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Weekly Guide: MATHEMATICS Grade 12th

COURSE: MAT 131 1448: Matematica Actualizada 1


Leonardo Torres Pagn, PhD

Unit The Real Numbers System


Lesson

INTRODUCCION

Academic
Strategies (AS)
Suplementary &
complementary
strategies (SS)

Scientific based
strategies (SB)
(Marzano)

High School
Student Profile
(SP)
Standard,
Expectations

Week #

Comparing Integers and Other Rational Numbers

AS1 Conceptual development


AS2 Curricular integration
AS3 Cooperative learning
SS1 Context teaching
SS2 Collaborative learning
SS3 Brain based learning
SS4 Stations

Date

AS4 Reading comprehension AS7 Differentiated instruction


AS5 Problem-based learning
AS8 Project-based learning
AS6 Significant learning
AS9 Technology integration
SS5 Problem solving
SS6 Technology integration
SS7 Values clarification
SS8 Scaffolding

SB1 Identifying similarities and differences

SB6 Cooperative learning

SB2 Summarizing and note taking

SB7 Setting objectives and providing feedback

SB3 Homework and practice

SB8 Generating and testing hypotheses


SB9 Cues, questions, and advance organizers

SB4 Non-linguistic representations


SB5 Reinforcing effort and providing recognition
SP1Apprentice
SP2 Effective communicator
SP3 Ethical
FUNCTIONS

SP4 Entrepreneur
SP5 Engaged in communities
Level of Knowledge

Indicator

STANDARDS

Standard,
Expectations

FUNCTIONS

Level of Knowledge

Indicator
Standard,
Expectations

ES.F.26.0 Build new functions from existing functions

Recall & Reproduction


Skills & Concepts
Strategic Thinking
Extended Thinking

Level of Knowledge

Indicator
(Concepts & Big ideas) OBJECTIVES

Recall & Reproduction


Skills & Concepts
Strategic Thinking
Extended Thinking

Recall & Reproduction


Skills & Concepts
Strategic Thinking
Extended Thinking

Formative Assessment

At the end of the study of this lesson, the student will

3-2-1 cards
Academic prompts

Brainstorming
Check list
Close questions
Comics
Exit prompt
Focal list
Graph organizer
Homework
Interviews

Investigations
Mind map
Observations
Open questions
Oral prompt
Performance task
Portfolio entry
Premises
Questionnaires
Quizzes
Reflexive diary

Report
Report (news)
Role playing
Scale
Simulations
Survey
Test items
Venn Diagram
Whip-arounds
Windshield check
POE Exercises

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CURRICULAR INTEGRATION

Transversal
themes
Morale
Strategies
Values
Technology
Standards

Accomodations

Peace education
Education & technology

Education for work


Civic & Ethics

Deliberation
Action research
Civism
Respect
Communication & Collaboration

Socratic dialogue
Values clarification
Reliability
Responsibility
Research & Information fluency

Digital citizenship

Technology operations & concepts

Discipline
Community

LLE

EE

Gifted &
Talented

504
ntiateDifere

Cultural identity
Environmental Education
Gender perspective
Dilemma
Role playing
Kindness
Justice
Creativity and innovations
Critical thinking, problem
solving & decision making

Content
Process

Word wall: Require students to use words from the Word Wall in their writing and to refer to the Word Wall to find
correct spellings. Leveled questions. Student journals. Math glossary. English worksheets. Read clearly and
slowly. Use motions, gestures, and facial expressions to communicate. Model appropriate nonverbal feedback for
students. Work in a group or with a partner asking and answering questions about a current event or book. Listen to
English movies. Replace an academic language word with a social language word to aid in understanding and building
new vocabulary. Allow student to choose topics and partners. Preferred seating. Complete a monitoring and selfevaluation chart. Pre-teach vocabulary using visuals. Pair words with pictures. Place math symbols on a sheet.
Encourage the use of math symbols. Use math cognates. Use color marker to highlight key words. Allow
students to nonverbally act out words to help them process vocabulary without having to speak. Promote structured and
appropriate discussion that requires students to utilize words from Word Wall in their verbal responses. Write simple
sentences to answer questions. Combine written language with corresponding visuals whenever possible. Provide a
text that is challenging but engaging, focusing not only on vocabulary, but also on grammatical concepts. Student
Response Boards: Allow students to work in pairs if they need more support or accept pictures as correct answers
instead of written language.
Use topics that are of interest to the student. Praise student for asking and answering questions. Give the student a
choice of topics. Provide frequent and specific feedback to the student on performance. Preferred seating.
Complete a monitoring and self-evaluation chart. Pair words with pictures. Provide age appropriate materials. Provide
graphic organizers for theme, summarizing, mind maps. Combine written language with corresponding visuals
whenever possible. Provide a text that is challenging but engaging, focusing not only on vocabulary, but also on
grammatical concepts. Provide students with key words from the text and have them put a checkmark next to a word.
Allow student to check with a partner before answering or commenting. Use marking strategies. Provide powerpoint
slides. Sort examples and non-examples appropriately. Provide students with examples and non-examples
Continuous Progress Curriculum (Flexible Pacing)the content and pacing of curriculum and instruction are
matched to the student's abilities and needs. Advanced Placement (AP)students have the opportunity to complete
college level coursework and earn college credit through examination while still in high school. Ability Groupingthe
flexible regrouping of students based on individual instructional needs. Curriculum Compactingallows highly able
students to "compact" or eliminate material already mastered from the curriculum, thus allowing them to complete
subject material in a shorter time span. Subject Accelerationtaking a course earlier than is typical. Tiered
Assignmentsassignments within the same lesson plan which are structured at varied levels of complexity, depth and
abstractness to meet the need of students with diverse abilities. Learning Contractsgive students freedom to plan
their time and yet provide guidelines for completing work responsibly. Problem-Based Learningtype of problem
solving in which students are presented with an "ill-structured" problem that resembles a real-life situation. Students are
responsible for identifying additional data and resources that they need and for deciding how to present their findings
and demonstrate their learning. Enrichmentprovides students with experiences in regular classrooms that are
additional or supplemental to the established curriculum. Mentorshipsenrichment program that pairs an individual
student with someone who has advanced skills and experiences in a particular discipline. This mentor can serve as an
advisor, counselor, and role model to the student.
Accommodation:
Differentiation instructional strategiesthe modification of instruction based on a student's academic needs. 4-MAT,
anchor activities, compacting, complex instruction, cubing, expression options, graphic organizers, group
investigations, grouping activities, Independent projects, independent studies, interest centers, interest groups,
jigsaws, journal prompts, layered Curriculum, learning contracts, learning contracts, literature circles, Menus, ,

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Unit
Lesson
Overview

Date
Comparing Integers and Other Rational Numbers

Week #

Students compare and interpret rational numbers order on the


number line, making statements that relate the numbers
location on the number line to their order.

Students apply their prerequisite knowledge of place value,


decimals, and fractions to compare integers and other rational
numbers.

Students relate integers and other rational numbers to realworld situations and problems.

Lesson Notes
Students complete an activity during Example 2 that requires
preparation. The Activity Cards (attached to the end of the lesson)
need to be prepared before the delivery of this lesson.

Materials & resources

Materials & resources

(Comments)

Start-up (Comments)

Start up
Example 1 (3 minutes): Interpreting Number Line Models to
Compare Numbers
Refer to the number line diagram below, which is also located in the
student materials. In a whole-group discussion, create a real-world
situation that relates to the numbers graphed on the number line.
Include an explanation of what zero represents. Students should
contribute suggestions to help the story evolve and come to a final
state. Students write the related story in their student materials.
Example 1: Interpreting Number Line Models to Compare
Numbers

Answers may vary. Every August, the Boy Scouts go on an

-day

40

-mile hike. At the halfway point (

20

miles into the hike), there is a check-in station for Scouts


to check in and register. Thomas and Evan are Scouts in

different hiking groups. By Wednesday morning,

Evans group has

10

miles to go before it reaches the

check-in station, and Thomass group is

miles beyond

the station. Zero on the number line represents the checkin station.

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Scaffolding:
Provide a set of
horizontal and
Development
(Comments)
vertical
number Development
Exercise 1 (7 minutes)
lines for visual
learners to create Display the following vertical number line model on the board.
Scaffolding:
Students are to independently interpret the number line model to
Provide a story
describe a real-world situation involving these two rational numbers.
starter for
Remind students to compare the numbers and describe their order in
students
their write-ups. After allowing adequate time for students to write
who are
their solutions, several students share what they wrote with the class.
struggling
Students in the class determine whether the written responses
to begin
correctly relate to the number line models.
Exercise 1
1.

Create a real-world situation that relates to the points shown in


the number line model. Be sure to describe the relationship
between the values of the two points and how it relates to their
order on the number line.
Answers will vary.
Alvin lives in Canada and is recording the outside
temperature each night before he goes to bed. On
Monday night, he recorded a temperature of

degrees Celsius. On Tuesday night, he recorded a

temperature of

degree Celsius. Tuesday nights

temperature was colder than Monday nights


temperature.

is less than

associated point is below

, so the

on a vertical number

line.

Example 2 (10 minutes)


Students are seated in groups of three or four, and each group is given
a set of Activity Cards. For each group, photocopy, cut out, and
scramble both sheets of Activity Cards that appear at the end of this
lesson.

Each group of students matches each word story card to its


related number line card.

For each number line diagram, students must write a


statement relating the numbers placement on the number line
to their order.

If time permits, the class goes over each answer as a whole


group. For each number line diagram, students present their
written statements as verbal statements to the class.

An example follows:

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Scaffolding:
Provide a set of
horizontal and
Development
(Comments)
vertical
number
lines for visual
learners to create

Development
The Navy Seals are
practicing new techniques.
The blue submarine is

450 ft .

below sea

level, while the red


submarine is

375 ft .

below sea

level.

The blue submarine is farther below sea level than the red

450

submarine because

is to the left of

375

on the

375 .

number line; it is less than

Exercises 28 (15 minutes)


Students read each of the following scenarios and decide whether they
agree or disagree. They must defend and explain their stance in
writing. Allow time for students to share their answers with the class
and explain their reasoning. The class should come to a consensus for
each one.
Exercises 28
For each problem, determine if you agree or disagree with
the representation. Then, defend your stance by citing
specific details in your writing.
2.

Felicia needs to write a story problem that relates to the order in

which the numbers

1
2

and

10

are represented on a

number line. She writes the following:


During a recent football game, our team lost yards on
two consecutive downs. We lost

1
2

yards on the

first down. During the second down, our quarterback


was sacked for an additional

10

-yard loss. On the

number line, I represented this situation by first


locating

1
2

1
2

. I located the point by moving

units to the left of zero. Then, I graphed the

second point by moving

10

units to the left of

.
Agree.

10

to the left of

is less than

1
2

1
2

since

10

is

on the number line. Since both

numbers are negative, they indicate the team lost


yards on both football plays, but they lost more yards
on the second play.

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Scaffolding:
Provide a set of
horizontal and
Development
(Comments)
vertical
number
lines for visual
learners to create
MP.
2
&
MP.

Development
3.

Manuel looks at a number line diagram that has the points

3
4

1
2

and

graphed. He writes the following related

story:

50

I borrowed
borrowed

75

cents from my friend, Lester. I


cents from my friend, Calvin. I owe

Lester less than I owe Calvin.

3
4

Agree.

0. 75

is equivalent to

0. 50

is equivalent to

0. 50

both show that he owes money. But

and

1
2

0. 75

and

0. 50

is

farther to the right on a number line, so Manuel does


not owe Lester as much as he owes Calvin.

4.

Henry located

1
4

and

2.1

on a number line. He wrote

the following related story:


In gym class, both Jerry and I ran for

Jerry ran

1
4

miles, and I ran

2.1

20

minutes.

miles. I ran a

farther distance.
Disagree.

1
4

is equivalent to

is greater than

2 .25

point associated with

2 .1
5.

2 .1

since

1
4

. On the number line, the

2 .25

is to the right of

. Jerry ran a farther distance.

Sam looked at two points that were graphed on a vertical


number line. He saw the points

1.5

and

. He wrote

the following description:


I am looking at a vertical number line that shows the
location of two specific points. The first point is a
negative number, so it is below zero. The second point
is a positive number, so it is above zero. The negative
number is

. The positive number is

1
2

unit

more than the negative number.


Disagree. Sam was right when he said the negative
number is below zero and the positive number is above
zero. But

1. 5

is

1
2

units above zero, and

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Scaffolding:
Provide a set of
horizontal and
Development
(Comments)
vertical
number
lines for visual
learners to create

Development
2

is

units below zero. So, altogether, that

means the positive number is

2
6.

1
2

units more than

Claire draws a vertical number line diagram and graphs two

10

points:

10

and

. She writes the following related

story:
These two locations represent diferent elevations.

10

One location is

10

location is
line,

10

feet above sea level, and one

feet below sea level. On a number

feet above sea level is represented by

10

graphing a point at

, and

10

feet below sea

10

level is represented by graphing a point at

Agree. Zero in this case represents sea level. Both

10

locations are

feet from zero but in opposite

directions, so they are graphed on the number line at

10
7.

10

and

Mrs. Kimble, the sixth-grade math teacher, asked the class to


describe the relationship between two points on the number
line,

7.45

7.5

and

, and to create a real-world scenario.

Jackson writes the following story:


Two friends, Jackie and Jennie, each brought money to
the fair. Jackie brought more than Jennie. Jackie

$ 7.45

brought
Since

7.45

has more digits than

7.5

come after

$ 7.50

, and Jennie brought

7.5

, it would

on the number line, or to the right,

so it is a greater value.
Disagree. Jackson is wrong by saying that

7 .5

to the right of
the same as

7 .50

on the number line.


, and it is greater than

and then

7 . 45

7 . 46
7 .50

7 . 47

. So,

7 .50

7 . 48

is

7 .5

is

7 . 45

7 . 45

When I count by hundredths starting at


would say

7 . 45

7 . 49

,I
,

is greater than

, and the associated point falls to the right of

the point associated with

7 . 45

on the number line.

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Scaffolding:
Provide a set of MP.
2
horizontal and&
Development
(Comments)
vertical number
MP.
lines for visual
learners to create

Development
8.

Justine graphs the points associated with the following numbers


on a vertical number line:

1
4

1
2

, and

. She

then writes the following real-world scenario:


The nurse measured the height of three sixth-grade
students and compared their heights to the height of a
typical sixth grader. Two of the students heights are
below the typical height, and one is above the typical

height. The point whose coordinate is

the student who has a height that is

represents
inch above

the typical height. Given this information, Justine


determined that the student represented by the point
associated with

1
4

is the shortest of the three

students.
Disagree. Justine was wrong when she said the point

1
4

represents the shortest of the three

students. If zero stands for no change from the typical


height, then the point associated with

1
2

is

farther below zero than the point associated with

1
4

Positive

. The greatest value is positive

represents the tallest person. The

shortest person is represented by

1
2

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Closure (Comments)

Closure

How can use you use the number line to order a set of
numbers? Will graphing the numbers on a vertical number line
rather than a horizontal number line change this process?

You can locate and graph the numbers on the number line to
determine their order. If you use a vertical number line, their
order is the same as it is on a horizontal number line, but
instead of moving from left to right to go from least to
greatest, you move from bottom to top. To determine the
order of a set of numbers, the number that is farthest left (or
farthest down on a vertical number line) is the smallest value.
As you move right (or toward the top on a vertical number
line), the numbers increase in value. So, the greatest number
is graphed farthest right on a number line (or the highest one
on a vertical number line).

If two points are graphed on a number line, what can you say
about the value of the number associated with the point on the
right in comparison to the value of the number associated with
the point on the left?

The number associated with the point on the right is greater


than the number associated with the point on the left.

Which number is larger:

1
3.4 or 3
2 ? How will

graphing these numbers on a number line help you make this


determination?

Whichever number is graphed farthest to the left (or


below) is the smaller number. In this example,
would be graphed to the left of

1
2

3.4 , so it is the

smaller number. You can compare the numbers to make


sure they are graphed correctly by either representing
them both as a decimal or both as a fraction.
is halfway between

and

1
2

4 . So, if I divide the

space into tenths, the associated point would be at

3.5

since

it would be
right of

1
5
3 =3
3.4 ,
2
10 . When I graph

0.1 closer to 3 , so it would be to the

1
3 . This means 3.4
2

is larger than

1
2 .

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Formative Evaluation
(Comments)

Formative evaluation
Exit Ticket
1. Interpret the number line diagram shown below, and write a
statement about the temperature for Tuesday compared to Monday
at 11:00 p.m.

2. If the temperature at 11:00 p.m. on Wednesday is warmer than


Tuesdays temperature but still below zero, what is a possible value
for the temperature at 11:00 p.m. Wednesday?

Differentiated instruction
(Comments)

Differentiated instruction

Homework(Comments)

Homework

Reflection (Comments)

Reflection on praxis

Test items (Comments)

Test items

References

References

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