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ITALY

Country Report on ICT in Education
Available on http://insight.eun.org
Antonella Turchi, INDIRE
2013

European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels, Belgium – www.eun.org

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Contact: Antonella Tozza, Ministero dell’istruzione

................................ Web 2........................................ 9 4......................... Responsibilities ........................................................ 8 3........................... Curriculum framework ........................................4....... TEACHER EDUCATION FOR ICT...........2....12 European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels................... 12 ICT supporting inclusion..........................11 5........................................................................................................... Students’ ICT competence .....................................0 ............................................................3.................................................................................4.................................5.. 11 5...............................................................................5.......................................................... National characteristics (optional) .................... 9 4............1............................................................................................. 5. 1 1....5................. ............................................................ ICT priorities...............................................2 Key challenges/priorities for education ............................................... 2 2.........................................................eun........................................................ ICT-based assessment ................................ Belgium – www.............. Quality assurance of the use of ICT in schools .......................... 1 1................................................................. 12 5............................................................ Assessment Schemes .............................................................................................6................. Training of Teacher Trainers .................................................................................. 7 3.....................................................................................TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 THE EDUCATION CONTEXT .. 8 3.... 8 3........................ 3 2....................................................4..........7 3......................................................................... ICT in the curriculum ...................................................................................................................................................................................3..................................... Learning Platforms .............................................. 11 5.........................1.............2.........................7 2..............................................................6................................ Specific ICT Initiatives............. Assessment schemes .........5 2....... 10 4........ ICT in in-service teacher education.........1 Education Reform................................ 3 2................................................................ 3 2. 12 5...................... 10 4........ ICT policies for schools ................................................................................................................ 9 4.........3..3.............................................................................. ICT in the curriculum ........................................................................................... User-generated content........7 Incentives ......6.............. 8 3................................. New initiatives ................................................ DIGITAL LEARNING RESOURCES AND SERVICE ...........................11 5........1........ Content sharing ....................................................................2...7 Access of SEN students........... .....................4...... 10 4............................................................................................................................................. 7 3.............................................................................. 9 4..........org 1 5.............................1..................................................................................................... Content development strategies .............................................. 12 ......................... E-content development ......2.......................................... ICT POLICY ......... ICT in initial teacher education ..........................................................5....................................................................................... 9 4.......................................................................

technical education and vocational education. Communication in the mother tongue. 53/2003. Primary School: 24 to 30 hours per week (according to the school curriculum) with one 6. being attentive to different methods. establishes. 7. 221 of 17 December 2012. Communication in foreign languages. the adoption of exclusively digital or mixed-media textbooks (a printed textbook with supplementary digital content. and aims to give more educational choice to students and their families. in line with the key competences for lifelong learning as defined by the European recommendations1. . 2. drawn up by a panel of experts in 2007 and by the additional Ministerial Decree No. Cultural awareness and expression European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels. following the principle of Lifelong Learning and defining the main characteristics of the education system. 4. Belgium – www. Economic Technological Vocational Institutions have two sectors:   Services Industry and Arts & Crafts The law establishes the number of teaching hours for the different school levels:   1 Artistic Classic Scientific Linguistic Musical Human Science Pre-primary school: 40 to 50 hours per week with two teachers. This law and its legislative decrees led to a reform.eun. The reform was applied for first year students in September 2010 and was extended to the entire school population in subsequent years. but also to the The law on upper secondary schooling (2 nd cycle). 53/2003 the National Guidelines for pre-primary school and the 1st cycle of education. THE EDUCATION AL CONTEXT 1.org 1 The latest Guidelines underline the fact that education today means relating the complexity of new ways of learning to the practical requirements of every day teaching. The liceum has six pathways:       Technical Institutions have two sectors (including eleven pathways):   1. Sense of initiative and entrepreneurship. as of 2014. EDUCATION REFORM Law No. Learning to learn.1. new media and multi-dimensional searching. or a combination of digital content and supplementary digital content that can even be purchased online separately). 5. passed in February 2010. Mathematical competence and basic comptentences in science and technology. Digital competence. which cover 5 years of primary school and 3 years of lower secondary school. were implemented by the Guidelines for the Curriculum. 8. Social and civic competences. 254 of 16 November 2012. A general reform of the Italian education system was introduced with Law No. concerns general education (liceum). divided into two cycles: - 1st cycle: primary school and lower secondary school 2nd cycle: upper secondary school Introduced shortly after Law No.1 achievement of basic aims. 3.

Supporting the diffusion of e-government services and guaranteeing access to online services for a growing number of citizens. further guidelines were produced by the Ministry of Education (MIUR) that define the duties of INVALSI:      National and international surveys on students’ learning School examination tests in the final exam of secondary level Assessment and self-assessment of schools Evaluation of school leadership School system evaluation Lower and upper secondary teachers must complete a teaching-oriented ‘second-cycle degree’ (two-year programme) with planned available posts and an admission exam. according to the aims of the European Commission. In 2006 and 2007 more administrative autonomy was given to INVALSI. including traineeship activities. Traineeship activities should begin from the second year of the course. Developing. Admission also requires the possession of an upper secondary leaving certificate from the state or any other equivalent qualification obtained abroad. for a total of 5261 available spaces. which also qualifies student teachers to teach at pre-primary and primary level. Promoting the redevelopment of school buildings. 2nd cycle and postsecondary education reform.eun. Belgium – www. teacher. according to new energy standards and meeting the basic requirements in terms of safety Enhancing students’ mobility abroad with the programme Erasmus Plus. the performance evaluation of the education system. Implementing the 1st cycle. Each year INVALSI has developed and collected tests for the assessment of primary. . in particular students’ learning abilities and competences. The degree course ends with the discussion of a final project and of the final traineeship report. and their head teachers and teachers. pre-primary/primary or secondary level). Continuing the pilots of evaluation systems for schools aiming to become a “merit school”. The first competitions for access to the newly established courses.org 2 According to the 2010 reform. lower and upper secondary students. setting out its competences for the evaluation of the school system. Enhancing technical and professional education in order to improve the technical and scientific culture. The discussion of the two reports forms the final exam. In October 2012. The general reform (based on the law no. Training is followed by a one-year traineeship period called ‘active formative traineeship’ (Tirocinio Formativo Attivo – TFA). exam.e. or 40 hours per week with two teachers Lower Secondary school: 30 to 36 hours.2 KEY CHALLENGES/PRIORITIES FOR EDUCATION The main priorities of the latest education reform are:    Initial teacher training Teachers of pre-primary and primary levels obtain a second-cycle degree after completion of a specific fiveyear university course (‘single-cycle degree’). youth employment and development of the country. Initial teacher training also includes traineeship activities and is organised differently according to the level at which teachers will work (i. 1. all teachers working in state schools are trained at higher level through programmes leading to a ‘second-cycle’ degree qualification. 53/2003) also enhanced the national evaluation system and improved teachers’ initial training (introducing compulsory fiveyear university education). Tests are experimental and are set to become compulsory in the near future. were held in October 2011. Courses have a planned number of available spaces and an admission    European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels. Evaluation of the education system The National Service for the Evaluation of the Education and Training System (INVALSI) was set up in 2004. or 40 hours (tempo prolungato) with different teachers for each subject.

The State.1.org 3 By constitutional law the State is in charge of education. A wide offer of initiatives has had the aim of reforming the school administration and renewing and enhancing the teaching/learning methodology to better cope with the needs of teachers.        Continuing and developing the activities of educational and vocational guidance and education for citizenship and legality in order to combat early drop-out. The major initiatives have concerned: European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels. which is developed as a result of the teamwork of the Teachers’ Assembly. Provinces and Municipalities are in charge of organisational matters at local level.2. Associations and Organisations: collaborate and support the process through donations and activities aiming to promote digital awareness. while following the general principles/rules given by the State. Promoting the development of school buildings to make schools at the structural level real interactive laboratories that contribute to the information society. outlines the fundamental principles and standards of the school system.). In September 2012. providing general rules concerning curricula and outcomes in education. extracurricular. Schools produce their own Piano dell'Offerta Formativa (POF – Educational Offer Plan). The POF is the fundamental document that describes the cultural and planning identity of an individual institution. The partners of this National Digital Plan for Schools are:      Schools: detect the local need to develop the learning project Regional Branches of the Ministry: manage activities and coordinate the regional supporting staff with the Ministry National Agency (INDIRE): takes care of documentation and teacher training Universities: support schools in their use of technology in school activities Companies. Unifying systems in order to create a unique repository for the collection.1. in order to spread and enhance the ‘Digital School’ initiatives. Schools. educational and organisational projects that each school adopts according to its autonomous regu- lations. Regional Authorities became new partners of the Plan. ICT POLICY 2. meet the regional needs through the POF. The Regions. ICT POLICIES FOR SCHOOLS Since 2000. It defines the curricular. Promoting digital innovation in schools. and 5. 2. University and Research (MIUR) has supported schools in the use of ICT in the teaching/learning processes. Reinforcing school autonomy. . the Ministry of Education.5. Implementing policies and projects to guarantee full transparency of public data (open data). RESPONSIBILITIES Policy makers in Italy developed a national plan to enhance the use of ICT at school. analysis and dissemination of data and the implementation of the Digital School Plan. Ensuring the maintenance of the objective of the rationalisation of expenditure for the school system. 2. students and families.eun. which is presented to families at the beginning of every school year (see also Sections 3. signing Agreements with the Ministry of Education to allocate funds for the implementation of the Plan and its actions throughout the country. based on input provided by the School Council and with the supervision of the school head. Belgium – www. Promoting the recovery of the most disadvantaged educational areas and strengthening measures for educational and vocational guidance and education for citizenship and legality. Widespread use of new technology in schools was introduced by means of the School System Reform in 2003 concerning the 1st cycle of education.

Cl@ssi 2. The School-Family project: This project provides new services ensuring better communication for families. teachers can produce and share digital content and use tools such as blogs. divided into several sections. In order to support the online registration of students. flexible and interactive (see also Sections 4.istruzione. The initiative has been developed in many phases:     the supply of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) to schools within classrooms. training courses. educational outcomes.3.0.000 teachers at primary and upper secondary level). Scuola in chiaro: This web application. as well as infrastructures. in an organised and coherent way. European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels.4. the experimentation. surveys on students’ attendance (to be communicated to families via email or mobile phone).0: The experimentation of innovative learning environments started in the school year 2009/2010 through the Cl@ssi 2.org . is accessible from the portal of the Ministry of Education and provides a range of information and data regarding schools. wikis and videoconferencing.000 teachers at lower secondary level and 25.2. By means of the network. Belgium – www. etc.eun. the development of entire digital schools – Scuol@ 2. and 4. in 2012 school registrations for all initial classes in the school year 2013/2014 were made exclusively online. of twenty innovative editorial digital products – Editoria Digitale Scolastica.3). and 4. students. Each user can identify the school of interest and access the relevant data using search filters for area or type of school (cercalatuascuola.it/cercalatuascuola/).4. 4 IWB project: the introduction of IWBs was implemented in four phases (from 2008 to 2012) as described in the table (see Annex I). The Ministry of Education has adopted several projects to develop the use of IT in the teaching/learning process: The Digital School Plan concerns the support and spread of ICT tools and innovative methodologies in schools. Through this application one can choose the school. Each school has its own datasheet.0: 15 schools (with increasing numbers in the following years) change their learning environments and organisation. created in 2012. the Ministry has developed a software application for easy access.). the development of digital classes – Cl@ssi 2. these datasheets contain general information about the school. services. digital registers. the project includes online reports. the national agency for the support of schools INDIRE ensures in-service teacher training for the proficient use of IWBs and digital content (50. Online Registration: Due to the digitalisation of administrative procedures.    Supplying schools with multimedia equipment Connecting schools to the internet Setting up networks and services Training teachers Initiatives to update the school system through the development of school networks and support for digital schooling were established by the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Public Administration and Innovation (October 2008). which involved 416 classes at primary.3.0 pilot project. lower and upper secondary level throughout all regions of the country. which is available on the MIUR portal. school personnel. to move beyond the traditional educational system (see also Sections 2. Editoria Digitale Scolastica: An initiative to pilot twenty innovative editorial tools with the following characteristics: multidisciplinary. Scuol@ 2. complete and send the registration form and follow the progress of the request through to its final acceptance. transversal in the curriculum. access to online student files and appointment booking. The process was monitored in order to evaluate the impact of ICT and the new learning environment on students’ performance and skills (see also Sections 2.). with the support of educational institutions. This project involved 4180 schools (40% of all schools) and was launched in December 2009. and 4.0.

designing new laws (DigItalia urgent measures) representing the strategy of the ADI together with the operational projects. PuntoEdu is conceived as the online training environment to be complemented by inperson sessions. this initiative is looking at the possibility of building an Italian cloud computing system.000 teachers at primary and upper secondary level). INDIRE provides the online training and the Regional Ministry Authorities organise the faceto-face activities. share ICT-related knowledge and solve specific problems with the support of experts and professionals (see also Section 5. The online platform for teachers provides several opportunities to develop collaborative activities in order to exchange experiences.. such as e-learning management systems for schools. or a combination of digital content and supplementary digital content that can even be purchased online separately. INDIRE (National Agency for the Support of School) ensures in-service teacher training for the proficient use of IWB and digital content (50.0 19 additional Scuole 2. and also to foster the creation and development of communities of practice. The objective of this online environment was to support the community of Italian school teachers by providing training opportunities and informative and normative digital content. thanks to other sources of funding there are 73. Among other things.0). European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels.0 Many Centri Scolastici Digitali in six Italian regions Between 13. the Legislative Decree 179/2012 – Decreto Crescita 2. Belgium – www.000 teachers at lower secondary level and 25. 1.) As continuous professional development has become a major issue for the Italian school system. FOR.000. established as a priority the implementation of the Digital School Plan.  the adoption of exclusively digital or mixed-media textbooks: a printed textbook with supplementary digital content. in 2012 the ADI (Agenda Digitale Italiana/Italian Digital Agenda).500 personal devices (PC/tablet) for students SPECIFIC ICT INITIAT IVES Interactive whiteboards. The provision for the next year within the implementation of the national Digital Plan are:      2. a new law was issued. Together with the Italian data centres (PPP) and the corresponding cloud system. tablets or other mobile technology National/regional level: The introduction of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) was implemented in four phases.eun.Teacher Training: INDIRE has taken over the commitment from the Ministry to design a blended teacher training model and develop the eLearning environment for school staff training. and 5.2.000 teachers through blended e-learning courses focusing on different professional needs (See also Sections 4.org 5 In line with the European dispositions within the Digital Agenda for Europe (Europe 2020 Strategy). Today. a webbased nationwide learning environment.000 teachers.5.650 and 112. many services have been designed.). was launched in 2006.0 (Growing 2. Article 11 of this law establishes: the development of digital centres (Centri Scolastici Digitali) to provide education in Italy’s mountain and island areas through remote teaching and learning activities.898 IWBs in classrooms the country (see section 2. Annex I) This project is supported by a national training initiative involving more than 70.5.3. 4200 additional IWBs 2600 additional Cl@ssi 2. Another result of the ADI was that in September 2012 the Ministry of Education signed 10 agreements with regional authorities to allocate funds for the implementation of the national Digital Plan for the schools in ten Italian regions. laptops/notebooks. Thanks to the ADI (Italian Digital Agenda). PuntoEdu has been training more than 1.  .

calendars etc. rehabilitation. video recordings and interviews with expert teachers. Tutors meet the teachers in their schools and discuss concrete problems emerging from their daily practice in order to try to find shared solutions. but limited or no information about it. share impressions and opinions and get familiar with the empowered classroom setting. the virtual class- 2.The training action initiative supports teachers in creating their own digital contents through an authoring tool and using free educational software to be used on IWB in everyday teaching practice. etc. Teachers learn how to design IWB-based lesson plans and to re-organise teaching and learning considering the impact of the new setting in their professional activity.2) . lasting a full year. such as videoconferencing. optical fibre connections) No specific initiatives in that area.) (See section 2. and discuss how the IWB affordances could be developed according to different contexts and teaching styles. flipcharts and other documentation. two levels of repositories are available online. Examples of best practice. smartphones. Cloud computing There are initiatives in this area. Inclusion and special needs The HSH@Network project guarantees the right to education for students who are in hospital or receiving homecare treatment with 64 wired hospitals (from 2006). Connectivity (e. The @urora project ensures assistance. laptop/notebook. The national repository collects the best lesson plans and flipcharts created by teachers and selected by tutors. tablets. which takes the form of on-the-job support. videos and other tools to support the activities of teachers and tutors are available on the online environment and can be explored individually or shared and discussed with colleagues and tutors in the virtual classroom. Content design. orientation and reintegration for young offenders in Italian detention centres. blogs. for a limited number of classrooms (416). 3.org 6 In the second phase the focus is on the concrete use of the IWB in the classroom with pupils. Cl@ssi 2. room developed by INDIRE.0. an advanced innovation project.g.eun. Teachers experiment with innovative solutions in their classrooms and receive pedagogical support from tutors (in person and online) and subject expert teachers (online).0 features for training purposes. In order to share and support the dissemination of lesson plans. At this stage. During the support phase teachers can work together in groups using the virtual classroom collaborative features to create lesson plans using both synchronous and asynchronous tools. classroom management issues and teaching methods are the main topics of the second phase. wikis. with vocational training courses and training on the use of ICT (from 2006). which provides a collaborative environment for small groups (within the online learning platform) integrating web 2. In the first phase teachers explore with the etutor the pedagogical potential of IWBs using case studies. while INDIRE offers more indepth support. piloted the change in learning environments in everyday school activities through an intensive use of technologies (IWB. wireless internet. 5. Belgium – www. that is divided into two phases. mailing lists. The school repository enables teachers to share materials with other teachers in their school even if they are not included within the training. Bring your own device (BYOD) There are no specific initiatives in that area. The features are part of Edulab. European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels. the use of online discussion forums and videoconference meetings are fundamental in order to develop the discussion. IWB resellers provide initial technical training to teachers in order to get them familiar with the technology and the main functionalities. shared documents. 4.

ICT IN THE CURRICULUM CURRICULAR FRAMEWORK According to the Italian Constitution. (See section 2.0: 15 schools (with increasing numbers in the following years) change their learning environments and organisation. communication. April 2012). (See section 2.1. through work aimed at modernising existing school buildings and building new school structures. European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels.2) 7. in line with innovations launched by the spread of ICT.2) 2. 3. problem solving. (See section 2. Provinces. ICT PRIORITIES High Area ICT in teacher training In-service teacher training Curriculum development ICT-based assessment Infrastructure and maintenance Digital learning resources School-home connections ICT for learners with disabilities/special needs ICT-related research e-Safety Reducing the digital divide Interactive Whiteboards Netbook/notebooks Tablets Developing key competences Developing 21st century skills (critical thinking.2) The new rules about school buildings (Legislative Decree No. to move beyond the traditional educational system. according to the most recent understanding of teaching/learning. are designed to ensure schools’ safety.4. while school autonomy is also safeguarded in some areas. The main aim is training and making teachers. innovation) Mid. through remote teaching and learning activities. creativity. Any other ICT initiative Safer Internet project: is promoted by the Save the Children organisation in cooperation with the Italian Ministry of Education. the State is in charge of education and shares some responsibilities with the Regions. . and Municipalities. Design of 21st century learning spaces Scuol@ 2. Centri Scolastici Digitali: the development of digital centres to provide education in the mountain and island areas of Italy.6.5.eun. sets out the fundamental principles and determines the standards in education. NATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS (OPTIONAL) No information provided. The project is aimed at primary (fourth and fifth grade) and lower secondary schools (first and second class) involved in the National Digital Plan for Schools. While following the general principles and rules given by the State and in accordance with regional needs. Low X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2. pupils and parents aware of the positive uses of ICT in schools. 35.org 7 3. Belgium – www. sustainability and comfort. as well as infrastructures. The State provides general rules concerning outcomes in education.

they understand the methodological value of IT in developing and modelling complex processes as well as in identifying solutions. At the end of the 1st school cycle. are proficient in the use of ICT to research and analyse data and information. Belgium – www. At the end of the 2nd cycle there is the upper secondary school leaving examination.  . extra-curricular. The guidelines for the first cycle (2012) continue to highlight the importance of ICT in order to educate future citizens of the information society. In the second education cycle (upper secondary school). to check and validate information and to interact with different people around the world.5. to distinguish reliable information from information that requires further research. to express themselves creatively and to communicate. autonomy in teaching autonomy within organisation autonomy in research. as it offers new multimedia methods of communication.eun. at the end of the first education cycle. the Minister’s new recommendations specify that the new digital content of textbooks that schools will adopt in 2013/2014 must be updated according to the aims set out in the new Guidelines. students are able to use specific software to create sounds and music. including ICT (in the schools that offer that subject). organisational and information resources to design and develop simple products. students use new technologies to research and investigate topics from different subject areas. ASSESSMENT SCHEMES Teachers are in charge of assessing students’ knowledge. It defines the curricular. experimentation and innovation.org 8 The national guidelines and curriculum guidelines provide the framework for introducing and supporting ICT within the 1st cycle of education. School autonomy is applied to:    3.schools produce their own Piano dell'Offerta Formativa (POF – Educational Offer Plan).3. Further. students have developed good digital skills. European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels.defined goals and objectives at the end of primary and lower secondary level. in art subjects (Music. 3. students are able to create and transform images and sounds using multimedia tools in a creative manner. In Music. skills and competences. students can use ICT tools in a critical manner in their research and study activities.    ICT IN THE CURRICULU M STUDENTS’ ICT COMPETENCE The Guidelines for the Curriculum set out the competences that should be reached by pupils at the end of primary school and lower secondary school:  3. 3. ICT is a subject within the MST subjects. The regulations concerning autonomy allow every school to create and implement its own curriculum.4. pupils have to pass an examination to enter the 2nd cycle. educational and organisational projects that each school adopts according to local needs. In 2004. Art and Design).1) The POF is the fundamental document that describes the cultural and planning identity of an individual institution. which is developed as a result of the teamwork of the Teachers’ Assembly. with well. students are able to use physical. Finally. ICT plays an important role in humanities subjects. in the subject of Technology. ICT-BASED ASSESSMENT There is no ICT-based student assessment. In the field of mathematics and technology. including digital ones.2. (See section 2. based on input provided by the School Council and with the supervision of the school head. Students’ assessment concerns all of the subjects in the curriculum. Computer Science and Technology was introduced as a subject within the curriculum.

training courses. which represents the final goal.000 learning objects (LOs). Every image has a file card that provides historical information and background together with suggestions for in-depth developments and study. DIGITAL LEARNING RES OURCES AND SERVICES 4.2) . establishes. as of 2014.indire.2.GENERATED CONTENT The first results of the Editoria Digitale Scolastica project have been many proposals of digital platforms designed to develop and manage digital contents.it/archivi/dia/) is a digital database of 25.it/gold2/) is the database of best practices. including LOs produced by teachers. LOs. students. There are 6953 examples of school experiences and 944 selected best practices. USER . containing data and information provided by the databases of the Information System of the Ministry of Education and the educational institutions. school personnel. Some schools choose to also include information on their ICT equipment.2) 4. This pilot project will help schools to change their learning environments and to introduce experimental PuntoEdu is the environment where multimedia educational content has been developed. together with the know-how to use them. The proposed LOs are designed to be reused and shared by teachers with their students. but software allowing students to create original content or to work on digital content in a collaborative way. European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels.3. (See sections 2. 4.eun. Gold (gold. educational outcomes. etc. QUALITY ASSURANCE OF THE USE OF ICT IN SCHOOLS Fascicolo Elettronico (Electronic folder) is a document prepared for each school.6. which have been developed for online teacher training by teachers themselves. or a combination of digital content and supplementary digital content that can even be purchased online separately). families and publishers by lowering the cost of books. the Editoria Scolastica Digitale is a way of providing innovative tools for the creation of knowledge and for the use of both formal and informal knowledge through the language of digital natives. and the transition to the fully digital book. the saving can be used either to provide students with digital devices – if they do not own and cooperative didactic activities. The data provided in the document includes general information about the school. Belgium – www.org 9 Law No.000 images related to all curricular subjects. The repository contains more than 3. GIES CONTENT DEVELOPMENT STRATE- one – or to enable the families to save money. 221 of 17 December 2012. 4. with 1982 selected examples.1. services.3.indire. The adopted strategy of the Ministry of Education is based upon agreements with publishers regarding the development of commercial products according to the following two transitional stages: the passage from the paper book to the mixed digital/paper edition. E-CONTENT DEVELOPMENT The Digital School Plan established the Editoria Scolastica Digitale in order to create digital content prototypes. Prototypes are not simple e-books. the adoption of exclusively digital or mixed-media textbooks (a printed textbook with supplementary digital content. usable directly by the schools. (See section 2. INDIRE has developed a database system that collects resources to be used by teachers:   Dia (www. The database contains 9849 LOs. This strategy tries to meet the needs of students. which is designed to support school head teachers in writing a self-assessment report for their school. have become meaningful within the new pedagogic concept of “learning by doing” which is becoming more and more familiar to teachers. In summary. The very first aim in introducing LOs through PuntoEdu was to offer training activities as well as pedagogical training to teachers.

1) 4. Participants now consider synchronous events and peer-to-peer sessions to be the most valuable type of event.3 and 2. Teachers’ interest in the new training environment has increased over the years.2.4. as a consequence.0). something that is also due to the role of “moderators” who prove to be highly competent in terms of didactics and subject area content. as shown by the increased user satisfaction expressed in evaluations. and the pilot. with the support of educational institutions. WEB 2.0 is the change of learning environments and. Belgium – www. of twenty innovative digital editing tools (Editoria Digitale Scolastica). and particularly to improve their quality.6.0 tools is essential to change teaching and schooling methods and to enable schools to become “21st century schools.0). See also Section 4.0). the development of digital classes (Cl@ssi 2. about 19. can improve the quality. technical issues have been replaced by didactic concerns. We firmly believe that the comparison of different digital content. The process has been monitored to evaluate the impact of ICT on students’ ICT competences since the establishment of a new learning environment (www. the technical upgrade of the platform to support the huge number of participants. Musiknet (www.scuoladigitale.6. Moreover. better performance and support from eTutors (not only from a technical point of view) and the transformation of the training from content delivery to content production and sharing.org 10 It is worth noting that the main goal of Cl@ssi 2. 4. Since 2000. This change in attitudes is certainly due to the growth of social networks. such as virtual classes and forums. the Italian Ministry of Education.5) European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels. for further information.5. In general the Digital School Plan concerns the support and spread of ICT tools and methodologies to promote innovative schools. CONTENT SHARING The learning object (LO) repository developed in PuntoEdu provides about 1100 LOs to be shared within the LRE portal.0 projects. just like market competition. the development of entire digital schools (Scuol@ 2.eun. LEARNING PLATFORMS PuntoEdu is the most widely used platform in the country and staff training at most schools has been carried out on this platform. (See sections 2.0 As part of the Digital School Plan.1 and 4. in which the use of web 2.it/musiknet/) is a virtual museum of music.0 project takes into account the possibility of changing the entire school organisation. (See sections 2. . in collaboration with CINECA. to an environment where digital content is crucial for training and didactics.2 and 4. for example. offering images.” (See sections 2. This allows many different products to be shared and used by all Italian schools. the experimentation of innovative learning environments began in the school year 2009/2010 with the IWB and Cl@ssi 2. eContent has reached a high level of quality and eLearning has therefore shifted from an environment based on social interaction. In future.indire. 4. Several aspects have been improved with.000 images from the DIA database are also available through the LRE portal.3) Moreover. which increasingly permeate our individual lives.it/classi2. The initiative has been developed in many phases: the supply of IWBs to schools within classrooms. the Scuol@2. sounds and descriptions of the instruments. it could be desirable to share and exchange the content of the platform with other countries in order to increase their number. is designing and implementing a platform to host both commercial and teacher/student developed digital content. the introduction of interactive and collaborative tools follows quite naturally. 4. In addition.

PuntoEdu is conceived as the online training environment to be complemented by in-person sessions. As well as helping to solve technical problems. they can spend part of the budget for each initiative to buy tools and assistive technologies for students with special needs. This new figure combines all the features of the eTutor (i.1.e. ogy. In particular. skills and competences has been developed. the coach is a subject content expert. TION ICT IN INITIAL TEACH ER EDUCA- ICT is part of initial teacher education at higher education level. Subject experts give advice on the content of eLearning activities including courses. TEACHER EDUCATION FO R ICT 5. ACCESS OF SEN STUDENTS The initiatives included in the Digital School Plan. Teachers’ Associations or other qualified institutions such as Research Institutes (Employment contract CCNL scuola 2006-2009). moderators have supported the group of participants receiving training for this purpose. such as Cl@ssi 2. who have been proved to be crucial figures for the involvement of teachers and the success of the initiative.0 enhance the usual activities for inclusion through the use of technology.eun. or schools networks can plan staff training with the support of Universities.2 and 2. Another virtual environment. In 2008 the figure of the coach was introduced in the eLearning course for Permanent Teachers. eLearning has developed with the support of eTutors. In synchronous activities. Belgium – www.2. Over the years a task force of eTutors with a high level of knowledge. chat. Thanks to the autonomy of the schools. virtual classes and LOs. ICT IN IN-SERVICE TEACHER EDUCATION INDIRE has taken over the commitment from the Ministry to establish PuntoEdu. European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels. ideas.4. In general.3) 5. 5. forums. the eLearning environment for the training of school staff. 2 and 3). rather than an expert in technical matters. eLearning training is compulsory for new payment teachers and newlyappointed head teachers. laboratories. high levels of technological competence) with mediation skills. adopting a “blended” methodol- Edulab. (see Sections 2. Moderators have been selected from subject area experts in order to be able to lead groups of people in synchronous events. This environment has been conceived to give teachers the opportunity to keep in touch and cooperate beyond formal training activities. this coach who has increasingly taken on the role of a “mediator” within the training process. Activities for monitoring eLearning initiatives have the purpose of transferring credits to the participants and evaluating the training process. in initial education.7.2. The offered trainings are not compulsory. a tool for online cooperative peer-training for teachers has also been developed within PuntoEd. INDIRE provides the online training and the Regional Ministry Authorities organise the face-to-face activities. digital resources and tools.0 and Scuol@ 2. Teacher training can be planned by the Ministry or schools. allows teachers who have already undergone or are undergoing their training to meet and share knowledge. 4.org 11 Teacher training must be planned within the Piano dell'Offerta Formativa (POF – Educational Offer Plan) according to the needs at school level and agreed by the Assembly of Teachers. future teachers are trained in pedagogical issues and in subject-specific training linked to ICT in teaching. FOR. (See sections 2.6) .5 and 4. making the best use of all the software resources and giving content and methodological support.1. ICT-related skills are defined in the core curriculum for initial education for teachers in primary and secondary education (ISCED 1. 4. PuntoEdu eTutors have received special training from INDIRE.

(See section 2. rehabilitation.3) The @urora project ensures assistance.6.it/).5.eun. European Schoolnet – Rue de Trèves 61 – 1040 Brussels.org 12    . The site can be used for the following purposes: To find useful didactic tools To find specialised information To share didactic experiences and make use of expert counselling The HSH@Network initiative guarantees the right to education for students who are in hospital or receiving homecare treatment. NEW INITIATIVES No information provided. Katja Engelhardt (European Schoolnet) Coordinator: Anja Balanskat (European Schoolnet) Incentives for in-service training are not provided according to the Employment contract (CCNL scuola 2006-2009). 5. special needs pupils and their families and teachers (handitecno. Belgium – www.5.4.3. Antonella Turchi (INDIRE) Editor: Anja Balanskat. INCENTIVES Publisher: European Schoolnet (EUN) Author: Antonella Tozza (Ministero dell’ istruzione). with vocational training courses and training on the use of ICT (from 2006). Handitecno is the point of reference for carers. 5. developed the Handitecno project to sustain the quality of the inclusion of special needs pupils through ICT.indire.7. ASSESSMENT SCHEMES No evaluation system exists for teachers’ ICT competence. in collaboration with INDIRE. 5. TRAINING OF TEACHER TRAINERS No information provided. with 64 wired hospitals (from 2006). orientation and reintegration for young offenders in Italian detention centres. ICT SUPPORTING INCLUS ION The Ministry of Education. 5.

ANNEX 1 Number of IWBs School level School Year 2008/2009 Primary Lower Secondary School Year 2010/2011 6.454 8939 Upper Secondary Total School Year 2009/2010 5796 8000 2944 8939 School Year 2011/2012 9398 2981 8000 8000 .