaireforthe
perceptiononthelevelofacceptabilityintheuseoftherecovery/recyclingmachineintermsofconstruction,
funcitonality,efficiencyandsafety.Moreso,thefinishedproductunderwentinitialfieldtestingforrecovery
andrecyclingoperations,modificationsandfieldexperimentforrecoveryandrecyclingcapacityandaccuracy.
Then,theconceptualprocessinvolvingfive(5)phases.Onthebasisofresultofthefinalevaluationfromthe
thirty(30)evaluatorsinthree(3)groups,namely:3mechanizalengineers,3RACtechnicians,and24RACstu
dents,usingthecriteriaset,as:construction,functionality(performance),efficiency,andsafety,itcouldbe
saidthat:theInnovativeRefrigerantRecovery/RecyclingMachineishighlyacceptable.Theevaluationhasre
vealedthatthemachinewasexcellentlyconstructed,veryfunctionalonitsoperationhavinghighefficiencyin
itsrecoveryofrefrigerants,andverysafetouse.Consequently,themachinewouldanswertheneedsof
schoolsofferingrefrigerationandairconditioningcourses,RACinstructors,engineers,RACshopowners,and
RACtechnicians.

Keywords:Refrigerantrecovery,Refrigerantrecycling,Ozonedepletingsubstances(ODS),
RAClaboratory

54

CULTURE AND
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

55


EFFECTOFNONFORMALEDUCATION(VIASTORYSHARING)
TOTHE4TH,5TH,AND6TH

GRADEPUPILSOFSTA.FILOMENAINTEGRATEDSCHOOL

ABSTRACT

ThisstudyisentitledEFFECTOFNONFORMALEDUCATION(VIASTORYSHARING)TOTHE4TH,
TH
5 , AND 6TH GRADE PUPILS OF STA. FILOMENA INTEGRATED SCHOOL. The study dealt with the
Relationship of NonFormal Education (via story sharing) to Pupils Achievement in English at Sta.
FilomenaIntegratedSchool,BarangaySta.Filomena,SanPabloCity.

Specifically, it sought answers to the following questions: (1) What is the profile of the respon
dents in terms of age, gender, and interest?; (2) What is the achievement of the pupils in English?; (3)
What is the perception of the respondents as to clearness, appeal and timeliness of storysharing?; (4)
Howdotherespondentsperceivethefollowingstorysharersrelatedfactors:abilitytogettheattention
ofthelisteners,fluencyinEnglishandmasteryofthestory?;(5)Isthereasignificantrelationshipbe
tweenpersonrelatedfactorsandpupilsachievementinEnglish?;(6)Isstorytellingsignificantlyre
latedtopupilsachievementinEnglish?;(7)Dothestorytellersrelatedfactorssignificantlyaffectpu
pilsachievementinEnglish?

The salient findings of the study are: Majority of the respondents, fifty three 953) or 51 percent
belongs to 1214 years old. Sixtyfive (65) or 63 percent are male and thirtyeight (38) o 37 percent are
female.Moreover,withtheoverallmeanof4.09andstandarddeviationof1.02,therespondentsverbally
interpretedtheirinterestandattitudetowardsstorysharingasMuchInterested.Mostofthepupils,
sixtythree(63)or61percentgotamarkrangingfrom8692withaninterpretationofAverage.

Mostrespondentsverballyinterpretedtheindicatorsastoclearness,appealandtimelinessofthe
stories as Often as shown in the overall mean of 3.9 with standard deviation of 1.1. As to fluency in
Englishwithanoverallmeanof3.89andstandarddeviationof1.11,masteryofthestory3.76andstan
darddeviationof1.23;abilitytogettheattentionofthelistenerswithameanof3.92andstandarddevia
tionof1.12allwereverballyinterpretedasOften.Thereisnosignificantrelationshipbetweenthepu
pilsrelatedfactorsandpupilsachievementinEnglishasshownbythefollowingindicatorssuchasage
(r=0.06;p=0.53);gender(r=0.18;p=0.07)andinterest(r=0.07;p=0.48).

Thereisnosignificantrelationshipbetweenstorytellingrelatedfactorsandpupilsachievementin
English as shown by the indicators such as clearness (r=0.17;p=0.08); appeal (r=0.08;p=0.42) and
timeliness(r=0.08;p=0.40).

Thereisnosignificantrelationshipbetweenstorytellersrelatedfactorsandpupilsachievementin
Englishasshownbytheindicatorslikeoralfluency(r=0.03;p=0.73),masteryofthestory(r=0.06;p=0.53)
andabilitytogettheattentionofthelisteners(r=0.03);p=0.76).

Based on the aforementioned findings of the study, it was concluded that in terms of age,
gender and interest/attitude, statistically are not significantly related to the pupils achievement in
English.Therefore,thehypothesiswhichstatethatthepupilsrelatedfactorsdonotsignificantlyrelateto
pupilsachievementinEnglishissupported.

In terms of appeal, clearness and timeliness, no significant relationship existed with pupils
achievement in English. Therefore, the hypothesis which state that the story sharing related factors are
notsignificantlyrelatedtopupilsachievementinEnglishissupported.

Furthermore, the hypothesis stating that the storytellers related factors are not significantly
relatedtopupilsachievementinEnglishisacceptedinthisstudy.

56


ADOPTABARANGAYPROJECTINBARANGAYDITA,CUENCA,BATANGAS

REDENTORA.JANABAN*

ABSTRACT

TheAdoptaBarangayProjectoftheTUPUESisunderCommunityBuildingDevelopmentServices
(CBDS)whichaimstoestablishpartnershipwiththecommunities,agenciesandorganizations,external
to the University to render effective community welfare programs. It is also incharge of developing,
monitoringandevaluatingcommunitywelfareprogramshandinhandwithcommunitiesand/orpartner
agenciesandorganizationstowardcommunitydevelopment.ItisinthislightthattheUESadoptedBrgy.
Dita, Cuenca, Batangas wherein a Memorandum of Agreement was signed between TUPManila and
Brgy.Dita,CuencaforaperiodofthreeyearswhichstartedlastFebruary7,2012andwillendonFebruary
6,2016.

A community needs assessment was conducted to identify the needs and priorities of the
communitypeople.Therespondentswerecomposedoffivehundredfiftythree(553)individuals.One
hundredthree(103)werefromSitioEwoksandIbaba,ninetythree(93)fromSitioLudlud,seventyeight
(78)fromSitioAsphaltandPutol,onehundredtwelve(112)fromSitioGreenhills,twentyeight(28)from
SitiolittleBaguio,twenty(20)fromSitioPlaza,sixtysix(66)fromSitioBurol,andfiftythree(53)from
SitioKanluran.

The following were the livelihood training programs that were implemented in the community
basedontheresultofthecommunityneedsassessmentthatwasconducted
FoodandGiftGivingProgramwith200clientslastFebruary2426,2012;
TrainingonBasicElectricalHousewiringandRepairwith13clientslastMarch1415,2013;
TrainingonPipefittingandPipeLayoutingwith13clientslastMarch1415,2013;
BasicCulinaryArtsandTechnologywith70clientslastOctober34,2013;
TshirtPrintingandTshirtDyeingTechnologywith54clientslastOctober34,2013;
SeminaronGenderandDevelopmentAwarenesswith50clientslastOctober14,2013;and
GenderandDevelopmentSeminarWorkshopwith52clientslastMay21,2014,

Therewereatotalof452individualsbenefittedfromthoseprogramsthatwereimplementedin
thecommunity.

Keywords:AdoptABarangay,Dita,Cuenca,Batangas

57

AssessmentoftheEdukasyongPantahanan
AtPangkabuhayan(EPP)TrainingCourse

Dr.SaturninaP.Aberin
aberinsaturnina@yahoo.com.ph

Abstract

ThisstudywasconductedafterthreeyearsoftheEPPtrainingcoursewasgiventoteachersof
DepED.Heisaremandatedtoperformthreefunctionsnamely:instruction,researchandextension.An
extensionactivitywasconductedbytheundergraduateprofessorstoenhancethecompetenciesofEPP
teachersthroughMPSCExtensions.

Theobjectivesofthetrainingcoursewereasfollows:toenhanceteachersknowledgeandskills
of the participant in the following courses: food processing, computer operation, basic handicrafts,
commercial cooking, basic sewing and sustainable agriculture. The study used the following
methodology:descriptiveresearch,surveytypeofresearchusingquestionnairetogatherdataandthe
retrieval rate was 62%. The DepED central office was so keen in training their non EPP teachers to
enhancetheirknowledgeandskillsinteachingtheedukasyongpantahananandpangkabuhayancourse
thethenMPSC,(nowMUST)beingoneoftheHEIs.TheDepEdthenthroughitsRegionalOfficesidenti
fiedthenowEPPteacherstoattendtheEPPtrainingcourse.MPSChearingtheneedmadeaproposal
and submitted to the DepEd Central Office stating the objectives of the training course. A MOA was
signed between the two parties.The training started and lasted for two consecutive years and in two
batches.Batchone(2008)consistedof83participantscomingfromtheregionsofVisayasandMindanao
andbatchtwo(2009)consistedof50participantsrepresentingLuzon,VisayasandMindanaowhichto
taled to 133 participants. Their main reason for attending the training was for personal development.
Theywantedtoimprovetheirknowledgeandskillssothattheycantrulyimpartthesetotheirstudents.
The result of the training was that the teachers are more confident in improving their crafts and their
teaching which would lead to their better economic condition since they can use this knowledge for
business.Theotherreasonssuchasresearchorganization,careerplanningandtravelopportunitywere
consideredbyteachersasfairlyimportantwhichmeansthatthesewillcomeaftertheyhavemastered
theircrafts.Astothescientificvalueoftheextensionprogramtheparticipantsrateditfromhightovery
high(57.8%41%).Thismeansthattheycanseetheopportunitytoimprovetheirlifetoprosperity,health,
environmentandtheirteachingcapabilities.Onehundredpercentoftheparticipantswerepositivethat
theycanapplythelearningattheirworkplacesuccessfullytoverysuccessfully.
RecommendationistocontinuetocatertheneedsoftheteachersintheKto12Curriculum.

58

BUSOG, LUSOG, TALINO (BLT)


FROM CONCEPTION TO ITS PRESENT STATUS

MR. JOEMIL G. GALVE, RSW


Community Extension Services Officer
John B. Lacson Colleges Foundation Bacolod Inc.
Email Add: joemilgalve_cesojblc@yahoo.com

Abstract
This descriptive-evaluative study aimed to access the development of the Busog,
Lusog, Talino school feeding program and its impact on the beneficiaries in terms of
Body Mass Index level after 136 feeding days. Part of the study was to determine the
common problems encountered by the BLT team and lastly, to evaluate the satisfaction
level of the BLT Teamand pupils parents on the program implementation.The data
revealed that an average of 95% to 97% of the pupils completed the program and that
82% to 85% of students attained a normal BMI level after its implementation. Finding
revealed that the five common problems encountered by the BLT team during the
program implementation were lack of parent commitment and involvement in the
program , lack of support (financial and in-kind) from the LGU, failure of the BLT schools
to attain 100% of pupils to complete the 136 feeding days , failures of the BLT schools to
achieve 100% of pupils to attain normal BMI and lack of medical intervention done to
pupils who were sickly and had poor appetite. Lastly, the findings showed that the BLT
team and parents of two participating schools were satisfied in the implementation of
the said program. As part of the recommendation , the researchers highlighted the
importance of looking for possible tie-ups or partners that can help sustain the program
and address the problem s encountered. Furthermore, a workshop on the formulation of
an action plan is recommended to ensure the overall success of the program.

59


CEBUACADEMENETWORK(CAN):REHABILITATIONOF
THEMAJORRIVERSOFCEBUTHROUGHEDUCATION
FORSUSTAINABLEDEVELOPMENT

By:LESLYCOMISOMAGALSO
NSTPHEAD&SOCIALWORKER,CIPOFST.THERESASCOLLEGE
COORDINATOROFTHECEBUACADEMENETWORK(CAN)

Abstract

The Cebu Academe Network (CAN) is an organization of twelve (12) SUCs and privately owned
HEIsinCebu,namely:CebuDoctorsUniversity(CDU),CebuNormalUniversity(CNU),CebuInstituteof
TechnologyUniversity(CITU),SaintTheresasCollege(STC),SouthWesternUniversity(SWU),University
of San Carlos (USC), University of Cebu (UC), University of San Jose Recoletos (USJR), University of
Southern PhIlippines Foundation (USPF) , University of the Philippines (UP), University of the VIsayas
(UV)andVelezCollege(VC).In2010,CANformalizeditscommitmenttohelptheCebuCitygovernment
initsriverrehabilitationeffortsthroughthesigningofaMemorandumofAgreementbetweentheCity
MayorandthePresidentsofthedifferentmemberschools.TheCANCoordinatorsitsasamemberof
theCebuCityRiversManagementCouncil(CCRMC)andparticipatesinitsstrategicplanningandpolicy
formulation.The12memberschoolsofCANareassignedtooneofthefive(5)majorriversofCebuthat
isclosesttotheHEIslocation/vicinity.TheacademesroleisonstrengtheningSocialMarketingthrough
Environmental Education not only to its students but also to the HEIs partner communities.
Noteworthyamongtheseactivitiesinclude:

StrategicPlanningWorkshops(twiceayear)fundedbyCCRMCtheyearlyrivercleanupwithDENR
EMBSolidWasteManagementProgramusingtheTakakuraCompostingMethodtrainingsprovideby
CCRMC&CebuCityEnvironmentOffice(CENRO)IntegratedWaterResourcesManagementtrainings
provided by the Cebu Uniting for Sustainable Water (CUSW) & Metropolitan Cebu Water District
(MCWD);CANproducessimplereplicablemodulesforcommunityeducationRapidSiteAssessmentof
the5MajorRiversofCebu,Monitoring&EvaluationwithLGUs;extentofmonitoringisdependenton
thecapabilityoftherespectiveHEIsPublicationoftheriverbookRiversAlivePartI(2013)acoffee
tablebookofthe5majorriversofCebushowingtheprofileofthedifferentriversbasedonthedata
collectedbythedifferentschoolsintheconductofrapidsiteassessment;fundedbytheFoundationfor
thePhilippineEnvironment(FPE)YearlyRiverSummits(since2012)fundedby:
**SangguniangKabataan(SK)Federation
**CebuChamberofCommerce&Industry(CCCI)
**CebuProvincialGovernment
**CANMemberInstitutions
**DENREMBYearlyRunfortheRivers(since2013)sponsoredbytheCebuChamberofCommerce
andIndustry(CCCI)
CAN2014Challenge:MandatefromtheCebuCityGovernmenttotaketheleadinSavingtheMahiga
River(KillerRiver)ofCebu
CANmemberschoolsaregiventheirrespectiveMahigaRiverassignment.
AllCANmemberschoolswillcontinuetoworkontheriverassignedtothemplusthenewgridforthe
MahigaRiver.

TruetoitsmottoRiversAlive:AtongSapa,AtongUgma,theCebuAcademeNetwork(CAN)com
mitsitselftocollaborateandshareresourceswithGOsandNGOsforaSUSTAINABLEANDLIVABLE
CEBUthroughEDUCATIONforSUSTAINABLEDEVELOPMENT!

60


CommunityDevelopmentProjectofthe
CollegeofLiberalArtsGraduateProgramInPartnershipwiththe
RotaryClubofMetroEastTaytay

RosalieGaligaandMonaPurganan

TheCollegeofLiberalArts(CLA)aimsatsavingthecommunitythroughextensionofexpert
serviceandavailableresources.TheRotaryClubofMetroEastTaytay(RcMET)Envisionscontributing
athelpingtheworldingeneralandthePhilippinesinparticularinaddressingpovertyissueswithinthe
Rotarian mission and vision. Specifically there are six major issues that Rotary International aims to
addressglobally,suchas;peaceandconflictprevention/resolution, diseasepreventionandtreatment,
water and sanitation, maternal and child health , basic education and literacy, and economic and
communitydevelopment.

In order to fully realize their respective missions and goals, the CLA and RC MET initiated
community and school based extension programs that endeavour to extend services to community
members,highschoolstudentsandschoolteachersinTaytay,Rizzal.ClaandRCMETenvisiontopro
vidingservicesatacertain degreeonthetwoofthe Rotarysareasofconcernsuchaseconomicand
community development or the community based project, and basic education literacy or the
schoolbasedproject.Saidprojectshadaninitialdurationofsixmonths,startingfromJuly2013until
DecemberofthesameyearbuttheentireprojectwascompletedinOctober2013

The Community Based Program consisted of two (2) major activities such s small group
organization and community livelihood development with 40 participants from the Damayan Home
Owners Association located at the Taytay Floodway. The school Based Program involved three ( 3)
trainingandmentoringactivitiesintendedforhighschoolstudentsandteachersatYnaresHighSchoolin
Taytay,Rizal.Theparticipantscomposedof56highschoolstudentsand68teachers.

For the projectss implementation, CLA Graduate Program provided experts / teachers to
overseefullprojectsimplementation.TheRCMETprovidedthefundingforalltheprojects,specifically
theexpensesonsuppliesandmaterialsandforthemealsandsnacksofthefacilitatorandtrainers.Both
partiesjointlymonitoredtheprogressoftheprojects.

The varied programs/ activities utilized varied approaches during implementation , such as;
participatoryapproachduringtrainings, workshopandcapacitybuildingapproach,technologytransfer
andevaluationandmonitoringactivities.

The project monitoring and evaluation ensure the projects proper implementation. The
projectorganizers/proponentscloselycoordinatewiththeRCMETofficialsalongwiththeparticipating
communityandschoolinordertoensurethattheprojectsoutcomesaresutained.

61

CULTUREANDCOMMUNITYDEVELOPMENT:Implicationto
DevelopmentofCultureandPractice

Dizon,JosefinaT.andPerez,JohnErinorioM.

InstituteforGovernanceandRuralDevelopment,CollegeofPublic
AffairsandDevelopment
DomingoLanticanAvenue,College,Laguna4031Philippines

Email:jtdizon@up.edu.ph
Telefax:0495360319

Abstract

Community development (CD) has been defined as a process in which a community is


strengthened in order to creatively help meet its own needs: physical, spiritual, mental, psychological,
social, economic and political (Palmer 2004). It takes place in an environmental context in which
communitiesorganizeanddevelopmentprojectstakeplace.Thecomponentsofthelocaldevelopment
environment include political, social, cultural, economic, and psychological (Swanepoel and De Beer,
2006).Theculturalenvironmentconsistsofthevaluesandmoresofasocietywhichareoftenspokenof
as the peoples tradition. Culture creates or contains taboos and provides a framework according to
whichpeopleactandreacttodailylife.

TheFreireanbasedapproachtoCDmakesconnectionbetweenknowledge,powerandculturein
enabling more authentic community empowerment and development. Some authors have focused on
the role of cultural values as facilitators of or constraints to development. Community development
experiences have shown how ethnic, gender and other cultural identities have shaped peoples
capacitiestochangetheirlivesandsocieties.Thus,Matarasso(2007)espousesculturalactionasaroute
to community development. On the other hand, Duncombe (2007) explains that there can becultural
resistance to community development. Against this backdrop, the paper will discuss how community
development as a process can respond to the needs of the client communities of HEIs by considering
their cultural context. Some cases will be used to highlight the relationship between culture and
communitydevelopment.

Keywords:Culture,communitydevelopment,culturalaction

62

DEVELOPMENTANDDELIVERYOFCULTURALLYSENSITIVEALTERNATIVEAND

EARLYEDUCATIONSYSTEMOFEDUCATIONFORTHEMANGYANS

Paunlagui,MerlyneMandQuerijero,NelsonJoseVincentB.
CollegeofPublicAffairsandDevelopment,UPLosBanos
College,Laguna,4031
Philippines
Telefax+63495360319/3637
CULTUREANDCOMMUNITYDEVELOPMENT

The World Declaration on Education For All (EFA) prescribes that basic learning needs (BLNs)
shallbemadeavailabletoallbyvariousmeans.BLNscomprisebothessentiallearningtoolsuchas
literacy, numeracy, oral expression and problem solving and the basic learning contents including
knowledge, skills, values and attitudes required by human beings to be able to survive, to develop
their full capacities, to live and work in dignity, to participate fully in development, to improve the
quality of their lives, and to make informed decisions (UNESCO 1994). Thus, a culturallysensitive
curriculum for alternative learning system and early education was developed and implemented in
selectedmunicipalitiesofOccidentalMindoro.

Despite the long process and other constraints met in the development and delivery of
culturallysensitive alternative learning system, individual and community level impacts have been
achieved. Community level impacts include unity among the people, improved health and hygiene
practices,improvedsocializationandcommunicationoutsidethecommunity,andtheabilitytodelve
intootherendeavours.Impactsontheindividualincludeincreasedconfidenceofthechildren,partial
fulfillment of their dreams for an education, and being able to communicate their needs to the
barangayofficialsandthelocalgovernmentunits.

63

EFFECTIVENESSOFKITAMWAAGARAL:ANEXTENSIONACTIVITYOFTHE
TEACHEREDUCATIONDEPARTMENT

AngelinaC.Paquibot
MichelleM.Gabasa*
JulieU.Lopez
HaideB.Asilo

Abstract

InconformitytoIndigenousPeoples(IP)RightsAct(R.A.8371)andinadherencetotheEducation
forAll(EFA)programofthePhilippinegovernment,bothOccidentalMindoroStateCollege,throughits
TeacherEducationDepartment(TED),andPlanPhilippines,believethattheCollegeIPScholarsshould
haveequalaccesstoqualityeducation.Withthisbelief,theKITAMWAAGARAL(LetUsLearn),atutorial
extensionactivityoftheTED,wasconceptualizedandwasimplemented.

Twentyseven(27)IPscholarsofPlanPhilippineswereconsideredinthisextensionprogram.The
extensionserviceswereheldeverySaturdayandSundayatOccidentalMindoroStateCollegeMaincam
pus. The extension activity was conducted from November 2012 to March 2013. The strategyused was
tutorialapproach.Mathematics,English,HousekeepingandHealthandHygienewerethetopicstaught.
Ttestwasusedtodetermineifthetutorialservicewaseffective.

ResultshowedthatthetutorialextensionactivityoftheTEDwaseffective.Thiswasrevealedby
theresultofthettestanalysiswhichshowedthattherewasasignificantdifferencebetweenthegrades
oftheIPscholarsduringthefirstandsecondsemestersofacademicyear20122013.
Itisrecommendedthatstronglinkageswithothernongovernmentoffices(NGOs)andevenwiththe
local government units (LGUs) be established so that this kind of extension activity by the Teacher
Education Department of Occidental Mindoro State College with that of the Plan Philippines will
continue.

64

EFFECTIVENESSOFTHEMADRASAHSABASAKASANEXTENSION
PROGRAMAMONGMERANAORICEFARMERS
INLANAODELSUR

Aguanta,LeoM.1andIntong,JudithD.2
FacultyMember,DepartmentofAgriculturalEducation
andExtension,CollegeofAgriculture,1
MindanaoSateUniversity,9
700MarawiCity,Email/contact:leaguanta@yahoo.com/
091034284792CentralMindanaoUniversity,
8710MusuanBukidnon.

ABSTRACT

Madrasah Sa Basak (MSB) is an extension program of MSU PhilRice, a communitybased and


participatoryeducationalcampaignforriceproduction.ThisstudywasconductedtoevaluatetheMa
drasah Sa Basak particularly its effectiveness in terms of Meranao rice farmers awareness, knowledge
andadoptionofMSBpracticesandidentifythefarmerrelatedandMSBrelatedfactorsthataffectthe
effectivenessoftheMSBprogram.DatafromMeranaoricefarmerrecipientsoftheMSBprogramfrom
theprovinceofLanaodelSur,Philippinesweregatheredusingastructuredquestionnaireandanalyzed
using ttest and correlation analysis. The findings of the study indicate that effectiveness of the MSB
program among the Meranao rice farmers in Lanao del Sur, Philippines is significantly associated with
availabilityoffarminputs(p<.05),farmsize(p<.05),andappropriatenessofMSBstrategies(p<.05).The
MSBprogramiseffectivewhenimplementingstrategiesintegratetheIslamicprinciplesusinggroupand
flexiblecurriculumtoMeranaoricefarmerswhohavebiggerfarmsandareprovidedwithfarminputs.
ThisimpliesreimplementationoftheMSBprogramoverawidercoverageincollaborationwithdifferent
agencies both government and nongovernment organizations that could provide the varied
infrastructuresupportvitaltotheeffectivenessandsustainabilityoftheMSBprogram.

Keywords:Effectiveness,MadrasahSaBasak,MSUPhilRice,MeranaoRiceFarmers

65

ENTREPINOYKIDS

Biares,RhestyR.,Lustre,LeaV.,Pena,DennisD.,Porlucas,Christian
BernardDominicC.,
Rodriguez,JojieM.,Tabardillo,RosemarieA.,Terrobias,MariettaZ.

PartidoStateUniversity
SanJuanBautistaSt
Goa,CamarinesSur,4422

HelpadoptedkidsimbibethetraitsandcharacteristicsnecessarytobeconsideredasEntrePinoy
Kids;inculcatethespiritofentrepreneurship;andexposetheadoptedkidbeneficiariesarethespecific
objectivesoftheproject.

TheprojectisasubcomponentoftheENTREPAMILYAanentrepreneurialextensionprogramfor
the family of the College. Needs assessment of the target community and formulation of possible
actions, projects, and activities was conducted first. After the needs assessment, planning and
coordination to concerned parties was made to assure the feasibility of the plan. Next, submission of
proposal, sourcing out funds and wide dissemination of the project/activities. Then, preparation and
securingallthematerialsandresourcesneeded;andfollowupandcontinuousparticipatorymonitoring
andevaluationofexecutionoftheactivities.Finally,revisionandimmediateactionsforpossiblechanges,
thus,theremustalwaysbeaplanB.

Furthermore, a positive feedback from the beneficiaries was seen on their enjoyment and
eagernesstolearnbusinessatyoungage.Theyalsoconveyedtheknowledgetheylearnedtotheentire
familyencouragingthemtobeanentrepreneursandbepartoftheENTREPAMILYAprogram.Thus,this
give the college to expand the project from barangay to barangay, school, and recently to Gawad
Kalinga.

Basedfromthepreviousactivitiesconducted,EntrePinoyKidswasimplementedandtheexecuted
activitiesaremoreinentrepreneurialmindsettingforthekidswhichwerebackupbytheirrationalethat
younggenerationsisthekeyforfuturedevelopment.

66

ESTABLISHINGACENTERFORCONFLICTRESOLUTIONANDSOCIAL
DEVELOPMENTINTHEWESTERNMINDANAOSTATEUNIVERSITY
COLLEGEOFSOCIALSCIENCES:
AHOLISTICAPPROACHFORTOTALHUMANDEVELOPMENT

Semorlan,AdrianP.
WesternMindanaoStateUniversity
NormalRoad,Baliwasan,ZamboangaCity,7000,Philippines
09064064400
adrianperezsemorlan@yahoo.com.ph
TopicAreas:CultureandCommunityDevelopment

The study focuses on the concept on establishing a Center for conflict resolution and social
development in Western Mindanao State University. The proposed center for conflict and social
developmentwillbepartoftheCollegeofSocialSciencesorganizationalpurposeundertheflagshipof
its extension and community involvement unit that promulgates a holistic approach for total human
development. The center serves as the permanent briefing center for humanitarian crisis and natural
disastervictimsinZamboangaCitythatwillrecuperatethesufferingexperiencesamongthepeoplewho
arevictimsofcatastrophes.Thestudysrespondentswereten(10)regularfacultyandfour(4)societal
PresidentsoftheWesternMindanaoStateUniversityCollegeofSocialSciences, whowereselectedby
random sampling. Half of the respondents have postgraduate degrees, and their positions were
Instructors,DepartmentHeadsandAssistantProfessor.

Findings show that of the fourteen (14) respondents, all replied that they agreed to establish a
Center for Conflict Resolution and Social Development in their College under the flagship of the
extensionandcommunityinvolvementunit.Intermsofbridgingpartners,majorityoftherespondents
repliedthattheproposedpartnersfortheoperationsoftheCenterwereneededfortheimplementation,
especiallythenecessarytrainings,seminars,workshops,foraandlecturestobegiventothefacultyand
studentsoftheuniversity.

Intermsoftheresponsesontheareaofexpertiseamongthefacultyandstudents,morethanhalf
oftherespondentshavetheskillstoconductservicestothevictimsinthefieldHumanandLegalRights,
Peace Education, Peace Building, Peace Mediation, Conflict Resolution, Historical, Ideological, Cultural
andGenderIssues,LivelihoodandOutreachprogramsandBudgeting.

The Establishing a Center for Conflict Resolution and Social Development is really necessary and
timelygiventhefactsandcircumstancesthatwerehappeninginourCity,thereforethatbridgingpart
nershipsfromvariousgovernmentalandnongovernmentalinstitutionsareindeedadvantageoustothe
academicinstitutions;apartnershipthatneedsserviceandactiontoimplementtheirplansandprograms
tothevictimsofcatastrophesinthecommunities.

Keywords:ConflictResolution,SocialDevelopment,BridgingPartners,Catastrophes

67


EXTENSIONPROGRAM:ADOPTABARANGAYPROGRAM
BuenaventuraT.CaluscosinIIandCristitaG.Guerra
DonMarianoMarcosMemorialStateUniversity
OpenUniversitySystem
CityofSanFernando,LaUnion,Philippines
btcii@yahoo.com,kriztyg@yahoo.com
Telefax:+63722423608;6078324

FundingEntity:DMMMSUOpenUniversitySystem
ImplementingEntity:DMMMSUOpenUniversitySystem
RecipientBarangay:BarangayPila,Luna,LaUnion
Duration:January2012January2014

ABSTRACT

Barangay Pila in the municipality of Luna, La Union is a landlock area with a population of 1,278
(asof2011).Coveringalandareaof157,583.6squaremeters,thebarangaywassubdividedinto7purok
where284householdsreside.Basicsourceofincomewasfishingandfarming.
Phase1oftheextensionactivitywastheneedsassessmentsurveytodeterminethekindofprogramto
beimplemented.Asaresult,thebarangayneedsagribasedtrainingprogramandhealthrelatedser
vices.

BarangayPilawaschosenasapilotareaforDMMMSUOUSextensionprogramsandassuchitisa
beneficiary of various services, trainings and programs that seek to effect improvement in the
socioeconomicandhealthconditionsofthepeople.Amongtheidentifiedtrainingstobeundertaken
inthebarangaywerethetilapia,bangus,siganidraisingandpolycultureofthesaidspeciesandlikewise
mushroom production. These were identified since fishery and farming are the major sources of
livelihoodinthebarangay.

It is envisioned that with an appropriate production technology imparted to the fisherfolks and
farmersinthebarangay,wouldflourishtoalevelwhereotherindustrieswouldemerge.

Phase2oftheprogramistheimplementationproper,hencethefollowingactivitiesundertaken:

MUNTINGPAARALANPROGRAM,February29,2012
ComputerliteracyforElementaryTeachers
ReadingforLifeforGrade1pupils
SportsforLife,Grade6pupils

HEALTHEDUCATIONPROGRAM,February29,2012
HealthEducationforMothers
MedicalMission,September19,2013
DonationofWheelChairs

AGRIBASEDTRAININGPROGRAM
Tilapia,BangusandSiganidProductionTraining,May31,2012
TrainingonMushroomProduction,August15,2013

68

FACULTYORIENTATIONANDPARTICIPATIONIN
COMMUNITYEXTENSIONSERVICES

ABSTRACT

By:CesarP.Gulang
Chairperson,UniversityofCebuCommunityExtension

This study determined the faculty orientation and participation in community extension services
fortheschoolyears2011to2014oftheUniversityofCebu.Descriptivecorrelationaldesignwasutilized
aided by the researcherprepared surveyquestionnaire that was administered to 68 fulltime faculty
members,representing40percentofthepopulation.TheCronbachsalphaofthepretestedinstrument
was0.8823.Documentsevidentiaryofthefacultyparticipationincommunityextensionwereaccessed
with propriety. Brought to light are the following: majority of the respondents were under 47 years of
age,females,married,andhavebeenteachingfornotover15years.Moreover,andgenerally,thefaculty
members were very much oriented on community extension, yet they had limited participation
therewith.Nosignificantrelationshipsexistedbetweentheprofileofthefacultyandtheirorientationon,
and participation in, community extension; and between their orientation on, and participation in,
communityextensionservices.Hence,facultyorientationisnoguarantyoftheirparticipationtherewith.
Theresearchersrecommendedtheimplementationofanactionplanintendedtoraisetheleveloffaculty
participationincommunityextension.

69

GETULIOCOMMUNITYBASEDRURALTOURISM(GCBRT):
ASUCCOMMUNITYPARTNERSHIP

LilianDianaParreno&NenitaMorada
GuimarasStateCollege

lilianparreno@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Thisprojectwasconceptualizedaftertheresearchstudyonthedistributionalecologyofmarine
mammalsinGuimarasIslandthatconfirmedthepresenceofcriticallyendangeredIrrawaddydolphinwas
completed and recommendations for the protection, awareness and providing facilities for dolphin
watchingwithouthavingtobeclosetotheanimalswererecommended.Awatchtowerwasestablished
inoneoftheisletofthebarangayfordolphinmonitoringandwatching.Thiswasestablishedwiththe
aimofhavingafacilitytoeasilywatchthedolphinspassingthroughthisareaandestablishtourismre
latedeventbyempoweringthepeopleinthebarangaybyholdinglumbalumbaawarenessprotection
campaign, coastal cleanup and setting up of facilities such as floating bridge and cottages through
bayanihansystemandestablishcommunityownershiptothesefacilities.Planningsessionwasestablish
with the barangay officials for the establishment of the facilities and training them in making IEC
materialstopromotetheareaasatourismdestination.Trainingssuchasentrepreneurship,marketing,
guesthandling,skillstrainingamongotherswillbeprovidedtothepeopleinthebarangaytocapacitate
them.Thisprojectslifeistargetedtobewithinthreeyearsafterwhichthiswillbelefttothebarangay
forthemtomanageandcontinuetheCBRTproject.
Keywords:CommunityBasedRuralTourism(CBRT)

70


HEALTHEXTENSIONPROGRAMAMONGBUHIDTRIBEATSITIOBATOSINGIT,
BARANGAYMANOOT,RIZAL,OCC.MINDORO

*MARCIELSALVADORBAUTISTA,R.N.,R.M.
OccidentalMindoroStateCollege
SanJose,OccidentalMindoro

ABSTRACT

Astheextensionprogrambegan,theMidwiferyDepartmentaimedtodeterminethenumberof
participants served on each activity; describe the approaches used in the conduct of the extension
activities;enumeratethevariousinterventionsmadeamongBuhidtriberelativetohealthpromotionand
preventionofdiseases;evaluatetheeffectivenessoftheprogramconducted.Triangulationmethodand
weighted mean were both employed for the preentry phase and post implementation phase of the
activities.

VariousactivitiesconductedrelativetothecomplianceoftheDepartmentofHealthprogramsand
the key result areas of the government in MDG 1 and 3 by 2015, to eradicate the extreme poverty and
hunger and promote gender equality and empower women respectively among Buhid tribe at Sitio
BatoSingit,Rizal,OccidentalMindoro.

All interventions were performed at a snails pace because the participants had difficulty in
understandingtagalogthusinterpreterwasrequiredinordertounderstandeachother.Theprogram
rated by the participants/beneficiaries involved garnered 4.92 interpreted as highly effective or
napakahusayintermsoftrainingcontents,trainingdesignandthetrainerscompetencies.Tocontinue
monitoringandevaluatingtheprograminitiatedandkeepclosepartnershipforthesmoothandproper
implementationoftheprogramwithotheragenciesandindividuals.

71


KAYAKAPP[KapwaAyYAmangKAagapaysaPagtataguyodngParokya]

RIO,MARITESM.09058364374
RIO,LEOC.09169849867
CRUZADO,CRYSALYNA.09164618040
VALLESTERO,NESTORC.
DOLORES,VIRGINIAT.

UNIVERSITYOFRIZALSYSTEM
SumulongSt.,Brgy.SanJuan,Morong,Rizal1968

ABSTRACT

KAYAKAPP aimstobridgehopeandtransformationalspiritamongthevarioussectorsinthe
Parish of St. JosephBaras, Rizal in the formulation and empowerment of its indigent sectors, out of
school youth, nonworking mothers, elderly as well as the physically deficient members of the
community.

SPECIFICOBJECTIVES:

1.ImprovetheacademicperformanceoflowperformingstudentsoftheparishinEnglish,Mathematics
andSciencethroughKAYAKAPPARALsfreetutoriallessons.
2.Improvetheproductivityandcompetenciesofthenonworkingmothersandelderlymembersofthe
parishthroughtheKAYAKAPPKITAskillscumlivelihoodtraininginvariouscrafts.
3.EnhancethetechnologyorientationandskillsofOutofSchoolYouthinartandtechnologytraining
throughtheKAYAKAPPsaSININGatTEKNOLOHIYA.
4.FacilitaterehabilitationoftheelectricalfacilityofthecenturyoldchurchthroughKAYAKAPPGAWA.
5.Strengthencommunicationskills/capabilityinsignlanguageaswellasincounseling/coachingskillsfor
the advancement of communication with deaf people among DSWD personnel and barangay workers
throughKAYAKAPPPITAK.
6. Develop health awareness and consciousness among individuals in the workplace with other
stakeholders of the University towards a more vibrant, productive community through KAYAKAPP
SIGLAKAS.

METHODS:

KAYAKAPPhasbeenasuccessfulroadwaytocommunitydevelopmentasitsplanning,prepa
ration,implementationandevaluationweremadeinconsultation,collaborationandpartnershipwitha
numberofstakeholders,individualsandgroups,governmentandnongovernmentorganizationsinthe
municipalityofBaras,intheProvinceofRizal.

RESULTS:

KAYAKAPP was given distinct recognitions as FIRST PLACE in EXTENSION PROGRAM


CATEGORYduringPRAISE2012andasBESTEXTENSIONPROGRAMduringPRAISE2013.

As per evaluation result, KAYAKAPP in general, was found to beHighly Contributory and
Beneficialasevaluatedbytheprogramparticipantsandstakeholders.

CONCLUSIONS:

KAYAKAPPProgramchampionsprojectcomponentsthatservesoundavenuesforcommunity
developmentandempowerment.

72

MATERNALANDCHILDHEALTHPROBLEMSIDENTIFIED:BASESFOR
OUTREACHPROGRAMINBARANGAYMANGARIN,SANJOSE,
OCCIDENTALMINDORO

*MARCIELSALVADORBAUTISTA,R.N.,R.M.
Extensionist

ABSTRACT

The Maternal and Child Health(MCH) care problems determined to serve as bases for outreach
programandaimedtoidentifymaternalandchildhealthneedsandproblems,showstrategiesusedin
the implementation of MCH care program as outreach activities and provide extension services. The
methodologies used in this extension program were field visitation, simple interview with key
informants and consultative meeting with barangay officials, Municipal Health Officer,Rural Health
MidwifeandBarangayHealthWorkers.Variousstrategiesandinterventionswereemployed.

A variety of programs conducted were as follows: 2012 and 2013 Nutrition Month Celebration,
MedicalandDentalMissionactivities;TrainingsandSeminaronImportanceonPrenatalcheckupsand
BreatfeedingandTeenageHealthyLifestyle;HealthteachingsandassessmentonImmunizationPlan.
This program dealt with the most pressing health problems identified to the mothers and
child.Moreover, the barangay officials and Rural Health Midwife appreciated what we have done in
compliancetoDepartmentofHealthAdministrativeOrderNo.20090025inOccidentalMindoro.

This paper highlights that some mothers ignored giving birthat BEmONC despite we informed
themtheMDGstargetandconsequencesofgivingbirthathome.Theystillembracedthesocialand
culturaltraditionsinrelationtothehomedelivery.Similarly,aseminaronthecomplicationsofadvance
maternalagewasgivenemphasized.

This paper shows that an academe and LGU partnership in development program is possible
providedthatMHO,particularlythemidwifeandBHWswillhelptomonitorthepregnantmothersand
givingfamilycounselingregardingthebirthingplan.Likewise,Mothersshouldbecontinuallyinformed
through strong advocacy IEC campaign about reproductive health and motivated by giving some
incentivesorrewardsinordertomeettheMDG5toreducebythreequartersbetween19902015.

73

CAPABILITY BUILDING AND


GOVERNANCE

74

MARIKINA POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE


Munding Cor., Mayor Chanyungco St., Sta. Elena
Marikina City - 1800

Title:ASSESSMENTOFTHETECHVOCCOMMUNITYEXTENSIONPROGRAMOFTHEMARIKINA
POLYTECHNICCOLLEGE:BASISFORPOLICYDIRECTION

Researcher/Presenter:Lagos,FidelitoD.
MarikinaPolytechnicCollege,MundingCor.,MayorChanyungcoSt.,Sta.Elena,MarikinaCity(1800)
Email:mpc09_college@yahoo.com
ContactInformation:3696790

Topicareas:TechVocExtensionPrograms

ABSTRACT

The researcher assessed the TechVoc Extension Program of the Marikina Polytechnic College in the
areasofresources,linkages,extensionistcompetency,andsocialinvolvement.Likewise,thestudyaimed
to identify the significant relationship between the assessed TechVoc Extension Programs and school
development where the areas on services delivery, community relations and physical development are
considered. The respondents of the study were the internal stakeholders consisting of the school
administrators and school extensionist, and the external stakeholders consisting of the LGU officials,
industrypartnersandcommunitymembers.Descriptivesurveywithfocusgroupdiscussionasresearch
methodologywasused.

Theresultofthestudyshowsthatresourcesandextensionistcompetencyareverysatisfactorywhilethe
linkages and social involvement appeared to be satisfactory only. On the other hand, school
development on services delivery and physical development appeared remarkable while community
relationswerefoundtobelessremarkable.

Basedonthefindingsofthestudy,theresearcherproposedapolicydirectiontogivefocusontheneed
toenhancecollaborationwiththecommunityandimprovelinkagesandsocialinvolvementoftheschool
withtheexternalsectors.

75

ChallengesandOpportunities,EnhancingandInhibitingForcesfor
Sustainabiity:TowardsaConsumersCooperativeDevelopmentModel

RobertoAbuleEstoconing,SillimanUniversity,DumagueteCity

ABSTRACT
Thesignificantfunctionconsumerscooperativesperformineverysocietycannotbediscounted.However,
thegradualandphenomenaldeathofconsumerscooperativesinthecountryaggravatingthepresently
wideningeconomicgapdrawstheattentionoftheresearchertolookintoSillimanUniversityConsumers
Cooperativewhichhassurvivedforoverseven(7)decades.
The study focused on thefollowing objectives: to ascertain the effect of socio economic factors on the
sustainabilityoftheconsumerscooperative;todeterminetheexternalandinternalfactorsaffectingthe
cooperativeinfocus;toidentifythemanagerialandoperationalchallenges,todeterminetheenhancing
and inhibiting forces present in the cooperative operation; and finally, to come up with a model or
guidelineforconsumerscooperativeoperations.

Officers,leadersandmembersoftheSUConsumersCooperativecanusetheresultsofthestudytoguide
theminpursuingitsdevelopment.Othercooperativeleadersstandtobenefitfromtheknowledgebase
andexperienceoftherecipientoftheLongestRunningAcademeBasedandMostDurableCooperative
inthePhilippinesawards.Cooperativeeducatorsandpolicymakerscanalsousetheresultsasbasisfor
policy development and strengthening the education program of the cooperative sector, more
particularlySillimanUniversitysexistingcooperativedevelopmentinitiativesinthecountrysidewhichgot
theirinspirationtherefrom.

Somemajorfindingsrevealthatsocioeconomicvariablesuchasage,income,civilstatus,gender,levelof
education, employment status and expenditure patterns partly explain the sustainability of the SU
Consumers Cooperative; that certain external and internal factors including specific enhancing and
inhibitingfactorspositivelycontributedtothesuccessandsustainabilityofthecooperativeunderstudy.

Overall,thestudyprovidedaclearperspectiveonhowlongtermsustainabilityinacooperativeoperation
as experienced by the Silliman University Consumers Cooperative is ensured. Thus, enabling the
researcher to come up with the proposed guideline for other consumers cooperatives as basis for
operations.

76


COMMUNITYBASEDAPPROACHINPROMOTINGAGRICULTURALEXTENSION
INOCCIDENTALMINDORO

SusanitaG.Lumbo,Ph.D.1,MaryYoleAppleDeclaroRuedas2,
andRizziAngelicaT.Dagos3

ABSTRACT

This paper posits that communitycentered and holistic approach in promoting agricultural
extensionamongthedifferentfarmingcommunitiesinOccidentalMindoro.

The Occidental Mindoro State College (OMSC) implements various extension activities in
partnershipwiththegovernment,nongovernmentandprivateorganizations.Theprogramhadserved
as vehicle in the strengthening of the working relationships between the College and other
development organizations.This had facilitated the institutions/organizations to pool resources and
worktogethertowardsacommongoaltheenablingofthecommunitiestobecomeempowered.

Trainingsandseminarsonorganicagriculture,organizationalmanagement,animalproductionand
postharvestwasconducted.

Participatory approach, education institution approach, resultdemonstration and publicprivate


peoplepartnershipwerethemethodologiesemployedintheprogram.

The agricultural extension program of OMSC can be very effective instrument in bringing
development to the communities. It has enabled the generation of sustainable livelihood, enhanced
community awareness on organic agriculture and rekindled aspirations of the people to attain better
lives.
It had also helped strengthen the Institutions working relationships with other public, private,
and peoples organizations. The collaborations that were formed by this program have not only
reinforced the extension activities, but have also opened many socioeconomic opportunities to the
communities.
Moreover, the project experiences suggest that the success of any development program is
dictatedbyrealisticandneeddrivenprograms.

________________________
1
ProfessorV,OccidentalMindoroStateCollege
2
ScienceResearchSpecialistI,OccidentalMindoroStateCollege
3
ScienceResearchAnalyst,OccidentalMindoroStateCollege

77


DEVELOPMENTOFAFISHSOLARDEHYDRATOR

Dr.AileenB.Esmeralda
CarlosHiladoMemorialStateCollege
TalisayCity,NegrosOccidentalPhilippines
esmeralda_aileen@yahoo.com

Abstract

Theworldtodayhasagrowingawarenessthatrenewableenergyhasimportantroletoplayinextend
ingtechnologytopeopleindevelopingcountriesinordertoincreaseproductivity.GuidedbytheBasic
PrinciplesofSolarGreenhouseDesign,anenergyefficientstructureofafishsolardehydratorwasde
velopedinordertoretainahygienicwithmaximumquantityofnutrientsonfishesthatarebeing
dried.Thisstudyaimedtodevelopafishsolardehydrator,testtheefficiencyofthedeviceintermsof
determiningtheairtemperatureinthedryingchamber,dryingrate,thefinancialfeasibilityindetermin
ingthereturnofinvestmentandpaybackperiod.Usingprojectandexperimentalresearchdesign,find
ingsrevealedthatthedryingrateforthefirsttwohoursisrelativelyveryfast.Itsloweddownasitun
derwentlongerexposureundertheheatofthesun.Thehighestaverageairtemperatureinsidethe
dryingchamberoccurredafterexposureofthedryerfrom46hoursofdrying.Theweightsofsamples
werealsoreducedfrom4.0kilogramsto3.5kilograms.Financialanalysispointedoutthataninvestor
onthisventurecanearn30%foreverypesoinvestedintheproductionandthetotalcostoftheproject
canberecoveredformorethanamonthofoperation.Itisrecommendedthatthissolardehydratorwill
beintroducedtofisherfolksandotherentrepreneursasthisgivesassuranceofaquickreturnofinvest
mentasidefromitiseasytoinstallandeasytomaintain.

Keywords:fishsolardehydrator,renewableenergy,technologydevelopment,Philippines

78


EMPOWERINGPEOPLESLIVESINSANJOSEOCCIDENTALMINDORO
THROUGHCOMMUNITYBASEDDISASTERMANAGEMENTPROGRAM

HAROLDQ.BAUTISTA,R.N

ABSTRACT

Theplanpreparationprocessessentiallyaimsatstrengtheningthecommunities,electedlocalofficials
responseandpreparedness.Theplansshouldbepreparedthroughaparticipatoryapproachincluding
identification of vulnerabilities and risks, and also be holistic, inclusive, sustainable and environment
friendly. During any disaster, communities are always the first responders. Community participation
ensureslocalownership,addresseslocalneeds,andpromotesvolunteerismandmutualhelptoprevent
andminimizedamage.
The extension program of the Criminology Department in community based disaster management
highlightsthecomponents,processes,localpractices,ingenuityinBarangayManootandSanAgustin,
SanJose,OccidentalMindoro.

Seminars andTrainings on Disaster Management RiskReduction, Disaster Response including first aid
andbasiclifesupportwereconductedamonglocalofficials,barangaytanods,volunteersandbarangay
healthworkers.

Theparticipantsimprovedtheirskillsknowledgeandattitudeinrespondingtoemergencyandrescue,
triage,treatmentofinjuredpersons,usingindigenousmaterialspresentintheircommunity.

79


ENHANCINGFARMERSSCIENTIFICAPPROACHESANDPRACTICES:
THECASEOFFARMERSCIENTISTSTRAININGPROGRAM
Seminiano,SimeonaC.

AgriculturalSystemsCluster,CollegeofAgricultureUPLB
College,Laguna,4031,Philippines
FaxNo.(049)5365282

CapabilityBuildingandGovernance

ABSTRACT

This study argues that farmers can bemoldedinto simple scientists based on a definition taken
from the American Scientist Journal of the Society of Sigma XI or the Scientific Research Society of
America(ReSA).Itstatesthatascientistwatchesthings,reads,findsouthowthingsworkandhowthey
can be made better, wonders, experiments, finds out what is true, and sees that wonderful things do
indeed happen. Farmerparticipants of theFarmerScientists Training Program (FSTP) are then
addressedasfarmerscientistsalsoasawayofgivingthemdignityasfoodproducers.

Theobjectivesofthestudyare:1)toexposefarmerstodifferentagriculturaltechnologiesoncrop
production;2)todevelopfarmersscientificskillsforgoodfarmingpractices;3)toidentifymoralvalues
and personality traits necessary for agricultural technology adaptation and 4) to establish institutional
changesforsustainableFSTPimplementation.

FSTPisanintegrativeandholisticthreephaseagriculturalresearch,developmentandextension
(RDE) methodology. It involves enhancement of appropriate values of farmers engaged in crops like
corn, vegetables and animals in a cornbased production system to adopt scientific and sustainable
farmingthroughpartnershipbasedonExecutiveOrder710.

FSTPiscurrentlyimplementednationwidefromRegions1to13.Primaryandsecondarydatafrom
interviews,observationandinsightsandpublicationsandreportswereutilizedforthispurpose.Results
showedthatfarmerswereprovidedmoreoptionsinadoptingsitespecificfarmingtechnologiesintheir
own farms. Some technologies which they adopted were the use of organic fertilizers like BioN and
chicken manure; corn OPVs like IPB Var 6; detasselling and corn intercropping. Improved moral values
and personality traits of farmers included prayerfulness, respect for the country, selfconfidence,
accountability,inquisitiveness,knowledgesharingandtechnical,leadershipandentrepreneurialskills.In
termsofgovernance,FSTPprovideddirectiontoLGUsontheiragriculturalprojects,expansionoftheir
staff and constituent farmerleaders role as extension agents and resource complementation from
otheragencies.

Therefore, farmers can be scientifically inclined towards sustainable agriculture when properly
motivatedandtrainedwithLGUs.

80


Eskwela sa Selda: A Jail-Based Model for Alternative Learning
and Development of Inmates in Odiongan District Jail

Fanny F. Arsenio, Delia C. Meren, Jun P. Dalisay, and


Emelyn R. VIllanueva*
College of Education, Romblon State University, Odiongan, Romblon
*Corresponding Author: ricoemelyn707@yahoo.com.ph

Abstract.Inmatesarealsoconsideredasmariginalizedsectorinthesocietywhoareheldbehind
barswhiletheircasesarebeingheard.IntheRombloncontest,preliminaryresearchdatarevealedthat
as of 2012, the educational attainment of about 75% of the inmates in Odiongan District Jail were
elementaryandhighschoolundergraduatesonly.ThispromptedtheCollegeofEducationofRomblon
State University (CEDRSU) to collaborate with the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology issue.
ThisprojectiscalledBLIKEskwelasaSelda,aliteracyextensionprojectprimarilyaimedtowideninside
the jail. The project forms part of the preservice elementary teachers requirements in professional
coursewhichincorporatestheteachone,eachoneapproachforthestudentinmates.Thestudent
teachers and their supervising professors conducted a threehour literacy class in jail per week over
aperiod of one semester which culminates in a graduation ceremony being evaluated by the DepEd
district supervisor of Odiongan. After graduation, review sessions were conducted to prepare the
inmates for the Alternative Learning Systems Accreditation and Equivalency Test (A&E). As to the
performance of the studentinmates in A&E test during the first year of projects implementation, it
resulted to 100% passing rate in elementary (10 out of 20), and 90% for secondary (16 out of 18). In
succeedingyear,thesecondbatchofexamineesgot65%passingrate(3outof5)inelementarywhile
insecondary,itgotan80%passingrate(16outof20).Aspartofthedevelopmentofinmates,different
activities were also integrated in the project such as values formation seminar, livelihood skills
developmentwhereinseriesofphysicalfitnesswereconducted.Aspartoftheoutreachactivitiesof
the college, the students, teachers, BJMP personnel, and the inmates gathered for a day of fun,
monitored and sustained by the extension unit of the College of Education in support of UNESCOs
goalofEducationforall(EfA).

Additional Keywords: Education for ALL (Efa), JailBaised Literacy Model (JBLM), School in Jail,
AlternativeLearningSystem(ALS)

81


FishProcessingSkillsTrainingfortheHousewivesofFisherFolks
inBataan:AnAnalysis

(Dr.FelicisimaE.Tungol;Dr.YolandaB.Simbul)

A livelihood project for the housewives of fisher folks beneficiaries had been approved and
fundedbytheBPSUGenderandDevelopment(GAD)intheamountofP224,280.00.Trainingonfish
processingsuchasbonelessbangus,smokedfishmaking,fishdrying,fishfillet,gourmetandthelikes
inseven(7)batcheswasconductedbyfoodprocessingexpertsfromBPSUOraniCampusinsupportto
theprogram.Rightaftereachbatchoftraineeshadfinishedtheirtraining,theprocessingmaterialsare
being awarded to them and they are granted asoft loan of 2,500.00 eachfor their business starting
capital. The soft loan is given at zero interest rate payable within five (5) months at 500 pesos per
month.AMemorandumofAgreementsignedaccordinglybythepartiesinvolved.

Bataan is primarily agricultural in nature comprised of farm lands as well as coastal areas and
havingacoastlinelengthof177km.PhilippineNationalAquasilvicultureProgramundertheBureauof
Fisheries and Aquatic Resources had seen the importance of taking good care of our coastline. The
Mangrove Rehabilitation Program under PNAP intends to uplift the lives of the fisher folks within
Bataan.

In so far as the fisher folks harvest the matured fishes from the aquasilviculture ponds, the
housewivesconcernishowtosellthem.Oversupplyoffishharvestwouldsometimesleadtowasteor
non income. Thus, the BPSU Orani Campus conceptualized the skills training in line with Fish
Processing. The excess fish harvest from the PNAP funded program will be processed to earn
additionalincomefortheirfamily.

A total of sixty (60) housewives of the fisher folks were trained in line with the said fish
processingwiththedurationoftwelvemonths(12)fromJune2013uptoMay2014.Theycamefrom
thetownsofSamal,Orani,Limay,BagacandHermosa,allintheprovinceofBataan.

82

MARIKINA POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE


Munding Cor., Mayor Chanyungco St., Sta. Elena
Marikina City - 1800

PROBLEMS,CHALLENGESANDOPPORTUNITIESOFEXTENSIONSERVICESOFFICEINSELECTED
SUCS:BASISFORDEVELOPMENTOFTRAININGENHANCEMENTPROGRAMS

Researcher/Presenter:Udaundo,RenylinM.
MarikinaPolytechnicCollege,MundingCor.,MayorChanyungcoSt.,Sta.Elena,
MarikinaCity(1800)
Email:mpc09_college@yahoo.com
ContactInformation:3696790

Topicareas:

Extensionservices,problems,challengesandopportunitiesinextension
implementation

ABSTRACT

Thisstudyassessedtheproblems,challengesandopportunitiesofextensionservicesoffice(ESO)in
selected SUCs in the National Capital Region. The respondents of the study were the school
administratorsandfacultyorstudentextensionistsastheyaretheonewhoweredirectlyinvolvein
the extension programs and projects. The extent of administrative support; availability of facilities,
suppliesandmaterials;stakeholdersparticipation;andcommitmentofbeneficiariesweretheprob
lems identified as regard the extension services implementation. On the other hand, challenges on
budgetallocation,humanresources,linkagesandmonitoringandevaluationofextensionprograms
are considered. Finally, opportunities on the competency requirements, policy instrument/
implementation,expansionandstatussustainabilityarerecognizedtowardsenhancementofexten
sionservicesunit.Descriptivesurveymethodologywasused.

Theassessmentoftherespondentsshowsagreatextentofproblemsandchallengesandveryhigh
extentofopportunities.ThiswaspostedduetothelackingofresourcesavailabletotheSUCsdespite
fullsupportfromtheadministration.Ontheotherhand,thelinkagessupportsystemhavegiventhe
extensionofficeitswaytoexpandandservethecommunitybetter.

Basedonthefindingsofthestudy,theresearcherproposedatrainingenhancementprogramforthe
schooladministrators,facultyandstudentextensionisttoempowertheextensionservicesofficefor
communitydevelopment.

83


PreschoolEducationProgram:EmpoweringFilipinoAdultLearners

AnaMarieV.Fernandez
CebuNormalUniversity
marylovetrisha25@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate variables in the implementation ofKABATAAN 2010a preschool
educationprogram.Itexploredtheparadigmthinking:bothpoliticalandsocialaspectsoftheextension
workers, their understanding of basic principles of community development continuum of volunteer
stylefromdependencytoempowerment.Thisisaquantitativedescriptivestudyusingthenationaldata
setsfromUNESCOInstituteofStatisticsanddatageneratedfromresearchermadequestionnaires.The
finding shows thatcommunity preschool program like KABATAAN2010 can generate success if
sustained and its proponents would not undermine the basic principles and guidelines of community
developmentwhichcanreduceschoolfailuresamongentranttoprimaryeducationandcanempower
adult learners through literacy. Thus, this program yielded no economic value and has not reached
sustainabilityorempowermentphase.

Keywords:PreschoolEducation,AdultEmpowermentandSchoolFailureReduction

84

SeriesSeminaronResponsibleParenthoodandValuesEducationasan
ExtensionProgramofBPSUOraniCampusAY20132014:An
Assessment

(Dr.YolandaB.Simbul;
Dr.FelicisimaE.Tungol)

The parents are the second teachers of a child at home. The school is the place where values,
behaviorandattitudesofachildarebeingmanifestedandobservedbyhispeergroupandhissuperior.
Parentsontheotherhand,playedagreatroleintheformationofgoodmannersandproperconductof
everychild.

The Office of Extension Services of BPSU Orani Campus had planned, coordinated and implemented,
seriesofseminarsonResponsibleParenthoodandValuesEducationfortheWomenandtheirChildren
inthetownsofOraniandSamal,Bataanfortheyear2013to2014.

There were five elementary schools included as beneficiaries of these extension programs and it
includes a. Lalawigan Elementary School 107 parents, b. Asuncion Consunji Elementary School 167
parents,c.ParaisoElementarySchool117parents,d.SamalSouthElementarySchool69parentsand
e.AlikabokElementarySchool80parents.Atotalof540parents,fromthefiveidentifiedelementary
schoolsunderthe4Psprogramhandattendedtheseminar.

TheOfficeofDepartmentofSocialWelfareandDevelopment,inchargeof4Psisincoordinationwith
BPSUOfficeofExternalServicesinordertoidentifytheparticipantsoftheSeriesofSeminar.

85


The2in1plusMaricultureFarmingSystem1
(ALivelihoodDevelopmentStrategyforCoastalFamilies)
ValentinoV.Prado2,RogelioM.Estacio
GerryN.Galvez3,RichardN.Rivera3,
IdaC.Junio2,EnoneV.Tepait2andLourdesP.Bisco3
DonMarianoMarcosMemorialStateUniversityBacnotan,LaUnion

ABSTRACT

Overfishing and degradation of coastal environment led to low fish catch and unproductive
fishing efforts of sustenance fisherman. At present they remain as one of the poorest sector of the
society. A need to provide additional source of income remains a challenge, hence the potential of
seafarming both seaweed and sea urchin was explored.Coined as 2 in 1 plus mariculture farming
system,itencouragesfamilyhouseholdstoworktogetherinasystemofproductionandprocessing;
optimizing coastal family productivity. The technology was developed through the integration of
severalexperimental/demofarmresultsandlocalpracticesonthecultureandprocessingofseaweed
andseaurchin.Returnonexpensesofrespectivetechnologieswaspresented.

The2in1plus,asanintegratedmariculturefarmingsystemmaximizestheuseoflimitedculture
areaandboostsproductivityofafamily.Ina200m2openwatergrowoutculturearea,productionof
seaweed and sea urchin serves an alternative source of livelihood producing food commodities for
local market with export potential. Direct benefit is a return on expenses of 87 and 67% for fresh
seaweedandseaurchinrespectively,andabout14to65%ofanyproductdevelopmentafamilywould
undertake,asavalueaddedinitiative.Thesaidfarmingsystempromotesentrepreneurshipenhancing
financialstabilityandsocialprogressionwithinthefamilyortocommunityingeneral.

Sustainedcollaborationandinvolvementofkeyplayersincoastalfisheriesmanagementissoughtfor
successfulfamilyorcommunitybasedadoptionofthe2in1plusmariculturefarmingsystem.TheLocal
GovernmentUnit(LGU)providesthepathforitspilotimplementation,andwithappropriatetraining
andmarketassistant.

86


WOMENOMICS:WOMENEMPOWERMENTTHROUGHSUSTAINABLE
ANDPARTICIPATORYEXTENSIONSERVICEDELIVERY
Cerio,CalydT.;Rodriguez,JojieM.;Tabardillo,RosemarieA.

PartidoStateUniversity
SanJuanBautistaSt.,Goa4422,
CamarinesSur,Philippines
Tel.No.4530235

ABSTRACT

WOMENOMICSisoneoftheextensionprojectsofthePartidoStateUniversityCollegeofBusinessand
Management.TheprojectstartedonMarch2010atBarangayGimaga,Goa,CamarinesSurwheretheir
active women are the beneficiaries of the project. WOMENOMICS was coined from two words
women and economics. This project aims to empower the women through skills and livelihood
trainings, financial literacy, gender sensitivity, product development, management enhancement and
enterprisedevelopment.

The mode of extension delivery uses participatory approach. The administration, faculty, students,
barangay council, community and other stakeholders are involved in planning, implementation,
monitoringandevaluationoftheproject.Addedtoit,linkagefromvariousinstitutionswasemployedin
theproject.

Throughtheproject,therewereorganizedwomenorganizationinthebarangayembracingthemanner,
principlesandvaluesofacooperativeenterprise.Womenarealsoknowledgeableandskilledinmaking
productsoutoftherawmaterialsavailableinthecommunity.Todate,thewomenorganizationarepro
ducingtheirproductswheretheyderivetheiradditionallivelihood,thus,makingsignificantcontribution
totheirfamilysincome,healthandeducation.

TheprojectconcludesthattheenthusiasmaboutWOMENOMICSisveryhighamongthebeneficiaries
showing that the womenparticipants have a positive mindset for engaging and participating in
activities.Continuousplanningandneedsassessment,however,hastobeemployedtoassurethatthe
project is suitable to their needs and inclination. Moreover, the community has various resources
(financial, social, human, personal and physical resources) that can be maximized using different
livelihood strategies to empower women and alleviate poverty. It is recommended that the available
resourcesshouldbeusedasrawmaterialsinthemakingvaluableandproductivethings.

TopicAreas:CultureandCommunityDevelopment

87

SUMMERSKILLSENHANCEMENTWORKSHOPINTECHNOLOGYAND
LIVELIHOODEDUCATION(T.L.E)
Proponents:Ma.IanP.DeLosTrinos
KarenK.Foronda

ABSTRACT

TheCollegeofIndustrialTechnologysignedamemorandumofagreementwiththeCity
SchoolsDivisionofDasmaninas,CavitetoprovidetrainingtopublichighschoolteachersinTechnology
andLivelihoodEducation.ThefirstimplementationoftheMOAisatrainingprogramentitledSkills
EnhancementSummerWorkshopinICTconductedlastApril1627,2012attheCongressionalNational
High School. The workshop aimed to provide relevant training in Photo Editing (Adobe Photoshop),
Basic Programming (Visual Basic), Computer Assembly, Maintenance and Troubleshooting, Desktop
Publishing,BasicDatabaseManagementandWebPageDesignto116ICTTeachers.

Inthesucceedingyear,trainingprogramsindifferentareasofTechnologyandLivelihood
Education (TLE) such as Commercial Cooking, Bread and Pastry, House Wiring(Electricity), Consumer
ElectronicsServicing,AutoCAD,AdvanceNetworking,andAdvancePhotoshopanddesktoppublishing
wereprovidedto126TLEteacherslastapril.

LastApril28uptoMay2,2014,theprogramaimedforthecontinuousimplementationof
theKto12curriculumandtoproviderelevanttraininginComputerProgramming,TechnicalDrafting,
Consumer Electronics, Electrical Installation and Maintenance, carpentry, Housekeeping, commercial
cooking,baking,breadandpastrymaking,andfoodserviceto138TLEteachersfrombothpublicand
privatesecondaryschoolsinthedivisionofDasmarinasCity.

Faculty members and Master of Information Technology students were the resource
personsandfacilitatorsoftheworkshop.Resultsoftheevaluationconductedafterthetraininggained
anOutstandingoverallratingwhichprovesthattheactivityistimelyandsignificanttotheTLEhigh
schoolteachersinimpartingknowledgeandskillstotheirstudentstohelpthembecomeeconomically
productive.

88


ASSESSMENT
OF READINESS TO INTEGRATE HALAL FOOD PRODUCTION
IN THE AGRICULTURE AND ALLIED SCIENCES CURRICULA OF
SELECTED HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS IN MINDANAO,
PHILIPPINES

Dimaporo-Tawantawan, Indihra B.
Director, Research and Extension
Mindanao State University Lanao Norte Agricultural College
Ramain, Sultan Naga Dimaporo, Lanao del Norte
Email: ibd.msulnac@gmail.com
Santillana, Carolina P.
Cardenas, Virginia R.
Quimbo, Maria Ana T.
Torres, Cleofe S.
University of the Philippines Los Baos

Designed as a purely descriptive research survey, the present study aimed to


assess the readiness of HEIs in Mindanao to integrate HFP in their agriculture and allied
sciences curricula.

A total of 136 respondents selected from both academe and

government offices from six regions in Mindanao participated in the survey. Based on
the provisions of the Philippine National Standards (PNS), results of the survey showed
that the capacity of HEIs to integrate HFP in their curricula is constrained by a number of
factors which generally includes technical expertise and infrastructures.

Given the

necessary policy environment and government support, HEIs will be more than capable
to integrate HFP in their academic programs.
The concept of halal is the convergence of the religious and the technical aspects
of HFP. Halal food production and its processes as they are adopted in science require
certain resources such as knowledge, skills and technology which, as the present study
perceives, can only be provided by HEIs. However, this is constrained by the lack of
certain infrastructures such as modern halal laboratory equipments to accommodate
89


halallaboratory techniques in the detection of haram components. There is an intense need for the
creationofstrongerimplementingrulesandregulationsandotherenablinglawstolegitimizePhilippine
NationalStandardsonhalalfood(PNS2067:2008)andCHEDMO14:2008.Moreimportantly,theremust
be a stronger government support and partnership with the HEIs to facilitate deeper and wider
perspectiveofHFPintegrationintothecurricula.

90

PHILIPPINE NATIONAL AQUASILVICULTURE PROGRAM:


MANGROVE REHABILITATION PROJECT IN CAMARINES SUR
Alma R. Basmayor Patricia M. CandelariaLuven H. Haja
Partido State University Sagnay Campus, Nato, Sagay, Camarines Sur

ABSTRACT
The Mangrove Rehabilitation Project as one of the components of the Philippine National
Aquasilviculture Program (PNAP) was implemented in partnership with the State Universities and
Colleges (SUCs) in the Bicol Region by virtue of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) by Bureau of
Fisheries and aquatic Resources BFAR) and the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) signed last
December 16, 2011. The Partido State University is SUC partner representing Camarines Sur in the
Bicol Region.
.
A total of 183,000 mangrove seedlings in 61 hectare area in the seven (7) barangays of
Caramoan, Tinambac and Garchitorena, Camarines Sur. These sites were specifically suggested by the
DENR because of its vast area suitable for planting mangroves.
The mangrove beneficiaries were identified by the Project Management Office(PMO)in
consultation with the Local Government Units (LGU) and the FARMC guided by the following criteria:
bonafide residentin the area/project site; willingness to participate in the program and abide with the
terms and conditions; preferably identified and included in the list of marginal sector of the Department
of Social Welfare Development (DSWD).
The budget for this project is 1,099,000.00 which started December2011 and terminated
December 2012.A total of 967,125.00 were paid to 150 beneficiaries for 183,000mangrove propagules
planted and 130,650 (75.57%) number of surviving propagules.
The willingness of the partner LGUs, beneficiaries, Community Organizers (COs) and other
stakeholders to participate in this project played a great part in the realization of the project. This
commendable intervention of the government addressed poverty among fisherfolks in Camarines Sur
particularly in Partido District. Environmental awareness was the tangible lesson learned by the
implementers and fisherfolk beneficiaries. They had come to learn that (1) mangrove have a greater
role in the environment than being made to charcoal for in exchange for a days meal; (2)mangrove
have a very great impact on the sustainability of their livelihood which is fishing; (3) fishes and aquatic
products should have a good refuge for them to multiply and live; and (4) in order to survive , they
should be fully aware of their roles for a sustainable and productive world.

91


CO-OPTATION
OF INDIGENOUS AND MODERN FARMING PRACTICES
AMONG TBOLI FARMERS IN LAKE SEBU, SOUTH COTABATO,
PHILIPPINES

Serrano, Evelie P.
Assistant Professor
Institute for Governance and Rural Development
College of Public Affairs and Development
University of the Philippines Los Baos
Email: evelieserrano@gmail.com
Baconguis, Rowena DT.
Cadiz, Maria Celeste H.
Cardenas, Virginia R.
Quimbo, Maria Ana T.
University of the Philippines Los Baos

This study sought to analyze the co-optation of indigenous and modern farming
practices among Tboli rice and corn farmers in Lake Sebu, South Cotabato, Philippines.
Data were collected primarily from Tboli rice and corn farmers, extension workers, and
community leaders through key informant interviews, focus group discussion, and other
personal communications. Interviews were transcribed and translated. Data were
analyzed qualitatively.
Results show that Tboli farmers combine indigenous farming practices and belief
systems with modern ones. Findings also show that co-optation is a natural process
among the Tbolis, is influenced by several actors, and is guided by learning principles.
Farmers believed that merging indigenous and modern farming knowledge could bring
about farming practices that are suitable to their capacities and needs.
Since delivering extension on a top-down basis and through diffusion of
innovation seems detrimental to the indigenous belief systems and practices, co-optation
should be given more importance in extension.
92


BUILDINGHOPEBEHINDBARS:APRELIMINARYSTUDYONTHE
IMPACTOFTECHNOLOGYPROGRAMSATTHEBATAANDISTRICTJAIL

BernadethB.Gabor,MAEd1andNomerN.Varua,MAEd2

1
InstructorIII,BPSUCollegeofIndustrialTechnology;Chair,BPSUCommunityBasedExtensionPrograms
2
InstructorI,BPSUCollegeofArtsandSciences;TechnicalStaff,BPSUOfficeofExtensionServices

ABSTRACT

ThisstudyassessedtheeffectivenessofthelivelihoodprogramsoftheBataanPeninsulaStateUniversity
attheBataanDistrictJailfrom20092013.ItassessedthelevelofadministrativecapabilityoftheBPSU
ExtensionOffice,extentofparticipationofthestakeholders,theleveloftheprogramoutputs,andthe
economic and social impacts of the livelihood trainings conducted. The influence of administrative
capability, participation of stakeholders and implementation of the program was also determined. In
order to answer the questions in the study, a surveyquestionnaire was adopted with appropriate
statistical tools applied. Onehundred thirtyeight (138) detaineerespondents participated in the study.
Resultsshowthattheadministrativecapability,theextentofparticipationofthedevelopmentpartners,
extent of implementation of the extension as well as the program outputs are allpositively related. In
termsoftheeconomicandsocialimpactsoftheprograms,amajoritybelievedthattheirsocioeconomic
status improved. The perception of the respondents on the implementation of the BPSU extension
programs yielded a significant positive relationship and that the respondents perceived that the
implementationofBPSUextensionprogramsisdirectlyinfluencedbytheextentofparticipationofthe
stakeholders..Maintenanceofeffectiveandefficientextensionprogrammechanismisrecommended.

Keywords: impact assessment, impact evaluation, community development, extension programs,


extensionprogrameffectiveness

93

ASSESSMENT OF THE Edukasyong Pantahanan


at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) Training Course

Juana M. De La Rama, Soccoro M Ibonia, Saturnina P. Aberin


Extension is an integral function of a public higher education institution. The College of Policy Studies,
Education and Management (CPSEM) of the Mindanao University of Science and Technology (MUST)
embarked on the different extension activities which included generation of technical and entrepreneurial
skills in basic handicraft, basic sewing, commercial cooking, computer operation, food processing and
sustainable agriculture. This study was aimed to assess the impact of the Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) training conducted by the College as one of its extension activities. Eighty three (83) participants who attended the training program responded to the survey. The training program was aimed to
enhance the knowledge and skills of the teachers who were teaching EPP in the different EPP areas. All the
respondents gained and enriched their knowledge and skills in canning, smoking, fermenting, curing, and
pickling fish and meat. They also learned candle making, batik making, needle works, crocheting,
macram, stuffed toys, origami and jewelries and accessories. In commercial cooking they gained knowledge and skills in baking, different cooking methods and preparation of Asian recipes, sandwiches, stocks,
salads and soup. In basic sewing they learn more in smocking, doing the different kinds of seams, attaching
zipper, and the making of an apron, pillow case and most of all in pattern making. While in
sustainable
agriculture they learned the advantage of using organic farming and the skills of making organic fertilizer
and pesticides. All the skills and knowledge were used primarily on the homes as well as in their workplace
(school etc.), and some business purposes. Majority of the participants perceived that the
training had a
strong effect or impact to them. From the results, it is concluded that the training was able to achieve its
objective in enhancing knowledge and skills of the teachers in the different areas of the Edukasyong Pantahanan and Pangkabuhayan (EPP) and had a greater impact in the teachers competencies in teaching the
different areas of EPP.
It is recommended that the training be continued to cater the needs of the teacher in implementing the K+12
curriculum and to include Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Entrepreneurship and ICT in the training.

Keywords: extension activities, Edukasyong Pantahanan at Pangkabuhayan (EPP) knowledge and


skills

94

THE
PROPOSED CONSTITUTION AND
BY LAWS
FOR RATIFICATION

95

BY-LAWS
Of

Philippine Association of Extension Program Implementors (PAEPI) Inc.


ARTICLE I
GENERAL ASSEMBLY AND MEETINGS
Section 1. Regular General Assembly shall be held annually on an agreed date that usually coincides
with the conduct of an annual convention or conference by the Association at the date, time and place as may
be designated by the Board of Directors. All regular members are expected to attend the General Assembly.
Section 2. Special meeting of the Association may be called at any time by the Board of Directors or
upon a written request of at least one-fifth of the members of the association.
Section 3. Notices of the time and place of annual and special meetings of the members shall be given
either personally or by special delivery mail, at least two (2) weeks before the date set for each meeting. The
notice of every special meeting shall state briefly the purpose or purposes of the meeting.
Section 4. Quorum- A quorum for any meeting of the members shall consist of a majority of the
members and majority of such quorum may decide any question at the meeting except those matters where the
Corporation Code requires the affirmative vote of a greater proportion.
Section 5. Order of Business- The order of the business at the annual meeting of the members shall be
as follows:
Proof of service of the required notice of the meeting.
Proof of the presence of quorum.
Reading and approval of the minutes of the previous annual meeting.
Unfinished business.
Report of the president.
Election of the trustees.
Other matters.
Section 6. Voting Proxy- each member shall be entitled to one vote, and he may vote either in person
or by proxy which shall be in writing and filed with the secretary of the association before the scheduled
meeting.

96

ARTICLE II
TRUSTEES (BOARD AND OFFICERS)
Section 1. The Board shall be the policy-making body of the Association. The business affairs of the
Association shall likewise be conducted by the Board of Directors who shall consist of one duly elected
member representing each region of the country based on the regional distribution approved by the Board or
in its absence, the regional distribution according to the list of the DILG. The term of the Directors shall be
two calendar years. Outgoing presidents of the Association shall be automatically an ex-officio member of the
Board provided said President signifies his/her willingness to continually serve the Association in such
capacity.
Section 2. Officers of the Board. The Board of Directors shall elect from among themselves the
Officers of the Board consisting of the Chair, Vice-Chair and Secretary.
Section 3. Board of Trustees The corporate powers of the association shall be exercised, its
business conducted and its property controlled by the Board of Trustees.
Section 4. Qualifications The trustees to be elected must be of legal age and members of the
association.
Section 5. Disqualification of Trustees or Officers - No member convicted by final judgment of an
offense punishable by imprisonment for a period exceeding six (6) years, or a violation of the Corporation
Code of the Philippines committed within five (5) years prior to the date of his election or appointment, shall
qualify as a trustee or officer.
Section 6. Term of Office of Trustees The trustees shall hold office for one year and until their
successors are duly elected and qualified.

ARTICLE III
OFFICERS
Section 1. Officers of the Association. The Board shall elect from among themselves the Officers of
the Association consisting of the President, three Vice-Presidents, a Secretary, a Treasurer, an Auditor, a
Business Manager and a Public Relation Officer. The Officers of the Association shall manage the programs,
projects and activities of the Association approved by the Board. The new President shall be authorized to
recommend an assistant secretary for purposes of communication or records keeping in the Main Office of the
Association. The Assistant Secretary who may not come from the Board shall be appointed by the Board
upon such recommendation.
Section 2. The three Vice-President shall decide among themselves who will become the First VicePresident of the Association. In case of resignation, leave of absence and other valid reasons, the First Vice
President shall take over the roles and functions of the President until the expiration of his/her term.
Section 3. Executive Committee. The President and the Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer of
the Association shall act as the Executive Committee with president as the Executive Chairman. The
Executive Committee shall enforce and carry out the decisions of the Board of Directors.

97


Section
4. The President shall recommend the creation of the secretariat whose primary duty is to
assist the President as Executive Chairman in the day-to-day affairs of the Association. The secretariat shall be
composed of the Executive Director, Co-Executive Director and members. The secretariat shall provide technical assistance in the conduct of the annual convention/nationwide conference and seminar activities conducted
by the Association. Members of the secretariat shall first be members of the Association.
Section 5. The outgoing Chairman/president shall be an ex-officio member of every incoming Board
of Directors unless reelected to said body. In such ex-officio capacity, the outgoing Chairman and President
shall be added to the number of Directors duly elected under the associations constitution and by-laws. He/she
shall be entitled to all the rights and privileges and the subject to the same duties and responsibilities as a
regular member thereof provided however that if he/she opts not to become an ex-officio member for reason of
health, career and other personal reason, he/she may be released an as ex-officio member of the Board but may
be retained as an Honorary member of the Association.
Section 6. No compensation shall be paid to any member of the Board, Officer or Secretariat except
reimbursement of expenses in the performance of duties to the Association or allowance/honoraria pertaining
to services rendered directly during the conduct of conferences or similar activities dependent upon the
financial capability of the Association.

ARTICLE IV
ELECTIONS AND TURN OVER OF RESPONSIBILITIES
Section 1. Period of Election. The members of the Board of Directors shall be elected every two years
during the General Assembly meeting.
Section 2. Committees for Election. There shall be nominating committee whose main task is to
accept and attest to the list of nominees for Board of Directors. Its membership shall be composed of at least
five members recommended by the President and approved by the Governing Board. Its membership may be
composed of Board members who are not interested to run for the position in the current election to be held.
There shall be Committee on Election comprising of five members with a chair and secretary elected by the
members of the committee. The committee shall be created under the pertinent provisions of this article and in
its absence through the recommendation by the President duly approved by a simple majority of the Board of
Directors prior to the election date. The COMELECs main task is manage the election and proclaim the
election Board of Directors to the General Assembly.
Section 3. Nominations. Nominations shall be made through the Nominating Committee prior to or
during the election by a member in good standing (whether individual, chapter or institutional) of the
Association. A form to be filled up by said member and duly agreed upon by the member being nominated
shall be secured and submitted to the nominating committee. Outgoing Board members are automatically
nominated by filling out the form for nomination without need of a nominator provided however, that said
Board member is still interested to be considered during the elections.
Section 4. Regional Representation of Nominees. Taking into consideration the procedures laid down
in section 2 above, those nominated should be members of good standing only. Their nomination shall indicate
the region, which the nominee will represent. A nominee shall be duly listed by the Nominating Committee
under the region of his choice or when he belongs. The Nominee shall be present during the elections. No
proxy shall be allowed for the nominee.
Section 5. Conduct Elections. The following shall be govern the conduct elections:

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Acceptance and Announcement of Nominees. At the first hour of the date of the General
Assembly Meeting nominees shall accepted and qualified by the Nominating
Committee. A list shall be officially prepared with attestation by the thereof and
submitted to the chair of the Committee on Elections. The said Committee shall post the
list of attested nominees in conspicuous places at the venue of elections and present the
candidates by region to the General Assembly prior to the casting of ballots. No protest
as to the nominee shall be entertained after the 1st has been attested and submitted to the
COMELEC. There shall be as many nominees there are who are qualified per region.
Only one candidate shall be written per region in the ballot by the voter. All bonafide voters
shall be entitled to cast their votes for once candidate per region.
Casting of Votes. Election shall be held through the casting of ballots by the members. Only
members in good standing shall be allowed to cast their ballots. Each individual member
whether regular, associate or lifetime shall be entitled to one vote. Each or institutional
member shall be entitled to one vote which shall be cast by its President or Head
respectively, or by its duty authorized representative who must be listed as a member in
good standing. Proxy in voting shall be allowed provided a letter authorizing the proxy
shall be submitted to the COMELEC who shall rule on the acceptance of the proxy.
Votes shall be cast and appreciated in the following manner.
3.1 If a ballot contains two or more candidates listed under one region, the first listed
candidates shall be credited the vote for the region.
3.2 If a candidates name is erroneously written under the wrong region, the names of
candidates correctly written under the correct region shall remain valid. Only the
erroneously written shall be valid.
3.3 The nickname, surname of full name of the candidate may be considered as a vote
cast for said candidate provided that any of these names are found in the nominating
form.
3.4 In case of doubt as to appreciation of votes, a simple majority of the COMELEC
members shall pass judgment on its appreciation.

Section 6. Proclamation of New Board Directors. After the last ballot has been conducted and duly
appreciated and the tally accomplished, the COMELEC shall proclaim the new list of Board members of the
Association, which shall consist of the candidate obtaining the highest vote per region. The ex-officio
members of the Board shall likewise be proclaimed through an official list prepared and signed by all members
of the COMELEC.
Section 7. Election of Officers of the Board and of the Association. On the same date after
proclamation of the new board, the outgoing President as ex-officio members of the Board or in his/her
absence, the new Board member getting the highest number of votes shall convene the Board. Said Board shall
its chair, vice-chair and secretary of the Board. It shall also elect the new Officers of the Association as
provided for under the pertinent Article of the Constitution of the Association. Any member of the Board
including the ex-officio members shall be entitled to be elected to any position in the Board or to pay of the
position as Officer of the Association if they so agree.
Section 8. After the election of the Officers of the Board and officer of the Association, they shall be
qualified to office by oath administered by any of the outgoing presidents sitting as ex-officio member of the
Board.
Section 9. The new Officers of the Board and of the Association shall hold a joint business to tackle
issues over to the new Officers by the outgoing officers and other immediate concerns of the Association.
Section 10. Assumption to Official Duties. The new Board, its officers and officers of the Association
shall officially assume office on the first day of January of the following year after the elections.

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Section 11. After the elections and until December 31 of the current year or until the new Board, its
officers and officers of the Association shall assume office, the outgoing officers of the Board and the
Association shall conduct activities that will result in the smooth transition of duties and accountabilities
including the winding up of activities that need to be finished on or before aforesaid date, preparation of
reports and organizing of assets and liabilities for the attention and action of the new Board and officers when
they assume office. A smooth turn over shall be conducted when the new Board and Officers assume their
functions.

ARTICLE V
MEMBERSHIP FEES AND DUES
Section 1. Membership Fees. The following membership fees shall be charged to the members of the
Association:
Institutional member:
Chapter members:
a. Institutional:
b. City/Municipal:
c. Provincial:
d. Regional:
Individual members:
a. Regular:
b. Associate:
c. Sustaining:
d. Lifetime:

P 1,500
P 250
P 350
P 450
P 550
P 200
P 150
P 1,000
P 1,500

The Board of Directors shall be authorized to increase the membership under each category but no to
exceed twenty percent of the recent fee. Said increases should be scheduled only once every two years and
shall be duty disseminated to the entire membership not later than one month after its approval. The increase
shall be deliberated and approved by a simple majority during a special meeting held for the purpose called
for by the chairman of the Board of Directors and attended by a majority of the Board Members, chapter
presidents and representatives of each category of the members chosen from at least ten percent of the
population of said category provided that a notice shall have been sent to these members not later than one
month before the said meeting and provided further that the quorum shall be based on the actual attendance in
the meeting and that incase of non attendance of those who were sent the notice, the meeting shall be included
as an item of the agenda during the annual meeting of the General Assembly.
Section 2. Change of Membership. Membership fees are changed only unless the kind of
membership is changed by the member in which case, said member shall be charged the membership fee for
the kind of membership applied for.
Section 3. Membership Dues. Annual membership dues shall be charged by the Association
according to categories of membership as follows:
1. Institutional Member:
2. Chapter Members:
2.1 Institutional:
2.2 City/Municipal:
2.3 Provincial:
2.4 Regional:

P 500
P 100
P 150
P 200
P 250

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3. Individual
members:
3.1 Regular:
3.2 Associate:
3.3 Sustaining:

P 100
P 50
P 500

Section 4. Sharing Membership Fees Dues with Chapters. Chapter individual members shall pay
only once the membership fee and every year thereafter the annual dues provided for under this Article
directly to the chapter. After payment, the membership fee or dues paid to the chapter by the members shall be
governed by the following sharing system with the Association:
4.1 30% of the total membership fees paid for the Regional Chapter share
4.2 25% of the total membership fees paid for the Provincial Chapter share
4.3 20% of the total membership fees paid for the City/Municipality Chapter share
4.4 15% of the total membership fees paid for the Institutional chapter share
Section 5. Special assessments may be levied at any time by a two-thirds vote of the Board of
Directors or by a simple majority vote of the general membership at any regular or special meeting of the
General Assembly.
Section 6. Failure to Pay Membership Fee or Annual Dues. The Association shall maintain the
principle once a member, always a member in matters affecting membership status for failure of payment of
membership fees annual dues subject to the provisions of this section. Any members whether institutional,
chapter or individual who fails to pay the membership fee even if other requirements shall have been
complied with shall not until such membership fee shall have been paid, be issue the Associations
identification card/certificate of membership and shall not be listed in the Roster of membership during the
calendar year of application as such nor shall there be entitlement to any of the privileged provided to
members under the Articles of Incorporation or By-laws of the Association.
Failure to pay the annual dues shall earn for the member the category of being a member in bad
standing. Said category shall only be erased if the said member pays fully its areas annual dues. The said
member can also opt to re-apply as a new member instead of paying its areas. In this latter case, said members
shall be charged the current rate for membership fee and annual dues and shall be treated as a new member of
the Association with loss of seniority based on the number of years of membership of the Association.

ARTICLE VI
FUNCTIONS & POWERS OF OFFICERS
Section 1. President the president shall be the Chief Executive Officer of the association.
He shall preside in all meetings of the members of the association ad the board of trustees.
Section 2. Vice-President The Vice-President, if qualified, shall exercise all powers and perform
all duties of the president during the absence or incapacity of the latter and shall perform duties that maybe
assigned by the Board of Trustees.
Section 3. Secretary - The Secretary shall give all notices required by these by-laws and keep the minutes of
all the meetings of all the members and of the Board of Trustees in a book kept for the purpose. He shall keep
the seal of the association and affix such seal to any paper or instrument requiring the same. He shall have
custody of the members register and the correspondence files of the association. He shall also perform all such
other duties and work as the Board of Trustees may from time to time assign to him.
Section 4. Treasurer The Treasurer shall have charge of the funds, receipts and disbursements of the
association. He shall keep all moneys and other valuables of the association in such banks as the Board of the
Trustees
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may designate.
He shall keep and have charge of the books of a accounts. He shall also perform such other
duties and functions as may be assigned to him from time to time by the Board of Trustees. He shall post a bond
in such amount as ay be fixed by the Board of Trustees.

ARTICLE VII
RESIGNATION, TERMINATION AND EXPULSION
Section 1. Resignation from membership shall be made in writing to the president of the Association.
Upon approval by the Committee on Membership and chapter organizing to whom the resignation shall be
referred by the President, the resigning members shall be dropped from the Roll of membership and the date of
such dropping noted in the Book of Membership. Henceforth all privileges and duties of membership shall
cease.
Section 2. A member may be dropped from the Roll of Membership for other valid reasons apart from
resignation such as failure to remit membership dues for three consecutive years following the payment of membership fee. The Committee on Membership and chapter organizing shall take action on this matter provided
however that a member may be reinstated by applying in accordance with policies on membership or if the reason is due to failure to pay annual dues, by remitting payments of arrears thereof.
Section 3. Any member of the Board or officer or secretariat or committee who fails to assume his/her
post within one month from the date of election in case of elected officers and board and one quarter from date
of appointments shall be automatically dropped from the president duly approved by the Chairman of the Board
provided that the affected officer or board or secretariat may justify in writing why he/she should not be
dropped. Failure to fulfill duties of the position such as attendance to meetings, participation in activities for
which the position is required and failure to accomplish any task assigned in accordance with duties of the
position shall be the main valid ground for removal from office provided that s simple majority of the Board
shall vote in favor thereof.

ARTICLE VIII
FUNDS AND DISBURSEMENT
Section 1. Funds of the Association shall be deposited in reputable banks as may be decided upon by
the greater majority of the Board provided that a portion of the fund be deposited in a reputable bank accessible
and located in the place where the Main Office of the Association is located to be decided by a simple majority
of the Board.
Section 2. Signatories to the bank/s shall be the Treasurer and the President. Withdrawal shall be
signed by both in any transaction made by the Association provided that a certain amount of petty cash shall be
allowed to be provided for disbursement, replacements and liquidation by the President of the Association.

ARTICLE IX
QUORUM
Section 1. A simple majority of the Board, or of the officers or the Committee members, council
members or similar bodies shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business within the said bodies
provided that alternative modes of securing approval by the absent members or of the entire body may be
allowed on issues, transactions or other concerns that will necessitate decisions of these bodies.
Section 2. One-third of the chapter and regular members in good standing present during the General
Assembly shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business during this and other special meetings.

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ARTICLE X
VOTES AND VOTING

Section 1. unless otherwise provided, all decisions of the Association at general meeting and
meetings of the Board, Officers, committees, councils and the like shall be carried by a simple majority vote.
Section 2. The manner of voting at General meetings and in the Board and other bodies shall be
decided by each body except in voting of the Board in which case the only voting allowed shall be through
secret balloting under the supervision of COMELEC as provided for under these by-laws.

ARTICLE XI
PARLIAMENTARY AUTHORITY
Section 1. Except as are, or may be, provided in the Constitution and By-Laws of this Association,
all its meetings shall be conducted according to acceptable parliamentary rules.

ARTICLE XII
TRANSITORY PROVISIONS
Section 1. The Board of Directors elected during the organizational meeting of the Association on
November 24, 1989 at the Technological University of the Philippines, Ayala Boulevard, Manila shall hold
office until such time as the regular members thereof shall been duly elected and qualified.
Section 2. Election for the chapter regular members of the Board of Director shall be held during the
Annual General Conference of the Association in November 1992, at such time and place as the Interim Board
of Directors shall designated by resolution.
Section 3. This Constitution and By-Laws shall take effect upon ratification by a majority of the
Incorporators and upon approval of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Section 4. Upon approval of the proposed amendments of the Constitution and By-Laws conducted
on October 24, 2001 at the Annual Convention and General Assembly of the Association held in Mindanao
University of Science and Technology, Cagayan de Oro City, the proposed amendments as deliberated,
modified and approved by the General Assembly shall take effect immediately upon by the required voted as
provided for under Article XI on Amendments.
ARTICLE XIII
CORPORATE SEAL
Section 1. Form The corporate seal of the association shall be in such form and design as aye
determined by the Board.

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ARTICLE XIIII
AMENDMENTS

Section 1. These by-laws may be amended at any regular or special meeting of the Association by
two-third of votes of the chapter and regular members in good standing personally present or represented by
their proxies during the meeting, provided that notice of the proposed amendments has been given at the
meeting previous to the one at which said amendment are to be voted upon or as per written notice. Written
notice is satisfied when an invitation is sent to the member to attend the General Assembly meeting/Annual
Convention which include as an activity the General Assembly Meeting as indicated in the program of
activities and when one of the items in the said General Assembly is the ratification of proposed amendments
to these Constitution and By-Laws.
Adopted this ____day of ____________ in
by the affirmative vote of the undersigned
members representing a majority of the members of the association in a special meeting duly held for the
purpose.

(Note:
incorporators;

1.If filed with articles of Incorporation, these by-laws should be signed by all

2. if filed after incorporation, should be signed by majority of the members and


should submit
Board of Trustees certificate for the adoption of the by-laws)

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FISCAL REPORT 2013


SUBMITTED TO SECURITY
AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

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107

108

109

110

111

112

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PAEPI EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

PROF. VALENTINO J. ANGELES


President, PAEPI
Director, University Extension Services
Technological Univ. of The Phils.
Regional Representative: NCR

DR. HERMOGENES PAGUIA


Vice President, Luzon
Assoc. Dir., Extension Services
Bataan Peninsula State Univ.
Regional Representative: Region III.

PROF. ROSEMARIE A. TABARDILLO

PAEPI Secretary
Dir., Community and Extension
Services Department
Partido State University
Regional Representative: Region V

DR. VICTORIA SUMANPAN


Vice President, Mindanao
Director, Extension Services Unit
Mindanao Univ. of Science and Technology

Regional Representative: Region X

PROF. LORENZO B. ISLA


PAEPI Treasurer
Dir., Community and Extension
Services Department
Colegio De San Juan Letran Calamba
Regional Representative: Region IV

DR. MA. MARILYN L. OLAVIDES


Vice President, Visayas
Director, Extension Services
Palompon Institute of Technology
Regional Representative: Region VIII.

DR. ROMEO CARASI


PAEPI Auditor
Section Chief
Don Mariano Marcos
Memorial State University
Regional Representative: Region I

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PAEPI BOARD OF DIRECTORS


2013 - 2014

PROF. ROBERTO L. SALADAR


Chairman Board of Directors
Campus Administrator
Aklan State UniversityIbajay Campus
Regional Representative: Region VI

DR. SUSANITA LUMBO


Vice Chair, Board of Directors
Director, Research, Development and
Extension
Chair, Gender and Development
Occidental Mindoro State College
Regional Representative: Region IV

DR. NICHOL R. ELMAN,


Ex-Officio Board of Director
Project Leader
SU Affiliated Renewable Energy Center
(SU-AREC)
SU Adjunct Professor
Regional Representative: Region VII

PROF. GLORIA B. CUICO


Board Secretary
Director, Community Extension
Cebu Doctors College
Regional Representative: Region VII

PROF. ALICE DIEL


Ex-Officio Board of Director
Former Director, Community Extension
Capitol University
(Retired)

115

AKLAN STATE UNIVERSITY


Academic Pillar of Excellence for Sustainable Development
Banga, Aklan 5601 Philippines
www.asu.edu.ph

Telefax No.: (+63)(036) 267 5801


eMail Add.:

National University for Agriculture


Center of Development in Agriculture Education for Region VI

DR. DANILO E. ABAYON

Provincial Institute for Fisheries

SUC President II
Third University President

Campus

Contact No.

Ibajay Campus, Ibajay, Aklan 5613


College of Hospitality and Rural Resources Management 289-2611

Main Campus, Banga, Aklan 5601


College of Agriculture, Forestry &
Environmental Sciences
College of Teacher Education
School of Arts & Sciences
School of Management Science
School of Veterinary Medicine

Kalibo Campus, Kalibo, Aklan 5600


267-7013
267-6813
267-6566
267-7130
267-6546

College of Industrial Technology

268-3042

Makato Campus, Makato, Aklan 5611


Teacher Education Center

276-6304

New Washington Campus, New Washingon, Aklan


5610
College of Fisheries and Marine Sciences

264-3569

CURRICULAR OFFERINGS

VERTICALIZED GRADUATE PROGRAMS


Master in Rural Development
Master in Public Administration
(Master of Arts in Education
Major in: Educational Management
DEGREE PROGRAMS
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (BSA)*
Major in:Animal Science
Crop Science

NON-DEGREE COURSES
Certificate in Teaching (CT)
Associate in Hotel and Restaurant Management
(AHRM)
Associate in Computer Science (ACS)

Legend:
*- Passed, Preliminary Survey by AACUP
** - Level 1, Accredited by AACUP, 2011
***- Level 2, Accredited by AACUP
***- Level 3, Accredited by AACUP
**** - Level 4, accredited by AACUP

Bachelor of Secondary Education (BSED)**


Major in: Filipino
English
Mathematics
Bachelor of Elementary Education (BEED)**
Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management (BSHRM)*
Bachelor of Science in Tourism (BST)*
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (BSCS)*
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science (BSES)*

116