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DE LA SALLE SANTIAGO ZOBEL SCHOOL

HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT


SOCIAL STUDIES UNIT
FIRST TERM, AY 2015-2016
UNIT ASSESSMENT MATRIX (WITH TABLE OF SPECIFICATIONS)
SUBJECT:

Contemporary Issues

LEVEL:

Grade 10

TEACHERS:

Ms. May Lubuguin and Ms. Nina Gavan

ASSESSMENTS:

Short Assessment 1 (KP)

LEARNING MODULE:

Contemporary Issues as a Tool to the Understanding of Economics as a Field of Study

CONTENT STANDARD:

Students identify and analyze the forms, causes and effects of local and international economic issues which hinder national and global
development.

PERFORMANCE STANDARD:

Students suggest programs that can aid in effective allocation of available resources for sustainable development

UNIT CONTENT:

Contemporary Issues as a Tool to the Understanding of Economics as a Field of Study

WHAT WILL I ASSESS?


KNOWLEDGE
- 15%
LEARNING COMPETENCY
Define and identify
contemporary issues
influencing the immediate
society

HOW WILL I ASSESS?


TEST ITEMS
(Please indicate the type of assessment: S-Short Assessment, L-Long Assessment,
etc.)
I. KNOWLEDGE: Identify the contemporary issue described in each sentence.
Write the capital letter that corresponds to your answer on the space provided.
A. POVERTY

B. UNEMPLOYMENT

C. CORRUPTION

D. CHILD LABOR

E. POOR INFRASTRUCTURE F. HIGH INFLATION

_____ 1. The increase in a currency supply relative to the number of people using it
_____ 2. The abuse of bestowed power or position to acquire a personal benefit
_____ 3. A situation where a person is currently without an occupation and/or actively
seeking work

HOW WILL I SCORE?

TYPE

ITEM
NOS.

SCORING
(1 POINT PER ITEM)

1-5

10 points
Comment [LMTC1]: revised

_____ 4. The practice of having children in any work that deprives them of their
childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school and that is
mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful

PROCESS
- 25%
LEARNING COMPETENCY

Explain how these


contemporary issues are
influencing the immediate
society

_____ 5. Characterized as a state of one who has insufficient amount of material


possession or money to meet their basic needs.
TOTAL NO. OF ITEMS/TOTAL SCORE:
TEST ITEMS
(Please indicate the type of assessment: S-Short Assessment, L-Long Assessment,
TYPE
ET-End-Term Assessment, etc.)
II. PROCESS: Based on the editorial cartoons below, explain how each cartoon
S
reflects the economic issues we are facing today. Write your explanation on
the space provided for each cartoon.

http://dipolognon.com/Southpoi
ntEditorialCartoon042108.jpg

http://opinion.inquirer.net/inquireropinion/
editorial/view/20081218-178561/Controlof-corruption?ModPagespeed=off

http://manilastandardtoday.com/201
3/06/14/unemployment/

Explanation:
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________

Explanation:
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________
____________________

Explanation:
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
TOTAL NO. OF ITEMS/TOTAL SCORE:

UNDERSTANDING
- 30%
ESSENTIAL QUESTION,
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING
& FACETS OF UNDERSTANDING

5
ITEM
NOS.

HOLISTIC RUBRIC SCORING GUIDE


(3 POINTS PER ITEM)

6 - 14

3 Answer is correct and clear.


Two examples are given as
supporting details.
2 Answer is correct. An example
is given as a supporting detail.
1 Answer is correct but no
supporting details are given.
0 No answer is given.

Comment [LMTC2]: cite sources accordingly

TEST ITEMS
(Please indicate the type of assessment: S-Short Assessment, L-Long Assessment,
ET-End-Term Assessment, etc.)

TYPE

ITEM
NOS.

III. UNDERSTANDING: Read the editorial below and write a brief yet thorough

15-20

HOLISTIC RUBRIC SCORING GUIDE


(6 POINTS PER ITEM)
Comment [LMTC4]: revised rubric (see TQ)

Evaluate the effects of


these emerging issues to
the economy

commentary on how the issue discussed affects our current economy. Refer to
the rubric for grading.
Economic Optimism
Multilateral lender World Bank has nothing but praise for the Philippines, observing that it is
moving toward more inclusive, sustainable growth that can further slash poverty, and
forecasting its leadership in the region in terms of economic growth in 2015 and 2016.
Despite bureaucratic inefficiencies (the government has been spending much less than it has
programmed, depriving the public of essential services), the positive prognosis has been traced
to the fact that other economies around the world are facing stronger head winds. Besides, the
Philippines can always rely on its own growth driversthe more than 10 million Filipinos
working overseas who send home nearly $2 billion a month, the burgeoning BPO (business
process outsourcing) sector that earns billions of dollars as well, and a regime of low interest
rates and inflation that is conducive to business expansion. Externally, something going for the
Philippines is the depressed prices of crude oil (it imports nearly all of its petroleum
requirements). For 2016, a particular growth driver is the increase in consumer spending due to
the national elections scheduled in May.
Rogier van den Brink, World Bank lead economist in the Philippines, told members of the media
last week on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Senior Finance Officials
meeting in Bataan that the country has achieved macroeconomic stability, high growth rates,
and more recently is starting to show the kind of growth which is more inclusive. In a report
released Friday in Washington, the World Bank also kept its growth projections for the
Philippines at 6.5 percent in 2015 and 2016 and 6.3 percent in 2017.
Van den Brink was not worried by the governments underspending in the first quarter, which
had largely been blamed for the slower-than-expected 5.2-percent GDP growth. He said the
Aquino administration was already working to ramp up public spending, such that the rest of the
year should show improved expenditures.
The big story, according to the economist, is that the Philippines has established a clear
trajectory toward growth that is more inclusive, which can be sustained if economic reforms
continue. He said that about 20 or 30 years ago, reports on the Philippines were all about
boom-and-bust cycles related to macroeconomic instability. Real growth was low, inflation rates
were high, the current account balance was negative, budget deficits were high, and national
government debt was soaring. But in recent years, he observed, such issues were no longer
major concerns because real growth was ranging from 5 to 7 percent, prices had stabilized, the
current account was registering surpluses, and Philippine finances were stronger than ever.
The World Banks prognosis for much of the rest of the world is different. In its latest Global
Economic Prospects report released last week in Washington, it warned that developing
countries are facing a series of tough challenges in 2015, including the looming prospect of

higher borrowing costs as they adapt to a new era of low prices for oil and other key
commodities, resulting in a fourth consecutive year of disappointing economic growth.
Developing countries are now projected to grow by 4.4 percent this year, with a likely rise to 5.2
percent in 2016 and 5.4 percent in 2017.
Developing countries were an engine of global growth following the financial crisis, but now
they face a more difficult economic environment, lamented World Bank Group president Jim
Yong Kim. The US Federal Reserves forthcoming first interest rate hike since the global
financial crisis can ignite market volatility and reduce capital flows to emerging markets. Lower
prices for oil and other strategic commodities have intensified the slowdown in developing
countries, many of which depend heavily on commodity exports.
The Philippines is indeed in a sweet spot. But moving forward, it will do the government well to
heed the advice of the World Bank president: We believe that countries that invest in peoples
education and health, improve the business environment, and create jobs through upgrades in
infrastructure will emerge much stronger in the years ahead. These kinds of investments will
help hundreds of millions of people lift themselves out of poverty.
Source: _____. (2015, June 16). Economic Optimism. Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved from
http://opinion.inquirer.net/85889/economic-optimism#ixzz3eNsv53zK
TOTAL NO. OF ITEMS/TOTAL SCORE:

Checked by:
Leah Marie Tumlos-Castillo
HS Social Studies Coordinator
June 30, 2015

Comment [LMTC3]: please cite accordingly,


corrected already