NEVADA COUNTY CANNABIS UNITED ­ RECOMMENDATIONS 
 
INTENTION 
 
● Unify the four options into a single recommendation by the cannabis community. 
● Clarify the conversation. First answer, “how do we solve the problems?” Then, “'what should we 
allow?” Determine land­use by reason and an informed process, rather than arbitrarily. 
● Let’s solve problems. Let’s compromise to take a small step forward. The ordinance should reflect 
and encourage compliance. Let’s include large collective grows and state regulations to address the 
problem.  
● The ordinance should clearly reflect a symbolic move away from a prohibition mentality towards a 
regulatory approach. 
 
CONSIDERATIONS 
 
● Replace ban with interim urgency ordinance at next BOS meeting 
○ Voting in a highly restrictive ordinance that puts the majority of cultivators out of compliance 
will result in the same outcome as Ordinance 2349 and will only perpetuate the problem 
○ Not passing a vote will be a violation of the Board’s Resolution of Intent 
● Interim urgency ordinance requires 4/5th vote of the BOS 
○ Board members accountable to all constituents 
○ Board members actions needs to reflect the outcome of the vote (59.5 to 40.5) and the 
will of the people 
■ We did not vote on the Resolution of Intent, we voted on Measure W. Measure W 
outlines the following: “a ban on all outdoor cultivation and commercial cannabis 
activity” 
○ Until collective grows and commercial activity are addressed the impacts will not resolve 
● CEQA is a response to a significant increase in environmental impacts.  
○ These impacts are already occurring, regulation will reduce these impacts 
○ Stalling or halting the implementation of regulation will perpetuate or acerbate the problems 
○ A CEQA lawsuit will be costly to the county 
○ Requested license types are a fraction of what the normal agricultural industry would 
consider as a small farm, most land­use recommendations take up less than 3% of ​
lot 
coverage​
 (less than 3% of the area of the property) 
● A nuisance ordinance should focus on addressing issues in regards to nuisances, public safety and 
environmental impact while honoring the rights of patients.  
○ Providing access without solving problems is not good enough –the community deserves 
solutions 
 
 
HIGHLIGHTS 
 
Residential vs. Rural (Personal and Collective) 
● Personal cultivation of 100 sq/ft (as allowed in MMRSA) in all zones including residential with 
appropriate nuisance restrictions 
● Allow for rural collective cultivation to provide for higher density residential areas 

 

Collective Cultivation designated to rural areas: general agriculture (AG), agriculture exclusive (AE), 
forest recreation (FR), and residential agriculture (RA) 
● Collective cultivation prohibited in respect to polling results and where commercial activity is 
prohibited (exclude in R1, R2, and R3) 
Plant Count or Square Footage 
● Use standards outlined by the new state laws in MMRSA 
● Use plant count ​
or​
 square footage as per state license types and cultivation practices 
○ Plant count favored by full season or in regards to geographical concerns 
○ Square footage reflects standard agricultural practices and is preferred for indoor, 
mixed­light and nursery growing approaches. Areas such as District 5 practically mandates 
indoor cultivation due to micro­climate 
○ Modern technology such as the Trimble GPS (commonly adopted by agricultural 
departments across the state) make square footage easy to ascertain 
 
Land­Use Allowance 
● Personal Use (100 sq/ft as defined by MMRSA) 
○ Allow in all areas regardless of zoning or parcel size so long as proper restrictions are 
followed to mitigate nuisance 
● Collective/Cooperative Cultivation  
○ Use appropriate parameters aligned with MMRSA for collective grows and prospective 
licensed businesses 
○ This is where most of the issues arise, if we address these operations we can effectively 
begin to solve the problems 
○ These recommendations reflect and encourage compliance and allow cultivators to focus 
on best practices, investing in infrastructure, and MMRSA compliance, thereby mitigating 
environmental impact, crime, and nuisances 
○ These numbers are a compromise and thus reduced by 50%, thus rather than a 85­95% 
compliance rate we would like to achieve, we would expect 50% or more to comply 
○ Cultivation would be allowed on rural parcels zoned Residential Agriculture (RA), General 
Agriculture (AG), Agricultural Exclusive (AE), Forest Recreation (FR), and Timber 
Production Zones (TPZ) 
○ Collective cultivation would be excluded on all Residential Zoning (R1, R2, and R3) 
○ The following chart outlines our land­use designations as well as their prospective lot 
coverage (what percentage of the parcel would be in cultivation) 
 

Parcel Size 

License Type Parameter (MMRSA) 

Further Restrictions 

Under 2 acres 

Up to a 12 plants ​
or​
 1,200 sq/ft (half of Type 1C) 
Lot coverage: 2.75% to 1.38%  

Notarized Neighbor Approval 

2 acres Up to 5 
acres 

Up to a 12 plants ​
or​
 1,200 sq/ft (half of Type 1C) 
Lot coverage: 1.38% to 0.55%  

With appropriate Setbacks 
 

5 acres Up to 20 
acres 

Up to a Type 1C, (2,500 sq/ft ​
or​
 25 plants) 
Lot coverage: 1.15% to 0.29%  

With appropriate Setbacks 
 

20 acres plus 

Up to to a Type 1, 1A, 1B (5,000 sq/ft ​
or​
 50 plants) 
Lot coverage: 0.6% or less 

With appropriate Setbacks 

 

Additional Land­Use Considerations 
○ In respecting an incremental approach and CEQA considerations we now recommend half 
of the small license types set by MMRSA the Type 1C “Cottage” license and the Type 1 
“Specialty License” 
○ To allay community concerns of not wanting to be known as a “grow county” and to respect 
our heritage culture of small, local, craft farmers we are ​
not​
 recommending the largest Type 
3 license 
○ All new ordinances by other counties moving forward with regulation are adopting the new 
state standards 

 
Further Considerations and Restrictions to Address Nuisance Concerns 
● We stand ​
neutral​
 on the following considerations 
○ Locked and secure fences to shield grows from view and to protect children and wildlife 
○ No visibility ​
of foliage ​
from public spaces or publicly traveled roads 
○ Restrictions that shield and confine light and glare to the interior of a structure. However, 
we ​
oppose​
 restrictions on use beyond anything that conforms to applicable building and 
electrical codes such as a wattage restriction 
○ Generators that comply with regular noise standards 
○ Pesticide and fuel limitations as designated by the department of agriculture and pesticide 
regulation 
○ Requirement of grading permits and other applicable building code permits such as 
electrical and plumbing 
○ Setbacks of 150’­300’ depending on acreage of parcel ​
and measured by nearest structure 
or outdoor living space of an adjacent property to garden perimeter (as outlined in 2349) 
○ 600’ setbacks from a list of current bus stops from when the growing season starts and the 
list must be available to the public on request 
● We ​
support​
 the following considerations: 
○ Terracing will no longer be required. This will help mitigate issues around unpermitted 
grading, and excessive costs 
○ Setback from schools will remain at 600’. This is the minimum designation outlined by 
MMRSA 
○ Posting of legal entity for collectives or cooperatives, and the appropriate number of 
recommendations 
○ A notarized approval from a landlord if renting 
○ Include the same CEQA exemptions found in Ordinance 2349 and Ordinance 2405 
● We firmly ​
oppose​
 the following considerations: 
○ We strongly oppose the placeholder ordinance to include any per plant per day fines or 
penalty provisions.  
■ Enacting fines or penalties alongside any ordinance that is written to exclude 75% 
of the cultivation population perpetuates an eradication mentality and will 
discourage growers to come into compliance 
■ However, if an ordinance is written to include 75% of cultivators we would be open 
to discussing terms for fines and penalties within the placeholder ordinance 
○ We oppose any changes to the current abatement process. However, if an ordinance is 
written to include 75% of cultivators we would be open to discussing terms for expediting 
the abatement process 
 
 

 

We Propose the Following Considerations: 
 
● Create  more clarity around the criteria of what defines a greenhouse, a hoop house, cold frame, or 
high tunnel, and that the latter should be allowed for agricultural purposes 
● Introduction of a 2 year residency clause or a moratorium to mitigate fears around a massive influx 
of growers despite an abnormally low real estate inventory 
○ Residency clauses or a moratorium depend on the issuing of permits, which is currently 
unavailable 
● Develop a robust mailing list of patients, concerned citizens and the general public to increase 
awareness, education and input around the issue 
● Recommend the Agricultural Commissioner be required to form a voluntary registry to identify 
interested growers and business owners  
● We ask for a statement of intent enacting a March 1, 2017 deadline for a comprehensive MMRSA 
compliant ordinance including the permitting of commercial license types for the 2017 grow season 
○  This includes a county­wide stakeholder process with input from the general public, and 
coordinated alongside the County by community members and dedicated professionals 

 
ENFORCEMENT PRIORITIES 
 
We recognize that the sheriff is an elected official and operates under his own autonomy. We commend his 
efforts to reduce criminal elements and environmental impacts. However it is important that the Board of 
Supervisors communicate that the intention of the ordinance is to adopt a regulation and new solution 
approach and that continuing with an eradication mindset will deteriorate goodwill and halt progress towards 
implementing solutions that our community urgently needs.  
 
We offer the following suggestions on enforcement priorities emphasizing the need to focus on dangerous 
and criminal practices that are a threat to public health and safety, and to offer respite to good faith 
operators working to come under compliance with state and local regulations.   
 
High Enforcement Priorities 
Dangerous and/or Illegal Operations 
● Trespass grows on public land 
● Criminal enterprises, gangs or cartels 
● Violence or the irresponsible use of firearms 
● Diversion of marijuana to minors 
● Massive grows that are obviously out of 215 compliance 
Building Code, Code Enforcement and Environmental Concerns 
● Water diversion/theft 
● Use of illegal pesticides (poisoning water and/or wildlife) 
● Haphazard electrical wiring (posing a fire risk) 
● Commercial activity in residential neighborhoods 
○ Butane Hash Labs 
 
Conditions for Low Priority 
● 215 compliance and proper number of patient recommendations 
● Show applications to Central Valley Regional Water Board and Board of Equalization 
● Application to voluntary county registry