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CROYDON GENERAL HOSPITAL SITE

PLANNING AND DESIGN BRIEF

LONDON BOROUGH OF CROYDON

Croydon General Hospital Site

Planning and Design Brief


CONTENTS

PART 1 : OBJECTIVES .........................................................................................................1


PART 2 : SITE INFORMATION .............................................................................................3
Ownership ......................................................................................................................3
Site Location ...................................................................................................................3
Description of Site ..........................................................................................................3
Site history ......................................................................................................................8
Transport........................................................................................................................8
Formal designations.........................................................................................................8
Existing consents and current proposals for the site and surrounding area ......................10
PART 3 - SITE CONSTRAINTS ..............................................................................................11
Existing buildings on the site............................................................................................11
Existing features to be protected from development.......................................................11
Previous use and possible contamination.........................................................................14
Vehicle access to the site.................................................................................................15
Access to utility services..................................................................................................15
PART 4 - POLICY CONTEXT ................................................................................................16
National Planning Policy and Guidance ............................................................................16
Unitary Development Plan Policies..................................................................................16
Planning Policies for Housing...........................................................................................17
Transport........................................................................................................................17
Recycling Facilities...........................................................................................................18
Energy efficiency and renewable energy..........................................................................18
Planning Agreements.......................................................................................................18
PART 5 : APPROPRIATE DEVELOPMENT RESPONSE .............................................................19
Sustainable Development ................................................................................................19
Uses sought ....................................................................................................................19
NHS Requirements for the site .......................................................................................19
Housing Element.............................................................................................................20
Residential density...........................................................................................................20
Size and type of housing ..................................................................................................21
Provision of affordable housing........................................................................................21

Supporting the local economy .........................................................................................21


Energy Consumption and waste minimisation .................................................................21
Public open space/sculpture park ....................................................................................22
Contribution to educational needs ..................................................................................24
Internal Road Layout .......................................................................................................24
Parking provision.............................................................................................................25
Servicing..........................................................................................................................25
Access to the site ............................................................................................................25
Pedestrian and cycle facilities...........................................................................................26
Lighting ...........................................................................................................................26
Traffic Calming................................................................................................................26
Traffic impact assessment................................................................................................27
Bus Stop Improvements ..................................................................................................27
Green Travel Plan ...........................................................................................................27
Identity of new development...........................................................................................27
Building Height and Massing ............................................................................................29
Retention of existing buildings and features .....................................................................29
Landscape .......................................................................................................................31
Trees ..............................................................................................................................32
Form and layout of parking areas.....................................................................................32
Recycling facilities and refuse storage ..............................................................................33
Safety and Security ..........................................................................................................33
Art and Craftsmanship.....................................................................................................33
Design and Sustainability Statement.................................................................................34
Site Layout and detailed design checklist
:Building Layout.........................................34
:Building Form and Detailed Design ...........34
:Access and Infrastructure..........................35
:External Spaces.........................................35
:Privacy, Security and Gardens...................36
PART 6 : URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES................................................................................37
APPENDICES
Appendix 1: Character of Surrounding Area....................................................................41
Appendix 2: Sources of Additional Information................................................................44
Appendix 3: Other Contacts ...........................................................................................45

Status of the Brief


This guidance is non statutory planning guidance which supplements the policies of the
Councils Unitary Development Plan, adopted on the 30th January 1997, which sets out the
Councils policies and proposals for the use of land in the Borough. This guidance also
supports the draft revised policies contained in the first review of the UDP.
Only the policies in the development plan can have the special status afforded by section
54A of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (as amended) in deciding planning
applications. However, the Government advises that supplementary planning guidance may
be taken into account as a material consideration, the weight accorded to it being increased
if it has been prepared in consultation with the public and has been the subject of a Council
resolution.
This document has undergone public consultation and was adopted by the Council at
Cabinet Committee on the 23rd September 2002.

Important Notice
All prospective developers must satisfy themselves by inspection or otherwise as to the
accuracy of the information contained within this brief. Any areas, measurements or
distances referred to in the brief are approximate and are provided only for general
guidance.

PART 1
OBJECTIVES
1.1

The purpose of this brief is to:

To promote the redevelopment of the site as a landmark for sustainable urban


renewal, and to fulfil the potential of the site for incorporating modern
environmental sustainability features in new development.

In the light of current Government guidance on sustainability and urban design, to


interpret and elaborate on development plan policies as they relate to the Croydon
General Hospital site. The advice in the brief incorporates modifications to some
existing UDP standards including density, parking and privacy, and supports the draft
reviewed policies of the UDP.

To promote the creative and sustainable development of the site which will bring
benefits to the vitality and viability of the area by resulting in a high quality, landmark
health /residential development which relies on its sensitivity to detail and quality of
design and construction to achieve an integrated scheme which enhances the
surrounding area, achieves distinctiveness and promotes environmental sustainability.

To use the opportunity of a high density urban development to address the


objectives of reducing energy consumption, and waste minimisation, encouraging the
use of bold and imaginative solutions.

to ensure that existing important site features are incorporated

1.2

The following principles of sustainable development as reflected in current planning


policy guidance are also reflected in the contents of the brief.
Encouraging the development of a brownfield site, thereby reducing pressure on
previously undeveloped land, particularly the open countryside
Raising the average residential density and increasing the population to support those
services
Promoting a design led solution for the redevelopment of the site, to incorporate
environmentally sustainable features and achieve a distinctive character that enhances
the area.
Improving the viability of public transport and other services in urban areas, and
increasing mobility without increasing car dependence through improving the
attractiveness of alternatives to the car.
Promoting a mixed use solution for the site
The promotion of energy conservation, renewable energy, waste minimisation and water
conservation measures
Assisting urban regeneration, and improving the quality of the urban environment

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

PART 2
SITE INFORMATION
Ownership
2.1

The Croydon Health Authority currently owns the site on behalf of the
Department of Health as retained estate.

Location of Site
2.2

Fig 1. Identifies the site and other relevant features such as local parks, schools and
shopping facilities. The site is located in Broad Green ward, close to the north
western boundary of Central Croydon and within 200m of West Croydon Station.
The central bus station lies approximately 350m to the south east of the site and
incorporates the West Croydon stop of the Tramlink route. Elmwood, St. Marys
and Kingsley Schools are located in the vicinity of the site. The site is immediately
adjacent to a variety of shops along the southern end of London Road and the
Broad Green local centre to the north. The extensive shopping offered by the
Central Croydon area lies approximately 200m to the south of the site.

2.3

The site is located within a mixed use area incorporating residential, retail and
commercial development.

Description of site
2.4

The site of the old Croydon General Hospital is currently part occupied by the
Croydon Community Health Council. The site comprises 1.325 hectares (3.27
acres). Fig. 2

2.5

The existing buildings on the site occupy an area of approximately 11,587 sq.m
(124,725 sq ft). The main three storey Victorian hospital building (built in 1876
with additions in 1926) fronts London Road and backs on to Lennard Road, with 34 storey pavilion wings with a range of subsidiary buildings. The well detailed
outpatients building fronts London Road and is a prominent local landmark. There
are a number of smaller subsidiary buildings on the site.

2.6

The buildings are not on the Statutory List of buildings of architectural or historic
interest, however, the outpatients building fronting London Road has an attractive
stone frontage.

2.7

Existing access to the site is predominantly via two entrances on London Road,
with subsidiary accesses off Lennard Road.

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

London Road Site on left, looking south

London Road Site on right, looking north

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Scale n.t.s

Site Plan

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Fig 2
5

2.8

The site is bounded by mixed commercial and residential development of varying


ages, styles and heights, ranging from large scale, four storey commercial buildings
along London Road, to smaller, but substantial houses on Lennard Road.

2.9

The edge of the site fronting London Road is bounded by a low wall with attractive
railings over, with vehicular entrances demarked by substantial brick piers. The
other boundaries around the site comprise closeboarded, and chain link fences.

2.10

A detailed character appraisal of the area surrounding the site is included as


Appendix 1

2.11

There are three significant mature trees on the site. A mature lime tree on the
London Road frontage is prominent in long views towards the site from both the
north and south. Within the site are a large plane tree and a cedar tree.

London Road Commercial buildings to south of site

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Lennard Road - east side

Lennard Road general view with site on left

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Site History
2.12

The Croydon General Hospital was established in 1867. The original building was
in Duppas Hill Lane and was known as the old infirmary. In 1873 larger premises
were needed and the mansion formerly known as Oakfield Lodge, in London
Road was acquired. After considerable alterations, the building was opened by the
Archbishop of Canterbury. The staff and patients moved there from the Old
Infirmary in Duppas Hill Lane. The 1868 map shows that the site was mainly
occupied by Oakfield Lodge and its grounds. The 1894 map shows that the
building had been enlarged and renamed General Hospital, In 1883 the Royal
Alfred wing was added and in 1894 a further new wing was opened by the
Archbishop of Canterbury. The 1911 map shows that it was later extended
southwards. By 1932 another extension was constructed on the site of the
nursery. Later maps show further extensions.

2.13

Continued expansion followed until the hospital finally closed in 1996.

Transport
2.14

The site is extremely well served by public transport. Seven bus routes pass in
front of the site along London Road, with fourteen routes terminating at West
Croydon Station to the south of the site. London Road is part of the London Bus
Priority network. The tramlink route, with connections to Wimbledon,
Beckenham and New Addington has a stop at West Croydon.

2.15

Fig. 3 showing bus routes (destinations), mainline railway station (destinations and
main links) and Tramlink route and close stops (destinations).

2.16

As part of the Croydon Cycle Network, a cycle route runs along London Road in
front of the site.

2.17

A consultation was carried out in 1998/9 regarding the introduction of traffic


management and calming measures in the area around the site. These were
introduced in the area in summer 1999 in conjunction with the Broad Green
capital challenge project. Further information on transportation issues is contained
within Croydon's Interim Local Transport Implementation Plan 2002-2003.

Formal Designations
2.18

London Road is designated as a Local Distributor Road as defined in the UDP.


There are no other site specific designations identified in the UDP. Just south of
the site from the junctions of Oakfield Road and Mead place with London Road,
southwards to the boundary with the central area, the retail frontages are
designated as shopping parades. The policy implications of these designations are
explained in Part 4 below.

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Existing consents and current proposals for the site and surrounding area
2.19

10

The Departments card index of planning applications does not record the original
permission for the hospital, the earliest permission being granted in 1874 for a lodge
in the hospital grounds. Between 1883 and 1911 seven permissions were granted for
additions, extensions, a laundry and alterations to the drainage at the hospital. In
subsequent years more alterations and additions were permitted.

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

PART 3
SITE CONSTRAINTS
Existing buildings on the site
3.1

The main hospital building is imposing, but not of great architectural significance. Its
retention would hamper the high density redevelopment of the site. The former
outpatients department however, has a well detailed stone faade which could be
successfully integrated into the redevelopment of the site, either in its present
location, with development over, or reused on another part of the site. The other
buildings on the site are of no particular architectural merit and their demolition is
expected. In the interests of environmental sustainability and cutting costs, re-use of
demolition waste from the site will be incorporated in the new development where
appropriate.

Existing features to be protected from development


3.2

The boundary of the site to London Road consists of a low wall with well detailed
railings over, with entrances marked by substantial brick and stone piers. This
boundary, including piers and railings, should be incorporated into the new
scheme in some way, preferably in its present location.

Detail
Existing boundary to London Road

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3.3

In addition to the retained stonework of the out patients building there are a number
of features which could be retained such as stone entranceways, porticoes, columns,
carved stone panels and two commemorative stones (on the front elevation of the
main building and the rear elevation of the veranda).
Detail from main building

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Plaque on front of main building

Plaque on rear of building

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3.4

The three main trees on the site i.e. The lime on the London Road frontage and the
Plane and cedar within the site, will be required to be retained and incorporated into
the redevelopment of the site. The new development should be designed to ensure
that their setting is enhanced and that they are able to be fully appreciated both from
within the development and the surrounding roads.

Cedar tree near Lennard Road Boundary

Previous use and possible contamination


3.5

Given the nature of some of the functions carried out in the original hospital, further
consideration may need to be given to their possible contaminating effect.

3.6

Developers are advised to carry out their own investigations into possible
contamination on the site. The Council will need to be satisfied that the land is free
from contaminants particularly if the land is to be used for residential development
(policy EP8).

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Vehicle access to the site


3.7

Existing access to the site is predominantly via two entrances on London Road, with
subsidiary accesses off Lennard Road.

Access to utility services


3.8

Developers will need to satisfy themselves that there is sufficient capacity in utility
networks to meet the needs of any development proposed (policy CS5). Developers
will also need to be aware of the siting of cabling, pipework and other equipment,
and will need to liaise with the relevant authorities to ensure that these facilities are
protected.

Stonework on out-patients building

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

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PART 4
POLICY CONTEXT
National Planning Policy and Guidance
4.1

Planning Policy Guidance note 3 (Housing), encourages the provision of wider


housing opportunity and choice and the creation of mixed communities. It
emphasises that priority should be given to reusing previously developed land in
urban areas. It also encourages the creation of more sustainable patterns of
development by building in ways which exploit and deliver accessibility by public
transport to jobs, education and health facilities, shopping leisure and local services,
by maximising the reuse of previously developed land.

4.2

The guidance stresses the importance of the review of planning policies and
standards to make more efficient use of land.

4.3

With regard to traffic, the guidance encourages reducing the need to travel by car,
extending sustainable transport choices, and promoting accessibility to jobs, services,
leisure facilities, shopping by public transport, walking and cycling.

4.4

The guidance ultimately encourages a more design led approach to development


focussing on the creation of high quality living environments.

4.5

The By Design report was issued by the DETR in May 2000 and highlights the
Governments commitment to achieving good design. It expands on the
Governments commitment to good design as set out in Planning Policy Guidance
Note 1(General Policy and Principles). It reinforces the call in the Urban Task Forces
Report Towards an Urban Renaissance, for earlier, greater and better informed
attention to urban Design.

4.6

All these aims are reflected in the contents of this brief

Unitary Development Plan Policies


4.7

The Development Plan for Croydon is the London Borough of Croydon Unitary
Development Plan (UDP) adopted in January 1997. The development guidelines of
this brief are generally based on policies contained within the UDP and the draft
revised policies which form part of the first review of the UDP.

4.8

Since the adoption of the UDP in January 1997, Government guidance has
encouraged a more design led approach to development, with the emphasis on
quality, local character, the needs of pedestrians and the avoidance of inflexible
planning and highway standards

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4.9

This brief complements the Councils current guidance in the form of the UDP,
revised Policies forming part of the first review of the UDP and Supplementary
Planning Guidance, to take account of the above changes.

Planning Policies for Housing


4.10

Policies SP30 to SP32 of the UDP seek to encourage new housing development to
meet the provision set out in regional guidance. To ensure that any residential
development proposed is of a high standard and provides a safe and secure
environment, and where practicable, that housing is available for people of all
incomes and for those in need of care and is accessible to people with impaired
mobility.

4.11

Policy H2 aims to ensure that the need to accommodate change does not result in
the loss of amenity and the character of residential areas. Proposals for residential
development must therefore meet the Councils policies for the design and layout
of development which set out those elements which make up the character of
residential areas.

4.12

Policy H18 and its associated Affordable Housing Supplementary Planning Guidance
No. 6, provide the planning policy framework for the provision of an element of
affordable housing on appropriate sites. The provision of affordable housing will be
required on the site.

4.13

The draft revised policies on housing which form part of the first review of the
UDP, aim to maximise housing provision in the Borough by intensifying
development on brownfield sites at accessible locations. The guidelines in this brief
support these aims.

Transport
4.14

The following UDP policies on transport are relevant to the development of the
site:

4.15

SP18, SP23, T3, T6, T23, T27, T28, T29, T31, T35, T37 and T46. In summary
these policies seek to achieve the following: To reduce the growth in the length
and number of car journeys, by directing development which generates a high
demand for movements to locations which are capable of being well served by
public transport. To outline parking standards that are appropriate to the type,
scale and location of the development given its proximity to the existing public
transport network. To improve pedestrian facilities with an emphasis on safety and
security and the attractiveness of the pedestrian environment, and to improve
cycling facilities. All these aims are strengthened in the draft policies of the
reviewed UDP.

4.16

The Council has developed a Sustainable Transport Strategy, which has the
following general objectives:
* To reduce congestion and dependency on car travel
* To reduce levels of air pollution and noise from transport
* To improve accessibility and encourage the use of environmentally friendly modes
of transport

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

* To raise awareness of the impact of transport and travel decisions


* To promote sustainable growth in terms of economic development and land use
planning

Recycling Facilities
4.17

Policy EP5 of the UDP seeks the inclusion of space within large scale development to
enable the collection and temporary storage of recyclable material arising from the
use of that development and the surrounding area. In accordance with this policy the
Council will expect the provision of integrated recycling facilities on the site.

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy


4.18

Policy EP16 encourages energy efficient layout and design, and the incorporation of
renewable energy producing equipment. This is complemented by policy E7 in the
Local Agenda 21 Strategy: to use the Councils planning process to encourage
developers in Croydon to build energy efficient homes and commercial buildings."

Planning Agreements
4.19

In order to address the impact of the new development, developers will be required
to enter into a planning agreement with the Council. As well as detailed attention to
high quality design in all aspects of the scheme, the agreement will be expected to
cover the following aspects:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)

The requirement for all homes to achieve the Building Research


Establishment's Eco Homes "Excellent" rating in accordance with para. 5.18
The provision of a car club to service the users of the site in accordance with
para. 5.37
The inclusion of an urban sculpture/play park in accordance with para.5.23
supported by contributions in accordance with BE15 Public Art.
The inclusion of public art in accordance with BE15 as an integral element of
the development. eg. Decorative metalwork and stonework.
Any highways works identified by the traffic impact assessment.

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PART 5
APPROPRIATE DEVELOPMENT RESPONSE
Sustainable Development
5.1

In accordance with the Councils Green Commitment, improved environmental


standards within the site will be required in order to revive the immediate locality of
the site and its surroundings and make it a more desirable place to live, work and
visit. Developers will be required to demonstrate the practical steps they will take to
ensure that sustainable development is addressed in all stages of the design process.
In particular, high standards of energy efficiency, (in accordance with paras 5.18 5.21) incorporation of renewable energy, reducing reliance on the private car, and
conservation of water resources are sought. A sustainability appraisal of the proposal
will therefore be required.

Uses Sought
5.2

An integrated health/housing scheme for the site will be required, which focuses on
principles of sustainable development. The housing element of the scheme should be
provided at a high density to take account of the sites highly accessible location.

NHS requirements for the site


5.3

It is proposed that part of the site is retained for Health Authority use. The
remainder of the site will be available for residential use.

5.4

The South London and Maudsley NHS Trust and the Croydon and Surrey Downs
Community Health Trust require new purpose built accommodation on part of the
site to house relocated community rehabilitation and adult community mental health
services. The following are the trusts space requirements.

5.5

The South London and Maudsley NHS Trust has a requirement to relocate a
comprehensive mental health service for people with mental health problems living
in north Croydon. They require a service that is easily accessible and a quality
environment that is easily adaptable to accommodate future service developments.

5.6

The Croydon and Surrey Downs Community Health Trust require the reprovision of
community rehabilitation services, with the aim to provide high quality specialist
rehabilitation services in the form of a one stop service, where users can access a
comprehensive range of health care in one place. A user-friendly environment is
required which focuses on encouraging independence in a non-institutionalised
environment.

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5.7

It is proposed that the facilities be provided as a Health Village accommodating the


following detailed requirements:
Elderly Resource Centre: floor area: 660m2 (0.067 ha) garden, Special requirements:
14 parking spaces, 2 mini buses and ambulance parking to front.: High number of
trips generated, need for flexibility and possibility for expansion.
Rehabilitation Services: floor area: 1281m2 including circulation and communication
space, approx. 25 parking spaces
Adult Community Mental Health Services: floor area:1403m2, approx. 35 p a r k i n g
spaces
Healthy Croydon Centre: The Croydon Health Authority have earmarked part of
the site for this use. The Croydon Community Health Council and Croydon
Voluntary Action have a joint proposal to develop a healthy living centre on part of
the site.

5.8

Generally, the Health Authority requires purpose built facilities, within a high quality
environment. Accommodation must be user friendly and should be designed to allow
future flexibility to expand or contract.

5.9

It is proposed that the Health Authority uses on the site are located at predominantly
ground floor level with residential accommodation on the upper levels.

Housing Element
5.10

It is proposed that the remainder of the site is devoted to the provision of high
density residential development. The housing element of the scheme should be
integrated with the health uses to create a comprehensive and sustainable
environment for residents, employees, visitors and neighbours.

Residential Density
5.11

Policy H10 makes reference to the Council permitting proposals for residential
development at densities higher than those specified in H8 subject to the quality of
their design and detailing.

5.12

This location close to central Croydon and in an area well served by public transport
is ideally suited to the application of higher residential densities, which will contribute
to the long-term sustainability of the development.

5.13

Increased density will also increase the opportunity to:


* provide a range of housing types, including a significant element of affordable
housing.
* improve the development in terms of design for energy use.
* design a development that enhances the character and vitality of the town centre.

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

* provide for a more pedestrian-friendly environment by reducing the space given


over to roads and car parking.
5.14

The density of residential development on the site should be at a minimum of 450


hrh. However, this figure is subject to the overriding requirement that new housing
at such densities should be considered as an opportunity to enhance the quality of
the site and its surroundings through skilful design and attention to detail.

Size and type of Housing


5.15

The housing element of the development should be provided as a mix of housing


type and tenure. The provision of one and two bed key worker housing will be
particularly supported.

Provision of affordable housing


5.16

A proportion of the total housing provision between 40% and 50%, should be
affordable housing. This should be provided as a mix of shared ownership for key
workers and housing provided as social rented housing. The affordable housing
provision should be defined as an affordable housing scheme consisting of a design
brief identifying the affordable units in the overall scheme, and a management
schedule defining how the units will be allocated and managed.

Supporting the Local Economy


5.17

Developers will be required where possible to employ local subcontractors of the


north west Croydon area, to progress those aspects of the development that are
contracted out. Priority should also be given to taking on labour from households
within the north west Croydon area.

Energy and water conservation, renewable energy and waste minimisation


5.18

It is important that all the environmental options are considered at the design phase.
Best practice examples need to be researched and fully incorporated into the design
proposals. All residential units on the site will be expected to achieve the Building
Research Establishment's "Eco Homes - Excellent" rating (www.bre.co.uk).

5.19

Expected features also include the following:


*Insulation above building regulation requirements
*Layout to maximise passive solar gain in winter, with control to limit this in
summer
*Triple glazing
*Use of natural ventilation
*Solar water heaters on roofs
*Photovoltaic cladding (with a possible bid for a grant from the Governments new
solar power initiative providing up to 80% of the capital cost)
*Use of combined heat and power
*District heating or gas condensing boilers

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*Reduction of embodied energy through re-use of demolition waste on site if


possible
*Use of local and sustainable materials
*Use of any on site boreholes for toilet flushing or grounds maintenance regimes for
watering
*Sustainable drainage systems
*Rain water recycling
*Grey water recycling, water metering
*Water efficient appliances, including mixer taps, aerated taps, low flush toilets
*Provision of recycling bins, including community composting.
5.20

Guidelines from the Building Research Establishment and other research bodies,
suggests that measures should form part of a package, which will achieve targets
beyond Government guidelines. The BedZED development in Sutton, demonstrates
many of the features proposed.

5.21

Up to 65% grant funding is available via the department of Trade and Industry's
Photovoltaic (PV) Demonstration Programme (www.solargrants.org.uk)

Public Open Space / Sculpture Park


5.22

The site is located within an area of local parks deficiency. In such areas, policy RO15
requires an element of Local Open Land in large housing schemes. The Broad Green
area has only 10ha of designated open land. The nearest parks to the hospital site are
Wandle Park and Wilford Road Recreation Ground, both being 1km away.

5.23

Given the existing mature trees within the site as shown on the Urban Design
Guidelines plan, and referred to in para.5.66, there is an opportunity to create an
area of publically accessible open space within the new development, linking London
and Lennard roads in accordance with the Urban Design Guidelines Plan in Part 6.
The open space should, where possible, be bordered with uses that encourage
natural surveillance and active use. Careful attention to high quality design and
detailing of the open space will be required. Building on the drama of the existing
mature cedar tree, it is intended that the open space is developed as an urban
sculpture/play park with the installation of quality sculptural/art pieces creating an
informal urban park.

5.24

The urban sculpture park should be geared towards quiet informal recreation with
some pieces being focussed towards the needs of children. The incorporation of the
following elements should be considered:
Sculpture
Mosaic
Water
New planting
Coordinated street furniture: seating, bollards, cycle stands and tree guards
Resin bonded gravel surfaces

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

5.25

Options for future ownership and maintenance of the park could either involve the
Council adopting responsibility following an adequate commuted payment or
ownership and maintenance resting with the developer.

Public Art

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

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Contribution to educational needs


5.26

Depending on the final mix of housing type provided, a contribution may be required
to support local educational facilities.

Internal Road Layout


5.27

The design of the roads, footpaths and parking areas should conform to the general
principles set out in Residential Roads and Footpaths - Layout Considerations Design Bulletin 32 as well as its recent supplement, Places Streets and Movement.

5.28

The internal road and footpath layout should be designed along Home Zone
principles in accordance with the DTLR Traffic Advisory leaflet 10/01 "Home ZonesPlanning and Design.

5.29

In accordance with Policy BE10 of the UDP, the main focus of the design of the
development should be an emphasis on a sense of place and community, with
movement networks to enhance those qualities. The detailed design of roads,
footpaths and cycle routes should avoid dominance by the car.

5.30

It is the relationship of buildings to each other that should be paramount and not the
road layout. The layout of the site should be based on a network of spaces, rather
than a hierarchy of roads; a layout of development in which roads play their part but
are not dominant.

5.31

The consideration of place, community and context will require an individual


response on this site, rather than the application of a standard set of formulae. The
key factors to take into account are:
the nature of the site
how the site relates to its surroundings, including movement routes
the framework of development, including the network of spaces and movement
patterns

5.32

A balance needs to be struck between movement of vehicles and a good residential


environment. The movement of pedestrians needs to be given greater priority over
the movement of vehicles within the site.

5.33

The layout of the site should be designed to enable it to contribute to the promotion
of walking, cycling and public transport. Appropriate signage and surface materials
should be employed to encourage a pedestrian orientated environment.

5.34

All roads and footpaths should be constructed to meet the Councils standards for
adoption.

5.35

The hierarchy of roads, footpaths and cycle ways should be clearly communicated by
changes of surface, enclosures at entrances and landscape. The use of shared
surfaces should be explored throughout the development.

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Parking provision
5.36

Given the proximity of the site to central Croydon, the bus station, West Croydon
railway station and the Tramlink route residents and users of the site will not be
heavily dependent on the private car.

5.37

The Councils existing parking standards are set out in Appendix 2 of the UDP.
However the Council is keen to encourage a substantially lower standard on sites
such as this where accessibility by public transport is particularly good. In order to
achieve a high density residential development on this site, as well as create space for
attractive features such as open land, the Council will encourage a minimal provision
of parking spaces. In order to reduce parking provision to a minimum the Council
proposes the establishment of a car club on the site to serve the needs of residents
and health workers alike (see para. 4.19 Planning Agreements)

5.38

In accordance with Policy BE11, essential parking spaces should not be allowed to
dominate any parts of the development. The design of parking areas should be
considered as an integral part of the scheme, and should be designed to lessen its
visual impact, by incorporating new planting where appropriate and exploring the
use of shared surfaces (see form and layout of parking areas). Priority should be
given to the provision of carefully designed, lit and detailed basement parking with an
emphasis on safety and security.

5.39

Approximately 33% of the total car parking provision on the site will be required to
be suitable for use by disabled drivers, (See SPG no. 10 Designing for Accessibility)
with 33% visitor parking and 33% allocated to the car club.

5.40

In addition, all weather cycle parking will be required to be provided within the site,
with sensitively designed cycle routes within the site linking in with existing cycle
routes. The London Cycle network design manual" contains guidelines on the siting
and design of cycle parking.

Servicing
5.41

The developer will need to demonstrate that adequate servicing is provided for the
site, including the safe and convenient access for refuse collection and large delivery
vehicles and the provision of adequately proportioned turning heads where required.
The design of service areas should not be allowed to dominate the layout of the site.
Service areas should be carefully integrated within the layout in a creative way, for
example, the use of pedestrian streets by emergency vehicles and generally
maximising opportunities for shared surfaces.

Access to the site


5.42

Vehicular access to the site could be from both London and Lennard Roads,
however, vehicular access across the site will not be acceptable

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

25

5.43

The priority within the site should be to establish a sense of place and community,
with movement networks used to enhance those qualities. Priority should be given
to pedestrian and cycle routes across and within the site will be encouraged.

5.44

The developer will need to satisfy the Council that vehicle access points comply with
current safety and design standards for all users.

Pedestrian and cycling facilities


5.45

The Council seeks to achieve sustainable development and encourages development


in those areas well served by a choice of means of travel and sufficiently accessible
to enable reductions in the use of the car. To achieve these objectives on this site,
alternative forms of transport need to be made as attractive as possible.In order to
encourage the safe movement of pedestrians and cyclists, within and around the site,
all vehicular access to the site as well as the internal layout of roads footpaths and
parking areas should give priority to the needs of pedestrians and cyclists. Where
appropriate, pedestrian crossing facilities should be provided by the developer in the
area surrounding the site.

5.46

Pedestrian routes within the development should assist in the creation of a


pedestrian orientated environment. The layout of the scheme should allow for high
degree of permeability for both pedestrians and cyclists, providing a variety of
possible routes through and across the site.

5.47

Good street lighting combined with frequently positioned doorways and entrances
and main living room windows that overlook the street encourage more active use of
the street by pedestrians.

Lighting
5.48

External lighting associated with the new development should be approached as a


coordinated package aimed at achieving the following benefits: good personal safety
and security, reduced light pollution, a more aesthetic treatment of buildings and the
spaces between them and a reduction in overall energy consumption. The Council
will assess applications for development with reference to SPG no. 4 Lighting.

Traffic Calming
5.49

26

Traffic speeds should be managed by the arrangement of buildings and spaces within
the site. The aim should be to take account of traffic calming at the earliest stages in
the design process rather than as an afterthought. The rigid application of standard
solutions should be avoided. Any added essential traffic calming features should be
integrated with the overall design.

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Traffic impact assessment


5.50

The developer will be required to provide a traffic impact assessment for the site in
accordance with the Guidelines for Traffic Impact Assessment as set out by the
Institution of Highways and Transportation. The study should consider the
development in the context of the local transport infrastructure and safety
implications and should include a review of traffic and parking in adjoining roads. Any
impact on existing controlled on-street parking provision or related infrastructure
should be clearly identified.

5.51

Proposals for managing the drop off and pick up area for the health uses will need to
be an integral part of any scheme. Figures will need to be provided for the number of
vehicle movements anticipated within this area as well as over the site as a whole.

5.52

The Council will seek to enter into legal agreements with the developer to enable
highway works which may be identified by the traffic impact assessment.

Bus stop improvements


5.53

As part of the redevelopment of the scheme, and in order to enhance the facilities of
sustainable modes of transport, the developer may be required to provide footway
improvements combined with improvements to bus stopping arrangements on the
London Road frontage of the site.

Green Travel Plan


5.54

Developers will be required to prepare a Green Travel Plan in accordance with the
DETRs A travel plan resource pack for employers. The plan should make
provision for the charging of electric vehicles, a car club, covered bike spaces and a
bike lane link to the local cycle route. The Council intends to produce SPG on Green
Travel Plans.

Identity of new development


5.55

New development and any possible refurbishment on the site must respond to the
character and context of this location, in particular the urban nature of the site. The
surrounding and retained buildings form and the adjacent street patterns should be
reinforced within the design of the development in accordance with policies in the
Design and Layout of Development, and Urban Conservation chapters of the UDP
and the draft revised policies of the UDP. The site is large enough to establish its
own distinctive character without compromising environmental sustainability
features.

5.56

Development on this site should reflect both its proximity to the urban centre of
Croydon, as well as the residential character of some of the surrounding streets. The
relationship between the new development and the existing streets needs to be
carefully considered to ensure that the scheme makes a positive enhancement to the
locality while reinforcing its urban character.

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

27

5.57

Standard Pattern book residential layouts will not be appropriate on this site. It is
likely that the residential form will be compact, dense and urban in character,
resulting in an integration of health/housing use, creating a health village focussed
predominantly on the London Road frontage, within a residential context.

Image of internal court showing scale, balconies and terraces


5.58

The existing character of development around the site ranges from mixed residential
styles in Oakfield, Lennard and Kidderminster Roads to retail and office uses on
London Road. Given the size of the site and the varied nature of its surroundings, it
would be appropriate for the scheme to establish its own residential character
bearing in mind the scale and massing of the surrounding buildings. In responding to
the character of the location, copies of surrounding building styles will not be
acceptable. The design of development on the site will be required to establish a
new identity for the site, based on sustainable contemporary designs, which take
cues from the surrounding architectural styles. Careful attention to detailed design
will be required to establish a high quality urban character.

5.59

The London Road frontage of the development should have a strong, urban
character, with richly modelled and articulated facades, incorporating balconies or
terraces. The character of the Lennard Road frontage should also be urban in scale
reflecting the character of the large Victorian buildings opposite the site.

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

5.60

It will not be acceptable for any element of the scheme to turn its back on the street.
Ground floor units should be accessible from the street frontage and the location of
entrances must be clearly identifiable and they should be a focus of architectural
interest.

5.61

The higher densities advocated by the Council on this site means that the privacy of
residents must be addressed by design rather than distance. The developer must
consider the need to create separation between the private residential space and the
street or public spaces. Building frontages will need to be designed carefully with
special attention paid to the design and location of entrances, doorways, windows
and other openings. Dwellings at street level can use set backs, steps and railings to
reinforce the distinction between public and private space. Access through a
courtyard also gives privacy to occupants.

5.62

Within this relatively high density development the Council will require a high quality
solution which relies on its sensitivity to detail and quality of design and construction
to achieve an integrated scheme which enhances the surrounding area and reinforces
sustainable living patterns in close proximity to Croydon town centre.

Building Height and Massing


5.63

The predominant building height in the area is three to four storeys. Development
on the site could be built to a maximum of five storeys. This maximum height could
be reached on the London Road frontage, taking into account the new residential
development to the north of the site. To continue the dominant scale of the street,
the built form along London Road will be required to establish a strong building line,
close to the back of the pavement, reflecting the four storey commercial buildings to
the south of the site.

5.64

Built form on the Lennard Road frontage of the site should be to a maximum of four
storeys, depending on the heights of adjacent buildings. Building heights should be
arranged to encourage a dense urban development that respects the context of the
surrounding environment. The buildings should be massed to provide a sense of
enclosure and containment within the development. Neighbourhood context and the
relationship to the street should be the predominant influences on the scale and form
of the development.

5.65

Terracing of the built form should be seen as an opportunity to introduce roof


terraces and balconies into the built form, bringing visual interest and landscape into
the heart of the development.

Retention of Existing Buildings and features


5.66

The Outpatients building forms an attractive landmark feature on this stretch of the
London Road. Built in 1926 the main part of the building is built of brick with a well
detailed ornamental stone frontage. Any proposal for the redevelopment of the site
should investigate the incorporation of the ornamental stonework into other parts of
the scheme possibly as part of the sculpture / play park.

Croydon
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Croydon
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SiteSite
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5.67

In addition, there are a number of architectural details on the original hospital


buildings which could be incorporated into the new development, such as columns,
plaques and ornamental stone entrances.

Outpatients Department, details of stonework

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Details from main building


5.68

The boundary wall and railings to the London Road frontage of the site are
attractively detailed and of significant local value in the existing street scene. They
should be refurbished and reused, either in their existing location or in another
location within the site boundary. (see section on Arts and Craftsmanship)

Landscape
5.69

The landscape associated with the scheme should be an intrinsic part of the overall
design concept of the development and should be considered in detail at the
outset. The developer will be required to produce a comprehensive landscape
strategy for the site, giving clear details of areas of planting, species and other
landscape features (policy BE14)

5.70

The landscape element of the scheme should be considered as a means of softening


the urban environment around as well as within the site. The appropriate use of
soft landscaping, the inclusion of balconies, roof terraces and flower boxes, the use
of street planting and climbing foliage as well as alternative and interesting surfacing
all assist in providing a contrast for the built form.

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

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5.71

Any new landscape should have regard to encouraging wildlife habitats in all areas of
the scheme.

5.72

Hard surfacing materials should be chosen to reinforce the urban, pedestrian scale of
the development. They should complement the materials of the built form, while
contributing to the richness and complexity of the scheme. In considering proposals
for the site, the emphasis will be on quality and detailing.

5.73

Attention should be paid to all areas of the development, whether within the
development or fronting the boundaries of the site in order to benefit both the
development and the neighbourhood in general by allowing glimpses through
archways, railings or gateways etc.

5.74

A landscape scheme will be required at the initial planning application stage. This will
be required to include proposals for future maintenance and management.

Trees
5.75

The three trees earmarked for retention should be used to guide the form of the
development. Their setting should be preserved and enhanced, enabling them to
make a significant contribution to the character of the development.

5.76

In the case of the cedar, no development will be permitted within 2m of the furthest
extent of its canopy. The plane tree will require a 10m protection zone around it
while the lime will require an 8m protection zone.

5.77

New tree planting will enhance and protect the residential environment by mitigating
the effects of noise and fumes. Deciduous trees allow maximum light in the winter
and give protection from the sun in summer. New tree planting will be required, and
the developer should consider where they can be planted for optimum effect, for
example to provide privacy and frame views.

5.78

The opportunity should be taken on the Lennard Road frontage of the site to
introduce new tree planting to reinforce those on the opposite side of the road.

5.79

Any construction work on the site should accord with the British Standards Institute
(BS 5837) Guide for trees in relation to construction.

Form and layout of parking areas


5.80

32

The amount of surface car parking should be minimal. Where surface car parking
cannot be avoided, the layout and landscaping of the space should allow it to serve as
a dual purpose space, ie. amenity. Basement level parking is preferred as it reduces
land take and minimises visual intrusion, however, attention should be paid to the
detailed design of the entrances and internal spaces to ensure that they are attractive
and that safety and security are not compromised. Car parking at ground level within
a building should not be located along the street frontage where it will have an
adverse impact on the street, in creating a dead frontage to the building. Access to

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

car parking could be made a feature with the use of archways. Such treatment will
ensure the continuity of the frontage, maximise land use and reduces the intrusion of
the car in the street scene.
Recycling facilities and refuse storage
5.81

Provision should be made in the detailed design of the scheme for the storage of
refuse in appropriate locations and the provision of integrated on site recycling bins,
including compost bins. Where possible, refuse and Recycling facilities should be
incorporated into the detailed design of all buildings. Where this is not achievable,
facilities should be screened, located close to the roadway, and accessed via a
dropped kerb.

Safety and Security


5.82

Residential development in close proximity to the town centre can assist in creating a
town that is safer to use. Development on this site should avoid presenting a
fortress mentality with reliance on high walls and fencing. Generally, the scheme
design should encourage the use of the public environment by encouraging
pedestrian access and movement and reducing dead frontages. In order to create a
safe and secure environment within and around the site, the scheme should be
designed so that there is a reduction in the opportunity for crime combined with an
increase in natural surveillance.

5.83

This can be achieved for example, by designing development to increase the


overlooking of public areas, avoidance of dark or secluded areas with no natural
surveillance, the provision and maintenance of appropriate levels of lighting, and the
creation of clear distinctions between public and private space.

5.84

Developers should liaise with the Crime Prevention Officer at Croydon Police
Station, who can provide advice on matters of designing out crime.

Art and Craftsmanship


5.85

Art and craftsmanship can make a significant contribution to the regeneration of this
area, contributing to the creation of a sense of place (PolicyBE15). The artistic and
architectural enrichment of the scheme should be considered in the details of the
development. Porches, framing of front entrances, metal work and balconies etc. are
all opportunities to enliven the development and encourage a sense of pride and
ownership. Entrance gateways or screens between public and private spaces as well
as the detailing of the buildings themselves can all provide opportunities for
enrichment. It is important that these opportunities are considered as part of the
initial, overall design concept.

5.86

In accordance with paragraph 4.19 (Planning Agreements), developers will be


required to include elements of public art as an integral component of the built form
of the scheme, in addition to the establishment of the urban sculpture / play park
(paragraphs 5.22 - 5.25)

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

33

5.87

In order to preserve some of the historical context of the site, consideration should
be given to the reuse of elements of the existing buildings on the site, such as
ornamental stonework incorporated into new entrances, railings incorporated into
balconies or commemorative plaques reinstated in new areas of paving or in walls.

Design And Sustainability Statement


5.88

In accordance with Policy BE23 (Design Statement)and the revised and enlarged
draft UDP Policy, the Council will require a detailed design and sustainability
statement to be submitted by the developer. The statement will be required to set
out how the proposed development satisfies the requirements of this brief.

Site layout and detailed design checklist


5.89

In order to achieve a sustainable, high quality development on this site, the following
factors will be taken into account when considering the suitability of proposals:

BUILDING LAYOUT

Does the site layout focus on the appropriate location of the built form rather than the
road layout?
Has the opportunity been taken to orientate the buildings for maximum solar gain
wherever possible, taking into account townscape issues?
Have privacy and overlooking been taken into account in the layout and detailed design
of the buildings and spaces around them?
Does the legibility of the built form make a clear distinction between public, semi-private
and private spaces?
Have the buildings been arranged to minimise overshadowing?
Has adequate use been made of the terrace form, which is more energy efficient?
Has the opportunity of high density development been taken to contribute richness to
the surrounding townscape?
Have principles of designing for security been incorporated into the design?

BUILDING FORM AND DETAILED DESIGN

Does the scale and massing of the development reinforce the urban character of the
site?
Are conflicts between the backs and fronts of buildings avoided?
Have opportunities been taken to incorporate stepped terraces into the form of the
development?
Are the buildings designed to take full advantage of daylight, sunlight and natural
ventilation to all rooms?
Have corridors and access areas been located on the north side of building frontages?
Are windows in southerly elevations large enough to provide long periods of useful sun?

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Have doors and windows been located to provide natural surveillance to shared
spaces?
Does the internal planning take account of the need for principal living rooms to face
south?
Where main living rooms cannot be orientated towards the sun, has superinsulation
been accounted for?
Have south facing sun spaces/glazed balconies been incorporated into the design?
Do the residential units achieve The Building Research Establishments Eco Homes
Excellent rating.
Have energy saving measures been incorporated into the detailed design of the units?
Have water saving measures such as rainwater reuse, greywater recycling and
installation of low water appliances etc. been incorporated into the design at the
outset?
Has the future adaptability of the buildings been taken into account?
Have existing site features been creatively incorporated into the design?
Have opportunities been taken to enrich both public and semi-private facades by
attention to detail and ornamentation?

ACCESS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Does the built form determine the nature and design of the road layout, rather than
vice versa?
Does the road and footpath layout give priority to pedestrians and cyclists?
Does the road and footpath network continue existing networks of movement
around the site and ensure appropriate levels of permeability by vehicles, cycles and
pedestrians?
Has full opportunity been taken to accommodate parking areas underground?
Are parking areas attractive, easily accessible and safe to use?
Have home zone principles for safety on the site roads been incorporated into the
design?
Is traffic calming an intrinsic element of the design?
Have spaces been designed to accommodate service vehicles while minimising land
take and visual intrusion?

EXTERNAL SPACES

Have possibilities been explored of overlapping a wide range of uses eg. Parking and
play areas, vehicular and pedestrian routes etc.
Have surfacing materials been chosen to enhance the character and pedestrian scale
of the development?
Have management and maintenance issues been considered?
Does the landscape scheme provide scale and focus to the development as well as
integrating existing features?
Have planting heights and layouts taken into account privacy and security?
Does the landscape scheme form an integral visual part of the development,
contributing to and enhancing its overall character?

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

35

Has surface water storage and run off been considered in the landscape design?
Have opportunities been taken to incorporate craftsmanship and the arts into the
scheme?

PRIVACY, SECURITY AND GARDENS

Does the scheme create a safe residential environment?


Are dead frontages avoided?
Is there a hierarchy of spaces ranging from public to private?
Are the public and private sides of buildings evident?
Does the development encourage an active pedestrian environment?
Are surveillance possibilities maximised through the layout of the buildings and the
positioning of doors and windows?
Are opportunities taken to maximise the provision of private roof gardens, balconies,
courtyards, etc.?
Has consideration been given to encouraging wildlife into the development, eg. pond
habitat?
Have the existing trees on the site been incorporated into the new development, and
supplemented with a variety of types of new green spaces?

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

PART 6
URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1
Character of Surrounding Area
The rear of the site incorporating Kidderminster Road, Lennard Road and Oakfield Road
consists of predominantly residential development ranging from large scale nurses
accommodation in Lennard Road to two storey terraced housing in Kidderminster Road.
Much of the original housing surrounding the site that is still retained today was developed
towards the end of the 19th Century and ranges from large detached and semi-detached
villas to smaller terraced houses in Kidderminster Road.
Oakfield Road
The southern end of Oakfield Road which lies to the south of the site, consists mainly of
two and three storey Victorian villas, some with basements. They are predominantly built
in a mixture of stock brick and render, with double and single height bays. Some houses on
the northern side of the road have been redeveloped as two and three storey blocks of
flats.
Some forecourt parking has been introduced infront of the Victorian properties, however,
the majority of parking is provided on street. Where front boundaries still remain, they
consist of low brick walls and hedges. The overall character of the street is one of a
predominantly traditional Victorian mixed street scene.
Cobblestone Place
This cul-de-sac consists of a small attractive development of high density mews style
houses around a cobbled yard. It has a very urban character which suits its location in close
proximity to the town centre.
Lennard Road
The flats at the junction of Lennard Road and Oakfield Road (9 Oakfield Road) provide a
weak corner feature. Number 3 Lennard Road (Lennard Lodge) is an attractive small scale
domestic Victorian building.
The private car park on the corner site is currently used by Croydon Community Health
staff. This side of the road does not contribute any sense of enclosure to the street, nor
does it complement the development on the opposite side of the road.
On the opposite side of the road at the southern end are large 3 storey Victorian villas with
basements. These were already built by 1880 and are now finished in a combination of
brick and render. Parking is achieved through a combination of rear and on and off street
parking.
There is a row of pollarded trees on the eastern side of the road, but none on the hospital

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

41

side.
Numbers 12-18, a former nurses home, are now occupied by the Croydon AND Surrey
Downs Community NHS trust. The building is non domestic in scale and consists of three
storeys and a parapet with basement and front boundary wall and gates. The building was
built in 1931 and 1934 as the Charles Heath Clark memorial and the Dame Flora Brown
Memorial. It is constructed in a mixture of stone and render finish with a portico at the
entrance to the northernmost section.
After this building, there is a change in scale down to two storey Victorian housing beginning
with three detached Victorian villas with off street parking. The road ends with numbers 26
and 28 which are attractive two storey brick buildings with stucco decoration.
Kidderminster Road
The western end of Kidderminster Road which runs close to the site consists predominantly
of terraced and semi detached housing of a more domestic scale than those buildings in
Lennard Road. The houses are finished in a mixture of brick, pebbledash and render. Some
forecourt parking has taken place, but the majority of parking is on street.
Towards the London Road end of the road, the character changes to a more commercial
nature with small scale office units and a garage. At this point, the residential building line of
the road is lost and the sense of enclosure weakened.
London Road
The part of London Road that bounds the site consists of a mix of styles, scale, massing and
building lines.
The opposite side of London Road to the site, opposite its junction with Kidderminster
Road, has a very weak building line, consisting of a garage and car showroom set back from
the road. Number 101 London Road is a very dominant element in the street scene and
consists of a four storey building (date?) built to the back edge of the pavement. The building
consists of offices with a former supermarket below. The sense of enclosure created by this
building is lost immediately after it, as it gives way to a brick boundary wall with pillars and a
car park at a lower level.
On the Hospital side of the road, numbers 160 and 144 were originally Victorian villas with
single storey shopfronts added at a later date. Further north are purpose built three storey
buildings incorporating retail uses at ground level with residential and offices over. This area
incorporates the Royal Parade Local Area of Special Character (The Council has produced
Supplementary Planning Guidance for this Local Area of Special Character).
The outpatients department of the hospital presents a good landmark frontage to London
Road. It was built from brick in 1926, with a decorative stone frontage under a slate roof.
The main frontage building of the hospital, by contrast, is set back from London Road and
steps forward slightly towards the southern boundary of the site. The main hospital building

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

is four storeys in height with sash windows and limited decoration under a tiled roof. At
the southernmost end are attractive glazed verandas rising to the height of the main
building.
The main hospital frontage has an attractive boundary consisting of a brick wall with
decorative railings with large brick piers with decorative stone tops. The rest of London
Road as far as the town centre consists of a variety of heights ranging from two to four
storeys housing both retail and commercial uses. The western side of this section of
London Road dates back to before 1880 and many of the original properties have had later
single storey shopfronts added bringing the building line to the back edge of the pavement.
The buildings are mainly of brick finish with attractive details such as original balconies,
chimneys and dormer windows. This part of London Road has a generally very urban scale
with a strong vertical emphasis to the buildings. This area tightens the sense of enclosure
as it focuses distant views on the Central Croydon area on slightly higher ground in the
near distance.

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

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APPENDIX 2: SOURCES OF ADDITIONAL


INFORMATION
PPG3 Housing
PPG1 General Policy and Principles
Planning for Sustainable Development: Towards better practice - DETR
Interim Local Implementation Plan (Transport) Croydon 2002 2003
Towards an Urban Renaissance Urban Task Force
By Design Urban Design in the Planning System:Towards Better Practice DETR
By Design Better Places to Live DETR
Design Bulletin 32: Residential Roads and Footpaths DETR
Places, Streets and Movement: Design Bulletin 32, A Companion Guide DETR
Housing Layouts Lifting the quality DETR

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Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

APPENDIX 3: OTHER CONTACTS


NHS

South London and Maudsley NHS Trust: Jacquie Levett 020 8776 4758
Croydon and Surrey Downs NHS Trust: 020 8407 6203

London Borough of Croydon: 020 8686 4433


Urban Design
Caroline Kearey ext.2251

Croydon General Hospital Site Planning & Design Brief Adopted 23rd September 2002

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