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AGENDA

Ordinary Meeting of Council


6.00pm Wednesday 20 July 2016

*** Broadcast live on Phoenix FM 106.7 ***

Question time at the formal Council Meeting will be limited to written questions received
before 12 noon on the day of the meeting. The questions will be read by a Council
representative and answered by the Mayor. There will not be an opportunity for questions
to be asked from the floor.

VENUE:
Reception Room,
Bendigo Town Hall,
Hargreaves Street, Bendigo

NEXT MEETING:
Wednesday 10 August 2016
Bendigo Town Hall
Copies of the City of Greater Bendigo Councils Agendas & Minutes
can be obtained online at www.bendigo.vic.gov.au

PAGE 1

This Council Meeting is conducted in accordance with Local Law


No. 8. It is an offence for any person to engage in improper or
disorderly conduct at the meeting.
Council Vision
Greater Bendigo - Working together to be Australia's most liveable regional city.

Council Values
Council wants the community to continue to have reason to be proud of the city and will
do this through:

Transparency - Information about Council decisions is readily available and easily


understood;
Efficiency and effectiveness - Council provides services based on evidence of
need and demonstrates continuous improvement in the delivery of services;
Inclusion and consultation - Council uses a range of engagement strategies to
ensure community members can understand and take part in discussion that
informs the development of new strategies and actions;
Clear decisive and consistent planning - In a rapidly growing municipality, Council
undertakes to plan effectively for our long-term future;
Respect for community priorities and needs - Council will advocate for improved
services for community members and will consider community impact and
feedback the decisions it makes.

Themes
1.

Planning for Growth

2.

Presentation and Vibrancy

3.

Productivity

4.

Sustainability

5.

Leadership and Good Governance

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ORDINARY MEETING
WEDNESDAY 20 JULY 2016

ORDER OF BUSINESS:
ITEM

PRECIS

PAGE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

PRAYER

PRESENT

APOLOGIES

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS

CR CAMPBELL'S REPORT

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

1.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

2.

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

10

2.1

IMPLEMENTATION OF CONNECTING GREATER BENDIGO


INTEGRATED TRANSPORT AND LAND USE STRATEGY
(ITLUS) - PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C227

10

2.2

PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C223 - WHITE HILLS


AND EAST BENDIGO HERITAGE STUDY STAGE 2 CONSIDER AUTHORISATION REQUEST

16

2.3

1096 CALDER ALTERNATIVE HIGHWAY, LOCKWOOD


3551 - DEVELOPMENT OF 2 SHEDS AND THEIR USE FOR
THE PURPOSE OF A STORE (CARAVAN STORAGE)

25

2.4

1, 2, 35 AND 42 IRONTREE CLOSE, KANGAROO FLAT


3555 - 8 LOT SUBDIVISION

35

2.5

51 HANNANS ROAD, MANDURANG SOUTH 3551 REFUSAL OF DEVELOPMENT PLAN AND SUBDIVIDE
LAND INTO 2 LOTS

46

PAGE 3

2.6

2015/16 ANNUAL REPORT - ROAD MANAGEMENT PLAN


VERSION 2.0

55

3.

PRESENTATION AND VIBRANCY

58

3.1

DOMESTIC ANIMAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 2016 - 2021

58

3.2

ADOPTION OF NEW ANIMAL KEEPING LOCAL LAW NO. 2


AND MINOR AMENDMENTS TO ADMINISTRATION LOCAL
LAW NO. 10

77

3.3

GREATER BENDIGO WELLBEING SURVEY 2015

83

4.

PRODUCTIVITY

98

5.

SUSTAINABILITY

99

5.1

RENAMING OF VAHLAND STREET IN NORTH BENDIGO

99

6.

LEADERSHIP AND GOOD GOVERNANCE

105

6.1

POSITIVE AGEING ADVISORY COMMITTEE

105

6.2

SMART CITIES PLAN - SUBMISSION BY THE CITY OF


GREATER BENDIGO

121

6.3

RECORD OF ASSEMBLIES

131

7.

URGENT BUSINESS

136

8.

NOTICES OF MOTION

137

8.1

NOTICE OF MOTION: WASTE TO ENERGY

137

9.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

138

10.

MAYOR'S REPORT

138

11.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

138

12.

CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS

138

____________________________
CRAIG NIEMANN
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY
PRAYER
PRESENT
APOLOGIES
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Cr Lisa Ruffell
Cr James Williams
SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS
That Standing Orders be suspended to allow the conduct of Public Question Time.

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME


Public Question Time Guidelines
Public Question Time Purpose
Council has provided the opportunity for members of the public to lodge written questions
of broad interest to Council and the community. Matters relating to routine Council works
should be taken up with Councils Customer Service Officers through its Customer
Request System.
Question time will be limited to written questions received before 12 noon on the
day of the meeting. The questions will be read by a Council representative and
answered by the Mayor.
No questions relating to planning matters on the Agenda will be accepted. By the time
planning matters have reached the council agenda, they have been through an extensive
process as required by the Planning and Environment Act. In addition, in most instances
mediation has been held between the parties involved. Throughout the process there are
many opportunities for people to ask questions.
Public Question Time Where, When And Who
The public question time is held at every Ordinary Meeting of Greater Bendigo City
Council. Meetings of Council commence at 6.00pm in the Reception Room, Bendigo
Town Hall, Hargreaves Street, Bendigo.
The public question time is held at the start of the meeting as close as practical to
6:00pm. A maximum of 30 minutes has been provided for registered written questions.

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Acceptance of Questions
Councils Meeting Procedure Local Law does not allow for other questions or comments
during the remainder of the meeting.
1.

An individual may only lodge one question per meeting.

2.

In the event that the same or similar written question is raised by more than one
person, an answer may be given as a combined response.

3.

In the event that time does not permit all written questions registered to be
answered, questions will be answered in writing or referred to the next meeting if
appropriate.

4.

The Mayor and or CEO have the right to decline registration on basis of:
Legal proceedings;
More appropriately addressed by other means;
Vague or lacking in substance, irrelevant, frivolous, insulting offensive,
improper, defamatory or demeaning;
Answer likely to compromise his / her position;
Confidential, commercial-in-confidence.

5.

Each individual whose written question has been accepted or declined will be
advised by early afternoon on the day of the scheduled meeting.

6.

In the event of a written question being declined the question will be circulated to
the Council for information.

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS


That Standing Orders be resumed.

CR CAMPBELL'S REPORT

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST


Pursuant to Sections 77, 78 and 79 of the Local Government Act 1989 (as
amended) direct and indirect conflict of interest must be declared prior to debate
on specific items within the agenda; or in writing to the Chief Executive Officer
before the meeting. Declaration of indirect interests must also include the
classification of the interest (in circumstances where a Councillor has made a
Declaration in writing, the classification of the interest must still be declared at the
meeting), i.e.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)

direct financial interest


indirect interest by close association
indirect interest that is an indirect financial interest
indirect interest because of conflicting duties
indirect interest because of receipt of an applicable gift
indirect interest as a consequence of becoming an interested party
indirect interest as a result of impact on residential amenity
conflicting personal interest

A Councillor who has declared a conflict of interest, must leave the meeting and
remain outside the room while the matter is being considered, or any vote is taken.
Councillors are also encouraged to declare circumstances where there may be a
perceived conflict of interest.

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES
Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Wednesday 29 June 2016.
The following items were considered at the Ordinary Council meeting held on
Wednesday 29 June 2016 at 6:00pm.

Council Plan 2016-2017 Update - Final Draft for Adoption


Adoption of 2016/17 Budget
Petition: Footpath Construction - Michael Street, Kennington
Planning Scheme Amendment C161 - Marong Business Park Consider Panel Report
and Adoption of Amendment
Big Hill Mandurang Valley Landscape Assessment Planning Scheme Amendment
C217
Planning Scheme Amendment C220 - Lansell Crest Development Plan Overlay to
Consider Authorisation Request
51 Hannans Road, Mandurang South - Refusal of Development Plan and Subdivide
Land into 2 Lots
Lot A and CA 8 Sawmill Road, Huntly - The Staged Subdivision of the Land into 57
Lots (49 House Lots and 8 Superlots) and the Removal of Native Vegetation
All Things Considered Exploring Options for Victoria's 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy
- Submission by the City of Greater Bendigo
Draft Environment Strategy
Commercial Fitness Operator Policy
Greater Bendigo Disability Inclusion Reference Committee Member Appointments
Lake Eppalock Land and On-Water Management Plan Implementation Working
Group
City of Greater Bendigo Reconciliation Plan 2016-2019
Awarding of Contract CT000269 for Kerbside Organics Collection Service
Loading, Carting and Disposal of Waste from Eaglehawk Landfill
Record of Assemblies
Contracts Awarded Under Delegation
Rescission Motion for Decision on 316-318 High Street, Kangaroo Flat - 34 Lot
Subdivision, Removal of Vegetation, Variation of Easements and Alteration of
Access to Road Zone Category 1

The unconfirmed minutes have also been posted on the City of Greater Bendigo website
pending confirmation at this meeting.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on Wednesday 29 June 2016,
as circulated, be taken as read and confirmed.

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

1.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

Nil.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

2.

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

2.1

IMPLEMENTATION OF CONNECTING GREATER BENDIGO


INTEGRATED TRANSPORT AND LAND USE STRATEGY (ITLUS) PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C227

Document Information
Author

Bridget Maplestone, Strategic Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
Amendment details:

This amendment implements the Connecting Greater Bendigo


Integrated Transport and Land Use Strategy (ITLUS) by making
changes to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. This will
mean the strategy is considered when assessing planning
applications.
The ITLUS was adopted by Council at its meeting on 26 August
2015. At the same meeting Council adopted the following
resolution to commence the planning scheme amendment
process to implement the relevant strategic and policy directions
of the adopted ITLUS. Council has prepared the amendment
documents consistent with this recommendation.
The amendment proposes to implement the ITLUS through the
Planning Scheme. It proposes to do this by making changes to
the Municipal Strategic Statement (which provides the key
strategic planning, land use and development objectives for the
municipality) and to add the strategy as a reference document.
This report recommends Council request a Panel should
submissions be received during the exhibition process.
Council will have an opportunity to resolve whether or not to adopt
the proposed amendment at the end of the process. This is the
final step for Council and does not change whether a Panel is
required or not.

Proponent:

City of Greater Bendigo

Key issues:

The ITLUS is a key Strategy to support the better integration of


land use and transport policy. This is consistent with state and
local planning policy. The implementation of this strategy in the

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

planning scheme and including the strategy as a reference


document will mean it is considered in assessing planning
applications. This will promote the better integration of land use
planning and transport through a focus on the more effective use
of existing infrastructure, improving active transport connections
and continuing to implement Bendigo Metro Rail.
Recommendation:

Should submissions be received into Amendment C227 which


request a change to the amendment and cannot be resolved, to
refer these submissions to an independent Panel in accordance
with Section 23(1)(b) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Planning for Growth
2.2 Council manages the planning and development of the City through the preparation
of major Strategies and effective amendments to the planning scheme.
2.2.1 Complete and implement the following major strategies through planning scheme
amendments:
Connecting Greater Bendigo: Integrated Transport and Land Use Strategy.
Background Information
The key steps in the amendment process are summarised below.

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Bendigo currently has one of Victorias highest rates of car ownership. The ITLUS is
about moving from a business as usual approach to transport which would, as the
population increased, place greater strain on the existing road network. It is also
estimated that poor health related to being overweight or obese costs the Bendigo
community $65 million annually.
Moving towards a more strategic approach to meeting its future transport, development
and housing needs as well as promoting active transport to improve the health of the
community, Council developed an ITLUS. This strategy was adopted in August 2015.
To ensure this important strategy is considered in development applications, the key
directions within the strategy need to be implemented into the planning scheme through
a planning scheme amendment.
Therefore at the August 2015 meeting a
recommendation was also received to commence the planning scheme amendment
process to implement the strategy.

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Previous Council decisions


August 2011 Council endorsed the motion to support a research project into the likely
actions, effectiveness and resource implications of completing a Sustainable Transport
Strategy for Bendigo.
November 2011 Council endorsed the Project Brief for the Sustainable Transport
Research Paper and Community Discussions.
May 2012 An Integrated Transport Research Paper was presented with a
recommendation to commence the development of an ITLUS.
August 2015 Council adopted the ITLUS and recommended to commence a planning
scheme amendment process to implement the strategy.
Report
The Planning and Environment Act 1987 allows for a planning scheme amendment to be
initiated by a municipal Council, or a Council can respond to a request for an
Amendment by any person or body.
When requesting authorisation from the Minister for Planning, an explanatory report must
be submitted that discusses the purpose, effects and strategic justification for the
Amendment.
The implementation of this strategy through objectives in the planning scheme will
ensure the more effective use of existing infrastructure, thereby reducing the need for
new infrastructure and costly upgrades. Objectives include implementing and advocating
for further improvements to Bendigo Metro Rail and the bus network and encouraging
the provision of walking and cycling infrastructure and improved connections, which will
be considered in assessing planning applications.
The Amendment proposes to:
Amend Clause 21.09 to include objectives and strategies to implement ITLUS
Amend Clause 21.10 to reference ITLUS
This amendment is consistent with Amendment C215 (currently with the Minister for
Planning for approval) which implements the Residential Strategy including the ideas of
10 minute neighbourhoods and a compact city. Many of the concepts within the
proposed Amendment C227 are consistent with and reinforce the concepts already
introduced as part of Amendment C215.
Priority/Importance:
The ITLUS is Councils principal strategy for managing the integration of transport and
land use into the future.

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Integration of transport and land use is mandated by the Transport Integration Act
(2010). All transport planning and land-use decisions are required to be made with
consideration of the Transport Integration Act (2010). This means Council is required to
have regard for the transport system objectives and decision making principles with
respect to any action the may significantly impact on the transport system.
The implementation of this strategy has already commenced. This includes the Bendigo
Metro Rail project which was implemented on the 26 June 2016. This increased the
frequency of weekday services to Epsom, Eaglehawk and Kangaroo Flat, and provided
greater connectivity with existing bus services. Further, on the 27 June 2016, the State
Government announced a new central transport agency (Transport for Victoria) for the
planning, coordination and operation of Victorias transport system.
Options/Alternatives:
Council has the option of:
Requesting a Panel be appointed should submissions be received into the
Amendment which cannot be resolved
Abandoning the amendment should submissions be received during the exhibition
process which cannot be resolved
Consultation/Communication
Internal Consultation
Internally, staff from City work areas responsible for transport, land use, community
health and wellbeing and associated activities were involved throughout the preparation
of the ITLUS.
Various staff within the Strategy and Statutory Planning unit were involved in the
preparation of this amendment.
External Consultation
The formal exhibition period will commence on Thursday 4 August 2016 and close on
Friday 2 September. Should a panel hearing be required this has been scheduled for
week commencing 24 October 2016.
Previous external consultation during development of the strategy
Key stakeholders, businesses and the community were consulted throughout the
development of the ITLUS.
More than 700 people provided comments on the ITLUS.
Key stakeholders including Council, VicRoads, the Department of Economic
Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources formally supported the strategy.
Key stakeholders including VicRoads and PTV will be directly notified during the
exhibition process. The community will have an opportunity to provide a submission
during the exhibition process.
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Resource Implications
Officer time will be required to prepare the amendment documentation for authorisation,
exhibition, managing the exhibition process and liaising with the Minister for Planning.
However, given the relatively minor nature of the Amendment this time is not expected to
be extensive.
The City is responsible for payment of statutory fees and costs incurred during the
processing of the Amendment. As per the purpose of this report, this may include a
panel hearing process if the Amendment has unresolved submissions following
exhibition. This has been budgeted for.
The Amendment proposes text changes to Councils Municipal Strategic Statement and
does not apply any additional planning controls to properties nor does it introduce
additional requirements when assessing applications. Therefore the ongoing resource
implications are likely to be minimal.
Conclusion
Implementing ITLUS via Amendment C227 will mean greater consideration will need to
be given to the document in the assessment of planning applications. This includes in
encouraging active transport infrastructure in new developments and advocating for
public transport improvements.
Attachments
Nil

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve:
1. That the Councillors on the ITLUS Steering Committee (Crs Cox, Campbell & Lyons)
and relevant staff consider the submissions.
2. That if unresolved submissions raise issues that impact on the strategic intent and
direction of the strategy, a report be prepared for Council's determination.
3. That if unresolved submissions raise issues that do not affect the overall strategic
intent of the planning scheme amendment, but request minor changes to Amendment
C227, that they be referred to an independent Panel in accordance with Section
23(1)(b) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

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2.2

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C223 - WHITE HILLS AND EAST


BENDIGO HERITAGE STUDY STAGE 2 - CONSIDER
AUTHORISATION REQUEST

Document Information
Author

Morgan James, Planner Amendments

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
Amendment details:

This amendment implements the recommendations from


Stage 2 of the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study,
2016 to include a number of heritage places and precincts
into the Heritage Overlay.

Proponent:

City of Greater Bendigo Statutory Planning

Key issues:

Protecting identified heritage places


Reducing the need for planning permits

Recommendations:

That Council adopt the White Hills and East Bendigo


Heritage Study - Stage 2, 2016.
That Council request the Minister for Planning to authorise
Amendment C223 to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme,
and when authorised, exhibit the Amendment.

Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2016-2017 Update)
Planning for Growth
Greater Bendigo plans for the needs of our growing population through the
preparation of long-term strategies and the development of major new assets and
supporting infrastructure.
Presentation & Vibrancy
Greater Bendigo is a community that values its heritage, arts facilities and major
events and supports arts and cultural experiences.
Sustainability
The history, unique heritage, streetscapes and buildings of Greater Bendigo are
conserved, restored, celebrated and managed wisely for the long term.

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Background Information
The Greater Bendigo Thematic Environmental History, 2013 identified the White Hills
corridor and East Bendigo as the highest priority areas requiring a heritage study. The
City subsequently commenced the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study in 201314. At this time, due to development pressure, the study area was expanded to include
the areas affected by the Hospital Precinct Structure Plan, which had never had a
comprehensive heritage study.
Due to a greater than expected number of individual places being identified during the
initial steps of the study, it was decided that the heritage study should be split into two
stages, with Stage 1 containing heritage places identified in the Hospital precinct area
and 5 large industrial type sites (shown on the map below). These places were included
in Planning Scheme Amendment C201: New Heritage Places and Efficiency Review,
which was approved by the Minister for Planning in May 2016. These places are now
covered by a Heritage Overlay.
Stage 2 of the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study was undertaken by heritage
consultants Context Pty Ltd during 2015-16 who considered places of potential cultural
heritage significance using historical research, community consultation and site surveys.
Stage 2 of the study is now ready to be adopted and included into the Planning Scheme.

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Figure 1: Study areas for Stages 1 and 2 of the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study.

The key steps in the Amendment process are summarised below:

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Amendment prepared

Council decides whether to seek


Ministerial Authorisation & exhibit

We are at this
point

Public Exhibition of Amendment

Submissions received

Council requests an Independent


Panel to consider submissions

Council decides to Adopt or


Abandon the Amendment

Send to Minister for Approval


and Gazettal

Previous Council Decisions


20 August 2014 Council resolved to adopt the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage
Study Stage 1, 2014 and request the Minister for Planning to authorise Amendment
C201 to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme, and when authorised, exhibit the
amendment.
26 August 2015 Council resolved to adopt Amendment C201 to the Greater Bendigo
Planning Scheme and request approval from the Minister for Planning.
Report
The Planning and Environment Act 1987 allows for a Planning Scheme Amendment to
be initiated by a municipal Council.
When requesting authorisation from the Minister for Planning, an Explanatory Report
must be submitted that discusses the purpose, effects and strategic justification for the
Amendment. Key issues identified in the Explanatory Report are summarised below.
(Full copy attached).

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Land affected by the Amendment


The amendment affects approximately 467 properties in the suburbs of White Hills,
Bendigo, Ascot and Epsom (see attached explanatory report for full address list).
However almost 300 of these properties are considered to be non-contributory places
within a heritage precinct and will be subject to additional planning permit exemptions
than those places identified as contributory or of individual heritage significance.
What the Amendment does
The amendment implements the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study Stage 2,
2016 by:
Applying the Heritage Overlay to:
o 5 new heritage precincts (Bridge Street North, Buller Street, Gleeson Street,
Norfolk Street, White Hills & Hamlet precincts)
o Extending 2 existing heritage precincts (Baxter Street and Tomlins Street
precincts)
o 16 individual places
o 3 miners cottages which will be added to the existing Miners Cottages serial
heritage listing in the planning scheme
Including the Study as a Reference Document at Clause 21.10.
Applying the Greater Bendigo Heritage Incorporated Plan - Planning Permit
exemptions to the affected properties to remove permit requirements for minor works.
Unlike Stage 1 of the study which only applied individual place heritage overlays, Stage 2
proposes to also apply and or extend 7 heritage overlay precincts. Within a heritage
precinct, places can be identified as contributing or not contributing to the heritage
precinct. Wherever possible, non-contributory places are excluded from the heritage
overlay, however some are often included in the precinct where they form part of a
streetscape, and in order to manage future development of the precinct appropriately.
It is recommended that all the places proposed to be included in the Heritage Overlay as
part of Stage 2 of the Study be included within the Greater Bendigo Heritage
Incorporated Plan - Planning Permit exemptions which was approved by the Minister for
Planning in May 2016.
Incorporated plans can be included in the Heritage Overlay to remove permit
requirements for minor works including things such as swimming pools, small
outbuildings and additions, and fences. A permit is generally not required if the owner
meets certain criteria, for example an outbuilding if it is not constructed in the front yard.
The incorporated plan will also be used to provide more generous permit exemptions for
non-contributory places than those of contributory or individual significance.
Removing these minor permit requirements from the Planning Scheme will have a
number of benefits including reduced permit burden for residents and reduced
applications for the City to process. This will mean that the statutory planners can focus
on larger, more complex applications.

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Social, Economic and Environmental Impacts


The amendment will have positive effects on the environment by providing protection for
heritage precincts and places, which will help retain existing urban infrastructure and
resources and contribute to the richness and diversity of the built environment. The
conservation of heritage places also promotes sustainable development through the
conservation of original materials and reduced demand for new construction materials.
Heritage places contribute to the character, amenity and identity of Greater Bendigo and
enhance its appeal as a place to live, work and visit. The amendment will have positive
social effects as it seeks to protect and enhance the cultural heritage of Greater Bendigo
for future generations; it will also improve community awareness about the importance
and value of heritage places.
The identification and protection of heritage places will also attract tourism to the region
thereby having a positive economic effect.
Although some additional costs may be borne by property owners through the need to
obtain a planning permit under the new Heritage Overlays, the amendment will not result
in any significant adverse economic impacts. New places included within the Heritage
Overlay will also become eligible for the Citys Heritage Restoration Loan Scheme.
Strategic Justification Planning Context
The amendment supports and implements the Loddon Mallee South Regional Growth
Plan, 2014 by addressing Principle 6: Protect and enhance our natural and built
environment, of the plan which states that settlement growth and development will occur
in sympathy with environmental and heritage assets. The amendment, by identifying and
protecting our cultural heritage assets implements a key future direction of the growth
plan by protecting identified visually important landscapes, and cultural and built heritage
places.
The Amendment is also supported by the following clauses in the Greater Bendigo
Planning Scheme:
State Planning Policy Framework
Clause 15 - Built Environment and Heritage of the State Planning Policy Framework. The
introduction to this clause notes that Planning should ensure all new land use and
development appropriately responds to its landscape, valued built form and cultural
context, and protect places and sites with significant heritage, architectural, aesthetic,
scientific and cultural value.
Clause 15.01-5 - Cultural identity and neighbourhood character which has the objective:
To recognise and protect cultural identity, neighbourhood character and sense of place.
Related strategies include:
Ensure development responds to its context and reinforces special characteristics of
local environment and place by emphasising:
o The underlying natural landscape character.
o The heritage values and built form that reflect community identity.

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o The values, needs and aspirations of the community.


The objective for clause 15.03-1 - Heritage Conservation is to ensure the conservation
of places of heritage significance. On this basis, it identifies a number of strategies
relevant to this amendment including:
Identify, assess and document places of natural and cultural heritage significance as
a basis for their inclusion in the planning scheme.
Provide for the conservation and enhancement of those places, which are of,
aesthetic, archaeological, architectural, cultural, scientific, or social significance, or
otherwise of special cultural value.
Local Planning Policy Framework
Planning Scheme Amendment C201 which was approved by the Minister for Planning in
May 2016, made a number of changes to improve and strengthen the management of
heritage issues in the Planning Scheme. Stage 2 of the White Hills and East Bendigo
Heritage Study supports and implements these strategic directions.
Clause 21.08 Environment establishes the heritage significance of Greater Bendigo
through the Greater Bendigo Thematic Environmental History, 2013 and sets the
framework for protecting heritage places.
This Clause includes a number of objectives and strategies to guide the identification,
protection and management of heritage, including the following objectives:
To identify and protect heritage places with Aboriginal and historic cultural value as
well as natural value.
To protect and enhance the municipalitys heritage for future generations.
The amendment also implements the objectives of Clause 22.06 Heritage Policy:
To retain heritage assets for the enjoyment, education and experience of residents,
visitors and future generations of the municipality.
To ensure that new development is sympathetic with the appearance and character
and maintains the significance of heritage places, including surrounding precincts.
To encourage the preservation, maintenance, restoration and where appropriate,
reconstruction of heritage places.
To encourage the sympathetic re-use and adaptation of heritage places so that such
places are maintained and enhanced.
Consultation/Communication
Extensive public consultation occurred in 2013 and 2014 during the initial identification
and research of places for White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study Stage 1.

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Stage 2 of the Study has not undergone public consultation yet due to the potential for
loss of places through demolition. When Stage 1 of the Study underwent informal public
consultation prior to the commencement of Planning Scheme Amendment C201, the City
received 3 applications for demolition of places identified as significant. Due to the
Minister for Plannings stance that an Interim Heritage Overlay request wont generally
be supported unless an amendment has been publically exhibited, it was decided that
public consultation for Stage 2 of the study would solely be undertaken through this
formal planning scheme amendment process.
The Greater Bendigo Heritage Advisory Committee reviewed the Stage 2 Study at its 17
March 2016 meeting.
Proposed Future Consultation
The Heritage Study and associated amendment documents will be publically exhibited
for a minimum of one month, as required under the Planning and Environment Act 1987.
The City must give notice of the Amendment to all owners and occupiers who may be
materially affected by an Amendment, together with prescribed Ministers and public
authorities.
Specifically, public exhibition will include:
The sending of notices to the land owners/occupiers where the Heritage Overlay is
proposed as per the recommendations of the Study.
Placing notices in the Local Newspapers (Bendigo Advertiser), Victorian Government
Gazette and on Councils website.
Media releases, Have Your say web page
As part of the public exhibition process, affected members of the community will be
invited to meet with Council officers to discuss the content and implication of the planning
scheme amendment.
Following completion of the public exhibition period, a report will be provided to Council
which will outline the exhibition process and the submissions received.
Conclusion
It is recommended that Council adopt Stage 2 of the White Hills and East Bendigo
Heritage Study, 2016 and seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare
and exhibit Amendment C223.
Options
Council has the option of:
Supporting the Amendment proposal and making a request to the Minister for
Planning to authorise preparation and exhibition of the Amendment (Officers
recommendation).
OR
Refusing the request to prepare an Amendment.

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Resource Implications
The amendment will increase the number of properties included within the Heritage
Overlay and this would ordinarily result in an increase in the number of planning permit
applications. However by including the affected places in the Permit Exemptions
Incorporated Plan and removing the need for planning permits for minor works, it is
considered that the implications of the amendment will be reduced.
Officer time will be required to prepare the Amendment documentation for authorisation,
exhibition, manage the exhibition process and liaise with the Minister for Planning.
The City is responsible for payment of statutory fees and costs incurred in the processing
of the Amendment. This may include a panel hearing process if the Amendment has
unresolved submissions following exhibition.
Attachments

Explanatory report
White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study Stage 2, 2016

RECOMMENDATION
The Greater Bendigo Thematic Environmental History, 2013 identified the White Hills
corridor and East Bendigo as the highest priority areas requiring a heritage study.
Authorising Amendment C223 will commence the process of including the places of
identified heritage significance into the Heritage Overlay.
Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1. Adopt the White Hills and East Bendigo Heritage Study - Stage 2, 2016.
2. Request the Minister for Planning to authorise Council to prepare Amendment C223
to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.
3. When Authorised by the Minister, exhibit Amendment C223 to the Greater Bendigo
Planning Scheme giving notification as required for a period of one month.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

2.3

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

1096 CALDER ALTERNATIVE HIGHWAY, LOCKWOOD 3551 DEVELOPMENT OF 2 SHEDS AND THEIR USE FOR THE PURPOSE
OF A STORE (CARAVAN STORAGE)

Document Information
Author

Kahlua Reid, Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
Application details:

Development of 2 sheds and their use for the purpose of a


store (caravan storage).

Application No:

DG/791/2015

Applicant:

Craig and Leonie Bassler

Land:

1096 Calder Alternative Highway, LOCKWOOD 3551

Zoning:

Rural Living Zone

Overlays:

There are no overlays applying to the site.

No. of objections:

Consultation
meeting:

A consultation meeting was not undertaken at the applicant's


request.

Key considerations:

Is the proposed use appropriate under the zone?


Is the proposed development appropriate in the area?
Will there be adverse amenity impacts?

Conclusion:

The proposed use of land for a store (caravan storage) is


prohibited under the Rural Living Zone as it is not in
association with the occupation of a resident of a dwelling on
the property.
To quote Victorian Government Using Victorias Planning
Scheme if the applicant insists on the application for a
prohibited use or development being considered, the
responsible authority (Council) must do so. The only decision
the authority can validly make in such a case where the use or
development is prohibited is to refuse to grant a permit.
In this instance the applicant has insisted a decision be made
on the proposal.

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Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2016-2017 Update)
Planning for Growth
Planning ensures residents have access to diverse, affordable and sustainable
housing choices.
Sustainability
The built and natural qualities that make Greater Bendigo an attractive and appealing
place are valued and conserved.
Background Information
Application History
A summary of the application history is provided as follows:
Application received on 19 October 2015 for Use and Development of Two Sheds
(associated with existing dwelling).
Advertising was completed on 1 December 2015 no objections received.
Request to amend application received on 22 January 2016 to include Use of Two
Sheds as a Store (caravans).
Ongoing discussion and correspondence with applicant through February and March
about proposal.
New advertising occurred due to change in proposal, completed 18 May 2016.
Four objections received following advertising.
Report
Subject Site and Surrounds
The site is a rectangular shaped allotment located on the eastern side of the Calder
Alternative Highway approximately 180 metres north of the Lockwood Road / Bendigo
Maryborough Road intersection.
The site has a frontage to the highway of 95.55 metres, a depth of 251.46 metres and
has a total area 2.403 hectare.
A dwelling and associated outbuildings are located in the eastern half of the site.
One of the outbuildings is utilised by the owner as a business known as Tuff Covers
which produces canvas and synthetic fabric products (i.e. boat covers).
Access to the site is provided via an unsealed driveway which extends along the
northern boundary from the Calder Alternative Highway.

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A dam is located towards the northern boundary approximately 35 metres north west of
the dwelling.
Fill has been placed at the front of the site.
Scattered native vegetation is evident.

Figure 1 View of site from Calder Alternative Highway

The site is located within an area zoned Rural Living which extends north to Wiegards
Road. Land to the north of Wiegards Road is zoned Farming (refer to Figure 2).

Figure 2 Zone Map

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Nearby properties generally contain dwellings and associated outbuildings and are
utilised for lifestyle purposes. There are also a number of businesses approved to
operate in the area including (but not limited to):
1090 Calder Alternative Highway (adjoining application site to the south) Planning
Permit 130/2006 Dog Training
792 Lockwood Road (adjoining application site to the east) Planning Permit
167/2000 Landscaping Supplies
CA 8 Calder Alternative Highway Planning Permit 637/2011 Use and Development
of Dwelling, Animal Keeping (Cattery), Creation of Access and Advertising Signage
1161 Calder Alternative Highway - Planning Permit 790/2013 Use of Land for Trade
Supplies and Industry on land zoned Farming
These land uses are permissible under their relevant zonings.
The Calder Alternative Highway is a Category 1 Road managed by VicRoads.

Figure 3 Location map showing subject site. Objectors' properties marked with a star.

Proposal
The application seeks planning approval for the development of two sheds and their use
for the purpose of a store (caravan storage).
The sheds are proposed to be located south of the existing dam.
One shed is proposed to run parallel to the southern boundary, while the other will run in
a north western direction, forming an L like shape.
A minimum offset of 4.8 metres will be provided from the southern boundary.
The sheds are proposed to be 30 metres long and 9 metres wide, with a maximum wall
height of 3.6 metres.
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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

There was discussion about reducing the size of the sheds, however, no formal
amendment was received.

Figure 4 Proposed site plan

While initially the application was to utilise these sheds solely for domestic purposes it
was subsequently amended for the use of a store, with the intention to store other
peoples caravans.
The caravan storage is a business proposition where external parties will bring their
caravans to the site and subsequently collect when required.

Figure 5 Proposed location of one shed

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Figure 6 Proposed location of second shed

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme


The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal:
State Planning Policy Framework
Clause 11.05-1 Regional Settlement Networks
Clause 11.12
Loddon Mallee South Regional Growth
Clause 16.02-1 Rural Residential Development
Municipal Strategic Statement
Clause 21.05

Settlement

Other Provisions
Clause 35.03
Clause 52.29
Clause 65

Rural Living Zone


Land Adjacent to a Road Zone, Category 1
Decision Guidelines

Consultation/Communication
Referrals
The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal:
Referral

Comment

VicRoads

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic

No objection

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Referral

Comment

Environmental Health

No objection

Public Notification
The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and
nearby owners and occupiers.
As a result of advertising, four objections were received, with the grounds of objection
being:
Proposed business not in keeping with the zoning of land;
Would set a precedent for operations of this nature in rural living area;
Traffic flow along unsealed driveway next to adjoining dwelling;
Noise impacts;
Movement of traffic from Calder Alternative Highway;
Extent of dirt (fill) on site;
Property devaluation;
The objections are discussed below.
Planning Assessment
Site and Zoning Context
The site and immediately surrounding land is identified as being within the Rural Living
Zone.
The purposes of the Rural Living Zone include:
To provide for residential use in a rural environment.
To provide for agricultural land uses which do not adversely affect the amenity of
surrounding land uses.
To protect and enhance the natural resources, biodiversity and landscape and
heritage values of the area.
To encourage use and development of land based on comprehensive and
sustainable land management practices and infrastructure provision.
The City of Greater Bendigo is committed to protecting and providing opportunity for rural
residential development in the municipality which is encouraged through Clause 21.05
Settlement. Objectives of Clause 21.05 Settlement include to provide alternative
residential options to those offered in the urban areas of Bendigo and to recognise that
rural living patterns of settlement are a legitimate and important aspect of settlement in
the municipality.
The purpose of the zone does not include the encouragement of commercial enterprises.
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While it is permissible for some commercial operations (i.e. community market, plant
nursery, primary produce sales etc.) to occur under the Rural Living Zone (subject to
planning approval) the use of land for a store in the manner proposed by this application
is not allowed (prohibited).
Land Use
The application proposes to use the sheds as a store (caravan storage).
Under the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme the use of land for a store is defined as
land used to store goods, machinery or vehicles.
The Rural Living Zone identifies the use of land for a store is a Section 2 Use (permit
required) subject to satisfying the following condition must be in a building, not a
dwelling, and used to store equipment, goods, or motor vehicles used in conjunction with
the occupation of a resident of a dwelling on the lot.
Lindsay Pty Ltd v Benalla Rural CC [2005] VCAT 708 (11 April 2005) stated because a
use is a Section 2 does not imply that a permit should or will be granted. The responsible
authority must decide whether the proposal will produce acceptable outcomes in terms of
the State Planning Policy Framework, Local Planning Policy Framework, the purpose
and decision guidelines of the zone and any other decision guidelines in Clause 65.
Based on the information provided the proposal does not satisfy the condition of the
zone, as the store is not associated within the occupation of a resident of the dwelling.
Manningham CC v Treefern Nominees Pty Ltd (Beasleys) [2008] VCAT 1105 (17 June
2008) supports this conclusion in paragraph 81 which states Furthermore, the second
part of the condition requires goods being stored to be used in conjunction with the
occupation of a resident of a dwelling on the lot. Thirty to thirty-five caravans owned by
other people and accommodated on the land, whether gratis or for payment hardly meet
that requirement.
The City of Greater Bendigo therefore has determined this use of the land is prohibited
and therefore an application must be refused.
In addition, the proposal is not considered to be in keeping with the purposes of the zone
which have previously been discussed in this report.
A number of objectors have also raised concern about the proposed use in regards to
amenity impacts.
These potential impacts are acknowledged, however, given that the use is prohibited for
the above reasons no further discussion regarding these matters is necessary.
The applicant did undertake discussions about amending the proposal for a third time
back to domestic purposes, however, no formal amendment was received and there was
no evidence the sheds would be utilised in this manner. The applicant has confirmed in
writing it is their intention to operate the business from the property.

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Development
Two sheds are proposed to be constructed on the site near the southern boundary.
There are already a number of sheds established on the property and therefore it is
questionable about the need for an additional two sheds of this size and scale.
The applicant was prepared to reduce the size of the sheds and indicated there were
domestic items (i.e. tractor, horse float) that were intended to be stored.
The siting of the sheds is generally considered acceptable.
No objections were received to the development of the sheds.
As the application is a combined use and development proposal the application needs to
be considered as a whole.
Although it may be reasonable for additional shedding to be provided on the site for
domestic purposes, based on evidence available there is concern that additional
shedding would not be utilised in this manner.
Other Matters
Two trees have been removed from the application site where the two sheds were
proposed to be located (refer to Figures 3, 4, 5 and 6).
Having inspected the site and noting the scattered native vegetation which is evident it is
considered possible these two trees were native and therefore would have required
planning approval for removal. As the vegetation was removed prior to an onsite
inspection no further action is proposed to be taken regarding this matter as it cannot be
proven the vegetation was native.
Conclusion
The decision to be made is not a consideration of the specific detail of the application nor
what has occurred in the area historically.
This is an application where the use is prohibited due to the proposal not satisfying a
condition in the Rural Living Zone which requires the use of land for a store to be in
conjunction with the occupation of a resident of the dwelling.
Therefore no planning permit can be granted.
The applicant may elect to appeal this position at VCAT.
Options
Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may
resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit.

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In order to justify granting a permit, Council would need to be satisfied that the use is not
prohibited. The question of whether the use is prohibited is a matter of judgement having
regard to the relevant facts. The opinion expressed in this report is that the use is clearly
prohibited and that no permit should be granted.

RECOMMENDATION
Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo
City Council resolve to Refuse to Grant a Permit for the development of two sheds and
their use for the purpose of a store (caravan storage) at 1096 Calder Alternative
Highway, LOCKWOOD 3551 for the following reasons:
1. The use of the land for a store (caravan storage) is prohibited under the Rural Living
Zone.
2. The proposal is inconsistent with the purposes of the zone.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

2.4

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

1, 2, 35 AND 42 IRONTREE CLOSE, KANGAROO FLAT 3555 - 8 LOT


SUBDIVISION

Document Information
Author

Bryce Kilian, Statutory Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
Application details:

8 Lot subdivision

Application No:

DS/543/2015

Applicant:

Tomkinson Group

Land:

1, 2, 35 and 42 Irontree Close, KANGAROO FLAT 3555

Zoning:

General Residential Zone

Overlays:

None

No. of objections:

Consultation
meeting:

No formal consultation meeting took place. Consultation was


undertaken through phone conversations with the objecting
parties.

Key considerations:

Does the proposal accord with the covenant?


Will the proposal result in an unacceptable increase in
vehicle traffic in the area?
Will the proposal significantly alter the character of the
area?
Loss of vegetation.

Conclusion:

The application is recommended for approval on the basis that


it represents an acceptable outcome with regards to the
requirements of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.

Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2016-2017 Update)
Planning for Growth
Planning ensures residents have access to diverse, affordable and sustainable
housing choices.

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Productivity
Greater Bendigo has a vibrant and diverse economy that grows jobs and enables
good living standards.
Sustainability
The built and natural qualities that make Greater Bendigo an attractive and appealing
place are valued and conserved.
Report
Subject Site and Surrounds
The subject site is actually four separate sites, two adjoining and two stand alone. All are
owned by the same entity and all have frontage to both Duke Street and Irontree Close.
The four lots are similarly sized and range from 740 to 940 square metres. The lots all
slope downward from south to north and slightly downward from west to east. The lots
are all able to be connected to reticulated services.
The area to the west of the subject lots was created at roughly the same time and as part
of the same subdivision so they are generally similar to the lots in question, size wise
and are all rectangular. The main difference between the subject lots and the majority of
other lots in the subdivision relates to street frontage in that the majority of lots only have
a single street frontage whereas the subject lots have two street frontages.
The vast majority of surrounding lots contain single dwellings. The new dwellings within
this subdivision to the west of Duke Street are modern, contemporary housing styles with
shallow street frontages and dominant vehicle storage facilities. Land to the east of Duke
Street forms part of an older area established through the 1970s approximately with the
majority of houses being weatherboard construction with vehicle storage to the side and
rear.

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Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objectors' properties marked with a star. Two objections
were received from a single property.

Figure 2: Aerial Photo of the area.


received from a single property.

Objectors' properties marked with a star. Two objections were

Proposal
The application seeks approval to subdivide four existing lots in common ownership into
eight lots.
The four lots in question all have frontages to both Duke Street and Irontree Close. At
present the lots have the ability to connect to all reticulated services.
The lot sizes range from 740 to 940 square metres and the proposed lots will range from
370m2 and 477m2, with the average lot size being 427m2.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Figure 3: Application Plans

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme


The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal:
State Planning Policy Framework
Regional development (clause 11.05).
Urban environment (clause 15.01).
Sustainable development (clause 15.02).
Residential development (clause 16.01).
Movement networks (clause 18.02).
Development infrastructure (clause 19.03).

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Municipal Strategic Statement


Municipal profile (clause 21.01).
Key issues and influences (clause 21.02).
Vision - strategic framework (clause 21.03).
Strategic directions (clause 21.04).
Settlement (clause 21.05).
Housing (clause 21.06).
Environment (clause 21.08).
Reference documents (clause 21.10).
Other Provisions
General Residential Zone (clause 32.08).
Residential subdivision (clause 56).
Decision guidelines (clause 65).
Referral and notice provisions (clause 66).
Consultation/Communication
Referrals
The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal:
Referral

Comment

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification
The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and
nearby owners and occupiers.
As a result of advertising, four objections were received, with the grounds of objection
being:
The proposal does not accord with the covenant.
The proposal will generate additional, unacceptable amounts of traffic.
The proposal will significantly alter the character of the area.
Vegetation loss.
The objections are discussed below.

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Planning Assessment
What does the covenant control?
The common objection to all parties is the question of whether the proposal accords with
the covenant registered on the title of the majority of lots within the subdivision.
The specific part of the Covenant AG669360M the objecting parties refer to reads as
follows;
"That the said lot will not be re-subdivided nor will more than one residence be
erected on the said lot, with the exception of lot 64, and any lot prefixed with the
Letter S which is for a further stage of development or unless the said lot
exceeds 1000 square metres in area in which case no more than two townhouses
can be erected on the said lot."
In this case, all of the lots applicable to this application are indicated as being an S lot
therefore this element of the covenant never applied.
Further to the above, the specific lots in question do not contain any such covenant
owing to the intention of the original developer to allow these lots to be more further
developed.
The above information being the case, no weight can be given to the objection ground as
the covenant does not apply to the lots in question and therefore cannot be considered.
Is the site appropriately located for some form of infill residential development?
The State and Local Policy framework of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme lends
support for an intensification of development on well serviced sites which are in proximity
to a full range of urban services including public transport and local convenience
shopping. The site is well situated to take advantage of the Kangaroo Flat business area
and is served by bus route 55 which travels along Duke Street. In this regard, the policy
attributes of the application are excellent.
The local provisions of the Planning Scheme, Clause 21.06 (Housing) and the
referenced Bendigo Residential Development Strategy 2014 identify the site as being
within existing urban zoned land (being in the General Residential Zone) hence policy
support for development on this site exists, subject of course to consideration of whether
the proposed development is site responsive and appropriate with regard to character.
The General Residential Zone has purposes to: encourage development that respects
the neighbourhood character of the area; implement neighbourhood character policy and
adopted neighbourhood character guidelines; provide a diversity of housing types and
moderate housing growth in locations offering good access to services and transport;
and allow educational, recreational, religious, community and a limited range of other
non-residential uses to serve local community needs in appropriate locations.

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A significant amount of growth has occurred in the area over the past 5 10 years with
numerous subdivisions approved and developed which have contributed to the changing
character of the area. Previously, the area featured larger blocks and had a semi-rural
feel, however the new subdivisions have created what is now a conventional look and
feel with smaller lot sizes and significantly reduced setbacks between dwellings. These
developments have created a new character to the area to the west of Duke Street which
the proposal would accord with.
In this case, the proposed development complies with the zone purposes and the
general neighbourhood character of the area.
The Residential Strategy 2014 has the aims of striving for urban containment and a
compact Bendigo. This proposal complies with the objectives of this by creating
additional lots within a well serviced, developing area.
Will the character of the area be significantly altered as a result of the proposal?
Some of the objectors believe that the lots being proposed are too small in comparison
with the prevailing pattern of subdivision in the area. They argue that larger lot sizes are
called for in the area. The proposed subdivision will yield lot sizes between 370m 2 and
477m2, with the average lot size being 427m2.
The proposed subdivision represents a fairly conventional suburban development. This is
not an unreasonable response to the site context. The area has undergone significant
change with large greenfield sites progressively transformed into housing estates. The
proposed subdivision is part of that change. The sites exclusions from the covenant
discussed earlier in this report add further weight to this.
The proposed subdivision offers diversity in the suburban housing market, perhaps
catering for people who want a smaller than average house. Providing such lot diversity
will not come at the expense of a desirable neighbourhood character. All of the proposed
lots will be large enough to accommodate a single dwelling with front and side setbacks,
providing the opportunity for garden planting and separation between dwellings.
In this context there is no compelling reason why the proposed lot sizes should be made
to exactly match those found in the surrounding estates. It is enough that the lots are
compatible with the general pattern of suburban development in the area and that they
are capable of producing positive built form outcomes that also support a more compact
Bendigo.
Traffic and vehicle movements
The sites have two street abuttals: Duke Street to the east and Irontree Close to the
north and south depending on the locality of the site. Irontree Close is a loop. The entire
area forms part of a contemporary housing estate with land to the west of Duke Street
being a more modern form. Duke Street links Wesley Street and Queen Streets though
both respective streets link back to Mitchell Street, a larger collector road.

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The current plan proposes to cut each of the four lots in half which would allow any
development on the sites to be designed in a manner which could have a single access
to Irontree Close and a single access to Duke Street or two separate access points to
Duke Street.
Concern was raised by objectors in Irontree Close regarding increased traffic in Irontree
Close.
In this case, all of the lots are at the entry and or egress points to Irontree Close owing to
the street being a loop. It would be highly irregular for vehicles from any of the proposed
new lots to drive around the Irontree Close loop as this would serve no purpose as the
loop only leads back to Duke Street. In order to exit or enter the area vehicles travel
along either Wesley Street or Queen Street.
The proposed subdivision layout will disperse the lots along Duke Street such that no
vehicles from the proposed lots will need to travel along the entire length of Irontree
Close with Duke Street being constructed in a manner that can accommodate the
additional 40 vehicle movements per day potentially generated in addition to what is
currently possible.
Does the subdivision comply with clause 56 in the Planning Scheme?
The proposal complies with all the subdivision design objectives in clause 56 of the
Planning Scheme. The lots in the subdivision will be fully serviced and they will enjoy a
good standard of amenity owing to their solar orientation and outlook. The site has many
locational advantages that make it a strong candidate for residential development,
including access to a shopping centre in Kangaroo Flat and public transport linkages. All
the lots will be large enough to contain a suburban dwelling with a backyard.
The site will also integrate well with the existing pedestrian and cycling network
established linking the development with the existing infrastructure.
Will roadside vegetation require removal?
At present it is difficult to determine if any of the existing roadside vegetation in either
Duke Street or Irontree Close would require removal as the proposal is for subdivision
only.
Notwithstanding this, the vast majority of the vegetation within the road reserve was
planted at the time of the subdivision for amenity value by the developer over the past 5
10 years with some older, remnant trees present.
Whether any vegetation would require removal would be contemplated by the City's
Engineers when vehicle crossover permits are applied for at the time of dwelling
construction.
Conclusion
The proposed subdivision complies with the requirements of the Planning Scheme for
the reasons discussed above. On this basis the submitted subdivision should be
approved and a permit should be granted for the proposal.
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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Options
Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may
resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit.
Attachments
Objections
RECOMMENDATION
Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo
City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for 8 lot subdivision
at 1, 2, 35 and 42 Irontree Close, KANGAROO FLAT 3555 subject to the following
conditions:
1.

LAYOUT PLANS
The subdivision, as shown on the endorsed plans, must not be altered without
the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

2.

DETAILED DRAINAGE
Prior to the certification of the plan of subdivision under the Subdivision Act
1988, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to
and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be
endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to
scale with dimensions. The plans must include:
(a) Direction of stormwater run-off.
(b) A point of discharge for each lot.
(c) Independent drainage for each lot.
(d) Consent from responsible authority for discharge.

3.

CONSTRUCTION OF WORKS
Road works, drainage and other civil works must be constructed in accordance
with the Infrastructure Design Manual and plans and specifications approved by
the responsible authority and must include:
(a) Underground drainage.

4.

SECTION 173 AGREEMENT


Should the applicant opt to install an on-site stormwater detention system or
water quality treatment system then, prior to the issue of statement of
compliance, the applicant/owner must enter into an Agreement under section
173 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. Such Agreement must covenant
that:
(a) The owner will maintain each system and not modify without prior written
approval from the responsible authority.
(b) The owner shall allow duly authorised officers of the responsible authority to
inspect the system at mutually agreed times.
(c) The Owner will pay for all costs associated with the construction and
maintenance of the system.
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5.

COLIBAN WATER
(a) The owner is required to provide reticulated water and sewerage services to
each of the lots within the subdivision. Services are to be provided in
accordance with our specifications.
(b) All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed,
are to be protected by Registered Easement in favour of Coliban Region
Water Corporation.

6.

POWERCOR
(a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act
1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with section
8 of that Act.
(b) The applicant shall provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision
in accordance with Powercors requirements and standards, including the
extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply
system, as required by Powercor (A payment to cover the cost of such work
will be required). In the event that a supply is not provided the applicant
shall provide a written undertaking to Powercor Australia Ltd that
prospective purchasers will be so informed.
(c) Where buildings or other installations exist on the land to be subdivided and
are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be brought into
compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by the Victorian
Electricity Supply Industry. The applicant shall arrange compliance through
a Registered Electrical Contractor.
(d) Any buildings must comply with the clearances required by the Electricity
Safety (Network Assets) Regulations.
(e) Any construction work must comply with the Officer of the Chief Electrical
Inspector No Go Zone rules.
(f) The applicant shall provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version
of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any
amendments which have been required.

7.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS
The owner of the land must enter into an agreement with:
(a) A telecommunications network or service provider for the provision of
telecommunication services to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in
accordance with the providers requirements and relevant legislation at the
time.
(b) A suitably qualified person for the provision of fibre ready
telecommunication facilities to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in
accordance with any industry specifications or any standards set by the
Australian Communications and Media Authority, unless the applicant can
demonstrate that the land is in an area where the National Broadband
Network will not be provided by optical fibre.
(c) Before the issue of a Statement of Compliance for any stage of the
subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, the owner of the land must
provide written confirmation from:
(d) A telecommunications network or service provider that all lots are
connected to or are ready for connection to telecommunications services in
accordance with the providers requirements and relevant legislation at the
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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

time.
(e) A suitably qualified person that fibre ready telecommunication facilities have
been provided in accordance with any industry specifications or any
standards set by the Australian Communications and Media Authority,
unless the applicant can demonstrate that the land is in an area where the
National Broadband Network will not be provided by optical fibre.
8.

AUSNET SERVICES (GAS)


The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to AusNet
Services (Gas) in accordance with section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

9.

EXPIRY OF THE PERMIT


(a) The plan of subdivision is not certified within two years from the date of this
permit; or
(b) The subdivision is not completed within five years from the date of
certification of the plan of subdivision.
The responsible authority may extend the time for certification of the plan if a
request is made in writing before the permit expires or within six months
afterwards.

CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ASSETS


Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible
authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed
in the report must be the condition of kerb & channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs
and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties
either side of the development. Unless identified with the written report, any damage to
infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or
developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public
infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit.
City of Greater Bendigo Engineering & Public Space Note
A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater
Bendigo Engineering & Public Space Unit prior to any work commencing in the road
reserve.
CONSENT FOR WORK ON ROAD RESERVES
The applicant must comply with:
(a) The Road Management Act 2004,
(b) Road Management (Works and Infrastructure) Regulations 2005, and
(c) Road Management (General) Regulations 2005
with respect to any requirements to notify the coordinating authority and/or seek consent
from the coordinating authority to undertake works (as defined in the Act) in, over or
under the road reserve. The responsible authority in the inclusion of this note on this
planning permit is not deemed to have been notified of, or to have given consent, to
undertake any works within the road reserve as proposed in this permit.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

2.5

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

51 HANNANS ROAD, MANDURANG SOUTH 3551 - REFUSAL OF


DEVELOPMENT PLAN AND SUBDIVIDE LAND INTO 2 LOTS

Document Information
Author

Liz Commadeur, Subdivision Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose
Application details:

The subdivision of land into two 1 hectare lots; one lot will
contain an existing dwelling, the other will be vacant.

Application No:

DS/121/2016

Applicant:

Shane Muir Consulting Engineers Pty Ltd

Land:

51 Hannans Road, MANDURANG SOUTH

Zoning:

Low Density Residential Zone

Overlays:

Bushfire Management Overlay


Development Plan Overlay 4 Density Management Areas

No. of objections:

There were no submissions.

Key considerations:

Central to an assessment of the application is the small size


of both proposed lots relative to the character of the area
where low density residential allotments predominate. The
proposed subdivision does not satisfy the requirements of the
Development Plan Overlay 4.

Conclusion:

This report recommends that Council oppose the approval of


a Development Plan on neighbourhood character grounds,
and that no permit be granted.

Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 2017 (2016-2017 Update)
Planning for Growth
Planning ensures residents have access to diverse, affordable and sustainable
housing choices.
Productivity
Greater Bendigo has a vibrant and diverse economy that grows jobs and enables
good living standards.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Sustainability
The built and natural qualities that make Greater Bendigo an attractive and appealing
place are valued and conserved.
Report
Subject Site and Surrounds
The subject site is comprised of one parcel located on the southern side of Hannans
Road in Mandurang South. The site is rectangular in shape with an area of 2.34 hectares
and has a very slight slope to the north western end of the site. A dwelling and
associated outbuildings are located on the western end of the site. A dam is located in
the south western part of the site. Access to the site is via an existing gateway in the
north west corner of the site to Hannans Road. Secondary access is available from the
north east corner to Hannans Road. Hannans Road is a sealed rural road. A rural post
and wire fence delineates the site to the adjoining properties. Scattered native trees are
located along the Hannans Road and Queen Street road reserve frontages.
The site is described as Crown Allotment 1 Section 2, Township of Mandurang, Parish of
Mandurang.
Power and telecommunications are connected to the site. The site is reliant on water
tanks for potable water supply and a wastewater treatment system for the management
of wastewater.
The pattern of subdivision in the area is comprised of established low density residential
lots to the south, east and west. Land to the further west is zone for Rural Living
purposes. The Mandurang South recreation reserve is located to the north of the site.
The character of the area is defined by the semi-rural and bushland setting, particularly
due to the location of forested areas further to the north west and west.

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site.


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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Proposal
This application seeks the approval of a development plan and subsequent issue of a
permit to subdivide the land into two low density residential lots.
The lots will each an area of 1.17 hectares.
Access to the lots will be from Hannans Road.
Lot 1 will contain the existing dwelling, while Lot 2 will be vacant.

Figure 2: Proposed plan of subdivision

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme


The site is in the Low Density Residential Zone (LDRZ) and is covered by the
Development Plan Overlay Schedule 4 (DPO4) and Bushfire Management Overlay
(BMO). A permit must not be granted to subdivide land, until a development plan has
been prepared to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. A permit is required to
subdivide land in the LDRZ and BMO.
The following provisions of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme are relevant to the
application:
State Planning Policy Framework:
Regional development (clause 11.05).
Sustainable development (clause 15.02).
Integrated transport (clause 18.01).
Movement networks (clause 18.02).
Municipal Strategic Statement:
Municipal profile (clause 21.01).
Key issues and influences (clause 21.02).
Vision - strategic framework (clause 21.03).
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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Strategic directions (clause 21.04).


Settlement (clause 21.05).
Housing (clause 21.06).
Environment (clause 21.08).
Infrastructure (clause 21.09).
Reference documents (clause 21.10).

Local Planning Policies:


Salinity and erosion risk policy (clause 22.04).
Other relevant provisions:
Low Density Residential Zone (clause 32.03).
Development Plan Overlay (clause 43.04).
Bushfire Management Overlay (clause 44.06)
Decision guidelines (clause 65).
Referral and notice provisions (clause 66).
Consultation/Communication
Referrals
The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal:
Referral

Comment

Country Fire Authority

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification
The application was informally advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to
adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising, no submissions
were received.
Planning Assessment
Development Plan Overlay Schedule 4
The DPO4 requires that lots in this area are to be at least two hectares in area. The
proposal is to subdivide the land into lots of only one hectare in area. Lots under the
minimum lot size of two hectares may be approved following consideration of the three
matters discussed below.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Will the subdivision be compatible with the general character of the area?
Hannans Road is comprised of lots that range in area from 0.51 to 2.65 hectares in a
bushland and semi-rural character setting. The site is situated between Queen Street to
the east and Hunts Gap Road to the west. A planning application for a five lot
subdivision, which abuts the site to the west, is currently being assessed by the Planning
Department. These proposed lots will each have an area in excess of two hectares.
In the context of the wider neighbourhood, the lots range between 0.9 to 4.5 hectares. In
similar terms to Hannans Road, properties are characterised by larger lots with large
gardens, particularly along Mandurang South Road and Queen Street.
According to the original parish plan, the site is included in the Township of Mandurang
and the size of the crown allotments varied from 0.2 hectare to 10 hectares (see Figure
3). These smaller parcels generally form part of slightly larger landholdings, such as the
recreation reserve opposite the site on the northern side of Hannans Lane. There are
smaller lots in the area, approved under some planning permits issued in excess of 15
years ago. One example is the re-alignment of three boundaries located immediately
east of Queen Street. This was approved because it was the re-subdivision of existing
lots and no new lot was created. Research into older files failed to identify the reason for
approving smaller lots whilst being located in an area with a two hectare minimum.
The proposal fails to meets the fundamental requirements of maintaining and
strengthening the semi-rural qualities of the area. The proposed lots, being just in excess
of 1 hectare, are 50% of the area desired by the DPO. The subject site is already 2.34
hectares in area, which fits well with the rest of the precinct. It is difficult to imagine how
any new dwelling on Lot 2 could strengthen the sites semi-rural setting given the modest
size of the lots.
Although the land is zoned for low density residential purposes, its distance of
approximately 10 km from Bendigo has influenced a pattern of development more suited
to rural living type activities, including the keeping of horses. It is important that these
existing activities are encouraged in a specified area, thus reducing the problem of
conflicting interests with dwellings constructed on smaller lots.
The intent of the DPO4 is to maintain the semi-rural and bushland qualities of the area,
by managing the density of future development on generous sized lots. It is imperative
that Council supports areas designated with specific minimum lot sizes under the DPO4,
to protect the future integrity of the area. It may be argued that the eastern end of the site
(proposed Lot 2) is devoid of vegetation and there is ample space for a dwelling and
associated outbuilding. However, in reality, setting a precedent for smaller lots and
subsequent development on these lots in the area would negatively impact on the
existing unique character.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Figure 3: Location of site shown in the original Township of Mandurang in the Parish of Mandurang

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Figure 4: Location of site in the Mandurang LDRZ precinct 11

Can the lots be appropriately serviced?


Power and telecommunication services are able to be connected to the site. The existing
dwelling is reliant on a septic tank system for the management of wastewater. The
application was referred to the Citys Environmental Health Officer regarding the
retention of wastewater within the boundaries of the proposed lots. The EHO concurred
with the conclusion stated in the submitted Land Capability Assessment that both
proposed lots were capable of retaining wastewater within the lot boundaries. Water
tanks are used for the collection of potable water.
Can remnant vegetation be retained?
There is very little native vegetation located on the site. There is no native vegetation
proposed to be removed as part of this application.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

In conclusion, the proposed subdivision is not in keeping with this neighbourhood


character for the following reasons:
Both lots are about half the area desired by the DPO4.
The neighbourhood has developed a strong sense of place due to the nature of the

bushland and semi-rural landscape character. The creation of smaller lots would
undermine this existing character.
The subdivision will set a poor precedent that would undermine the intent of the
DPO4.
Permit Application
As stated earlier, a development plan must be approved prior to the issue of a planning
permit. The assessment of the application for the approval of a permit in a LDRZ area is
very similar to that of the development plan. Issues of neighbourhood character have
been addressed earlier in the report. It is noted that there is no reason to believe that
amenity issues would be raised by the proposed subdivision, mainly due to the
separation by stands of native vegetation.
The proposed subdivision would undoubtedly create lots that are far removed from the
intent of the DPO4, and subsequently not meet the requirements of the LDRZ, in
particular the protection and enhancement of the natural environment and character of
the area (clause 32.03-6).
Bushfire Management Overlay (BMO)
The site is affected by the BMO, due to its close proximity to forested areas. The
application was referred to the Country Fire Authority, who had no objection, subject to
the inclusion of standard conditions should a permit be issued.
Conclusion
Based on the assessment of the character of the low density residential area, the area of
both lots do not meet the meet the minimum lot size of two hectares and subsequently
does not accord with the existing or desired neighbourhood character in the manner
required by the Development Plan Overlay 4.
Options
Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may
resolve to: approve a development plan prior to the issue of a planning permit with
conditions or refuse a development plan prior to the issue of a refusal to grant a planning
permit.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

RECOMMENDATION
Pursuant to Section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, Greater Bendigo City
Council resolves the following with respect to the land at 51 Hannans Road,
MANDURANG SOUTH 3551:
1. To refuse to grant approval for the submitted development plan. The proposed
development plan does not satisfy the requirements of Schedule 4 to the
Development Plan Overlay because:
1.1 The lot sizes shown on the plan do not accord with the preferred 2 hectare
minimum lot size specified for the Mandurang South area.
2. To refuse to grant a permit allowing the subdivision of the land into two lots for the
following reasons:
2.1 A permit cannot be granted in the absence of an approved development plan.
2.2 The proposed lot sizes are incompatible with the existing character of the area.

PAGE 54

Planning for Growth - Reports

2.6

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

2015/16 ANNUAL REPORT - ROAD MANAGEMENT PLAN VERSION


2.0

Document Information
Author

Paul Nicholson, Coordinator GIS & Asset Information

Responsible
Director

Rachelle Quattrocchi, Acting Director, Presentation and Assets

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this document is to report on the City of Greater Bendigo's performance
levels with regard to the Road Management Plan Version 2.0 as adopted by Council at
its Ordinary Meeting on 18 June 2014.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017 (2016-2017 Update):
Theme: 2

Planning for Growth

Action: 2.3.4

Increase footpath maintenance in accordance with the


Road Management Plan.

Theme: 5

Sustainability

Challenges and
Opportunities

Keeping our assets and infrastructure in good repair is an


important principle.
Essential infrastructure, footpaths, drainage, and well built
and maintained roads are essential for economic and
social purposes.

Strategic Objective: 4

Council manages its resources, assets and infrastructure


for the long term.

Strategy: 5.3

Essential infrastructure is constructed, maintained and


renewed to meet the needs of current and future residents.

Background Information
The Road Management Act 2004 allows each road authority in Victoria to develop a
Road Management Plan (RMP). The primary purpose of the RMP is to document the
standards and priorities that enable road authorities to safely manage the road and path
network.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

The RMP details road hierarchies, inspection frequencies and hazard response times
with a focus on ensuring the road and path network is safe for the public to use. This
differs to an Asset Management Plan that focuses on the overall condition and long term
replacement of road assets. The RMP is the City of Greater Bendigo's (CoGB) tool in
the defence against claims of negligence in relation to the municipal road and path
network.
At the Ordinary Meeting on 18 June 2014, Council adopted the Road Management Plan
Version 2.0 and resolved that, commencing in July 2015, an annual report be presented
to Council on the performance against the plan.

Report
The two key areas that the CoGB need to comply with under the RMP are safety
inspections and defect response times. CoGB has a legal obligation to proactively
inspect its road and path network to ensure it is in a safe condition.
Programmed Safety Inspections:
In the past year, over 30,446 proactive inspections were undertaken on roads and paths
by CoGBs three dedicated asset inspectors (Sealed Roads, Unsealed Roads, and
Footpaths). Of these, 30,366 (99.7%) were undertaken within the timeframe specified in
the RMP.
Defect Response Works:
The RMP outlines the required response times to defects on the road and path network,
with these times being based on risk to the community.
The 'footpath lip' intervention level in the RMP Version 2.0 was reduced from 50mm to
25mm, which added a significant number of defects. Council allocated $300,000
additional funding in both 2014/2015 and 2015/2016 to meet this new standard and a
number of external contractors were engaged. This work involved either the replacement
of sections of footpath where footpath lips were substantial or grinding of concrete
footpaths where the lip was smaller. Over the last 2 years more than 2000 footpath lips
over 25mm have been fixed. Additionally, 6000 smaller footpath lips were able to be
removed by grinding.
Efficiencies through the use of technology have also occurred. IPads have been provided
to maintenance crews allowing them to receive and complete works in the field
eliminating the paper based system. Having an accurate completion date for
maintenance works is critical for Council to be able to defend claims.
Resource Implications
Since the adoption of the RMP V2.0, Council has invested significant additional funds in
the repair and maintenance of footpaths. This has substantially reduced the number of
footpath lips around the municipality.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Conclusion
CoGBs asset inspectors are doing a great job ensuring that the proactive inspection
regime specified in the RMP is being complied with.
The additional Council funding for footpath repair and maintenance over the previous 2
years has enabled CoGB to meet the new standard for footpaths outlined in the RMP
V2.0. This has also allowed the treatment of footpath lips and defects that are below the
threshold for treatment under the RMP with the extensive program of footpath grinding
eliminating thousands of minor lips, improving safety for pedestrians and other path
users.
Utilising technology has considerably improved the management of works through
paperless and timely delivery and completion of works.

Attachments
1. Road Management Plan Version 2.0

RECOMMENDATION
That Council acknowledge CoGBs asset inspectors efforts in complying with the RMP
and the huge reduction in outstanding RMP defects that was achieved by the additional
funding supplied by Council over the previous 2 years.

PAGE 57

Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

3.

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

PRESENTATION AND VIBRANCY

3.1

DOMESTIC ANIMAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 2016 - 2021

Document Information
Author

Anthony Schofield, Coordinator Animal Services

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
This report considers the submissions received in response to the draft Domestic Animal
Management Plan and recommends that Council adopts the amended Domestic Animal
Management Plan 2016-2021 (DAMP).
Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017 (2015-2016 Update):
Theme 3.

Presentation & Vibrancy

Strategy:

3.5

People are supported to learn about and make decisions that


enable them to be safe and the healthiest they can be

Action

3.5.2

Adopt the updated Domestic Animal Management Plan (20162021) and implement the first-year actions.

Integrated Transport and Land Use Strategy (ITLUS)


Dog Parks: Harcourt Park, Strathdale is a park to exercise your dog off their leash. The
park has a bitumen walking track, four small dams, a creek complete with steel bridges
and good shade trees. Dog parks open the opportunity for both dogs and their owners to
exercise in a nice park setting.
Domestic Animals Act 1994
The DAMP has been developed in accordance with the legislative requirements of this
Act.
Background Information
At its meeting of 25 November 2015, Council considered the draft DAMP and resolved to
approve the release of the draft plan for the purpose of seeking public comment. The
public comment period closed on Wednesday 23 December, 2015.
The DAMP is a review of the previous Plan adopted by Council in 2013.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Councils are required to submit a DAMP to the Secretary of the Department of Economic
Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources (DEDJTR) every 4 years. The next
submission of DAMP was due to the Secretary on 3 November 2016. However, as this
date coincides with Council elections, the Secretary has agreed to accept submissions of
new DAMPs by 3 November 2017.
As some Councils, including City of Greater Bendigo have almost completed the next
DAMP, DEDJTR have advised that these plans can still be submitted prior to 3
November 2016 and although required to be reviewed annually, will not need to be
renewed until 3 November 2021.
Report
The draft DAMP was forwarded to all respondents who registered their interest.
Public notice was given in local newspapers seeking comment and submissions on the
draft plan. It was also made available on the internet and social media.
In addition to the issues and initiatives Council has already reviewed, which were
received as part of developing the draft DAMP, a total of 48 submissions have been
received on the draft DAMP. Some of these contain several topics/issues (9). The topic
of cat curfew received the most responses (44). No person asked to be heard.
A petition with 365 signatures was presented to Council requesting the opening of 2 dog
parks in Bendigo. This is addressed further in the body of the report.
The 2 issues that received the most comment are the creation of 2 extra dog parks (off
leash exercise areas) and whether or not to extend the current cat curfew.
A summary of the submissions are included in the following table
Submitters Topic / Issue

Number of
Officer Comments
Responses

Dogs in Public Places (Creation of additional dog parks)


Support for additional dog parks.

Off lead areas with secure fencing for 3


dogs to interact / mingle and associate
with other dogs off-lead.
Off-lead dog park allows a place for 2
owners and dogs to exercise /
exercise promotes health benefits for
both owners and dogs.

PAGE 59

Agree. Addressed in body of


report.

Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Submitters Topic / Issue

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Number of
Officer Comments
Responses

Support for one or two additional dog 4


parks in one of the following suburbs
to allow people a considerable
distance from the current dog park a
place to exercise their dogs:
Epsom (2)
Huntly (1)
Eaglehawk (2)
Maiden Gully (1).
Education / Compliance
We need a more proactive presence 1
from the Animal Management Team in
the (Harcourt) dog park to help with
education of dog owners as to the
responsibilities as a dog owner,
especially with understanding what is
unacceptable behaviour by both the
owner and/or their dog.

Agree. Officers already carry


out proactive patrols when
existing resources allow.

Desexing of dogs and cats should be 1


expanded. Propose that on return of
an impounded cat/dog to their owner
if not desexed, issue a voucher on the
understanding that this will be done.

Disagree. This would provide


a disincentive for owners to
reclaim their pet, leading to
the pound needing to find new
homes for an increased
number of cats and dogs. The
City
already
provides
discounted
desexing
vouchers for owners to desex
their pets.

Maybe
offer
much
cheaper 1
registration for desexed cats and
dogs. Ideally desexing should be
compulsory for all cats and dogs
unless a registered breeder.

Agree. Owners of desexed


cats and dogs already receive
discounted fees to register
their pet.
Disagree.
Compulsory
desexing would provide a
disincentive for owners to
register their pet.

24/7 cat curfew


Against - reasons

29

A 24 hour cat curfew would be too


difficult to Police / enforce / waste of
Council resources.

Agree. This is addressed


further in the body of the
report.

More cats will be abandoned /


dumped or surrendered for euthanasia
PAGE 60

Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Submitters Topic / Issue

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Number of
Officer Comments
Responses

by owners against the curfew.


There would be less adoptions of cats.
Affordability
issues
/
financial
implications / prohibitive costs of cat
enclosures that would be required if
the curfew was implemented.
It is difficult / impossible to keep cats
within property boundaries.
Issues with adaptation / adjustment of
cats to the curfew. This would impact
on the animals health being confined
24/7.
It is cruel.
Instead of introducing a 24/7 curfew,
more effort should be made by
Council to educate cat owners who do
not supervise their animals.
More thought needs to go into how the
24/7 curfew would impact on the
deprivation of cats freedom / ability to
exercise / welfare / mental wellbeing.
Council should police / monitor
Facebook / social media where cats /
kittens are advertised. Too many are
advertised free to good home. This
contributes to higher numbers of cats
that are at fault for a 24/7 curfew
being considered.
The community will not accept the
24/7 cat curfew proposal and will not
assist with its enforcement.
The curfew will cause a decrease in
cat microchipping and registration.
Disagree with 24/7 curfew, but agree
with night time curfew.
There should be a compulsory /
mandatory requirement for bells on

PAGE 61

Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Submitters Topic / Issue

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Number of
Officer Comments
Responses

cats.
A 24/7 curfew would not allow
effective rodent / vermin capture at
properties and there would be a rise in
vermin / rodent populations.
It is only an initiative so that Council
can raise more revenue.
For - reasons

14

It will reduce cats stalking / hunting /


killing native flora and fauna.

Disagree. This is addressed


further in the body of the
report.

It will reduce overnight instances of


cats fighting / howling / wandering and
setting the neighbourhood dogs in
motion.
Residents are tired of cleaning up of
cat faeces / cat spraying / mating
instances on other properties.
It will provide a reduction in
euthanasia rates because cats will be
required to be contained, wont be
caught in traps / wandering so wont
be impounded and unclaimed.
Cats should be kept on their own
property.
Wandering cats are rife in Bendigo
despite being a City in a Forest with
important
environmental
assets
throughout both rural and urban
areas.
The current curfew does not meet the
needs of the community.
The regulations have a grey zone in
which cats must be confined between
dusk and dawn, but may be allowed
outside
during
daylight
hours,
however they are supposedly not to
trespass on neighbours properties.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Submitters Topic / Issue

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Number of
Officer Comments
Responses

The onus is placed upon neighbours


to monitor, record details of wandering
and trespassing cats, to communicate
with the relevant cat owner before
proceeding with action (which should
be un-necessary) and indeed facing
possible belligerent and aggressive
behaviour from said cat owners.
Yarra Ranges and the Mornington
Shires are to commended for
introducing total cat confinement 24/7.
It should be a priority for the City of
Greater Bendigo.
If the public were informed during the
development of the current DAMP,
that cats are the only domestic animal
that are allowed to roam during the
day, they are often maimed or killed in
road accidents, fight with other cats
and end up ill or diseased, kill other
peoples pets or domestic animals as
well as an enormous threat to wildlife,
urinate on peoples doors, fight and
wail during the night causing dogs to
bark and in any case wake everyone
up, then the support for the current
controls might have been very
different.
No opinion

1
The
Citys
Animal
Management Officers would
be responsible. Would require
further
resources
from
Council if 24/7 curfew was
introduced.

If a 24 hour cat curfew was


introduced, who is responsible for
checking that cats are confined?
Will the neighbours be expected to
report any wandering felines?
Responsible Pet Ownership Program
This should be extended past schools, 1
children and community groups.

PAGE 63

Agree.
Officers
already
distribute information packs
on responsible pet ownership
to all owners registering their
dog for the first time and also
visit popular dog walking
locations
to
hand
out
information packs.

Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Number of
Officer Comments
Responses

Submitters Topic / Issue


Restricted Breed Dogs

Penalties for Restricted Breed Dogs 1


should include penalties if they kill or
injure another dog.

Agree. The Domestic Animals


Act has penalties that may
include
a
term
of
imprisonment not exceeding 6
months or a fine not
exceeding up to $18,500.

Euthanasing of dangerous dogs


Query made if person in the role of 1
Manager Parking & Animals Services
has
knowledge,
experience,
judgement
to
declare
a
dog
dangerous / menacing and deem it
necessary for it to be euthanised.
Suggest that a vet or animal
behaviourist should be involved in this
decision making process. Is there an
appeals process before action is
taken?

The Manager Parking &


Animal Services and the
Director
Planning
&
Development have delegated
authority under the Domestic
Animals
Act
to
order
destruction of a dog under
certain
circumstances.
Council
has
statutory
responsibilities
concerning
public safety and a procedure
has been developed to
provide guidance for this
decision making.
Owners can appeal these
decisions through the County
Court or VCAT.

General comments
There are many good features of the 1
plan including:
Encouragement of microchipping;
Encouragement of
paying /
castration;
Eschewing the requirement for
dogs to always be on leash.

Agree.

There are a couple of issues that the 1


plan fails to address satisfactorily:
Compulsory Cat Registration (with
microchipping). It is nigh on
impossible to distinguish between
feral cats and domestic animals,
so effective control programs are
impracticable.
Compulsory
registration would enable effective
feral cat programs.

It is a requirement that all cats


and dogs are registered and
microchips.

Reduced

The Domestic Animals Act

registration

for

rural
PAGE 64

Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Submitters Topic / Issue

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Number of
Officer Comments
Responses

dogs. Most of Councils domestic


animal-related
services
are
focused strongly on urban pets. All
registrants pay for these services
even though they make scant use
of them. Rural dog owners are
paying for many services they
neither use nor need.

allows
for
discounted
registration for working dogs.

Dogs should really be on a lead


when in public. Its a safety issue.

Until such time as there is


sufficient dedicated areas/dog
parks for owners to exercise
their dogs it is not proposed to
introduce a blanket on-leash
requirement.

Allow dogs to be walked on a lead


in parks and other open spaces.
Specifically, Crusoe Reserve park
which is no animals. It should be
dogs on lead. There are no other
available facilities in the Lockwood
South / Bendigo area.

Dogs are prohibited to enter


Crusoe Reserve due to
conflict with Conservation
Principles.
Additional areas to exercise
dogs is addressed in body of
the report.

The Council seems to be going about 1


animal management in a very
responsible way.

Agree

I feel that the 2016-2020 Plan is much 1


improved - it is more constructive,
inclusive
and
provides
advice/information and guidelines.

Noted

There is a need for signage at the 1


current dog park in form of sandwich
boards at entrances with changing
reminders such as picking up after
your dog or what is unacceptable dog
owner behaviour. Council contact
information needs to be displayed
within the park at various locations,
e.g. at the bridge entrances.

Agree - requires
investigation.

Issues that will require a Council decision are discussed below.

PAGE 65

further

Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Dog exercise areas (dog parks)


Council may remember being advised at the Councillor Forum presentation of the draft
DAMP on 17 November 2015, that officers had identified 1 site in Kangaroo Flat and 1
site in California Gully to further investigate the establishment of 2 dog parks (off leash
exercise areas). This was positively received by Councillors at the Forum.
The current use of Harcourt Park, Crook Street, as an off leash dog exercise area has
proven to be very popular with dog owners and minimum disruption to local residents
reported. Harcourt Park is within the Eppalock Ward (approximately 6,000 registered
dogs).
The 2 sites identified for Councils consideration are Allingham Street, Kangaroo Flat
(Lockwood Ward, approximately 7,000 dogs registered) and Turner Street, California
Gully (Whipstick Ward approximately 7,000 dogs registered). Maps and further
information provided below.
The sites listed below have been identified through internal discussions with City staff
and suggestions submitted by community members. All sites have been considered in
context of the recently scoped Greater Bendigo Public Space Plan, where the community
will be given the opportunity to express their views on a broad range of open space use.
One or both of the suggested sites could be used as a pilot project to inform the Public
Space Plan.
Both sites would need to be fenced and have close proximity to access water.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Lockwood Ward - Allingham Street, Kangaroo Flat

This site has been chosen due to:


Land is already used by local residents as parkland and to walk their dogs.
Adequate parking.
Low impact on residents.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Established shade trees. Noise and visual buffer for residents.


Easy access to water.
Total land area of 26,000 square meters.
Borders the railway line.
Provides a low maintenance, natural environment for dog play.

Other sites in this ward that have been considered include:


Location
Wolstencroft Reserve,
Flora Hill
Ken Wust Reserve,
Quarry Hill

Crusoe Reserve
Kangaroo Flat

Negatives
No infrastructure
Expensive to provide water to site
No trees
No fencing
Close proximity to sporting field
Limited parking during sporting events
(weekends)
Flood retention area
Limited fencing
No trees
The oval has been developed as a sporting
field

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Whipstick Ward Turner St, California Gully

PAGE 69

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

This site has been chosen due to:


The land is within the Eaglehawk Structure Plan 500m buffer zone, associated with
the landfill site.
Land is already used by local residents as parkland and to walk their dogs.
Adequate parking.
Road separates the land from residences.
Low impact on residents.
Established shade trees.
Total land area of 21,000 square metres.
Provides a low maintenance, natural environment for dog play.
Water close by.
Other sites in this ward that have been considered include:
Location
Albert Roy Reserve, Eaglehawk

Negatives
Impact on other user groups
No shade
No infrastructure
High costs to fence
Scout Hall Reserve, Eaglehawk Impact on residents - residents on 2 sides
Small area
Limited parking
Lake Tom Thumb, Eaglehawk
Gets very wet in winter
(Golf course end of lake)
Contamination of lake (if not fully fenced)
Is a Natural Reserve and will conflict with
Conservation Principles
Difficult to fence
Rough ground
No infrastructure
Prouses Road to Finn Street, Impact on residents and nursing home
Holdsworth Road
No infrastructure
(This area may be considered should CoGB
consider further on leash controls in the future)
Havilah Road / Dillon Street, Impact on residents - residents on 2 sides
Long Gully
Limited parking during the week
McGowan Street, Long Gully
Impact on residents - residents on 3 sides
Lack of parking
Limited infrastructure
Costs
Turner Street site:
Capital costs for installing fencing, gates and signage approximately $27,000
Capital costs for reticulated water and drinking fountain for dog and owner
approximately - $5,000
Recurrent maintenance costs approximately $6,500 per annum

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Allingham Street site:


Capital costs for installing fencing, gates and signage approximately $32,000
Capital costs for reticulated water and drinking fountain for dog and owner - $10,000
Recurrent maintenance costs - $6,500 per annum
Comments
Establishment of additional dog parks and shared use arrangements will be well
received by dog owners and will provide for suitable dog exercise areas should the City
move towards a default on-leash requirement in all public areas within City of Greater
Bendigo or restrict the use of sporting fields as dog exercise areas.
Council collects approximately $1,2M income from dog and cat registration fees and
fines each year. The animal services program is full cost recovery with an annual
surplus in the order of $100,000. The creation of additional dog exercise areas is a
positive initiative which will be well received by the public and demonstrates that Council
is investing income from registration fees back into community facilities.
With Bendigo predominantly being an off leash city, no legal mechanism, consultation or
Council resolution is required as all public areas (other than those declared by Council to
be on leash), are off leash by default. Therefore residents who are aware of the sites
can and are using the area for dog exercise already.
Residents in the vicinity of both Turner Street, California Gully and Allingham Street,
Kangaroo Flat have been consulted in relation to the proposed dog exercise areas. A
summary of feedback obtained includes:
2 responses were received for the Turner Street site. Both responses were negative,
sighting extra traffic and parking, dog faeces, dogs off leash, disruption to the area,
close proximity to the playground and the cost to transform the area into a dog park,
as issues.
3 responses were received in relation to the Allingham Street site. All were positive
and believe the area would be suitable for use as a dog park.
A petition was received by Council with 365 signatures requesting the opening of two (2)
off lead dog parks in Bendigo, as outlined below:
"Bendigo Council has indicated two new fenced off-lead dog parks may be
provided in Kangaroo Flat & Eaglehawk. There are positive exercise and
socialisation benefits for dogs and owners alike.
We, the undersigned fully support this initiative and would like to see the new
off lead dog parks opened."
The Bendigo Advertiser conducted an online survey following the council meeting to
adopt the draft DAMP, asking the question; Does Greater Bendigo need more off-lead
dog parks?
There were no numbers provided for the amount of people who responded, however
83% voted yes and 17% voted no.

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

The provision of additional dedicated fenced dog exercise areas is a positive initiative
and will reduce the use of active sporting fields by owners for exercising dogs.
The recommendation is to approve the creation of 2 additional dog exercise areas,
Turner Street, California Gully and Allingham Street, Kangaroo Flat and that these
sites are considered for future funding bids.
Cat curfew
The City has an existing curfew which requires cats to be confined between sunset and
sunrise. This curfew has been reviewed further following submissions received in
response to the draft DAMP. Extending the curfew to require cats to be confined at all
times was considered. The review found:
Disadvantages:
There would be significant resourcing costs to enforce cats wandering at large during
the day time. (additional staff would be required to meet the community expectation).
It is much more difficult and costly to confine a cat which may make it prohibitive for
some people to own a cat.
It is very difficult to catch a cat which does not wish to be caught.
Additional controls may provide a disincentive to register and or microchip, resulting
in more cats not being reclaimed and euthanized.
55% of respondents to the original survey and 69% of respondents to the draft plan
did not support extending the curfew to 24/7.
There are welfare considerations with 24/7 confinement as many residents would
need to lock their cat indoors.
Difficult to introduce and enforce at the local level.
Advantages:
It could reduce nuisance issues between neighbours.
Reduction in impact on native fauna.
Positive welfare consideration in relation to reduction in fighting and disease transfer.
Would be less spraying and faecal matter left in public areas and neighbouring
properties.
Cat kept in a safe house often live longer.
Cats who roam are at risk of injury from cars, human cruelty, poison baits, attacks
from other animals and unwanted pregnancies.
The Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources have
advised that 13 councils have cat curfews. Of these 7 have 24-hour curfews and 6
(including Bendigo), have night time curfews. No neighbouring municipalities have cat
curfews. Comments from councils with a 24 hour curfew:
o No one was able to provide statistics or other information on whether the 24-hour
curfew was effective, in reducing the impact on wildlife.
o One utilises resources to identify and educate owners of cats wandering or
trespassing, prior to attempting to trap the cats. Reluctant to trap cats as 80% of
impounded cats are not reclaimed. (88% not reclaimed in CoGB 14/15).
o One proactively traps cats in environmentally sensitive areas, (Dandenong Ranges).

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

o One doesnt resource or actively enforce 24-hour curfew. Advised they would need to
increase staff resources to police 24-hour curfew.
o Councils proactively enforcing the 24-hour curfews have greater staffing resources
than CoGB, in comparison to the number of cats and dogs registered and area
covered:
Council 1- 2,500 square kms 3,927 registered cats and dogs per Animal
Management Officer.
Council 2 - 700 square kms 2,666 registered cats and dogs per Animal
Management Officer.
CoGB -3,000 square kms
Management Officer.

5,189 registered cats and dogs per Animal

The Bendigo Advertiser conducted an online survey following the Council meeting to
release the draft DAMP for public comment, asking the question: Should cats be allowed
to roam the streets of Bendigo?
There were 2,255 responses.
17% responded Yes, all the time
39% responded Yes, but only during the day'
43% responded No
1% responded Other
The recommendation is to not extend the curfew during the life of the 2016 2021
plan.
Risk Analysis:
Council must have its Plan in place by November 2017 or risk not being in compliance
with the Act.
There is significant risk if Council does not have rigorous management processes to deal
with dog attack and other nuisance issues, with relevant delegations in place. This has
been an area of focus over the past 4 years.
There is also significant risk if Council does not have competent and trained enforcement
staff dealing with dog attack issues.
Consultation/Communication
Consultation with the community and relevant stakeholders is the key to the successful
implementation of any plan. The following consultation took place in the development of
the DAMP:

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Internal
Consultation has occurred with staff from Units including Parks and Natural Environment,
Community Partnerships, Building and Property, Strategy, Open Space Planning and
Active and Healthy Communities.
External
Initial consultation occurred with relevant stakeholders as part of the Local Law and
Domestic Animal Management Plan review. This consultation has included:
February July 2015
Community survey / questionnaire Completed by 643 persons. The information
gathered has helped validate the data and inform the actions within the Plan.
Media releases and paid advertisements in the Local media to advise the community
of the development of the new plan.
Information in the Greater Bendigo News and on social media
Information made available at the Customer Service Centers and on the City of
Greater Bendigo Web.
Mail out to relevant community contacts and interest groups.
Information at District Engagement and Ward Meetings.
Listening posts at several locations.
November December 2015
Promotion of the draft DAMP and comments were sought through the CoGB, social
media sites.
Copies of the draft DAMP were made available at Councils Customer Service Centre
and sent to people who registered their interest. It was also made available on the
internet.
Public notice was given in local newspapers.
Consultation has been ongoing and will continue with community members, stakeholder
and staff from other City departments throughout the implementation and life of the plan.
Amendments to the Plan
The following amendment has been incorporated into the draft plan:
Incorporate advice from the Secretary of the Department of Economic
Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources extending the life of this DAMP
until 2021.

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Where to from here?


The next step is to submit the adopted DAMP to the Secretary of the Department of
Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources and begin implementing actions
stated in the plan.
An update on the plans progress will be included as part of Councils Annual Report.
Resource Implications
There have been no additional costs incurred in the development of the plan as the
Parking & Animal Services Management Team developed the plan in-house utilising
exiting resources.
The majority of objectives within the Plan fall within the animal management operating
budget.
The following aspects of the Plan would require funding through the budget process in
future years:
Provision of additional dog parks;
Ongoing training and developing of staff
Undertaking a pet expo;
Continuing with the Be Safe Around Dogs and Responsible Pet Ownership Programs;
Continuing with dog and cat desexing vouchers and subsidised microchipping.
Conclusion
The Plan will ensure that Council meets its obligations under the Domestic Animals Act
and will use a mix of educational and regulatory approaches to promote the notion of
responsible pet ownership and gain compliance with the Act.
Much of the Plan will be business as usual. The Act is quite prescriptive in the strategic
areas of animal management that Council must address; hence the Plan has been
structured in a way to capture these requirements.
The Plan recognises the need to address one of the key liability indicators (reducing
obesity) by providing open space for dogs to exercise which in turn provides incentive for
residents to exercise themselves.
The Plan will make a valuable contribution towards the City's vision of Greater Bendigo
being the best place to live, work and visit through minimising the nuisance and possible
danger created by some dogs and cats.
Attachments
Domestic Animal Management Plan.

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1. Adopt the Domestic Animal Management Plan for the period 2016 2021
2. Maintain the sunset to sunrise cat curfew during the life of the 2016 2021 Plan.
3. Approve the creation of 2 additional dog exercise areas, Turner Street, California
Gully and Allingham Street, Kangaroo Flat and that these sites are considered for
future funding bids within the life of the 2016 - 2021 Plan.

PAGE 76

Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

3.2

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

ADOPTION OF NEW ANIMAL KEEPING LOCAL LAW NO. 2 AND


MINOR AMENDMENTS TO ADMINISTRATION LOCAL LAW NO. 10

Document Information
Author

Anthony Schofield, Coordinator Animal Services

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
This report considers submissions received in response to the draft Animal Keeping
Local Law and recommends that the Greater Bendigo City Council adopt the draft Animal
Keeping Local Law No. 2. as well as minor amendments to Administration Local Law No.
10.
Proposed changes to the current Local Laws include:
Reinforcing expected standards by introducing a clause into the Local Law to provide
for animals to be kept in accordance with the relevant industry code of practice or
standards;
Improve community understanding by changing the land zoning descriptions within
the Local Law definitions to be consistent with the Greater Bendigo Planning
Scheme;
Changing the wording in the local Law so that penalties apply after a finding of guilt
by any Court instead of after conviction by any Court;
Amending the 'appeal of decision to refuse application' provision of the administration
Local Law to enable appeals to be heard more quickly by expanding the range of
suitably qualified people who can participate on a review panel;
Changing the notification period from 10 days to 28 days to advise the applicant of
the review panels decision. This will allow sufficient time for information to be
gathered and considered when an appeal is made.
The draft Local Law No. 2. and amendments to the Administrative Local Law No. 10. will
come into effect on 1 August 2016, if the Council resolve to adopt the law.
Policy Context
City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017 (2016-2017 Update):
Theme 3.

Presentation & Vibrancy

Strategy:

3.5

People are supported to learn about and make decisions that


enable them to be safe and the healthiest they can be.

Action

3.5.2

Adopt the updated Domestic Animal Management Plan (2016-

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

2021) and implement the first-year actions.


Background Information
Local Government is given the ability to create, administer and enforce Local Laws under
the Local Government Act 1989. Typically, Local Laws must be reviewed every ten
years however, if appropriate, laws can be amended earlier if the need is identified, this
review is as a result of changes to the Domestic Animal Management Plan and
development in industry best practice guidelines.
Local Laws must be consistent with the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and
Responsibilities and prepared with consideration to the 'Guidelines for Local Laws
Manual'.
Report
Council reviewed Animal Keeping Local Law No. 2 at its Ordinary meeting of 25
November 2015. At this meeting Council resolved to give public notice of its intent to
adopt a new Local Law and make the draft Animal Keeping Local Law available for
community comment.
The Local Government Act requires that Local Laws are reviewed every 10 years or
earlier if the need is identified. The current Animal Keeping Local Law No. 2 came into
effect on 1 January 2010 and will cease operation on 31 December 2019.
The objective of the Animal Keeping Local Law is to regulate and control activities
associated with the keeping of animals, birds and poultry so as to provide for the welfare
of animals, birds and poultry and to protect general amenity.
A process of community engagement and internal review has occurred throughout the
past 16 months to review the current Animal Keeping Local Law and develop a new
Animal Keeping Local Law.
In reviewing a Local Law it is important to reflect on the overall aims of the law and its
relevance. A Local Law is a subordinate instrument and it must not duplicate or be
inconsistent with any existing Act or regulation.
The following Acts, plans, policies and regulations have been considered as part of the
review:
Council Plan
Local Government Act
Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme
Domestic Animals Act
Victorian Charter of Human Rights
City of Greater Bendigo Human Rights Charter
National Competition Policy
Domestic Animal Management Plan
Australian Poultry Standards
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Disability Discrimination Act


Impounding of Livestock Act
Prevention of Cruelty to Animal Act
Numerous Local Government - Animal Keeping Local Laws
Open Space Strategy
Relevant Codes of Practice.
The draft Local Law was made available for public viewing for a period of 4 weeks,
during which time the public were invited to make submissions in accordance with
Section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989. Public notices were placed in the
Advertiser, Government Gazette and McIvor Times. Media stories also appeared in the
Weekly and Advertiser.
Summary of changes are:
Animal
Keeping
Local Law No.
2

The introduction of a clause into the Local Law to provide for animals
to be kept in accordance with the relevant industry code of practice
or standards.
Changing the land zoning descriptions within the Local Law
definitions to be consistent with the Greater Bendigo Planning
Scheme.
Changing the penalty for any breaches of the Local Law that refer to
conviction by any Court to a finding of guilt by any Court.

Administration Amendment to the appeal of decision to refuse to issue a permit


Local Law No. provision, to enable appeals to be heard more quickly by expanding
the range of suitably qualified people who can participate on a
10
review panel.
Amendment to change the notification of the panels decision from
10 days to 28 days to allow for both parties to an appeal to have
sufficient time to respond to the process, and all information to be
gathered and considered when an appeal is made.
Submissions
Two written submissions were received in relation to the draft Local Law, as well as a
recommendation from the solicitor Council engages for advice and legal representation
for animal related matters. No person asked to be heard.
A summary is included in the following table:
Issue / Initiative
Would like to see a tightening of rules for keeping of other livestock in residential
areas to control the impact of vermin, pest animals and smell on adjoining properties.
Raised by - Community

Supported No

Reason: The Local law already allows for officers to take action against livestock
owners who allow their animal to cause a nuisance to anyone by noise, dust, smell or
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Issue / Initiative
other condition and fail to keep the land occupied by the animal clear and clean of
waste, feed scraps and excrement, which may attract vermin or pest animals.
Issue / Initiative
The number of new subdivisions with smaller blocks is increasing, as is the resubdivision of large house blocks to have 2 and more dwellings onto what once held
one home. This must impact on the number of animals allowed in any one dwelling.
On the current policy of 2 dogs per residential dwelling, the potential is that 10 dogs
may reside at 5 units on what was once equivalent to one house block.
People residing in units, townhouses flat-type dwellings often choose small yappy
dogs. They fail to exercise the pet and leave the pet to spend many hours leading to
barking and making a nuisance to neighbours. Boredom and lack of exercise are the
product of irresponsible pet ownership.
Many who live in these dwellings are renters with no responsibility felt towards
sustaining a harmoneous neighbourhood.
Another issue for these dwellings is that without an adequate back yard the residents
allow the dogs to roam and deficate in neighbouring properties and nature strips.
Suggested alternatives are:
1 Rather than per dwelling, a minimum sized land is required per dog/cat.
2 Blocks where two or more dwellings exists a total number of dog ( or cats ) be
capped for the whole facility not per dwelling. In my example above a total of 3 or
4 dogs for the entire block of units would be a maximum
3 A requirement where multiple dwellings exist there are strict requirements on pet
ownership. Barking control, dog waste management, compulsory daily outdoor
exercising of the pet is mandated. And a reportable offense if not followed.
4 Where there are multiple dwellings on a block the neighbours surrounding the
property be notified of the number of dog/cats and be given the option of
partitioning against the ownership of animals particularaly if there have been past
issues with irresponsible pet ownership and noise.
Implimenting such strict requirements would be an incentive for pet owners to be
responsible and cooporative with the neighbourhood.
Raised by - Community

Supported - No

Reason: It is not proposed to regulate the number of dogs allowed to be kept at a


property, based on the size of the property. It would not be practical to regulate every
cat and dog kept at all unit blocks within the City. It is recommended to introduce a
clause into the Local Law to stipulate that animals, including dogs must be kept in
accordance with the applicable industry codes. There is already legislation in place
that deals with barking dogs, dog waste and containment of dogs.
Issue / Initiative
Changing the wording in the local Law so that penalties apply after a finding of guilt
by any Court instead of after conviction by any Court.
Raised by Legal Advice

Supported - Yes

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Issue / Initiative
Reason: After a finding of guilt, Magistrates are sometimes reluctant to record a
conviction against perpetrators as part of their punishment. Changing the wording will
make it less restrictive for officers to enforce subsequent breaches of the Local Law.
Where to from here?
The next step in the process is for Council to adopt the new Local Law. The new Local
Law will be advertised in the local papers and the Government Gazette. The Minister for
Local Government will also be provided with a copy of the new Local Law.
Consultation/Communication
The following consultation took place in the review of the Animal Keeping Local Law.
February July 2015
Community survey / questionnaire Completed by 643 persons.
Media releases and paid advertisements in the Local media to advise the community
of the Local Law review.
Information in the Greater Bendigo News and on social media
Information made available at the Customer Service Centers and on the City of
Greater Bendigo Web.
Mail out to relevant community contacts and interest groups.
Information at District Engagement and Ward Meetings.
Listening posts at several locations.
November December 2015
Public notice was given in the Government Gazette and local newspapers.
Promotion of the Local Law review and comments were sought through the City's
social media sites.
Copies of the draft Local Law were made available at the Citys Customer Service
Centre. It was also made available on the internet.
Consultation has also been undertaken with various City of Greater Bendigo staff.
Resource Implications
Staff resources and minor financial cost will be incurred through implementation,
education and monitoring of the new Local Law.
Attachments
1. New Animal Keeping Local Law
2. Community Impact Statement

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Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1. Adopt and implement the Animal Keeping Local Law No. 2.
2. Adopt and implement the amended provisions of the Administration Local Law No.
10.
3. In accordance with Section 119 subsection (3), that after the local law has been made
or amended, that Council must give notice in the Government Gazette and a public
notice specifying:
(a) the purpose and general purport of the local law:
(b) a copy of the local law can be obtained from Council offices; and
(c) that a copy of the local law may be inspected at the Council office.
4. Send a copy of the Animal Keeping Local Law No. 2 and amended Administration
Local Law No. 10 and community Impact Statement to the Minister for Local
Government.

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Presentation and Vibrancy - Reports

3.3

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

GREATER BENDIGO WELLBEING SURVEY 2015

Document Information
Author

Stacey Poulter, Social Planner

Responsible

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to present the major results of and comment on the Greater
Bendigo Wellbeing Survey conducted in October 2015.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Leadership and Good Governance
1.4 Continue to improve Councils communications and engagement practices to support
open and inclusive decision making and reach diverse audiences.
1.4.1 Implement the Community Engagement Framework to guide engagement
opportunities, timetables and feedback throughout strategy and policy development and
services reviews.
Strategy Reference
Greater Bendigo Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2013-2017 Wellbeing Charter for
the City of Greater Bendigo
Council Policy Reference
Community Engagement Framework evidence based decision making.
Background Information
In November 2011 the City of Greater Bendigo undertook the first Wellbeing Survey for
the Municipality, with 1,544 households completing the survey. Following this, in 2014
the second wellbeing survey was completed with over 2,174 households completing the
survey.
Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s):
19 October 2011, 29 February 2012 and 23 Jan 2013.

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Report
There are a number of areas of peoples lives that influence social wellbeing: health,
safety, social connectedness, knowledge and skills, paid work, economic standard of
living, civil and political rights, cultural identity, leisure and recreation and life satisfaction.
The Greater Bendigo Wellbeing Survey has asked questions across all these areas,
these results together with other available data such as the Australian Bureau Statistics
and Community Indicators Victoria, build a picture of the social wellbeing of the CoGB
community.
The Wellbeing Survey questions focus on attitudes to a number of emerging health and
wellbeing issues that affect the community, and identifying opportunities for
improvement. Survey participants are representative of the Greater Bendigo community
and their responses provide an understanding of how community needs across the
municipality are changing.
Importantly, the Wellbeing Survey also assists in measuring how well or poorly CoGB is
performing against our liveability indicators and outcomes, in order to achieve Greater
Bendigos vision of Working together to be Australias most liveable regional city.
Survey responses have been grouped under the relevant liveability outcomes and in
future will be analysed across age groups and suburbs.
Various communication methods, such as newspaper, radio, mail and internet, were
used to engage as many residents as possible in the Wellbeing Survey. Residents were
provided with an opportunity to complete either a hard copy of the survey or online:
3,000 households were randomly selected to complete a hard copy of the survey
10,000 postcards were distributed in public places (such as Post Offices and libraries)
and direct delivery to post boxes in various urban and rural suburbs
Most of the Survey responses received were completed online through SurveyMonkey
(68%), with fewer completing a hard copy of the Survey and returning through the post
(32%). The third Wellbeing Survey response rate (2,090) was significantly higher than
the 2011 response rate (1,544), however less than the 2014 responses (2,174).
Statistically there is a good representation of the age groups and across suburbs, which
will allow for detailed analysis that is significantly relevant for the CoGB.
The survey is a snapshot in time that is representative of the community, and the
circumstances that were relevant around the time of the Survey will also be reflected in
these results. Comments received that did not relate to the Survey questions have not
been presented in this data.
Overall most people expressed a positive outlook on their happiness, health, trust in
others, and agree that Bendigo is a liveable city. The complete results are presented in a
separate document referenced as Greater Bendigo Wellbeing Survey 2015, however a
few key findings from each liveability outcome are included below:
Demography of respondents
Little cultural diversity, with few people being born overseas (7.53%), first language
other than English (1.57%), Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander ancestry (2%) and
GLBTIQ (4%).
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A healthier City
Disparity between peoples perception of good health (71.3%) and being overweight
or obese (62%).
A fairer and more inclusive City
The two largest proportions of respondents described their household financial
situation as either struggling or just getting by (35%) and comfortable (51%).
40.3% of respondents attended 5 or more community events in the past year
20% of respondents felt discriminated against in Bendigo, most commonly based on
one of the following; religion, race, disability, age or gender.
While over half of respondents are within 10 minutes walking distance from a bus
stop, only 34.7% occasionally use public transport and 37.5% never use public
transport. However if improvements were made those reporting to never use public
transport reduces to 22.7%.
43.4% of respondents stated they never cycle, however if improvements were made
this would reduce to 29.71%.
60.7% agree that Bendigo is an excellent place to raise children.
67.3% agree that more should be done by the City of Greater Bendigo to make sure
that there is always some housing for available for rent by people on low incomes.
68.6% agree that the City of Greater Bendigo has an important role in helping to
support people experiencing temporary homelessness and housing insecurity.
More than half of respondents (65.8%) agree that their neighbourhood has several
free or low cost recreation facilities.
A more resilient City
68.4% agree it is important for the City of Greater Bendigo to support education
initiatives which are designed to make stronger links between schools and
workplaces.
A Planned City
Most people (84%) are happy with the area in which they live.
Greater Bendigos public spaces are very important to:
o respondents and their families 57.5%
o the liveability of Greater Bendigo 65%
o the public image of Greater Bendigo 63.8%
A Proud and Safe City
Most people think Bendigo is a liveable city.
71.2% agree that Bendigo is a great place to live and work.
A Sustainable City
Just over half of respondents (53%) are reusing domestic wastewater (collect
wastewater from washing machines, showers or sinks).
A More Productive, Innovative, Adaptive City
Low levels of community and civic engagement, in the last 12 months over half of
respondents did not:
o Participate in an online discussion about political or local community issues
o Join a protest demonstration
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o Met with, phoned or written to a local politician


o Attend a community meeting, public hearing or discussion
o Sat on a decision-making board or committee (e.g. school council, sports club or
church)
o Attend a body corporate meeting
o Helped out with social activities (e.g. school/community, committee or canteen)
Almost 60% believe they have no ability to influence local government decision
making.

Some comparisons can be made over time from the past three Surveys, however it is
important to note that some questions from each respective Survey have changed, which
limits comparative data. The purpose of progressively altering questions and the
inclusion of new questions is to better align with the Victorian Population Health Survey,
and to assist with the development of the Citys strategies, such as the Cultural Diversity
and Inclusion Plan (CDIP) and the Public Space Strategy (PSS). Some general trends
observed over the past three Greater Bendigo Wellbeing Surveys include:
Overall increase in the percentage of responses;
o Civic engagement,
o sufficient and good quality open space, and
o sufficient licensed venues in the City of Greater Bendigo.
Fluctuating or slowly decreasing yet relatively high responses;
o Those describing their financial situation as comfortable,
o being a leader in celebrating and recognising young peoples achievements,
o creativity and innovation is encouraged,
o policies and strategies around say NO to violence against women,
o CoGB providing adequate opportunities for involvement in local planning
issues,
o Bendigo is a great place to live,
o locals feel proud of Bendigo,
o CoGB supporting homelessness and housing insecurity,
o CoGB ensuring housing (build/purchase/rent) is available for low income
earners, and
o local laws and surveillance systems in relation to anti-social behaviour.
Sharply decreasing trends in responses;
o Volunteering,
o conservation of heritage,
o CoGB offered programs, activities and services,
o residents feeling part of their community,
o Greater Bendigo has a good image,
o access for disabled
o cultural diversity, and
o valuing youth and providing youth support.
These decreasing trends form part of a wider trend across Victoria that shows
community consultation and communication are areas where community opinion would
like to see improvement.
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Trends and data from the of the Greater Wellbeing Survey are already informing the
Citys policies and reporting, such as the CDIP, PSS, Municipal Public Health and
Wellbeing Plan (MPHWP), and the Liveability Indicators Report. This data should also
continue to guide future directions of the Council Plan.
The potential use and application of this data may not be immediately apparent, there is
considerable value in sharing this data across the CoGB organisation and the wider
community. It is important to ensure the data is easily available and accessible to as
many as possible.
Priority/Importance:
The Greater Wellbeing Survey 2015 is of high importance as it assists in achieving the
strategic objectives set out in the Council Plan. The Survey collects a wide range of
views from the community on a broad set of issues, which will inform long term planning
and budget considerations. Importantly, the Survey is significant in providing an insight
into the communitys preferred directions for Greater Bendigo.
Options/Alternatives:
Council could take no action or source data and information already available from
Australian Bureau of Statistics or Community Indicators Victoria. However, these
alternatives do not collect community views at a local level, they cannot be tailored to
address issues that are specific to Greater Bendigo, and data can often be outdated or
inaccurate if not updated frequently.
Timelines:
The results of the Survey conducted in October 2015 are presented in attachment 1, and
will be analysed in further detail together with the results from the Wellbeing Surveys
from 2014 and 2011 to track trends over time. The next Survey will be conducted in
2017.
Risk Analysis:
There was a risk of not getting a large enough sample size (of responses) or a broad
cross section of residents to complete the Survey. However, an extensive advertising
campaign was run to promote and encourage as many community members as possible
to complete in the Wellbeing Survey. In addition, residents were provided with the
options of completing the Survey online (over the internet) or via hard copy.
Consultation/Communication
As detailed above in this report, every effort was made to ensure all residents within the
CoGB were given the opportunity to participate in the Survey. Residents were provided
with two alternative ways of completing the Survey, either online (over the internet) or via
hard copy (3,000 households were randomly selected to complete the survey).
Advertising was through the newspaper (Bendigo Advertiser, Bendigo Weekly and The
McIvor Times), Facebook, and mail outs (10,000 postcards were distributed in public
places and to post boxes in various urban and rural suburbs). Further detailed analysis
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will be undertaken over the next few months that will include comparative data i.e.
differences in responses in age group and suburbs, ABS Data and community indicators
Victorian and other relevant data.
Conclusion
This is the third Wellbeing Survey which continues the story about how Greater Bendigo
is fairing over time, identifying strengths and vulnerabilities of different areas across our
community. The Survey is a snapshot in time that is representative of the community,
and provides peoples views on important social matters. The response rate provides a
statistically significant body of data from which reliable conclusions can be drawn.
Findings from this Survey will provide an overview of how well CoGB is addressing social
issues, and provide a comparison with previous Wellbeing Surveys (2011 and 2014) to
reveal trends across the community and within CoGB. The results will also provide data
for benchmarking at regional and national levels. This Wellbeing Survey provides an
important insight into the communitys preferred directions for Greater Bendigo and will
assist in future decision making.
Resource Implications
Budget Allocation in the Current Financial Year: $12,000
Previous Council Support: 2011 and 2014
Attachments
Greater Bendigo Wellbeing Survey 2015

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1. Thank those in the community who completed the survey.
2. Use the Greater Bendigo Wellbeing Survey to help prioritise resource allocation
and provide some baseline data for future planning and strategic development.
3. Release the results of the third Greater Bendigo Wellbeing Survey (2015) to the
community and key organisations for information.

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3.4

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Draft Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan

Document Information
Author

Natalie Jacobson, Coordinator Inclusive Communities


Deb Simpson, Acting Manager Community Partnerships

Responsible
Director

Michael Smyth, Acting Director Community Wellbeing

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is for Council to consider the draft Cultural Diversity and
Inclusion Plan and release the Plan for a period of community consultation.
Policy Context
This report responds to the following:
City of Greater Bendigo Independent Review (Independent Review):
Recommendation 47 - Develop a Reconciliation Action Plan and a Cultural Diversity
Strategy during the 2013/14 financial year.
Council Plan 2013 - 2017 (2015/16 update):
Strategy 3.6 - Greater Bendigo has inclusive and equitable communities where people
feel welcome and connected to others.
Action 3.6.3 - Promote equitable and inclusive communities through implementation of
the Human Rights Charter across the organisation and development of a first
Reconciliation Action Plan and Cultural Diversity Strategy.
Council Policy:
City of Greater Bendigo Human Rights Charter 2014:
Freedom of expression;
Freedom of thought, conscience, religion and belief; and
Cultural rights.
Background Information
The Independent Review noted that the City of Greater Bendigo (the City) was the only
Local Government Area in Victoria with a population over 100,000 people that did not
have a Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan (CDIP) or similar. It also noted that without
strategic approaches to fostering social equality and to reducing all forms of racial and

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religious discrimination, the City was at risk of failing to meet the legislative requirements
of the Victorian Human Rights and Responsibilities Act, Race Discrimination Act and the
Local Government Act.
The Citys development of a CDIP is in response to the Independent Review
recommendations and Greater Bendigos growing multiculturalism (including many
residents from non-English speaking backgrounds). The CDIP is intended to promote
strategic and collaborative approaches to improving cultural inclusion as a key
consideration in achieving social cohesion, and to preventing racial and religious
discrimination.
Australian Bureau of Statistics data demonstrates that between the 2006 and 2011
Censuses there was a 26% increase in the number of Greater Bendigo residents born
overseas. Additionally, Greater Bendigo experienced a 178% increase in people
becoming Australian Citizens between 2011/12 and 2013/14, along with a transition to a
majority of those being from non-English speaking backgrounds. It is anticipated that the
results of the pending 2016 Census will highlight continued growth in Greater Bendigos
multiculturalism.
Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s):
5 August 2015: Council endorsed the CDIP project methodology. Council also resolved
to appoint Councillors Williams, Weragoda and Fyffe to the CDIP Community Reference
Group (CRG). Councillor Cox also opted to participate in the CRG out of personal
interest.
Report
Significant bodies of research have identified that cultural inclusion does not naturally
occur as a direct consequence of increased cultural diversity. Cultural segregation and
racial and religious discrimination are generally commonplace in culturally diverse
communities where there has been an absence of strategic and ongoing investment in
cultural inclusion.
Cultural inclusion and social cohesion are key determining factors in assessing
population health and wellbeing. Improvements in these two factors are considered
integral to the achievement of outcomes in many of the City adopted strategies and
plans, including the Municipal Health and Wellbeing Plan and the Economic
Development Plan. For example, a community that is respectful and inclusive of cultural
differences is far more likely to attract investors and tourists, which in turn generates
positive social and economic flow on effects.
Whilst Council committed to the development of a CDIP in 2013, the social divisions that
became apparent following the Citys receipt of a planning permit application for the
construction of a mosque brought the need for a CDIP into sharp focus.

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Development of the draft CDIP


The draft CDIP is premised on different organisations working in a planned and
collaborative manner to implement a range of evidence-based objectives and actions
over a three year period.
Consistent with the project methodology endorsed by Council in August 2015, the
development of the draft CDIP has involved significant research and consultation to:
1) understand local attitudes towards cultural diversity and the experiences of
culturally diverse residents.
2) identify community needs and possible opportunities.
3) develop the proposed evidence-based objectives and actions
4) develop the proposed governance structure.
The CRG has played a pivotal role in the development of the draft CDIP. The
Multiculturalism in Bendigo forum held in October 2015 attracted over 120 participants
and provided an excellent opportunity to promote the CRGs role. Monash Universitys
Professor Markus - who developed the Social Cohesion Index and has led the largest
body of longitudinal research on social cohesion within Australia - and Doctor Tim
Soutphommasane - the Australian Race Discrimination Commissioner - both provided
thought provoking presentations at the forum.
Following the forum, a public expression of interest process for membership of the CRG
was undertaken. There was strong interest in this opportunity and 26 people were
subsequently appointed as CRG members. The community sectors represented by CRG
members include business / industry, culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD)
residents, community and emergency services, education, ethnic groups, government,
health, refugees, settlement services, sport and recreation and youth.
Upon its establishment the CRG agreed on priority theme areas to focus on. These
theme areas were informed by the local research results. The theme areas were as
follows:
Cultural inclusion in the workplace
Cultural inclusion in sports and recreation
Welcoming newcomers to Bendigo
Youth
Community awareness about Islam and addressing discrimination.
The CRG then agreed to form smaller focus groups to enable more rigorous discussions
around each theme area and to support the development of proposed themed objectives
and actions for inclusion within the draft CDIP. Each focus group was facilitated by a
nominated CRG member and had the ability to invite input from other stakeholders with
particular expertise in the relevant theme area.
49 people have been involved in the CRG and its focus groups to support the
development of the proposed objectives and actions included within the draft CDIP. See
Attachment 1 - Membership List for further details.

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Local research
121 residents from culturally diverse backgrounds participated in the local qualitative
research process. They included representatives of the following categories:
international students
migrants
skilled migrants, including invisible migrants i.e. migrants with an Anglo ethnicity
who still experience cultural differences such as migrants from Denmark,
Germany, New Zealand and the United States of America.
refugees: men, women, seniors and youth.
representatives of local cultural, ethnic and religious organisations.
The opportunity for people from culturally diverse backgrounds to participate in the
research was advertised publicly and through various networks and organisations. The
following themes (which align with Professor Markus Social Cohesion Index) were
explored through the research:
sense of belonging and inclusion.
access to information.
civic and community participation.
experiences of discrimination.
A selection of the research findings are presented below and provide a brief overview of
some of the current issues, observations and feelings within the community as identified
through the local qualitative research:
Most participants felt that Greater Bendigo is a friendly community and had
experienced welcoming actions and support.
There was strong interest in participating in community events that are family
friendly and do not involve alcohol.
Most participants observed a lack of cultural awareness and sensitivity in the
broader community. Many reported being treated differently because of their race,
culture or nationality.
There was a prevailing host / guest dynamic i.e. most participants felt more
accepted if they did not express their culture or question norms.
The ability to access services and opportunities was strongly related to personal
agency, confidence and education.
Many participants felt disconnected from ethnic, cultural and religious communities
that exist in Melbourne and felt an absence of local cultural expression and
resources.
Many existing intercultural friendships had been fostered at sporting clubs or in
workplaces.
Many participants expressed strong interest in growing their civic and community
participation e.g. volunteering, however there was a lack of knowledge about the
availability of such opportunities and processes to get involved.
There was a lack of understanding regarding human rights, ways to address
discrimination and a reluctance to complain about discrimination.
Visible migrants and Muslim residents reported increased levels of different types
of racial and religious discrimination over the previous 18 months. This has
caused great distress to residents, many of whom have modified their behaviour
to reduce the risk of further discrimination.
Many migrant women expressed significant challenges in finding employment.

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Refugee seniors expressed strong interest in cultural preservation and spiritual


connections.
In addition to understanding the experiences of CALD residents, the CDIP research was
concerned with understanding broader community attitudes towards cultural diversity. To
achieve this a partnership with Monash University was established as it was managing
the delivery of the Australia@2015 survey, which provides a measurement on such
issues. Fortuitously this nationwide survey coincided with the CDIP research phase and
Monash University agreed to disaggregate Greater Bendigos data from the national
data, with 1250 Greater Bendigo residents completing the survey. Initially the survey
data was to be released in early 2016 however the release of all data has now been
delayed until August 24. This data, once received, will be able to be used to inform
future CDIP objective and action planning.

A limitation of the Australia@2015 survey was the 18 years of age or over criteria in
order to participate in the survey. To support the development of draft CDIP objectives
and actions for youth, a modified version of the Australia@2015 survey was developed
for young people and promoted within local schools and youth services. In total 786 local
young people completed the survey with the survey data identifying:
90% agreed with the statement we should recognise that cultural and ethnic
diversity is an important feature of Australian society.
89% agreed with the statement we should do more to learn about the customs
and heritage of different ethnic and cultural groups in this country.
there were different feelings towards different ethnic and religious groups e.g. 26%
felt cold towards Muslims, 22% felt cold towards Jews, and 8.5% felt cold
towards Asians.
19% of first and second generation Australians had experienced racial or religious
discrimination, the most common site for which was an educational institute.
most wanted to learn more about other cultures and religions and participate in
anti-racism bystander training.
The final tool that supported the development of draft CDIP objectives and actions and
baseline progress measures was the Human Rights Commissions Workplace Cultural
Diversity Tool (Tool), which provides a measurement on the degree of cultural inclusion
in workplaces. The Citys CDIP Internal Working Group undertook an assessment of the
City using the Tool. The City achieved a score of 39 points out of a possible 90 points.
This score reflects that the organisation is in the starting phase of developing policies
and processes that support cultural inclusion, rather than merely relying on good
intentions. Many of the actions under the draft CDIP Goal 4 The City of Greater
Bendigo is a leading organisation for cultural inclusion are in response to this
assessment and it is anticipated that upon completion of the actions a repeat
assessment would show a dramatic score increase.
The draft CDIP
As previously outlined, the CRG and its associated focus groups have played an integral
role in the development of the draft CDIP objectives and actions. 18 different
organisations including the City are proposing to share responsibility for progressing the
36 objectives and 135 actions - see Attachment 2: Draft Greater Bendigo Cultural

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Diversity and Inclusion Plan. The various objectives and actions have been aligned
under the following goals:
1) Goal 1: A Greater Bendigo community that understands and respects cultural
and religious differences and supports multiculturalism.
Focus areas: increasing opportunities for intercultural exchange, awareness and
institutional cultural inclusion - particularly in sporting clubs, workplaces and
volunteering organisations.
2) Goal 2: Residents from culturally, linguistically and religiously diverse
backgrounds have equal opportunities to access culturally appropriate
services and participate fully in the Greater Bendigo community.
Focus areas: increasing employment opportunities; capacity building of CALD
organisations; fostering opportunities to participate in sports, recreation and
volunteering; increasing access to information for quick settlement and integration.

3) Goal 3: Religious and racial discrimination is prevented and / or addressed


effectively.
Focus areas: reducing racial and religious discrimination in schools; increasing the
capacity of both bystanders and subjects of discrimination to respond effectively;
mitigating extremist behaviour.
4) Goal 4: The City of Greater Bendigo is a leading organisation for cultural
inclusion.
Focus areas: increasing access to City information, services, programs;
increasing the cultural diversity of the workforce; developing culturally inclusive
work environments.

5) Ensure capacity to implement the CDIP and apply continual improvements.


Focus areas: strong project governance and accountability structures; review and
evaluation.
For each proposed action there is a Lead Organisation indicated. Lead Organisations
will have responsibility for progressing the respective action.
Other organisations have indicated a strong commitment to the draft CDIP through their
willingness to be named as a Lead Organisation. Lead Organisations will also be
encouraged to enter into a CDIP Partnership Agreement.
It is acknowledged that the draft CDIP is ambitious. Whilst there is a risk that not all
actions will be able to be progressed, there is a collective level of stakeholder confidence
that most will. If Council endorses the draft CDIP, the City will be responsible for
implementing 84 (62%) of the actions, with responsibility spread across 13 different
business units. The City will also be responsible for supporting the CDIP governance.

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It is proposed to evaluate the CDIPs impact in the following ways:


Measuring change in community attitudes towards cultural diversity.
Measuring the number of self-reported experiences of discrimination.
Measuring levels of CALD resident community participation, particularly in
terms of sports and volunteer roles participation.
Measuring change in the Citys Human Rights Commission Cultural Inclusion
Workplace Assessment Tool score.
If Council adopts the CDIP, City officers will undertake a recruitment process for
membership of a CDIP Steering Group (Steering Group) to support CDIP governance.
This will include maintaining relationships with Lead Organisations and monitoring
progress on actions. Steering Group member recruitment will involve a public expression
of interest process however representation by Lead Organisations that represent
different community sectors will be strongly encouraged.
Priority/Importance:
Council endorsement of the draft CDIP is of high importance. Council resolved to
complete all Independent Review recommendations within the current Council term. If
the draft CDIP is not released for community consultation at this point in time Council will
not be able to meet its Independent Review goal as Council is unable to adopt strategies
or plans during Caretaker Period.
Timelines:
The following timelines are proposed to enable Council to adopt the CDIP (should
Council opt to do so) prior to the commencement of Caretaker Period:
20 July - Council to review the draft CDIP and to consider releasing the draft
CDIP for a period of community consultation.
21 July to 8 August - Community consultation period.
31 August - Council to review the final version of the CDIP.
Risk Analysis:
In recent years cultural and religious diversity has been a controversial issue within
Greater Bendigo, generating strong and often polarised public opinions. Whilst the
proposed draft CDIP community consultation period seeks community comment, it is
possible that the draft CDIP may provide a platform for some extremist comments and
actions. It is proposed that this risk is mitigated as far as possible by the existing
Communications Plan, which ensures consistent messaging and outlines the CDIP
objectives and the level of diverse stakeholder support.
There is a risk that 19 of the proposed actions within the draft CDIP will not be able to be
progressed as they are reliant on attracting additional external funding. It is proposed to
manage and report on this risk on an action by action basis.

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Consultation/Communication
Internal Consultation:
12 City business units have supported the development of the draft CDIP and its
associated objectives and actions through their involvement in the CDIP Internal Working
Group.
All City staff will be encouraged to provide input into the draft CDIP should Council
resolve to release it for a period of community consultation. This will include relevant
Community Partnerships unit staff promoting the opportunity to deliver presentations on
the draft CDIP at unit or directorate meetings across the organisation.
External Consultation:
Apart from the CRG and its focus groups, external consultation regarding the draft CDIP
has been undertaken through the following:
Living Together Forum: Held during the Festival of Cultures (in partnership with
Make a Change Australia and Loddon Campaspe Multicultural Services), over 100
people participated in this forum. It sought feedback from participants on the
challenges and opportunities presented by multiculturalism and cultural inclusion.
Understanding Islam and Cultural Inclusion in the Workplace Forum: This forum
was facilitated by the Greater Bendigo Human Resources (HR) network. 34 HR
professionals participated in this forum and feedback was sought on challenges
and opportunities associated with cultural inclusion in workplaces.
Council officers also provided presentations and sought feedback about the CDIP
concept to the following groups: the Greater Bendigo Settlement Network,
Councils Farming Advisory Committee, the Bendigo Safe Communities Forum,
various local ethnic and cultural groups, the Municipal Emergency Management
Planning Committee, and the Communities for Children Steering Committee.
Resource Implications
Responsibility for implementing the CDIP will be shared between the City and other
organisations who have already agreed to be a Lead Organisation to implement the
proposed actions.
Resourcing of the proposed actions will be achieved via a combination of the following:
existing City resources ($42,000 is denoted for CDIP implementation within the
draft 2016/17 budget).
existing resources of other organisations.
individual organisation and partnership based grant applications.
to a lesser extent, bids within respective organisations for additional resources.
External Funding Sources:
There is a risk that 19 of the proposed actions within the draft CDIP will not be able to be
progressed as they are reliant on attracting additional external funding. It is proposed to
manage this risk on an action by action basis.
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The City is the lead agency in a Strategic Partnership Grant application to the Victorian
Multicultural Commission that is currently under consideration. Bendigo Community
Health Services and Loddon Campaspe Multicultural Services are the application
partners. If the application is successful it will contribute to the delivery of several of the
19 proposed draft CDIP actions that are reliant on obtaining external funding. Officers
will continue to explore alternative and additional external funding opportunities in
conjunction with other organisations to assist with the delivery of the 19 proposed actions
that require external funding assistance.
Conclusion
The development of a Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan (CDIP) has been established
as a priority through the City of Greater Bendigo Independent Review and the Council
Plan 20132017. The CDIP is intended to promote strategic and collaborative
approaches to improving cultural inclusion as a key consideration in achieving social
cohesion, and to preventing racial and religious discrimination.
Research outcomes and internal and external stakeholder consultation have informed
the proposed objectives and actions outlined within the draft CDIP. 17 organisations
apart from the City of Greater Bendigo have been involved in the development process
and are committed to assuming responsibility for implementing relevant proposed
actions. Whilst 13 different City of Greater Bendigo business units have also expressed
their commitment to implementing relevant proposed actions in the draft CDIP.
The proposed draft CDIP community consultation period from 21 July to 8 August
presents an opportunity for internal and external stakeholders to further shape
development of the CDIP.
Attachments
1.
2.

Membership List
Draft Greater Bendigo Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan

RECOMMENDATION
That Council:
1) formally thank members of the Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan Community
Reference Group and the other individuals / organisations that were invited to
provide input into the respective focus groups.
2) endorse the release of the draft Cultural Diversity and Inclusion Plan for a
community consultation period of 21 July to 8 August 2016.

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4.

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PRODUCTIVITY

Nil.

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Sustainability - Reports

5.

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

SUSTAINABILITY

5.1

RENAMING OF VAHLAND STREET IN NORTH BENDIGO

Document Information
Author

Philip DeAraugo, Activity Centres Place Manager

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
To consider the renaming of Vahland Street in North Bendigo to Kurmala Street.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Sustainability
5.2 The history, unique heritage, streetscapes and buildings of Greater Bendigo are
conserved, restored, celebrated and managed wisely for the long term.
Council Policy Reference:
Council adopted its Place Naming Policy on 15 October 2008. Its purpose is to provide
guidance on the naming of places within the City of Greater Bendigo. Its major emphasis
is to preserve the Citys identity, heritage, physical features and to recognise our cultural
diversity. The policy is consistent with the Geographic Place Names Act 1998 and the
more recently developed Guidelines for Geographic Names 2010, Version 2: A guide to
naming or renaming features, localities and roads in Victoria.
Background Information
This street naming proposal is linked to the recently endorsed renaming of a section of
Bull Street in central Bendigo to William Vahland Place. To avoid the potential for
duplication and confusion between the new William Vahland Place and the existing
Vahland Street, the Registrar of Geographic Names has directed the City to rename
Vahland Street in North Bendigo. Given there are only two tenants of Vahland Street,
Ambulance Victoria and Bendigo Health, it was considered to be an achievable outcome
and consultation was undertaken with both organisations to determine an appropriate
new name.

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Previous Council Decision Dates:


At its Ordinary Meeting of 25 May 2016, among other things, Council resolved to adopt
the renaming of the section of Bull Street between Pall Mall and the Bendigo Creek to
William Vahland Place. The resolution has been actioned and the renaming request has
been lodged with the Office of Geographic Names.
Report
It is proposed to rename Vahland Street in North Bendigo to Kurmala Street. This 290m
street runs off Holdsworth Road and into the former Bendigo Psychiatric Hospital site.
Currently there are only two tenants that use the street, Ambulance Victorias Regional
Office and Vehicle Workshop and Bendigo Healths Vahland House. There are no
private residential addresses along Vahland Street.

Figure 1: Location of proposed roadway for renaming

As the two properties facing Vahland Street are health related, it was agreed that any
name change should reference the history of our health sector. Kurmala Street was
identified as an option as it would provide an ongoing reference to the Kurmala building
at the Bendigo Hospital. This building is proposed to be demolished as part of the New
Bendigo Hospital development.
As reported in The Argus on Wednesday 13 March 1935:

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His Excellency the Governor General (Sir Isaac Isaacs) has accepted an
invitation by the Bendigo Hospital Board to open the new community wing of the
hospital on April 27. The wing which is to cost more than 30,000 is to be named
Kurmala, which is a New Zealand word for sleep. A cast bronze tablet will be
placed in the new wing to commemorate the opening by the Governor General.
It is believed that the proposed name would provide appropriate recognition for the word
Kurmala, which will live on in a health related precinct in North Bendigo. The proposed
name has the support of both Bendigo Health and Ambulance Victoria.
In considering the proposed name change, the City needs to ensure that it complies with
the requirements of the Guidelines for Geographic Names 2010, Version 2. A number of
possible names with a connection to Bendigos healthcare system were considered,
however many have already been used across urban Bendigo. One of the key principles
relates to avoiding the potential for duplication (Principle 1D), and it is the primary reason
we are required to undertake this proposed name change. The name Kurmala has not
been used as a street name in Greater Bendigo and therefore meets the criteria.
Priority/Importance:
The proposal is relatively minor, however its relevance is important to the two tenants
that currently access their properties from Vahland Street.
Options/Alternatives:
Council has the option of:
Not endorsing the proposed name change and re-commencing the stakeholder and
community engagement process to find another name.
Endorsing the name change resulting in Vahland Street being renamed to Kurmala
Street.
Write to the Registrar of Geographic Names to argue for the retention of the current
name.
Timelines:
Once adopted the proposed name change will be submitted to the Office of Geographic
Names for approval. This will happen soon after the minutes of the Council meeting are
available.
Risk Analysis:
There is very little risk associated with the proposal due to its compliance with relevant
policies and procedures.
Consultation/Communication
Internal Consultation:
The proposal has been discussed with relevant units such as Rates and Information
Management. All internal stakeholders have indicated support for the proposal.

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External Consultation:
Consultation with the two tenants of the street, that being Bendigo Health and
Ambulance Victoria, began as soon as it became apparent that a name change would be
required. Both agencies carefully considered the matter, with the issue being discussed
at Board level at Bendigo Health and CEO level at Ambulance Victoria. Both agencies
have endorsed the proposed name.
As soon as confirmation from the two tenants was received, the formal consultation
process began with the broader community. Letters were sent to stakeholders, including
adjacent properties, emergency services and government agencies on 10 May 2016. A
public notice was published in the Bendigo Advertiser on Saturday 14 May and
Wednesday 18 May, and a Frequently Asked Questions Bulletin was posted on the Citys
website in the Have your say section.
As a result of the notification process we have received two submissions.
Submitter 1: Jenny Daly
Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

Proposes a different name to the one


advertised. Acknowledges that there has
been an attempt to keep the Kurmala
name alive, but suggests that a name
with more relevance to the local area
would be more appropriate. The former
psychiatric centre wards were named
after mythical characters and the ward
closest to Vahland Street was named
Capricorn Ward. It is suggested that the
street is renamed to Capricorn Way or a
derivative there of.

While it is accepted that there may be a


variety of names that would be
appropriate, Kurmala is the one that has
been endorsed by the two tenants. To
propose a new name would require
restarting the renaming process, which is
certainly a possibility should Council
decide to choose this option. However it
is recommended that the City proceed
with the renaming to Kurmala Street and
reserving the proposed name for use in
this precinct in the future. The site has
recently been decontaminated and it is
understood that it will be developed once
again. This will require internal roads to
be developed and formally named, such
as the east-west road that connects
Vahland Street and Davidson Street on
which several of the Psychiatric Centre
buildings were once located.

It was also suggested that the renaming


could be delayed until Bendigo Health
vacate Vahland House in January 2017
to avoid confusion.

It is recommended that the delayed


implementation of a new name be
discussed with the Office of Geographic
Names.

Submitter 2: Bendigo Regional Genealogical Society Inc


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

The members propose that the Vahland

The requirement to rename Vahland

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Submitter 2: Bendigo Regional Genealogical Society Inc


Supports/Objects

Officer Response & Recommendation

Street name remain unchanged and that


the name Kurmala be used at a location
closer to the Bendigo Hospital.

Street is a directive of the Registrar of


Geographic Names and is intended to
reduce the likelihood of confusion
between it and the soon to be named,
William Vahland Place. Whilst it is
agreed that they are different, there is still
the potential for confusion and in
accordance with the guidelines a new
name has been proposed that is
acceptable to the tenants and the Office
of Geographic Names. Officers believe
that on balance, achieving recognition for
Goldfields Architect William Vahland in
central Bendigo is most important and
that given the former psychiatric centre
site will be developed in the future, it
provides an opportunity for the name
Kurmala to become more prominent in its
own right. It is recommended that the
proposed naming proceed as outlined in
this report.

It is stated that William Vahland Place is


an excellent choice for the end of Bull
Street, and that Vahland Street is quite
different to William Vahland Place, so
they are not technically the same and
could both be used.

Conclusion
The proposal to rename Vahland Street in North Bendigo to Kurmala Street has been
placed on public exhibition and while it attracted a small number of comments, it is
believed that on balance, it will be a positive change and it should proceed. It will also
deliver on the directive of the Office of Geographic Names to reduce duplication resulting
from renaming a section of Bull Street to William Vahland Place. The alternative
proposed name, Capricorn Way, will be placed on file and recommended for use when
the former Psychiatric Centre site is redeveloped and internal roads are created and
named.
Resource Implications
The resource implications are limited to the preparation and installation of a new road
sign, which will be covered under the Road Sign Maintenance budget.
Attachments
Nil

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RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to:
1. Formally adopt the renaming of Vahland Street in North Bendigo to Kurmala Street.
2. Endorse this report and the ongoing process to complete registration of the official
name.
3. Request the Office of Geographic Names delay the implementation of the new name
until January 2017, when the current Vahland House is transferred to the New
Bendigo Hospital.

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Leadership and Good Governance - Reports

6.

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

LEADERSHIP AND GOOD GOVERNANCE

6.1

POSITIVE AGEING ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Document Information
Author

Deb Simpson, Acting Manager Community Partnerships

Responsible
Director

Michael Smyth, Acting Director Community Wellbeing

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is for Council to consider the establishment of a Positive
Ageing Advisory Committee and the Committees Terms of Reference.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
This report is consistent with the following Council Plan 2013-2017 themes and
strategies:
Theme 1 Leadership and Good Governance
Strategy 1.4 Community engagement strategies and methods are adapted and
updated to improve how the community can receive information in an accessible
form and provide feedback to Council.
Theme 3 Presentation and Vibrancy
Strategy 3.6 Greater Bendigo has inclusive and equitable communities where
people feel welcome and connected to others.
Strategy 3.7 Structured community engagement, community planning and
community development programs support our residents and communities,
particularly those who may experience isolation.
Background Information
The terms positive ageing and active ageing are often used interchangeably.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) defines active ageing as the process of
optimising opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance quality
of life as people age.
The United Nations (UN) standard for older people is 60 however the UN
acknowledges that there are many factors that influence how people age and that
chronological age is not a consistent marker. The UN therefore advocates that
governments and organisations adopt flexible approaches to promoting active ageing.

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The Municipal Association of Victoria became a signatory to the Age Friendly Victoria
Declaration (Declaration) in 2016. This Declaration outlines the commitment of the
Victorian Government and Victorian Local Government Authorities to working
collaboratively to create and maintain age-friendly communities.
Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s):
The 2009 2013 Council Plan included an action to develop a Positive Ageing Strategy
(Strategy).
November 2009: Council endorsed the Strategy objectives and the establishment of a
Positive Ageing Advisory Group (PAAG) to support the Strategys development.
November 2010: Council released the draft Strategy for public comment.
February 2011: Council adopted the Strategy and resolved to amend the PAAGs Terms
of Reference with the objectives of:

overseeing the implementation of the Strategy.

providing information and strategic advice to the City of Greater Bendigo


(City) on matters affecting the needs, interests and wellbeing of older
people within the municipality.

acting as a point of referral for the exchange of information and views


between the community and the City on issues of interest to older people.

November 2015: Council considered a Strategy completion report and resolved to


maintain support for positive ageing and to review the PAAGs Terms of Reference with
the intent of re-establishing the group in 2016.
Report
There is an ageing population trend globally which the UN describes as both a triumph
and a challenge. It is considered a triumph as life expectancies are increasing however
it is also considered a challenge due to the strain that longer life expectancies place on
resources and systems.
The World Report on Ageing and Health (WHO, 2015) notes that for the first time in
history most people can expect to live into their 60s and beyond. In low- and middleincome countries, this is largely the result of reductions in mortality at younger ages,
particularly during childbirth and childhood, and from infectious diseases. In high-income
countries, continuing increases in life expectancy are now mainly due to declining
mortality among those who are older.
Greater Bendigos population forecasts indicate that, between 2011 and 2026, the
number of people aged between 60 and 79 is expected to increase from 17,223 to
26,150 persons, or by 65.8% (refer Table 1). These population forecasts emphasise the
need for the City and broader Greater Bendigo community to promote positive ageing.

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Table 1: Greater Bendigos forecast population changes by five year age cohorts

Source: http://forecast.id.com.au
The WHOs World Report on Ageing and Health (2015) postures that current systems
and societal attitudes need to be changed to enable positive ageing: it is not simply a
case of doing more of what is already being done or of doing it better, systemic changes
are needed. Ageist attitudes limit the way problems are conceptualised and the
capacity to seize innovative opportunities. It observes that in high-income countries
(such as Australia), systemic approaches are often weighted towards treating acute
health conditions rather than preventing or managing chronic health conditions.
It is proposed to establish a Positive Ageing Advisory Committee (Committee) to provide
strategic advice to Council and the City on how positive ageing can best be achieved.
The role of the proposed Committee would be to support advocacy for plus the
development, implementation and evaluation of initiatives to promote active ageing within
Greater Bendigo.
The attached draft Terms of Reference for the proposed Committee outline its objectives
as:
a) To integrate the needs and interests of senior residents into relevant City
strategies, plans, facilities, services and projects.
b) To increase community awareness of positive ageing principles and opportunities,
and to build the communitys positive ageing capacity.
c) To increase the social inclusion of and opportunities for Greater Bendigos senior
residents to participate in and contribute to activities across the Greater Bendigo
community.
d) To improve physical and mental wellbeing of Greater Bendigos senior residents.

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Consultation/Communication
External Consultation:
Following Councils re-affirmation of its commitment to positive ageing and to a
community advisory group on positive ageing, at the 4 November 2015 Ordinary Council
meeting, City staff met with interested members of the previous PAAG to gather their
observations and recommendations for moving forward. They included:
Positive ageing principles and related actions should be embedded into all City
strategies, plans etc. rather than developing another stand-alone Positive Ageing
Strategy.
The previous PAAGs desire to monitor the Citys Home and Community Care
service review contributed to it becoming very service provision focused for an
extended period of time. Any future Committee should be conscious of
maintaining a continual focus on building individual and community positive ageing
capacity.
Any future Committee membership should be more representative of the
communitys population diversity (e.g. Indigenous persons, culturally diverse
persons, persons with a disability).
The ability for a Committee to establish working groups is important, and people
with relevant knowledge and skills should be able to be co-opted into the working
groups.
Internal Consultation:
At the 8 June Councillor Forum Councillors considered an initial draft Terms of
Reference. Councillors feedback at the forum included:
The Group should be established as an Advisory Committee of Council.
A Councillor should chair the Committee meetings.
The Committee membership terms should be for four years (to align with Council
election cycles), and that 50% of the Committee membership should be opened
up for election on alternate two year cycles.
The Committee membership should be restricted to 15 persons in total.
The Committee should meet on a bi-monthly basis, with the capacity for working
groups to meet on a more frequent or as required basis.
Community member representation on the Committee should be for people aged
50 or above.
This Draft Terms of Reference for the Committee (Attachment 1) have been developed in
response to this feedback.
Resource Implications
Should Council endorse the Committees establishment, the Citys Community
Partnerships Unit staff will recruit Committee members, coordinate Committee meetings
and provide administrative support for the Committee. It is anticipated that this support
will be able to be delivered with existing resources.

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From time to time the Committee may propose priority initiatives that will require
additional resourcing. Such requests will need to be considered by Council / the City on a
case by case basis in accordance with established budgetary processes and
parameters. Options may also exist for the City to source external resources to support
priority initiatives.
Conclusion
Positive ageing as a concept focuses not only on improving life expectancies, but also
ensuring that individuals and population groups enjoy the best possible physical, mental
and social wellbeing and can participate in civic and community life to the full extent of
their interests throughout their life course.
Population forecasts indicate a global ageing trend, and Greater Bendigos population
forecasts are no exception to this. With a 65.8% increase in Greater Bendigos
population of 60 to 79 year olds predicted between 2011 and 2026, there is a strong
argument for governments and organisations to invest in positive ageing.
Council has indicated it wishes to maintain a focus on positive ageing and to establish a
Positive Ageing Advisory Committee that will provide strategic advice to Council on how
positive ageing can best be achieved.

Attachments
1. Positive Ageing Advisory Committee draft Terms of Reference

RECOMMENDATION
That Council resolve to:
1. Establish a Positive Ageing Advisory Committee.
2. Endorse the Terms of Reference for the Positive Ageing Advisory
Committee.

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Positive Ageing Advisory


Committee

TERMS OF REFERENCE
and associated matters
1.

Introduction

The terms positive ageing and active ageing are often used interchangeably.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) defines active ageing as the process of
optimising opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance quality
of life as people age.
The United Nations (UN) standard for older people is 60 however the UN
acknowledges that there are many factors that influence how people age and that
chronological age is not a consistent marker. The UN therefore advocates that
organisations adopt flexible approaches to promoting active ageing.

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There is an ageing population trend globally which the UN describes as both a triumph
and a challenge. It is considered a triumph as life expectancies are increasing however
it is also considered a challenge due to the strain that longer life expectancies are
anticipated to place on resources and systems.
Greater Bendigos population forecasts indicate that, between 2011 and 2026, the
number of people aged between 60 and 79 is expected to increase from 17,223 to
26,150 persons, or by 65.8%. These population forecasts emphasise the need for the
City and broader Greater Bendigo community to promote positive ageing. (Source:
http://forecast.id.com.au)

The Municipal Association of Victoria became a signatory to the Age Friendly Victoria
Declaration (Declaration) in 2016. This Declaration outlines the commitment of the
Victorian Government and Victorian Local Government Authorities to working
collaboratively to create and maintain age-friendly communities.

2.

Purpose

The Positive Ageing Advisory Committee (Committee) will advocate for and provide
strategic advice to Council on matters related to positive ageing. The Committee will also
support the development, implementation and evaluation of initiatives to promote positive
ageing within Greater Bendigo.
2.1

The Committees objectives are:


2.1.1 To integrate the needs and interests of senior residents into relevant
City strategies, plans, facilities, services and projects.
2.1.2 To increase community awareness of positive ageing principles and
opportunities, and to build the communitys positive ageing capacity.
2.1.3 To increase the social inclusion of and opportunities for Greater
Bendigos senior residents to participate in and contribute to activities
across the Greater Bendigo community.

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2.1.4 To improve physical and mental wellbeing of Greater Bendigos


senior residents.
Council will take the opinions of the Committee into consideration as part of its
deliberations and decision making processes.

3.

Membership

3.1 Membership of the Committee shall not exceed 15 persons. Community


representatives on the Committee should be aged 50 or above.
3.2 The Committees membership shall comprise:
3.2.1

one Councillor who shall chair meetings.


3.2.2 a minimum of four community representatives that - as far as
possible - represent the diversity of seniors interests and experiences in
Greater Bendigo plus a diversity of ages;
3.2.3 up to five representatives from local community groups and
organisations whose purpose involves working with people over the age of
50.
3.2.4 up to three representatives from relevant peak bodies, networks or
committees;
3.2.5 up to two City staff as deemed relevant. (Other City Staff may be
involved in Working Groups or may attend particular meetings as guest
speakers).

4.

Appointment of Members

4.1 Community and organisational representatives shall be appointed by Council


following an expression of interest and interview process.

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4.2 Expressions of interest will be sought from the categories outlined in 3.2.2, 3.2.3
and 3.2.4. The expressions of interest process will be publicly advertised.

4.3 All expressions of interest received for membership will be considered by a Panel.
The role of the Panel shall be to assess all expressions of interest received and,
following interviews of shortlisted candidates, make recommendations to Council on
member appointments.

4.4 The inaugural Panel will include a Councillor, two relevant staff from the City and 2
external organisation representatives e.g. from the Council on the Ageing Australia
(COTA).

4.5 Following the completion of the first term, former members not seeking reappointment will be invited to participate in Panel processes along with a Councillor
and City staff member.

4.6 The initial round of expressions of interest for community representatives will seek
half the members for a four year appointment and half for a two year appointment.
Member appointments will be for four year terms thereafter. This will allow for half
of the community representatives to retire in alternative years to encourage
continuity.

4.7 In developing its member appointment recommendations for Council, the Panel will
have regard for applicants:
4.7.1 demonstrated understanding of / commitment to positive ageing
concepts, and the willingness to apply the World Health Organisations
Active Ageing Framework to Greater Bendigo contexts;
4.7.2 commitment to social justice and social inclusion principles;
4.7.3 commitment to work respectfully and collaboratively, and ability to
cultivate community input into the issues and opportunities that are the
Committees focus;

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4.7.4 current participation in groups or activities that support positive


ageing or willingness to be involved in such;
4.7.5 potential to create or maintain strong networks and communication
pathways to foster exchange of information between the Committee and
broader community;
4.7.6 reflectiveness of the diversity of seniors in the Greater Bendigo
community;
4.7.7 willingness to support local government processes, including
compliance with relevant policies and procedures, and the interests of the
organisation.

5.

Term of Appointment

5.1 With the exception of the Councillor and City staff, member appointments shall be
for a four year term however for the first term half of the members terms will finish
after two years.
5.2 Councillor appointments shall be for a twelve-month term.
5.3 Retiring members may apply for further membership terms without expectation of
automatic renewal.

6.

Cessation or Revocation of Membership

6.1 A member may resign from the Committee at any time by providing written notice.
6.2 The term of office of any newly appointed member shall expire at the same time as
the member being replaced.
6.3 Given the resources required to advertise vacancies through a range of diverse
mediums, a minimum of three member vacancies will be required in order to trigger
a formal recruitment drive.

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6.4 If a member misses more than three meetings in succession without informing the
City staff, their membership may be revoked through the decision of the Committee;
6.5 Council and the Chief Executive Officer retain the right to revoke the membership of
any member deemed to be acting outside the interests of the Committee, the City
and Greater Bendigos senior residents.

7. Conduct of Members
In performing the role of a Committee member, persons are required to:
7.1 Participate in an induction session at the commencement of each term.
7.2 Comply with relevant City policies e.g. the Citys Human Rights Charter, Code of
Conduct, Volunteer Policy and organisational values and behaviours.
7.3 Act honestly, declare any conflicts of interest and act respectfully with City staff,
other Committee members and members of the public.
7.4 Not make improper use of their position or improper use of information acquired
during their membership term.
7.5 No member is authorised to speak on behalf of the Committee without prior support
from the Committee or the Chairperson.

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8.

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Conduct of Meetings

Timing and frequency


8.1 Meetings will be held bi-monthly during the working week at a time that is most
convenient for the majority of members.
8.2 Special meetings may be called at the discretion of the Chairperson.
8.3 Working Groups can be formed by the Committee and can meet on an as per
need basis and will report back at regular Committee meetings. Working Groups
will operate more informally, but within the objectives of these Terms of Reference.

Agendas and minutes


8.4 The standard agenda items of Committee meetings will include:
- Acknowledgment of Country.
- Attendance and apologies.
- Conflicts of interest.
- Consideration / endorsement of previous meeting minutes.
- Working Group reports.
- Other business.
8.5 The Committee, by resolution or through the Chairperson, may invite any individual,
interest group, or agency representative to attend a meeting as a delegation or to
present information that will assist the Committee in meeting its objectives.
8.6 Minutes of each Committee meeting will be recorded and distributed to all
members, all Councillors, the Citys Executive Management Team and placed on
Councils website.

Attendance and quorum


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8.7 It is expected that members make a reasonable effort to attend all Committee
meetings. Should a member not be able to attend a meeting they should notify the
Chairperson or City staff prior to the meeting.
8.8 A quorum will consist of half of the appointed members (taking into consideration
any resignations) plus one.

Conflicts of interest
8.9 Where a member has a conflict of interest in relation to an item to be discussed,
where if any decision made could result in a direct or indirect benefit or loss to them
as opposed to a large sector of the community, the member must declare their
conflict of interest to the Committee at the beginning of the meeting.
8.10 The provisions of the Local Government Act 1989 apply to Councillor members.

9.

Insurance

9.1 Public Liability Insurance: Members of any Committee established by the Council
under the Local Government Act or any other enabling legislation all, whilst acting
in that capacity within the scope of their duties for and on behalf of the Council, are
provided with cover under the LMI Broadform Public and Products Liability and
Professional Indemnity Insurance, subject to the LMI policy terms, conditions,
endorsements, exclusions and deductible and the like.
9.2 Council appointed Committee members, whilst acting in that capacity within the
scope of their duties for and on behalf of Council, are covered within the terms and
conditions of the Councils LMI Public and Products Liability Insurance Policy for
third party personal injury or damage to property (as defined) caused by an
occurrence, and where applicable for breach of professional duty, in connection
with the Business of the Council.
9.3 The Citys insurance policies provide indemnity for personal injury, property loss,
products liability and claims for breach of professional duty, subject at all times to
the Policy "Conditions and Exclusions".

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10. Dissolution

10.1 The Committee may, at any meeting, agree to disband.


10.2 The Council may - for any reason - resolve to disband the Committee and, upon
written notice to that effect being given to Committee members, the Committee
shall be disbanded.

11. Implementation and Review


11.1 A review report will be submitted to Council every two years detailing the activities
and achievements of the Committee against its stated objectives and any
recommendations for improvements. The report will also outline any suggested
amendments to the Committees Terms of Reference.

12. Resources Provided by the City


The City will provide support to Committee functions. This support will include:
12.1 Briefing the Chair on relevant issues and opportunities and suggested meeting
agenda items.
12.2 Providing secretarial, technical and coordination support for Committee meetings,
including organising guest speakers.
12.3 Provide a suitable venue for the Committee's bi-monthly meetings.
12.4 Updating the Citys webpage on positive ageing activities and news.

13. Other Matters


13.1 Members are encouraged to provide feedback about participation experiences
throughout the year during meetings, via agenda items or by contacting the
Chairperson or City staff outside of meetings.

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13.2 The last meeting of each year will involve evaluating the past year of Committee
functioning, as well as planning for the following year.
13.3 Where possible, the City will support members to enhance their skills and capacity
both personally and professionally as leaders in the community. This could be in the
form of guest speakers, events, training, etc. This will based on Committee agreed
needs for skills and capacity development.

14. Induction Program


The induction program will include:
14.1 familiarisation with the contents of the information package (per item 15).
14.2 an overview of the Citys structure and functions and relationship with Councillors
and the community.
14.3 an overview of the schedule and structure of Committee meetings.
14.4 positive ageing principles and relevant information about the Greater Bendigo
community.
14.5 the Citys Human Rights Charter, Code of Conduct, Volunteer Policy and
organisational values and behaviours.

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15. Information Package


All new Committee members will be provided with an information package consisting of:

Terms of Reference.

Meeting schedule.

Citys Human Rights Charter, Code of Conduct, Volunteer Policy and organisational
values and behaviours.

The Citys organisational chart.

Ward Councillor contact details.

Greater Bendigo community profile.

City staff contact details.

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6.2

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SMART CITIES PLAN - SUBMISSION BY THE CITY OF GREATER


BENDIGO

Document Information
Author

Bridget Maplestone, Strategic Planner

Responsible
Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose
This report provides a copy of the City of Greater Bendigo submission into the Federal
Governments Smart Cities Plan and seeks endorsement of that submission. The Smart
Cities Plan was released on 29 April 2016 and required submissions to be forwarded to
the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet by 24 June 2016. The short
consultation period did not allow for a submission to be prepared in time to be placed on
an earlier Council agenda. The development of the submission has been informed by
input from relevant City staff.
The submission outlines why the City of Greater Bendigo is ideally placed to be used as
a regional pilot for a City Deal as part of the Smart Cities Plan. A City Deal is about
identifying local infrastructure investment opportunities to be funded by government and
industry, which would in turn deliver productivity improvements and jobs growth, thereby
creating benefits from this investment. The submission does not identify a single
infrastructure project.
The City has demonstrated its credentials in delivering on projects which require
investment from all levels of government as well as corporate philanthropy. This
submission outlines how a short term investment in infrastructure in the city will pay clear
dividends in the medium to long term.
The submission also supports the submission being provided by the Bendigo Business
Council.
Policy Context
Council Plan Reference:
Leadership and Good Governance
1.3 Contribute to policy and strategy development being led by government and other
agencies.
Background Information
On the 29 April 2016 the Smart Cities Plan was released by the Federal Government.

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The Smart Cities Plan provides an overview of a variety of issues facing Australian Cities
today including jobs, housing, the environment, investing in infrastructure and smart
technology.
One aspect of the Smart Cities Plan is the need to plan for the future of regional cities.
This includes supporting their long term growth.
A submission (attached) was drafted with input from relevant City staff and responds to
the Smart Cities Plan outlining why the City would be well placed for investment from the
plan.
Report
The submission supports the release of a Smart Cities Plan. It sees the opportunities
which can be realised through idea generation and collaboration with government, the
community and the private sector.
The Smart Cities Plan outlines some of the key challenges and opportunities facing
Australia. This includes around jobs, housing, transport, green urban spaces and human
capital.
The Plan then talks about building the cities of tomorrow through smart policy. One of
the options presented is delivering City Deals A City Deal is tailored to an individual
city and is about working collaboratively between government, industry and communities
to maximise funding for local infrastructure to deliver productivity improvements and jobs
growth.
The submission outlines a number of reasons why the City is well placed to be used as
an inland regional pilot project to benefit from a City Deal. The submission outlines the
Citys ability to work effectively with all levels of government and private enterprise to
deliver on key projects and initiatives. The submission then provides an overview of
some of the innovative projects and policy undertaken by the City in recent years.
Priority/Importance:
There is the potential for significant investment as part of this plan. While no investment
has been currently allocated to the City, should investment be earmarked this would
allow Council to progress its infrastructure priorities.
Options/Alternatives:
The Council has the option of endorsing the submission or amending it.
Consultation/Communication
Internal Consultation:
Internal consultation from staff with particular interests and responsibility related to future
planning.

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Conclusion
It is important for the City to advocate for investment in infrastructure at Federal and
State level. By providing a submission outlining its credentials into the Smart Cities Plan
it is encouraging investment.
Attachments
1.

The City of Greater Bendigo submission to the Smart Cities Plan.

RECOMMENDATION
That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to endorse the submission to the Smart
Cities Plan.

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6.3

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

RECORD OF ASSEMBLIES

Document Information
Author

Peter Davies, Manager Executive Services

Responsible
Officer

Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer

Summary/Purpose
The purpose of this report is to provide the record of any assembly of Councillors, which
has been held since the last Council Meeting, so that it can be recorded in the Minutes of
the formal Council Meeting.
Policy Context
Council demonstrates leadership in its decisions to meet future needs and challenges.
Background Information
The Local Government Act provides a definition of an assembly of Councillors where
conflicts of interest must be disclosed.
A meeting will be an assembly of Councillors if it considers matters that are likely to be
the subject of a Council decision, or, the exercise of a Council delegation and the
meeting is:
1.
2.

A planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors (5) and a
member of Council staff; or
an advisory committee of the Council where one or more Councillors are present.

The requirement for reporting provides increased transparency and the opportunity for
Councillors to check the record, particularly the declarations of conflict of interest.

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Report
Meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
Matters discussed

Meeting Information
Councillors' Forum
1 June 2016
1. Briefing from Public Transport Victoria
2. Commercial use of open space
3. Housing Strategy
4. Community Grants
5. Dog Park
6. Departure from 'strategy'
7. Epsom Primary School
8. Cost-shifting
9. Bendigo Groundwater Committee
10. Epsom Huntly Drainage Strategy
11. Flood Study
12. Organics collection
13. Writers' Festival
14. Mark Erskine development
15. Jimmy Possum
16. Williamson and Mollison Streets roadworks
17. Street trees
18. Car parking around Rosalind Park
19. Strathfieldsaye noticeboard
20. Organics recycling
21. Budget submissions
22. Safe Community Forum
23. World Heritage Listing for the Goldfields
24. Baptist School
25. Public Question Time
26. Meeting with Minister about violence in CBD
27. Athletics Track
28. CFA dispute
29. Former White Hills landfill site
30. Screens in the Hargreaves Mall
31. Community Satisfaction Survey

Attendees/Apologies
Councillors
Cr Rod Fyffe
Cr Rod Campbell
Cr Peter Cox
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Barry Lyons
Cr Mark Weragoda
Cr James Williams
Apologies:
Cr Elise Chapman
Cr Lisa Ruffell
Staff/
Mr Craig Niemann
Community
Ms Kerryn Ellis
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Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Mr Darren Fuzzard
Mr David Lloyd
Ms Prue Mansfield
Mr Michael Smyth
Mr Peter Davies
Mrs Alison Campbell

Conflict of Interest disclosures


Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
No.
Nil

Meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
Matters discussed

Councillor/officer left
meeting

Meeting Information
Governance Meeting
1 June 2016
1. Office development
2. Corporate Structure update
3. Audit Committee report
4. Local Government Inspectorate
5. Aquatic facility
6. Citizens' Jury
7. Caretaker period
8. Code of Conduct
9. Social Media

Attendees/Apologies
Councillors
Cr Rod Fyffe
Cr Rod Campbell
Cr Peter Cox
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Barry Lyons
Cr James Williams
Apologies:
Cr Elise Chapman
Cr Lisa Ruffell
Cr Mark Weragoda
Staff/
Mr Craig Niemann
Community
Mr Peter Davies
Representatives
Mrs Alison Campbell
Conflict of Interest disclosures
Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
No.
Nil

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Meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
Matters discussed

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Meeting Information
Councillors' Forum
8 June 2016
1. 'Scarf-up for Scouting'
2. Draft agenda review and planning matters
3. Meeting with VicRoads
4. GBM Gold
5. Positive Ageing Advisory Committee
6. Emergency Management Cluster Plan
7. Epsom Primary School
8. Special Meeting agenda
9. Baptist School, Junortoun
10. Organics exemption process
11. Tree inspection
12. Informing Councillors
13. Drought assistance
14. Organics bin
15. Mosque application
16. Darren Fuzzard appointment
17. 30-year infrastructure plan

Attendees/Apologies
Councillors
Cr Rod Fyffe
Cr Rod Campbell
Cr Peter Cox
Cr Helen Leach
Cr Barry Lyons
Cr Lisa Ruffell
Cr Mark Weragoda
Cr James Williams
Apology:
Cr Elise Chapman
Staff/
Mr Craig Niemann
Community
Ms Kerryn Ellis
Representatives
Mr Darren Fuzzard
Mr David Lloyd
Ms Prue Mansfield
Mr Michael Smyth
Mr Peter Davies
Mr Peter Davies
Mrs Alison Campbell
Conflict of Interest disclosures
Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
No.
Nil

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Meeting
Name/Type
Meeting Date
Matters discussed

Ordinary Meeting - 20 July 2016

Meeting Information
Heritage Advisory Committee
16 June 2016
1. Commemorate activities for the Peter Ellis OAM
2. Terms of Reference
3. 'WeHeartBendigo' photo competition
4. Joint meeting with Sustainability and Environment
Advisory Committee
5. Bendigo Gasworks
6. Planning update
7. Strategy update
8. Site watch list

Attendees/Apologies
Councillors
Cr Peter Cox
Apology:
Cr Mark Weragoda
Staff/
Ms Emma Bryant
Community
Dr Dannielle Orr/
Representatives
Mr Laurie Brown
Ms Elaine Doling
Ms Kay MacGregor
Mr Rod Spitty
Mr Calum Walker
Mr Darren Wright
Apologies:
Mr Trevor Budge
Ms Megan McDougall
Ms Trudy Rickard/
Ms Helen Ashby
Mr David Bannear
Mr Jordan Grenfell
Dr Di Smith
Conflict of Interest disclosures
Matter Councillor/officer making disclosure
No.
Nil

Councillor/officer left
meeting

RECOMMENDATION
That Council endorse the record of assemblies of Councillors as outlined in this report.

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7.

URGENT BUSINESS

Nil.

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8.

NOTICES OF MOTION

8.1

NOTICE OF MOTION: WASTE TO ENERGY

CR HELEN LEACH

That Council resolve to investigate the establishment of a regional high intensity


incinerator facility to dispose of and process non-organic and non-recyclable household
and commercial waste and produce energy.

Officer comment (A/Director, Presentation and Assets):


New businesses to Bendigo are invited to talk to the City's Economic Development area
about potential opportunities within our region however we are not in a position to attract
or promote this type of business. This is also not the City's focus at this point in time
given the organic waste collection rollout.
The City's Waste and Resource Management Strategy acknowledges the role the City
plays in reducing waste to landfill to minimise future costs and environmental impacts, an
example the organic waste collection program has been introduced.
Whilst the City is looking to reduce waste to landfill, a Waste to Energy possible solution
such as an incinerator facility, would be a sizable operation and significant cost to set up,
there may also be issues with the location of facility within a regional setting such as
Bendigo. Examples of these types of facilities provided by Phoenix Energy are located in
remote areas of Western Australia and overseas.

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9.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

10.

MAYOR'S REPORT

11.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

12.

CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS

Nil.

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