258

N his visits t o London Ronald Overbury, patrolleader of the Mongoose Patrol of t h e D a s h f o r d Troop of B o y Scouts, liked nothing better than t o wander about exploring the b y - w a y s of the great c i t y : not that he ex­ pected to meet with any very startling a d v e n t ­ ures, b u t b e c a u s e he a l w a y s f o u n d p l e n t y t o interest him in the people and places which he c a m e a c r o s s o n these v o y a g e s of d i s c o v e r y . L o n d o n is a c i t y of m y s t e r i e s . Among the c r o w d s w h o pass y o u in t h e street are h i d d e n r o m ­ ances, unsus­ pected villains, undiscovered h e r o e s . B u t R o n a l d t h o u g h t of n o n e of these t h i n g s : he little t h o u g h t t h a t he w a s s o s o o n t o be m i x e d u p w ith a series o f s t r a n g e e v e n t s , as e x c i t i n g as a n y s t o r y he h a d e v e r r e a d a n d d a n g e r o u s e n o u g h t o test t h e c o u r a g e o f t h e b e s t of b o y s c o u t s . A t present ho was just an ordinary English s c h o o l b o y o u t for a walk, never dreaming that a few short steps a w a y lay the L a n d of A d v e n t u r e . H e w a s t h i n k i n g of t u r n i n g b a c k , as it was near sunset, w h e n , passing a s i d e street, he saw at the other e n d a wild c o m m o t i o n . T h e r e w a s a c r o w d of a b o u t tw enty p e r s o n s , some of t h e m w o m e n , s u r r o u n d e d byn u m e r o u s g u t t e r u r c h i n s e a g e r f o r a sensa­ tion, and every one seemed t o be greatly excited about something. R o n a l d stopped t o see w h a t w a s t h e m a t t e r ; a n d then, as he c o u l d n o t m a k e o u t t h e c a u s e of t h e u p r o a r , t u r n e d d o w n t h e street a n d h u r r i e d in the direction of the c r o w d . Perhaps there might be a chance of doing a g o o d turn t o s o m e o n e , he t h o u g h t ; a t a n y r a t e something unusual was happening which w a s certain t o p r o v e interesting.
7

The

'Boy's
CHAPTER I.

Otetn
MB. LUIGI

Taper.
COSTA.

he h a d n o t learned b o x i n g a n d ju-jitsu for n o t h i n g ; s o , careless o f c o n s e q u e n c e s t o himself, h e p u s h e d his w a y i n t o t h e c r o w d . " not " one G i v e h i m a c h a n c e ! " he c r i e d . " I t is fair—so m a n y against o n e . ' ' M i n d y o u r o w n business ! " replied of t h e c r o w d , a b r a w n y b u t c h e r .

frightened, but round and innocent like t h o s e o f a c h i l d , as t h e y m e t R o n a l d s i n q u i r i n g l o o k w i t h an h o n e s t g a z e . " W e l l , y e s , I rather think I h a v e , " s a i d the man. " But come and have a cup o f tea w i t h m e a n d I will tell y o u all a b o u t it— t h a t is, o f c o u r s e , if y o u care t o t a k e tea w i t h a complete stranger." T h o u g h h o was a little d o u b t f u l whether his father w o u l d a p p r o v e , R o n a l d was tooc u r i o u s t o refuse the i n v i t a t i o n ; a n d so thet w o w a l k e d b a c k t o the m a i n t h o r o u g h f a r e i n search of a t e a - s h o p . O n t h e w a y t h e m a n t o l d h i m his namei w a s L u i g i C o s t a : h o was an artist a n d had) a p i c t u r e i n t h e R o y a l A c a d e m y that y e a r . T h o u g h h o w a s an I t a l i a n b y birth, h o h a d married an Irishwoman, a professional singer ; t h e y had o n e c h i l d — a b o y , a n d were l i v i n g a t present in K e n s i n g t o n . " A n d n o w , " said L u i g i Costa, as t h e y s a t d o w n a t a n u n o c c u p i e d table in t h e cafet h e y h a d e n t e r e d , " I h a v e t o l d y o u som u c h a b o u t m y s e l f ; b u t I m u s t tell you> one t h i n g m o r e b e f o r e I e x p l a i n h o w I c a m e t o b e m o b b e d . I t m a y b e t h a t when, y o u hear w h a t I h a v o t o say y o u will n o t wish t o r e m a i n i n m y c o m p a n y a n y l o n g e r . S o a l l o w m e first t o o r d e r tea ; a n d then, if, when y o u h e a r , y o u prefer it, I will g o a w a y at o n c e a n d l e a v e y o u . " T h i s o n l y m a d e R o n a l d t h e m o r e anxioust o hear t h e s t o r y , a n d it was with s o m e i m p a t i e n c e t h a t h e w a i t e d , while Costa, ordered the tea. " Y o u will e a t m y share f o r m e , w o n ' t y o u , if I a m u n a b l e t o s t a y t o finish it ? " a d d e d C o s t a w i t h a s m i l e , as the waitress" b r o u g h t t h e tea. T h e n he c o n t i n u e d i n a low voice, " D i d y o u hear, m y y o u n g friend, w h a t t h e ruffians in t h e c r o w d weresa\dng a b o u t m e ? " " W e l l , " said R o n a l d s h y l y , " s o m e c a l l e d y o u an alien d o g . " " I a m n o t q u i t e t h a t , " said Costa, s m i l i n g . " I h a v e l i v e d in E n g l a n d n o w f o r t h i r t y years. D i d t h e y s a y a n y t h i n g else ? " " S o m e called y o u a n a n a r c h i s t , I t h i n k , " replied R o n a l d after a little hesitation. " M y y o u n g f r i e n d , " said Costa, r a t h e r sadly, looking hard at Ronald, " they s p o k e the t r u t h : I a m a n a n a r c h i s t . " R o n a l d stared. I t h a d n e v e r o c c u r r e d toh i m before t h a t t h e c r o w d m i g h t b e right. A l l he had e v e r h e a r d of anarchist outragespassed t h r o u g h his m i n d — t h e lawlessness, t h e b r u t a l i t y , t h e c r u e l t y of t h e m ; a n d i n v o l u n t a r i l y he d r e w b a c k f r o m his h o s t with a s h u d d e r . C o s t a t u r n e d his d a r k eyes away and sighed ; then, taking up the bill, w h i c h t h e waitress h a d left, he roso tohis feet. " N e v e r m i n d , " h o said, " I shall alwaysb e grateful t o y o u for y o u r b r a v e rescue ; t h o u g h , h a d y o u k n o w n w h a t I was, y o u w o u l d p r o b a b l y h a v o left m o t o m y fate. I a m sorry t o h a v e r e p a i d y o u so ungratefully b y giving y o u this shock. G o o d evening." F o r a m o m e n t R o n a l d w a s d a z e d , then hesprang u p a n d ran after t h e anarchist, whehad s t o p p e d a t t h e d o o r t o p a y the bill. " S i r , " h o said, t o u c h i n g h i m o n t h o shoulder, " please d o n o t g o a w a y . Y o u h a v e n o t h a d a n y tea a n d I h a v e n o t y e t heard y o u r story." Costa looked round

" I o n l y w a n t t o see fair p l a y , " said Ronald. ' W h a t has h e d o n e ? I f y o u w o n ' t g i v e h i m a c h a n c e , here is o n e at least w h o will s t a n d u p f^r h i m . " " Shut y o u r row ! " cried a drayman, w i t h an u g l y r e m a r k , g i v i n g R o n a l d a b l o w i n t h e e y e . O u t w e n t R o n a l d ' s fist a n d t h e d r a y m a n t o his great surprise f o u n d himself l y i n g in t h e g u t t e r . F o r a m o m e n t the m o b hesitated, though t h e y h a d t h e a d v a n t a g e of n u m b e r s : it was o n e t h i n g t o a t t a c k an alien a n d an anarchist, but t o molest a healthy y o u n g Englishman w a s a m o r e serious m a t t e r . T h e d r a y m a n , h o w e v e r , w a s n o t g o i n g t o g i v e in s o easily ; a n d s t a g g e r i n g t o his feet, half d r u n k as he was, he rushed at R o n a l d again. The boy w a s r e a d y f o r h i m with a n o t h e r b l o w a n d t h e d r a y m a n t o t t e r e d b u t d i d n o t fall. S u d d e n l y he a d o p t e d o t h e r t a c t i c s ; seizing R o n a l d b y the throat ho tried t o strangle him. N o w was Ronald's chance to put into p r a c t i c e o n e of t h e j u - j i t s u t r i c k s he h a d l e a r n t ; a n d the big d r a y m a n was highly a s t o n i s h e d t o find his h o l d t h r o w n off a n d himself h u r l e d t o t h e g r o u n d a n d h e l d t h e r e s o t h a t he c o u l d n o t rise. H i s friends w o u l d h a v e interfered w h e n s o m e o n e called o u t " c o p p e r s ! " a t w h i c h t h e w h o l e c r o w d ran d o w n t h e s t r e e t like f r i g h t e n e d d e e r a n d v a n i s h e d i n t o t h e m u r k y t w i l i g h t of t h e slums. R o n a l d released his p r i s o n e r . " I d o n ' t want y o u to get locked u p , " he said, " t h o u g h y o u j o l l y well d e s e r v e i t . S o y o u had better clear out as q u i c k l y as y o u c a n . " S o t h e b i g d r a y m a n , t h u s released, b o l t e d after t h e rest, l e a v i n g R o n a l d a l o n e w i t h t h e little m a n w i t h t h e f r i g h t e n e d e y e s . R o n a l d l o o k e d c u r i o u s l y a t his c o m ­ panion, and saw that though dishevelled w i t h t h e struggle he was w e l l d r e s s e d . His h a n d s were w h i t e a n d fine like t h o s o o f a n artist, a n d h e h a d a small d a r k m o u s t a c h e , a short beard and rather long hair. A l ­ t o g e t h e r h e g a v e t h e i m p r e s s i o n of b e i n g a m a n of refined t a s t e s , a n d o f a g e n t l e d i s p o s i t i o n , b u t w i t h n o great s t r e n g t h o f character. " S i r , " h e said, b o w i n g t o R o n a l d w i t h an old-fashioned politeness, " I cannot express m y gratitude t o y o u for y o u r noble intervention." H e spoke with a slight foreign accent. " I a m g l a d I w a s a b l e t o b e of use t o y o u , " said R o n a l d m o d e s t l y . " I suppose y o u will r e p o r t t h i s t o t h e p o l i c e , sir ? H a v e t h o s e ruffians r o b b e d y o u ? " " N o , they have not robbed me, thank you. A n d a s f o r the p o l i c e — I w o u l d r a t h e r say n o t h i n g m o r e a b o u t it. T h i s is n o t t h e first t i m e I h a v e b e e n m o b b e d b y y o u r Londoners." " T h e n , " said R o n a l d , " I s h o u l d t h i n k it was a b o u t t i m e y o u d i d c o m p l a i n . Have y o u a n y idea w h y t h e y a t t a c k e d y o u ? " The man's dark eyes twinkled with sup­ pressed l a u g h t e r ; t h e y were n o l o n g e r

A s he d r e w n e a r e r h e h e a r d c r i e s o f " Alien dog ! " " Anarchist ! " " Pitch him in the r i v e r ! " T h e n he n o t i c e d in t h e m i d d l e of t h e c r o w d a little w h i t e - f a c e d m a n w i t h l o n g d a r k h a i r a n d large f r i g h t e n e d e y e s . H i s c o a t w a s t o r n a n d he h a d lost his h a t : t h e c r o w d h a d e v i d e n t l y b e e n using h i m v e r y roughly. W h e t h e r it w a s t h a t t h e m a n d i d n o t l o o k l i k e a villain o r m e r e l y b e c a u s e it s e e m e d a n unfair s t r u g g l e , o n e a g a i n s t so m a n y , R o n a l d ' s c h i v a l r o u s feelings w e r e a r o u s e d a n d h e d e c i d e d t o interfere. He w a s tall a n d s t r o n g f o r a b o y of s i x t e e n a n d

'

The Son
in s o m e surprise, a n d then, when h e had received his c h a n g e , r e t u r n e d w i t h R o n a l d t o the table t h e y h a d just left. " T h e n y o u d o n o t m i n d t a k i n g tea w i t h an anarchist ? " a s k e d C o s t a , a s t h e y s a t d o w n again. " I c a n n o t b e l i e v e y o u really are o n e , sir," said R o n a l d , h o p i n g t h a t he h a d mis­ u n d e r s t o o d his strange friend's c o n f e s s i o n . " Y o u d o not look cruel." " N o , " said C o s t a g r a v e l y , " it is b e c a u s e I a m n o t cruel t h a t I a m an anarchist. A l l t h e m i s e r y I h a v e seen i n this a n d o t h e r c o u n t r i e s p r o v e s t o m e t h a t t h e state of s o c i e t y is so b a d , t h a t i t c a n o n l y b e p u t right b y pulling d o w n t h e o l d a n d rebuilding all a n e w . I a m an anarchist because I h a v e seen h o w s o m a n y , especially the p o o r , suffer." " B u t , " objected Ronald, " there a r e heaps of kind-hearted p e o p l e w h o are n o t anarchists." " T h a t is b e c a u s e t h e y are b l i n d . T h e y d o n o t feel i t all as I feel it. W h y ! even when I read the d a i l y papers, I see i t all in imagination—the sufferings o f t h e p o o r , the w o m e n w o r k i n g like slaves, a n d little children s t a r v i n g — o h ! m y b l o o d b o i l s a n d I wish b y o n e b o l d s t r o k e I c o u l d p u t a n e n d t o it all ! " " B u t killing t h e k i n g w o u l d n o t h e l p the poor people," objected Ronald. " N o , " said the anarchist. " I d o n o t b e l i e v e in killing kings unless t h e y a r e t y r a n t s . W i t h the K i n g of E n g l a n d I h a v e n o quarrel. I t is the great financiers, t h e selfish c a p i t a ­ lists, w h o w o u l d be b e t t e r o u t of the w a y . " " D o y o u really g o in f o r killing p e o p l e ? " asked R o n a l d , b e g i n n i n g t o w i s h t h a t h o h a d n o t i n t e r p o s e d t o s a v e this stranger. " O h n o , " said C o s t a . " I was o n l y arguing t h a t u n d e r c e r t a i n c i r c u m s t a n c e s assassination m i g h t b e justified. Y o u see, it is like war ; t h o u g h o n e w a r w a g e d b y the p a i d assassins of o u r E n g l i s h G o v e r n ­ m e n t is far m o r e c r u e l t h a n a n y anarchist o u t r a g e . N o , m y y o u n g friend, I a m n o t an assassin nor a s o l d i e r ; I t r y t o h e l p t h e cause of F r e e d o m b y m o r e peaceful m e t h o d s . " " Y o u mean that y o u d o t h e talking, while others d o t h e d a n g e r o u s a n d d i r t y w o r k ? " said R o n a l d , b e g i n n i n g t o s u s p e c t t h a t his c o m p a n i o n was o n l y o n e of t h o s e reckless a g i t a t o r s , w h o d o so m u c h h a r m in t h e w o r l d b y their v i o l e n t l a n g u a g e . C o s t a ' s pale face flushed for a m o m e n t : t h e s h o t h a d w o u n d e d h i m in a t e n d e r p l a c e . " N o , " said he, " I h o p e I h a v e t h e courage o f m y convictions. I f I thought it was m y d u t y t o a t t a c k s o m e e n e m y o f the p e o p l e , I trust I s h o u l d n o t b e f o u n d wanting. B u t I h a v e n o t y e t t o l d y o u how I g o t i n t o difficulties this a f t e r n o o n . 1 e x p e c t y o u c a n guess it all. I w a s a d d r e s s i n g a c r o w d of w o r k i n g m e n , o n behalf o f t h e cause of F r e e d o m , w h e n — I s u p p o s e I h a d said t o o m u c h — p r e s e n t l y s o m e o n e s h o u t e d ' Houndsditch ! ' and the whole m o b was a b o u t m y ears in an instant. T h e n y o u , m y friend, c a m e a n d r e s c u e d m e . Y o u h a v e my undying gratitude." " Please d o n o t say a n y t h i n g m o r e a b o u t that, s i r , " - s a i d R o n a l d , " b u t m a y I ask a favour of y o u ? " " A s k a t h o u s a n d a n d y o u shall h a v e all I c a n give. I o w e y o u m y life, for I b e l i e v e the brutes w o u l d h a v e l y n c h e d m e . " " T h e n , sir—I h o p e y o u d o n ' t m i n d
No.

of an

Anarchist.

259

m y s a y i n g it—please d o n ' t b e an a n a r c h i s t any more. Y o u can't p u t everything r i g h t , a n d the p e o p l e w h o will t r y t o h e l p y o u a r e m o s t l y c r i m i n a l s — a t least s o father says. Please, M r . C o s t a , d o n ' t h a v e anything more to d o with them ! " I t c o s t R o n a l d a g r e a t effort t o m a k e t h i s appeal, and, when he looked a t Costa t o see h o w h e t o o k it, he w a s r e l i e v e d t o n o t i c e t h a t he w a s s m i l i n g . " I have never had anything t o d o with t h e T e r r o r i s t s , if t h a t is w h a t y o u m e a n , " h e said. " T h e y are n o t m y s t y l e a t all. I c a n ' t g i v e u p m y c o n v i c t i o n s e v e n t o please y o u , m y f r i e n d ; but I d o n ' t suppose there is a n y fear o f m y b e c o m i n g a n assassin. Till I d o , h o w e v e r , will y o u c o n s e n t t o — n o t t h i n k t o o b a d l y of m e ? " " Y e s , " said R o n a l d .

" W e m a y never meet again," went o n t h e a n a r c h i s t , " b u t here i s m y c a r d . I f y o u e v e r feel i n c l i n e d t o l o o k m e u p , y o u will find a w a r m w e l c o m e . M y wife a n d s o n will b e d e l i g h t e d t o see y o u . N o w , m y preserver, I must say farewell." A f e w m i n u t e s later R o n a l d was a l o n e , g a z i n g a t a c a r d bearing t h e n a m e : Mr. Luigi Costa, Artist.

w i t h t h e a d d r e s s o f a h o u s e in K e n s i n g t o n . S l o w l y h e g o t u p , p l a c e d t h e c a r d i n hia p o c k e t a n d w a l k e d o u t of t h e s h o p . I t w a s late before h e reached h o m e ; b u t his absence had caused no anxiety, so Ronald s a i d n o t h i n g t o a n y o n e e i t h e r a b o u t his a d v e n t u r e w i t h t h e m o b o r a b o u t hia anarchist friend.
(To be continued.)

S t ftfi

Pip's" Diary.
By FRANCIS MARLOWE.
like c i g a r e t t e p i c t u r e c o l l e c t i n g , s t a m p c o l l e c t i n g , o r k e e p i n g p e t a n i m a l s of s o m e kind. I didn't say anything more about i t j u s t then, b u t I ' v e b e e n t h i n k i n g a b o u t i t since a n d t r y i n g t o m a k e u p m y m i n d w h a t h o b b y I s h o u l d t a k e u p . I s u p p o s e in a w a y this D i a r y is a sort o f h o b b y , b u t it d o e s n ' t take long enough to d o each night to o c c u p y m u c h o f m y spare t i m e . I a m n o t q u i t e sure w h a t I s h o u l d like t o d o . I d o n ' t c a r e for t h e idea o f c i g a r e t t e p i c t u r e c o l l e c t i n g ; m o s t of t h e b o y s w h o h a v e t h a t for a h o b b y seem t o m e t o stand for hours outside t o b a c c o n i s t s ' s h o p s t r y i n g t o speak i n n i c e p o l i t e v o i c e s w h e n t h e y ask t h e c u s t o m e r s w h o a r e g o i n g i n a n d o u t for c i g a r e t t e p i c t u r e s , o r else t h e y s t o p p e o p l e i n t h e streets t o a s k for t h e m . I k n o w p e o p l e m u s t be getting j o l l y s i c k of b e i n g w o r r i e d for cigarette pictures. W h y , t h e o t h e r d a y , w h e n I s t o p p e d i n front o f quite a good-tempered looking old gentleman t o ask h i m t h e t i m e , he s u d d e n l y g o t a w f u l l y r e d , glared a t m e v e r y fiercely, a n d said i n a b e l l o w y k i n d o f v o i c e : " N o , I h a v e not g o t a cigarette picture." J u s t as if I s h o u l d a s k a n o l d g e n t l e m a n w h o l o o k e d v e r y like t h e L o r d Chief J u s t i c e if he h a d g o t a c i g a r e t t e picture ! B u t t h e r e are s o m e b o y s w h o w o u l d n e v e r miss a c h a n c e of asking. There was y o u n g T y l e r , w h o was w i t h m e last w e e k w h e n w e h a p p e n e d t o b e passing t h e P o s t Office j u s t as M a j o r W i c k s , t h e m o s t p e p p e r y o l d retired soldier t h a t w a s e v e r m a d e , c a m e o u t a n d slipped o n a p i e c e of b a n a n a peel. H e c a m e a m o s t l o v e l y c r o p p e r a n d t h e letters t h a t h e was c a r r y i n g i n his h a n d s w e n t flying i n t o t h e m u d d y r o a d . Y o u n g T y l e r s a w t h e w h o l e thing, b u t instead o f helping m e t o p i c k u p t h e letters f o r t h e p o o r o l d c h a p he n e v e r t h o u g h t o f t h a t , a n d w h e n t h e M a j o r , w h o was p o p p i n g o u t l a n g u a g e a t a terrible rate, g o t u p and w e n t , in t h a t f u n n y w a y t h a t s o m e p e o p l e h a v e w h e n t h e y slip, t o l o o k for t h e thing h e s l i p p e d o n , he f o u n d y o u n g T y l e r in his w a y a n d a l m o s t fell o v e r h i m . W h i l e t h e M a j o r w a s t r y i n g t o disentangle h i m from his legs y o u n g T y l e r l o o k e d u p a t h i m and said in his soft little v o i c e : " H a v e y o u g o t a cigarette p i c t u r e , please, sir ? " H e said it q u i t e civilly, o f c o u r s e , b u t after

Being » Record of Percy Ignatius Pocock's Bid Tor Fame.
[EXTRACT III.]

I

going t o take u p a h o b b y . I ' v e often w o n d e r e d w h a t a h o b b y w a s , b u t I n e v e r t h o u g h t t o ask a n y o n e until t o - d a y w h e n I was r e m i n d e d o f i t b y hearing m y m o t h e r say t o t h e V i c a r , a j o l l y o l d m a n w h o calls t o see us a b o u t o n c e a w e e k , t h a t she often w i s h e d I w o u l d t a k e u p a h o b b y . A f t e r t h e V i c a r h a d g o n e I a s k e d her w h a t she m e a n t . She t o l d m e t h a t a h o b b y was something which people t o o k a particular pleasure in d o i n g , s o m e t h i n g i n w h i c h t h e y

'M

I h a v e not g o t a c i g a r e t t e p i c t u r e !

c o u l d interest t h e m s e l v e s i n their spare t i m e t o k e e p themselves f r o m idling a b o u t t h e house, as she was sorry t o n o t i c e I w a s getting i n t o the h a b i t o f d o i n g . I k n e w t h e n t h a t she m e a n t s o m e t h i n g

260
w h a t t h e M a j o r said t o h i m I d o n ' t t h i n k he'll e v e r a s k h i m f o r a n y t h i n g again. I k n o w I j o l l y well w o u l d n ' t . I t must be pretty m u c h the same with stamp collecting. Unless you've got pocket-money enough t o b u y from stamp dealers a f e l l o w w h o gets as f e w letters as I

The

"Boy's

Otetn

Paper.
T h e n e w b o y , w h o was sitting n e x t t o m e , rose u p in his seat, as w e t h o u g h t , t o ask s o m e q u e s t i o n a b o u t t h e p r o b l e m ; b u t he s e e m e d s u d d e n l y t o c h a n g e his m i n d , blushed u p t o t h e r o o t s of his hair, shut his m o u t h t i g h t l y a n d sat d o w n w i t h o u t speaking. " I ' m s-s-s-speaking t o y o u , n e w b u b - b u b bub-boy. D - d - d - d - d o y o u understand the pup-pup-pup-pup-problem ? " the mathe­ m a t i c s m a s t e r repeated. T h e n e w b o y w r i g g l e d in his seat, and g o t redder t h a n ever, a n d as the master glared crossly a t h i m he b e g a n t o l o o k scared. But he said n o t h i n g . I n u d g e d h i m t o t r y a n d g e t h i m t o speak, b u t he k i c k e d v i c i o u s l y a t m e . " W o w - w o w - w o w - w i l l y o u speak, b u b b u b - b u b - b o y ? " a s k e d t h e master, getting really a n g r y . Still t h e b o y m a d e n o reply. T h e mathe­ m a t i c s m a s t e r left t h e r o o m t o fetch "the Head. W h e n h e h a d g o n e I a s k e d the b o y w h y he w o u l d n o t answer. "D-d-d-d-do you th-th-th-th-think I w a - w a - w a - w a n t t o g e t k - k - k - k - k - c a n e d for being r u d e t o a m u m - m u m - m u m - m a s t e r ? " he stuttered. Of c o u r s e t h e H e a d straightened it all o u t w h e n he c a m e a l o n g . . . . A n s o n w a s t o o upset a b o u t the d e a t h of his j a c k d a w t o t a k e a n y interest in m y Kindness to A n i m a l s League yesterday, but I believe I w o u l d h a v e g o t him t o start w o r k o n it with m e t o - d a y if it h a d n o t been for finding t h e b o x o f electric light b u l b s in our class-room c u p b o a r d . A n s o n f o u n d the b o x , a n d he was so full o f the idea it g a v e him

d o c a n o n l y g e t s t a m p s b y pestering p e o p l e for t h e m . A s for k e e p i n g p o t animals, I d o n ' t see h o w I c a n m a k e t h a t m y h o b b y ; n o t t h a t I ' m n o t f o n d of animals, b e c a u s e I a m , b u t I k n o w m y m o t h e r w o u l d n ' t let me keep any. She won't even have a dog o r c a t a b o u t the p l a c e . She says w e ' v e s c a r c e l y g o t l o o m e n o u g h for ourselves. B u t she has p r o m i s e d t h a t w h e n she c a n afford t o m o v e t o a b i g g e r p l a c e she'll p a y t h e l i c e n c e f o r a d o g for m e if I like. Still, I k n o w w h a t I'll d o . I'll start a K i n d n e s s t o A n i m a l s L e a g u e . I ' m sure I c a n get a l o t of fellows a t t h e s c h o o l t o j o i n it if I talk t o t h e m p r o p e r l y . T h a t will b e a h o b b y t h a t I c a n t a k e a l o t of interest in. I'll see a b o u t starting it t o - m o r r o w . I must go to bed now. . . . S o m e h o w I think the Kindness to A n i m a l s L e a g u e will t a k e an awful l o t of w o r k i n g u p t o b e a success. I s p o k e t o m y n e w c h u m , A n s o n , a b o u t it t o - d a y . I felt sure h e ' d b e interested in it b e c a u s e he's a l w a y s getting s o m e n e w k i n d of pet, b u t after talking t o h i m for a little while I f o u n d t h a t his ideas of kindness were n o t just t h e s a m s as m i n e . He got a jackdaw a few d a y s a g o t h a t he t h i n k s a l o t of, a n d after he had p r o m i s e d t o h e l p m e in f o r m i n g t h e K i n d n e s s t o A n i m a l s L e a g u e he a s k e d m e t o g o h o m e w i t h h i m t h a t afternoon a n d see it. " I ' d like y o u t o c o m e t o - d a y , b e c a u s e I ' m g o i n g t o split its t o n g u e , " he said. I thought I hadn't properly understood him. H e saw that I was puzzled and r e p e a t e d w h a t he h a d said. T h e n I asked h i m w h y he w a n t e d t o split t h e p o o r j a c k ­ d a w ' s t o n g u e , a n d t o l d h i m t h a t it w a s n ' t m u c h use asking him t o help m e t o start a K i n d n e s s t o A n i m a l s L e a g u e if he was g o i n g t o d o a cruel t h i n g like t h a t t o a p o o r d u m b bird. " W h y , y o u silly c h u m p , " he said, l a u g h i n g at m e , " it's just b e c a u s e it's

d u m b t h a t I ' m g o i n g t o d o it. It's not cruel. D o n ' t y o u k n o w t h a t if y o u split a j a c k d a w ' s t o n g u e y o u m a k e it a b l e t o speak ? " I told him I didn't believe him, and that e v e n if he c o u l d m a k e it sing, splitting its t o n g u e w o u l d b e a r o t t e n t h i n g t o d o t o the poor bird. H e g o t a b i t cross t h e n a n d said I d i d n ' t k n o w what I was talking about, and that a person who didn't k n o w what kindness really was w o u l d n ' t b e m u c h g o o d at starting a Kindness to Animals League. " W h a t c o u l d b e kinder t o an animal t h a n m a k i n g it a b l e t o talk ? " he a s k e d m e . " I t ' s just t h e o n e t h i n g t h a t animals n e e d t o m a k e t h e m a b l e t o e n j o y life p r o p e r l y , especially p e t a n i m a l s . Look h o w many animals d i e in c a p t i v i t y just b e c a u s e t h e y are n o t t r e a t e d in t h e right k i n d o f w a y . If t h e y w e r e a b l e t o talk t h e y c o u l d tell t h e i r keepers e x a c t l y t h e right k i n d of f o o d t o g i v e t h e m , instead o f h a v i n g t o s t a r v e or eat stuff t h a t ' s just as likely t o disagree with t h e m as n o t . A n d t h e y c o u l d say whether t h e y were b e i n g k e p t t o o h o t o r t o o c o l d , a n d w h e t h e r t h e y were getting e n o u g h exercise, a n d lots of things l i k e that, t h a t m a y m e a n life or d e a t h t o t h e m . Besides, look h o w useful it w o u l d b e s o m e t i m e s if animals c o u l d tell w h a t t h e y h a d seen. L o t s m o r e criminals w o u l d h a v e b e e n c a u g h t if d o g s o r cats, o r e v e n birds w h o h a d seen t h e m c o m m i t their c r i m e s , h a d b e e n able t o t a l k . " H e t a l k e d a l o t m o r e silly stuff like t h a t . I c a n ' t r e m e m b e r half of i t ; a n d it was just like s p e a k i n g t o a s t o n e wall t o t r y t o s h o w h i m t h a t he w a s w r o n g . I t o l d h i m t h a t if ' j a c k d a w s were i n t e n d e d t o talk t h e y w o u l d h a v e b e e n b o r n with split t o n g u e s if t h a t was all t h a t w a s w a n t e d . " B e s i d e s , " I said, " l o o k at p a r r o t s ; t h e y talk, a n d a l o t of g o o d it d o e s t h e m . H a v e n ' t y o u e v e r heard of a p a r r o t h a v i n g its n e c k t w i s t e d b e c a u s e it t a l k e d t o o m u c h ? " B u t it w a s n o use talking, A n s o n w a s b e n t o n splitting his j a c k d a w ' s t o n g u e , a n d as I h a d p r o m i s e d t o g o a l o n g a n d see t h e b i r d I w e n t h o m e w i t h h i m in t h e a f t e r n o o n , t r y i n g all t h e t i m e t o t h i n k of s o m e w a y of m a k i n g h i m c h a n g e his m i n d . B u t , as it t u r n e d o u t , I n e e d n o t h a v e w o r r i e d a bit b e c a u s e w h e n w e g o t t o his b a c k g a r d e n •where he h a d b e e n k e e p i n g t h e j a c k d a w tied b y t h e leg t o a s t a k e s t u c k in t h e g r o u n d w e f o u n d n o t h i n g b u t t h e stake, a frayed p i e c e of string a n d a mess o f feathers. The jack­ d a w was g o n e . A n s o n l o o k e d a t t h e t a t t e r e d feathers as if he w a s g o i n g t o c r y o v e r t h e m . I b e l i e v e he w a s really f o n d of t h e j a c k d a w . " R a t s , " he said m i s e r a b l y . " Or p e r h a p s a c a t , " I suggested. " I t d o e s n ' t m a t t e r m u c h w h i c h it w a s , " he a n s w e r e d m o u r n f u l l y ; " t h e p o o r thing is g o n e . " If I was t h e bird I ' d h a v e t h o u g h t m y s e l f lucky to have escaped having m y tongue h a c k e d at b y A n s o n ' s knife. . . . W e h a v e a m a s t e r at o u r s c h o o l w h o stammers frightfully sometimes. H e is o u r m a t h e m a t i c s m a s t e r a n d he talks all r i g h t in t h e o r d i n a r y w a y , b u t a l w a y s when he takes us o n , as he d o e s e v e r y o n c e in a while, at s o m e t r i c k y little p r o b l e m in algebra of his o w n i n v e n t i o n , he seems t o g e t c r a m p in t h e t o n g u e . T o - d a y he started o n o n e of his p r o b l e m s first thing, a n d in a m i n u t e was stuttering a w a y like o n e o ' c l o c k . When he h a d s t a t e d his p r o b l e m he p a u s e d a m o m e n t , a n d l o o k i n g r o u n d t h e class p i c k e d o n a b o y w h o h a d o n l y j o i n e d the s c h o o l to-day. " D-d-d-d-do y - y - y o u und-und-und-unders t a n d t h e p u p - p u p - p u p - p r o b l e m ? " he asked.

" A s he raised the

cover there was

a

second

explosion."

t h a t he d i d n ' t g i v e m e a c h a n c e t o get a w o r d in a b o u t m y league. H e was first t o g e t t o s c h o o l this m o r n i n g , and, wanting t o d r a w s o m e t h i n g o n the b l a c k b o a r d , he w e n t t o t h e c u p b o a r d t o g e t a piece of c h a l k . W h i l e he was there he s p o t t e d a b o x full of electric light bulbs, a b o u t t w e n t y of t h e m , that h a d e v i d e n t l y been stored a w a y there as t h e y b e c a m e w o r n out, and forgotten. H e picked up one to l o o k at it a n d s o m e h o w m a n a g e d t o d r o p it. T h e e x p l o s i o n it m a d e w h e n it smashed

"Tip's"
scared him a w f u l l y ; he t o l d m e he t h o u g h t at first that s o m e o n e had t h r o w n a b o m b at him. B u t he u n d e r s t o o d q u i c k l y t h a t it was the broken b u l b that h a d m a d e t h e explosion, especially w h e n he s a w t h e mess of p o w d e r e d glass t h a t h a d b e e n b l o w n all a b o u t the place. W h i l e he was clear­ ing this u p with a duster he hit o n his idea, and w h e n he h a d finished the j o b he t o o k half a d o z e n of the bulbs a n d h i d them in his d e s k . W h e n A n s o n t o l d m o this I h a d a p r e t t y g o o d n o t i o n w h a t his idea w a s , and I s o o n f o u n d o u t t h a t I was right. I was n o t v e r y keen t o h a v e a h a n d in it, b u t as he said t h a t he was g o i n g t o c a r r y it o u t a n y h o w , a n d that I m i g h t as well j o i n in t h e s p o r t as b e shivering in m y shoes all the t i m e t h e fun was o n , for fear it w o u l d b e f o u n d o u t t h a t I k n e w all a b o u t it beforehand, I agreed to help him. But I was glad when I found that o u r v i c t i m was t o b e our F r e n c h m a s t e r . I didn't mind playing a j o k e on him. H i s n a m e is N a g a n o w s k i , and he is a P o l e , b u t w e c a l l h i m " N a g " b e c a u s e i t is so m u c h shorter than his full n a m e a n d b e c a u s e it suits h i m so well. H e is a l w a y s " n a g g i n g " one o f us b o y s , a n d g i v i n g " lines " f o r harm­ less i n n o c e n t things t h a t a d e c e n t m a s t e r w o u l d scorn t o t a k e a n y n o t i c e of. Besides " N a g " was just the m a n for o u r j o k e . He looks like a conspirator, just the k i n d of man y o u read a b o u t in stories a b o u t A n a r c h i s t s ; you could almost imagine h i m carrying a b o m b under the l o o s e b l a c k c l o a k he wears, and he p r o w l s a b o u t in the m o s t m y s t e r i o u s way, l o o k i n g a b o u t h i m n e r v o u s l y all the time, just as if he was afraid o f b e i n g tracked d o w n or t h a t s o m e o n e w a s g o i n g t o assassinate h i m . Well, w e fixed things u p beautifully, a n d , by being in s c h o o l a b o u t t w e n t y minutes earlier than a n y o n e else after l u n c h , w e were all ready w h e n i t was t i m e for " N a g " t o c o m e in and start t h e F r e n c h lesson. For some minutes b e f o r e " N a g " was due Anson h a d been s t a n d i n g carelessly against the d o o r so that i t was n o t c l o s e d until all the class was in. T h a t was an important point, b e c a u s e w e d i d n ' t w a n t anyone but " N a g " t o o p e n t h a t d o o r after it had been o n c e shut. W h e n all the b o y s were in Anson shut the d o o r carefully, b u t n o t so that anyone w o u l d particularly n o t i c e h i m . Then he sat at his desk a n d tried t o l o o k serious. T h a t was just the p o i n t a b o u t A n s o n t h a t I was afraid of, whether h e c o u l d k e e p a serious face and pretend t o b e j u s t as m u c h in the dark as anyone else w h e n the fun was o n . So just to make sure o f h i m I s l i p p e d i n t o his p o c k e t at the last m o m e n t o n e o f the b u l b s which, unknown t o h i m , I h a d t a k e n f r o m the b o x in the c u p b o a r d . W i t h our p e n k n i v e s w e had r e m o v e d the brass rims and plaster o f Paris from the half-dozen bulbs t h a t A n s o n had taken o u t so t h a t after t h e y e x p l o d e d there w o u l d b e n o t h i n g left t o g i v e a c l u e t o what they were. I n his usual creepy style " N a g " o p e n e d t h e d o o r a n d slipped i n t o the c l a s s - r o o m , b u t stealthily as he had o p e n e d it he d i d n o t fail t o spring the surprise w e h a d prepared for h i m . As his head and shoulders s h o w e d i n t h e d o o r w a y our b o m b e x p l o d e d a b o v e it. " N a g " uttered a sort of m o a n i n g s c r e a m , t h e whole class rose t o its feet, scared w h i t e , a n d w a t c h e d h i m scuttering u p t h e r o o m l i k e a dazed r a b b i t , w i t h his head b e n t a n d protected b y his hands and arms. H i s f a c e w a s t h e c o l o u r of t a l l o w when he d r o p p e d his h a n d s and showed it, b u t w h e n he had m a d e sure t h a t he was n o t s h o t he pulled himself together b r a v e l y , l o o k e d sharply at us as if h e was trying t o p i c k o n s o m e o n e t o punish for p l a y i n g a t r i c k o n

Diary. T h e Y o u n g Musician>
By FREDERICK JAMES, L.R.A.M.
INSTRUMENT TO

261

h i m , b u t as he c o u l d see n o n e b u t p u z z l e d and startled faces he d e c i d e d t o p r e t e n d t h a t nothing worth mentioning had happened. " G e t b a c k t o y o u r d e s k s , y o u b o y s , " he c a l l e d o u t s h a r p l y , t h o u g h his v o i c e was a bit q u a v e r y , t o s o m e o f the b i g g e r b o y s w h o were m o v i n g c a u t i o u s l y t o w a r d s t h e d o o r t o t r y a n d find o u t w h a t h a d c a u s e d t h e e x p l o s i o n . A n s o n w a s o n e o f t h e m a n d as he w a s nearest t h e d o o r " N a g " t o l d h i m t o c l o s e it. W h e n A n s o n r e t u r n e d t o his d e s k , " N a g , " with a c r o o k e d s m i l e o n his f a c e , p r e t e n d i n g t h a t he h a d b e e n a m u s e d at o u r fright instead o f b e i n g n e a r l y soared o u t of his wits himself, b u t still w a t c h i n g us sus­ p i c i o u s l y , lifted the c o v e r o f his d e s k t o t a k e o u t t h e F r e n c h b o o k h e k e p t there. A s he raised t h e c o v e r there w a s a s e c o n d e x p l o s i o n , m u c h m o r e startling t h a n t h e first b e c a u s e it was f o l l o w e d b y the terrific b a n g w i t h w h i c h " N a g " s l a p p e d his desk shut, a n d b e c a u s e e v e r y o n e ' s nerves were on edge. T h i s t i m e w e t h o u g h t " N a g " was g o i n g t o faint, f o r after t h r o w i n g h i m s e l f f o r w a r d o n his desk as t h o u g h he was t r y i n g frantically t o p r e v e n t s o m e t h i n g f r o m j u m p i n g o u t o f it, he s l i p p e d b a c k l i m p l y o n t o t h e c u s h i o n o f his chair. B u t he d i d n ' t s t a y there a s e c o n d , b e c a u s e t h e r e was a n o t h e r a l a r m i n g e x ­ p l o s i o n , muffled a l i t t l e b i t this t i m e b y t h e c u s h i o n , b u t e n o u g h t o set " N a g ' s " eyes p o p p i n g o u t o f his h e a d , a n d start t h e class in a frightful u p r o a r . One b o y began to cry like a baby. " N a g " was so scared b y this t i m e t h a t he s e e m e d t o b o q u i t e paralysed for a m o m e n t , then he b e g a n s l a p p i n g himself m a d l y all o v e r his b o d y . I t w a s as m u c h as I c o u l d d o t o k e e p m y face straight, a n d it was lucky that I kept one eye on Anson, because his m o u t h was t w i t c h i n g s o t h a t I k n e w he w o u l d burst i n t o a roar o f l a u g h t e r if s o m e ­ thing w a s n ' t d o n e t o p r e v e n t h i m . S o I d i d something. I swung m y hand sharply against his p o c k e t , and d i d n ' t h e j u s t j u m p ! I h a d e x p l o d e d his o w n p r i v a t e m i n e t h a t he k n e w n o t h i n g a b o u t . B u t I j u m p e d , a n d y e l l e d , t o o , myself, an instant later, f o r he fell u p against m e , a n d — b a n g — t h e r e was an e x p l o s i o n a n d a s i c k e n i n g k i n d of s m a c k against m y left side. T h a t was the last s t r a w for " N a g . " My y e l l m u s t h a v e finished h i m . I s a w his coat-tails j u s t d i s a p p e a r i n g through the d o o r , with all t h e class t e a r i n g w i l d l y b e h i n d h i m . W h e n A n s o n a n d I , l o o k i n g as scared as w e c o u l d , g o t i n t o t h e c o r r i d o r t h e r e was n o sign o f " N a g , " b u t w e f o u n d t h e H e a d , w h o was c o m i n g a l o n g t o see w h a t all the r o w was a b o u t , surrounded b y half a d o z e n of t h e b o y s all t r y i n g t o tell h i m a t o n c e a b o u t the mysterious explosions. Anson had j u s t started t o e x p l a i n h o w frightened he h a d b e e n w h e n the H e a d t o l d us w e c o u l d all g o h o m e for t h e afternoon a n d t h a t he would l o o k into the matter. I d o n ' t t h i n k there is m u c h c h a n c e t h a t A n s o n a n d I w i l l b o f o u n d o u t , unless s o m e S h e r l o c k H o l m e s d i s c o v e r s t h e electric l i g h t b u l b s in t h e c u p b o a r d a n d finds t h a t s o m e of t h e m are missing. We'll know about that to-morrow.
(To be continue*.)

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" I t is n o t g o o d t o s p e a k evil of all w h o m we k n o w b a d : it is w o r s e t o j u d g e e v i l of a n y w h o m a y p r o v e g o o d . T o s p e a k ill u p o n k n o w l e d g e s h o w s a w a n t of c h a r i t y : t o s p e a k ill u p o n s u s p i c i o n s h o w s a w a n t of h o n e s t y . . . . H e m a y b e evil himself w h o s p e a k s g o o d of others u p o n k n o w l e d g e , b u t he c a n n e v e r b e g o o d himself w h o s p e a k s evil of others u p o n s u s p i c i o n . " (ARTHUR
WARWICK.)

w h o d o n o t possess t h e a b i l i t y t o learn t o p l a y s o m e k i n d o f instrument decently. W e are w e l l a w a r e , o f c o u r s e , ' t h a t s o m e of us h a v e greater n a t u r a l gifts t h a n o t h e r s , n o t o n l y in m u s i c , b u t in o t h e r d i r e c t i o n s , as for i n s t a n c e i n s w i m m i n g , g y m n a s t i c s , c r i c k e t - p l a y i n g , e t c . , w h e r e s o m e o f us a c h i e v e success e a s i l y . Y e t n o n e o f us w o u l d t h i n k for a m o m e n t o f l i m i t i n g t h e p r a c t i c e o f swimming, gymnastics, and cricket only t o t h o s e w h o s h o w great n a t u r a l a p t i t u d e . W e rather t h i n k t h a t e v e r y o n e s h o u l d t a k e u p these things. I t is t h e s a m e w i t h regard t o t h e pursuit o f m u s i c . H e r e , as in all other occupations, those necessary and w o n d e r f u l qualities, p e r s e v e r a n c e a n d en­ t h u s i a s m , c o u n t f o r a g r e a t d e a l ' s o far as u l t i m a t e success is c o n c e r n e d . T h e writer of this article has h a d a b u n d a n t e v i d e n c e of t h e t r u t h o f this s t a t e m e n t d u r i n g t h e last t h i r t y y e a r s , e s p e c i a l l y i n t h e case o f b o y s . T o learn t o p l a y an i n s t r u m e n t w h e n y o u n g m e a n s t h a t a c o n s t a n t pleasure is p r o v i d e d for life. A t i m e c o m e s in o u r l i v e s w h e n w e are t o o o l d f o r f o o t b a l l , c y c l i n g , golf, e t c . , b u t , if w e h a v e an interest in m u s i c a n d s o m e skill i n m a n i p u l a t i n g an i n s t r u m e n t , w e possess s o m e t h i n g w h i c h w i l l b e a c o n s t a n t p a s t i m e a n d will s t i c k t o us t o t h e last. I t is best t o b e g i n t o t a k e u p m u s i c in earnest w h e n y o u n g . If it is left u n t i l the a g e of, s a y , t w e n t y - f i v e , success r a r e l y c o m e s . B y t h a t t i m e p e o p l e fancy t h e y are t o o o l d t o learn, a n d this p r e j u d i c e g e n e r a l l y cripples all musical a t t e m p t s w h i c h are made. F i x u p o n the instrument which y o u would like to be able to play and then be d e t e r m i n e d t o m a k e h o n e s t a n d earnest efforts t o d o w e l l . T h e p i a n o f o r t e is c e r t a i n l y t h e i n s t r u m e n t w h i c h is practised m o r e t h a n a n y o t h e r ; in fact w e m a y g o s o far as t o s a y t h a t i t e x c l u d e s m a n y o t h e r i n s t r u m e n t s . I t is the h o u s e h o l d i n s t r u m e n t b e y o n d all others. T o b e a b l e t o p l a y t h e p i a n o f o r t e , if even w e c a n d o n o m o r e t h a n p l a y the a c c o m p a n i ­ m e n t t o a s o n g , is an a c c o m p l i s h m e n t o f n o small importance. S o m e people get n o further t h a n p l a y i n g s i m p l e m u s i c s u c h as national melodies and hymn-tunes, and yet, in this m o d e s t w a y , m u c h pleasure a n d profit c a n b e d e r i v e d . L e t us n o w c o n s i d e r t h e o r g a n as an instrument which y o u n g people may take up. B o y s are g e n e r a l l y m u c h w r a p t u p in this. I t is necessary t o b e a b l e t o p l a y the p i a n o ­ forte m o d e r a t e l y well b e f o r e a start is m a d e with t h e o r g a n . T h e difficulty of getting enough practice is often experienced. W h e r e this is t h e case w e r e c o m m e n d the at­ t a c h m e n t o f a set of pedals t o t h e pianoforte. P l e n t y of p e d a l p r a c t i c e ( w h i c h is so neces­ s a r y ) can t h e n b e g o t at h o m e . These " a t t a c h m e n t s " c a n b e b o u g h t for as little

262
as £ 6 — s e c o n d - h a n d o n e s a r e s o m e t i m e s advertised. A s t i m e g o e s o n a successful s t u d e n t o f t h e organ m a y get a Sunday church-appoint­ m e n t . T h e r e is real n e e d f o r g o o d a m a t e u r o r g a n i s t s ; 7 5 p e r c e n t , o f the organs in t h e c o u n t r y are p l a y e d b y a m a t e u r s , half o f w h o m are indifferent p l a y e r s . H a r m o n i u m s a n d A m e r i c a n o r g a n s (this t e r m s h o u l d really b e " A m e r i c a n har­ moniums") are m e r e l y s u b s t i t u t e s f o r o r g a n s . T h e i r t o n e c o m e s f r o m reeds, n o t f r o m p i p e s . I t is a p i t y t h a t t h e y are s o i m p e r f e c t l y u n d e r s t o o d , a n d so b a d l y p l a y e d , a s t h e y a r e n o t w i t h o u t their uses, a n d e v e n t h e i r c h a r m s , — a s s u m i n g , o f c o u r s e , t h a t t h e y are w e l l - m a d e i n s t r u m e n t s a n d are n o t o f t h a t h o r r i d , c h e a p t y p e w h i c h gluts t h e m a r k e t n o w a d a y s . A great m u s i c i a n , t w e n t y - f i v e y e a r s a g o , used t o g i v e a fascinating l e c t u r e on " The harmonium—a much abused and misused i n s t r u m e n t , " a n d g a v e illustrations as to h o w a harmonium should, and should not, be played. W e will n o w s a y a f e w w o r d s r e s p e c t i n g t h e v i o l i n . B o y s h a v e often an e a r l y f a n c y for this i n s t r u m e n t , b u t this m a y s o o n d i s a p p e a r w h e n a t t e m p t s are m a d e t o learn t o p l a y it. T h e c h i e f difficulty is t h e l a c k o f c a p a c i t y for playing i n correct tune. O n k e y e d i n s t r u m e n t s , s u c h as t h e p i a n o , flute, c o r n e t , e t c . , t h e v a r i o u s n o t e s are a l r e a d y t h e r e , whereas o n t h e s t r i n g e d i n s t r u m e n t s , p l a y e d w i t h a b o w , t h e p l a y e r m u s t find h i s o w n n o t e s . C o n s e q u e n t l y , if the ear d o e s n o t

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i n s t r u m e n t s are c a p a b l e of b e i n g used f o r p l a y i n g s o l o s with (and s o m e t i m e s w i t h o u t ) pianoforte accompaniment. However, it is a real pleasure t o p l a y t h e d o u b l e bass in c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h o t h e r instruments, as in the c a s e o f b a n d s , s m a l l or large. T h e r e is this a d v a n t a g e t o o , t h a t i t takes a c o m p a r a t i v e l y short t i m e t o learn t o p l a y t h e d o u b l e bass well e n o u g h t o b e able t o p l a y s i m p l e m u s i c . A l i t t l e i n f o r m a t i o n respecting the c o s t o f these stringed i n s t r u m e n t s m a y b e useful. Get as g o o d a o n e as y o u c a n . A v i o l i n at £5, if carefully c h o s e n , o r a ' c e l l o a t £ 7 , w o u l d d o c a p i t a l l y , b u t y o u c a n m a n a g e satis­ f a c t o r i l y o n a less e x p e n d i t u r e — a t least in the earlier stages. F o r 30*. y o u c a n get a v i o l i n , c a s e a n d b o w c o m p l e t e , which, i f s e l e c t e d w i t h care, w i l l answer all purposes for a considerable time. Second-hand bargains c a n a l s o b e m a d e . A cheap viola would cost about a guinea. A ' c e l l o c a n b e g o t for 2 3 s . ; c o s t o f b o w 7*. I n this i n s t a n c e a w o o d e n case is e x p e n s i v e o w i n g t o t h e size o f the i n s t r u m e n t ; there­ fore a green b a i z e b a g ( w h i c h c a n b e m a d e at h o m e ) is o f t e n u s e d where the e x p e n s e is a c o n s i d e r a t i o n . D o u b l e basses c a n b e g o t (of G e r m a n m a k e ) f o r as little as £ 3 t o £ 4 — bow Is. (id. T h e s e are just passable. A green b a i z e b a g i s a l m o s t i n v a r i a b l y used e x c e p t b y p r o f e s s i o n a l players w h o travel a b o u t a great d e a l . I n a f o l l o w i n g article w e h o p e t o s p e a k o f other musical instruments which boys m a y t a k e u p as a p a s t i m e a n d s t u d y .

possess n a t u r a l l y c o r r e c t ideas o f p i t c h , i t b e c o m e s difficult t o m a k e satisfactory progress. T h i s needs t o b e t a k e n i n t o c o n ­ s i d e r a t i o n at t h e v e r y first. I n a n y c a s e , the early stages o f v i o l i n p l a y i n g are d r e a r y a n d t r y i n g — s t i l l , when t h e y are g o t o v e r , a s a t i s f a c t o r y a m o u n t of pleasure s o o n f o l l o w s . T h e r e i s a great a m o u n t o f m u s i c p u b l i s h e d f o r the v i o l i n , m u c h o f it a t c h e a p p r i c e s . S o m e p e o p l e w h o h a v e n o t m a d e startling progress w i t h t h e v i o l i n t a k e u p t h e t e n o r v i o l i n ( c a l l e d , i n this c o u n t r y , t h e v i o l a ) . I t is h e l d u n d e r t h e c h i n l i k e t h e v i o l i n , b u t is c o n s i d e r a b l y larger. T h i s i n s t r u m e n t suits s o m e p e o p l e b e t t e r t h a n t h e v i o l i n . I t is n e c e s s a r y t o b e a b l e t o p l a y the v i o l i n fairly w e l l b e f o r e t h e v i o l a is t a k e n in hand. N e x t t o t h e v i o l i n t h e stringed i n s t r u m e n t w h i c h is m o s t s t u d i e d is t h e ' c e l l o (the full w o r d is v i o l o n c e l l o ) . T h i s is a bass instru­ m e n t , t h o u g h i t is p o s s i b l e , i n s o m e cases, f o r i t t o p l a y i n t h e t e n o r , a l t o , a n d treble registers. I t is a m o s t useful a n d i m p o r t a n t i n s t r u m e n t , a n d b o y s are g e n e r a l l y successful w i t h it. W e h a v e k n o w n s o m e w h o , h a v i n g l i t t l e success w i t h t h e v i o l i n , h a v e s o o n d o n e satisfactorily with the 'cello. T h e d o u b l e bass i s a b i g a n d u n w i e l d y instrument, but its value i n a band o r o r c h e s t r a is great. P l a y e r s are n o t e a s y t o get, partly because i t is inconvenient t o g e t t h i s b u l k y i n s t r u m e n t f r o m o n e place t o a n o t h e r , a n d p a r t l y b e c a u s e i t is of n o use for s o l o p l a y i n g . A l l the other stringed

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Eton, Christ's Hospital, and the Charterhouse are Represented.
GEORGE A. WADE, B . A .
w i t h t h e first s c h o l a r s o f St. P a u l ' s b e h i n d him, give a d d e d attractions to the paint­ i n g w h i c h m u c h e n h a n c e its v a l u e . T h e first s c h o l a r s o f St. P a u l ' s , w i t h t h e good Colet himself ! N o w o n d e r that the s c h o o l at H a m m e r s m i t h is so p r o u d o f t h i s p i c t u r e , a n d w o u l d m u c h l i k e t o possess it. For those b o y s in the painting, one o f w h o m is d e p i c t e d a s c a r r y i n g a m o d e l of t h e f u t u r e s c h o o l b u i l d i n g s f o r K i n g H e n r y ' s inspection, w e r e the forerunners of a mighty line, w h i c h was to include one J o h n M i l t o n , o n e J o h n C h u r c h i l l , o n e S a m u e l P e p y s , a n d o t h e r s o f t h a t ilk, w h o h a v e i n d e e d l e f t t h e i r n a m e s w r i t large in E n g l i s h h i s t o r y a n d l i t e r a t u r e . T h e next magnificent painting of this class—and w h a t a m a g n i f i c e n t p i c t u r e i t is, t o b e sure!—is t h e celebrated " V e r r i o " that the noted Bluecoat School took with it when i t emigrated from N e w g a t e Street t o H o r s h a m . • T h i s im­ m e n s e c a n v a s u s e d t o c o v e r n e a r l y the w h o l e o f t h e l o n g s i d e in t h e a n c i e n t hall of C h r i s t ' s H o s p i t a l in L o n d o n , and w i t h a fitting t o u c h , n o t a l w a y s f o u n d in such cases, i t s new place at t h e splendid H o r s h a m site i s also a l o n g o n e s i d e o f the glorious dining-hall there. C h r i s t ' s H o s p i t a l is p e r h a p s t h e richest of all t h e g r e a t a n d a n c i e n t f o u n d a t i o n s in its c o l l e c t i o n o f v a l u a b l e o l d p a i n t i n g s by n o t e d m a s t e r s . But this one by t h e f a m o u s V e r r i o i s its u n i q u e treasure, the piece de resistance. T h e painting shows K i n g E d w a r d V I . s i t t i n g o n his t h r o n e in t h e c e n t r e , and w e l c o m i n g with a g r a v e smile t h e H o s p i t a l children who are b r o u g h t t o h i m as b e i n g t h e first t o a t t e n d the royal school he had founded. T h e correspondent's account of this brave b o y t o l d h o w , a t a c r i s i s o f t h e fight, s e e i n g the troops badly needing aid, he mounted p u b l i c s c h o o l s is j j j j j j | ^ n t h a t , c o n s i d e r i n g a h o r s e , c a l l e d t o h i s c o m p a n i o n , also an Old Etonian, t o follow him, and dashed h a t l e s s i n t o t h e fight, w a v i n g h i s s w o r d and shouting i n defiance o f t h e f o e , ^^K«|^/^|^ mense renown, " Floreat Etona ! " L a d y Butler's s p l e n d i d canvas has de­ picted the lad at this thrilling m o m e n t . It i s a picture that fascinates the g a z e r ; it is a s t o r y w h i c h n e e d s n o w o r d s a f t e r you have read the title. Y o u feel t h a t hitherto done. t h e b r a v e y o u n g officer r e q u i r e d n o g r a n d e r Of c o u r s e i n m o s t n o t e d c o l l e c t i o n s o f s p u r t o risk d e a t h a n d d a n g e r t h a n t h e p a i n t i n g s , p u b l i c o r p r i v a t e , o n e c a n find h o n o u r and g l o r y o f the old school h e an example b y some famous painter, which l o v e d so m u c h . W e l e a r n f r o m t h e r e c o r d s deals with something a b o u t school-life o r o f t h e w a r t h a t he f e l l in t h e b a t t l e , a n d c o n n e c t i o n s . B u t these p i c t u r e s are, f o r t h u s d i e d w i t h E t o n ' s n a m e t h e last o n e t h e m o s t p a r t , g e n e r a l in t h e i r a p p l i c a t i o n ; on his l i p s ! W e l l , he w a s o n l y o n e o f t h e y d o n o t represent this o r t h a t p a r t i c u l a r scores and scores of gallant Etonians w h o g r e a t s c h o o l o f t h e E t o n or H a r r o w t y p e . h a v e f a l l e n b r a v e l y in t h e s a m e w a y ! How empty of such pictures our biggest P r o b a b l y the next most popular paint­ A r t G a l l e r i e s are m a y b e g a t h e r e d f r o m ing b y a master-hand, dealing with the b i g the fact that the writer, w h o knows most schools, is that i n the R o y a l E x c h a n g e , o f t h e m f a i r l y w e l l , c a n o n l y recall off­ L o n d o n , which was specially painted t o h a n d f o u r o r five i n s t a n c e s o f noted adorn a panel there. T h i s picture, b y pictures by famous masters w h i c h indubit­ W. F . Yeames, R.A., shows King a b l y and clearly refer to any special one Henry V I I I . receiving Dean Colet most of the greatest schools in the land. And graciously, and giving him a royal charter e v e n t h e s e u n i q u e p a i n t i n g s are n o t all i n for t h e f o u n d i n g o f St. P a u l ' s S c h o o l . galleries that can be seen b y t h e p u b l i c C h a r m i n g and striking indeed is this at a n y t i m e . painting, for i t not only represents K i n g Best k n o w n o f all school pictures i s H e n r y V I I I . in o n e o f h i s m o s t pleasant u n d o u b t e d l y t h e fine a n d s t i r r i n g " F l o r e a t m o o d s , b u t i t g i v e s us a p o r t r a i t o f h i m E t o n a ! " o f Miss Elizabeth Thompson, w h i c h has a l w a y s been regarded amongst afterwards L a d y Butler. This celebrated the very best o f such. M o r e o v e r , the painter of w a r scenes t o o k for her subject l o v e l y figure o f Q u e e n A n n e B o l e y n s i t t i n g t h e i n c i d e n t o f t h e y o u n g officer i n t h e b y his s i d e , a n d t h e fine p i c t u r e o f t h e B o e r W a r w h o fell a t L a i n g ' s N e k . T h e great Dean kneeling before t h e K i n g , fact

^^"'TfiSj^xS ^^JR^ I

The Schools
h o y s stand o n o n e s i d e and t h e g i r l s on t h e other, t h e i r dress q u a i n t a n d d e l i g h t ­ f u l as it is t o - d a y , w h i l s t t h e n o t e d C o u r t and School officials are t h e r e also i n g r e a t array. So b i g i s t h e c a n v a s t h a t it h a d t o b e c u t into three, w h e n the school emigrated to H o r s h a m , ere it w a s f o u n d p o s s i b l e t o effect its r e m o v a l s u c c e s s f u l l y . But l u c k i l y , t h e c u t t i n g w a s so e x c e l l e n t l y d o n e , and t h e r e p l a c i n g so j u d i c i o u s l y m a n a g e d , t h a t n o t o n l y is t h e o r d i n a r y visitor u n a b l e t o tell it e v e r has b e e n c u t , but it s h o w s e x t r e m e l y w e l l , t o o , i n its new position, and on s e e i n g it, as with the St. Paul's painting at the Royal Exchange, y o u feel a special interest i n t h e figures o f t h e c h i l d r e n portrayed there. For not only are these first boys of Christ's Hospital t h e f o r e r u n n e r s o f a l i n e w h i c h g a v e us Charles L a m b , Samuel T a y l o r C o l e r i d g e , Leigh Hunt, Samuel Richardson, Sir Henry Maine, etc., but—who'Can tell?— p e r h a p s l i t t l e G e o r g e P e e l e h i m s e l f , after­ wards intimate friend of the immortal S w a n o f A v o n , c o l l a b o r a t o r in t h e l a t t e r ' s e a r l y d r a m a t i c w o r k , and sole a u t h o r o f several o t h e r n o t e d p l a y s , m a y b e a m o n g s t that c r o w d o f c h i l d r e n in q u a i n t a t t i r e w h o thus stand b e f o r e the b o y k i n g ! F o r w a s not little G e o r g e P e e l e o n e o f t h e first scholars at C h r i s t ' s H o s p i t a l ? B o r d e r i n g close o n t h e s e p a i n t i n g s o f the great s c h o o l s m u s t c o m e t h a t e x t r e m e l y well-known one, " T h e Chapel of the Charterhouse," which adorns the Tate G a l l e r y , and w a s p a i n t e d b y H e r k o m e r . T h e artist, it is t r u e , p r o b a b l y i n t e n d e d rather t o d e p i c t t h e O l d C a r t h u s i a n s i n their chapel t h a n t h e f a m o u s s c h o o l itself. B u t are not t h e t w o i n s e p a r a b l y c o n n e c t e d ? H a v e not also m o s t o f t h e "Brethren" in former y e a r s b e e n at t h e c e l e b r a t e d school, which used to stand close b y their ancient c h a p e l ? Cannot y o u recognise nearly every f a c e i n t h e g r e a t p i c t u r e as t h a t o f some f a m o u s p a s t o r p r e s e n t Carthusian ? What a splendid example of the painter's art t h i s p i c t u r e is. What c r o w d s o f visitors d a i l y s t a n d t o g a z e at it w i t h delight and a d m i r a t i o n ! W h y , h a v e w e not heard h o w e v e n t h e j u d g e s at the Royal Academy, when this picture w a s first revealed t o t h e i r e y e s w h i l s t s e l e c t i n g for the E x h i b i t i o n , w e r e so c h a r m e d and carried a w a y w i t h i t t h a t t h e y rose in a b o d y and c l a p p e d t h e i r hands! T h e n another fine p i c t u r e o f a f a m o u s s c h o o l , a painting b y a n o t e d a r t i s t , t o o , is that of " T h e Choir B o y s of the Chapel R o y a l , " b y W . F . Yeanies. T h i s painting is also o n e o f those w h i c h d o h o n o u r t o b o t h p a i n t e r and s u b j e c t , and it is c e r t a i n l y n o t t h e least striking and b e a u t i f u l o f such. T h e p o s e o f the b o y s , in t h e i r h e a v y s c a r l e t a n d g o l d coats, w i t h t h e i r k n e e b r e e c h e s a n d w h i t e b a n d s m u c h in e v i ­ d e n c e , t o o , is e x t r e m e l y g o o d f o r m a k i n g a fine effect. T h e older boy appears to b e t e l l i n g t h e o t h e r s a capital s t o r y , w h i c h is f a s c i n a t i n g t h e m v e r y m u c h , if w e m a y j u d g e b y t h e l o o k s o f eagerness and t h e h a l f - s m i l i n g a t t i t u d e o f their f a c e s . M r . Y e a m e s at his best is o n e o f t h e finest o f o u r p r e s e n t - d a y painters, b u t h e h a s s e l d o m g i v e n us a n y t h i n g in the p o r ­ t r a i t l i n e s u p e r i o r t o this p i c t u r e o f t h e choir-boys of the Chapel Royal. That school m a y not be one of the biggest or o l d e s t in t h e l a n d , nor r e c k o n e d in t h e category o f the schools we have just dealt with. B u t it h a s an a t t r a c t i o n , a quaintness, an i n d i v i d u a l i t y o f its o w n . A n d a school w h i c h has p r o d u c e d a Sullivan, a

in Famous

"Pictures.

263

B a r n b y , a Creser, a B r i d g e , and other splendid m e n in the ranks of English m u s i c i a n s , h a s n o n e e d t o f e e l t h a t i t is inferior to a n y in the land—from the m u s i c a l p o i n t o f v i e w , at a n y r a t e ! But, with that picture, there really closes t h e l i s t o f f a m o u s p a i n t i n g s p o r ­ traying phases o f the best-known and o l d e s t s c h o o l s , as p a i n t e d b y a n y o f t h e master-hands of ancient or modern times, for, of course, we cannot include mere portraits o f masters o r scholars in o u r list, h o w e v e r eminent such m a y b e , when

school-pictures by that well-known Academician, Thomas Webster, R.A., which the artist has entitled "The T r u a n t " and " A D a m e ' s S c h o o l . " It m a y b e g a t h e r e d at o n c e f r o m t h e t i t l e s that these paintings s h o w striking scenes in t h e c o u n t r y - s c h o o l s o f b y g o n e d a y s , scenes w i t h w h i c h the painter was very f a m i l i a r in his b o y h o o d . W e b s t e r has t h e knack o f m a k i n g his canvases " t a l k , " w i t h t h a t c l e a r n e s s w h i c h so m a n y p a i n t e r s envy but never attain. A n d so it is n o w o n d e r t h a t y o u u s u a l l y find an a d m i r i n g

The Choir Boys of the Chapel Royal.
(From the painting by W. P. YEAMES, E.A.)

representing their originals alone, and w i t h o u t r e f e r e n c e t o t h e i r s c h o o l itself in the picture. Y e t our chief galleries a n d c o l l e c t i o n s h a v e s o m e o t h e r fine p a i n t ­ ings about schools f r o m the general stand­ p o i n t , w h i c h are w o r t h m e n t i o n i n g . T h e r e is, i n t h e T a t e G a l l e r y at L a m ­ b e t h , t h a t b e a u t i f u l p a i n t i n g o f an o l d time school, entitled " T h e Last In." T h i s w o r k o f art, w h i c h is t h e o u t c o m e of t h e c l e v e r brush o f W . M u l r e a d y , R . A . , d e p i c t s t h e late s c h o l a r shuffling i n t o t h e r o o m as usual, w h i l s t t h e o t h e r l a d s are r o u n d t h e m a s t e r ' s d e s k , and t h e o l d man h i m s e l f is f r o w n i n g at the habitual dallier. T h e n i n t h i s g a l l e r y w e h a v e also t w o

circle round these t w o capital examples from his brush w h i c h adorn the walls o f the celebrated gallery on the Embank­ ment. M o s t of those w h o love Scottish life, m o s t o f t h o s e — a n d t h e i r n a m e is l e g i o n — w h o a d m i r e the genius of the greatest p a i n t e r f r o m b e y o n d t h e T w e e d , Sir D a v i d W i l k i e , h a v e n o n e e d t o b e r e m i n d e d that o n e o f his m o s t t e l l i n g p i c t u r e s is t h a t k n o w n as " T h e V i l l a g e S c h o o l . " This picture has been engraved and copied times without n u m b e r , so t h a t many h o m e s in t h e B r i t i s h I s l e s and a b r o a d m u s t o f n e c e s s i t y possess a p r i n t o f it o f s o m e s o r t or o t h e r . T h e r e is e v e r y e l e m e n t o f the old Scottish school of the " D o m i n i e

264

The

"Boy's Oban

Taper.

S a m p s o n " t y p e s h o w n in this noted paint­ ing, w h i c h e x h i b i t s t o t h e f u l l W i l k i e ' s wondrous p o w e r and master-craft i n h i s art. A n d that gorgeous feast of valuable and beautiful things, t h e Wallace Collection at H e r t f o r d H o u s e , i s n o t w i t h o u t i t s own charming examples o f pictures o f school life. I t possesses t h e " S c h o o l ­ m i s t r e s s , " b y t h a t fine F r e n c h a r t i s t , J e a n Fragonard, which came from t h e great P e r r e g a u x Collection i n 1841, where i t was a c c o u n t e d o n e o f F r a g o n a r d ' s g e m s . I t is a g e m , as y o u will allow when y o u see it, i f y o u a r e a n y t r u e j u d g e o f s u c h works o f art. This famous Wallace treasure-house possesses, t o o , the beautiful and valuable " V i s i t t o t h e BoardingS c h o o l , " which has always been reckoned a splendid example o f the genius of that erratic b u t wonderful portrayer o f E n g l i s h v i l l a g e l i f e a n d rustic s c e n e s , George Morland. This fine painter's palette w a s s o subtle that h i s colours r e m a i n a s f r e s h a n d g l o w i n g t o - d a y as on t h e d a y a f t e r t h e y w e r e l a i d o n t h e canvas, and h e has ever been regarded as i n c o m p a r a b l e i n h i s o w n r a n g e o f s u b j e c t s , w h i c h w e r e , h o w e v e r , m o r e after t h e class o f f a r m s c e n e s a n d field w o r k t h a n o f s c h o o l t o p i c s . B u t his " V i s i t t o the Boarding-School " i s charming, show­ i n g t h e a n x i o u s p a r e n t c o m i n g t o see h o w her child is getting o n , a n d depicting, too, t h e eagerness w i t h w h i c h scholar, mistress, a n d mother are all waiting t o meet one another. T h e r e a r e , o f course, several other school-subjects ( a n d particularly some pertaining to Sunday Schools), which have attracted t h e brushes a n d t h e genius o f m a n y great painters o f past and present times. Our English galleries can testify to this truth. But those mentioned above w i l l b e sufficient t o i n d i c a t e a f e w o f t h e b e s t a n d m o s t p r o m i n e n t , a s w e l l as t o t y p i f y o n w h a t lines t h e p a i n t e r ' s c o n c e p ­ tions have generally run. Y e t , notwith­ standing, w e m a y repeat w h a t w e said at the beginning—it is strange indeed that so f e w o f . o u r v e r y finest p u b l i c s c h o o l s h a v e figured s p e c i a l l y i n t h i s m a n n e r , a n d there should surely b e a g o o d opening f o r some coming genius with the brush in that direction, if o n l y his inclinations led h i m to r e g a r d H a r r o w , W e s t m i n s t e r , S h r e w s ­ bury, Kugby, Wellington, etc., from that standpoint. Let us close with one w o r d about a school-picture that h a s not o n l y w o n im­ m e n s e p o p u l a r i t y b e c a u s e o f i t s fine e x e c u ­ tion, i t s amusing t o p i c , a n d i t s general a t t r a c t i v e n e s s , b u t w h i c h is a l s o a l m o s t u n i q u e i n b e i n g q u i t e off t h e l i n e s o f t h e ordinary painting about a school subject. W e r e f e r t o the p o p u l a r p i c t u r e b y E r s k i n e Nicol, A . R . A . , w h i c h bears t h e amusing title o f " B o t h P u z z l e d . " T h e Irish s c h o o l b o y , s c r a t c h i n g his h e a d i n b e w i l d e r ­ m e n t , is n o t m o r e d e l i g h t f u l i n c o n c e p t i o n t h a n t h e I r i s h s c h o o l m a s t e r , w h o sits fairly flabbergasted b y t h e pupil's query, " But, sor, if wanst nought b e nought, then twice nought must b e something, b e c a u s e it's d o u b l e w h a t w a n s t n o u g h t is ! " M o r e f o l k h a v e b e e n m a d e t o l a u g h , per­ haps, b y this picture than b y a n y other dealing with school-life. Erskine Nicol's genius and master-hand, t o o , have depicted the scene t o a nicety, and nothing could be more delightful in its w a y than this famous painting. I t i s , as T a m s u r e y o u will admit, a capital one with which to end t h i s a c c o u n t ; a n d i t is n o t t h e least o f t h e m a n y fine s c h o o l - p i c t u r e s I h a v e here mentioned.

' Be useful where thou Hvest they may Both want and wish thy pleasing presence still. Kindnesse, good parts, great places, are the way

To compasse this. Finde out wen's wants and will, And meet them there. All worldly joys go lesse To the one joy of doing kind­ nesses." (G. HERBERT.")

_ p o u r i n g i n t o t h e " B . O . P . " office, a n d it is q u i t e e v i d e n t that m y readers far a n d w i d e h a v o t a k e n t o t h e i d e a o f the L e a g u e o f F r i e n d s h i p enthusiastically. M a n y o f t h o s e w h o write t o offer suggestions are a m b i t i o u s t o s e e t h e L . O . F . l a u n c h e d a t o n c e with a n established headquarters' c l u b - r o o m in L o n d o n a n d b r a n c h e s all o v e r the k i n g d o m . T h i s , h o w e v e r , is a s t e p that cannot b e taken immediately. In t i m e , n o d o u b t , w h e n the idea o f the L e a g u e has t a k e n r o o t and the n e e d f o r c l u b organisa­ t i o n m a k e s itself felt, m e m b e r s in v a r i o u s districts will c o m b i n e t o f o r m their o w n b r a n c h e s f o r the p u r p o s e o f m e e t i n g t o g e t h e r for m u t u a l benefit. I n o u r last C l u b R o o m notes it w a s suggested that t h e League offered m a n y a d v a n t a g e s t o readers w h o s e special h o b b i e s were n a t u r a l h i s t o r y , p o s t a g e s t a m p c o l l e c t i n g , a n d so o n . H e r e is a w a y in w h i c h m e m b e r s o f the L . O . F . m a y begin operations.

A

PPLICATIONS

for

membership

are

now

F o r g i v e n e s s free f r o m evil d o n e , A n d l o v e t o all m e n ' n e a t h the s u n . " (Kipling.)
Sent by DONALD B. DRAKE.

" N o t chance of birth o r place has m a d e us friends, B e i n g o f t e n t i m e s o f different t o n g u e s a n d nations ; B u t t h e e n d e a v o u r f o r t h e selfsame e n d , W i t h t h e same h o p e s , a n d fears, a n d aspirations." (Longfellow.)
Sent by CECIL FALSHAW.

and, " K i n d m e s s a g e s t h a t pass f r o m land t o l a n d ; K i n d letters t h a t b e t r a y t h e heart's d e e p history, In w h i c h w e feel t h e pressure o f a h a n d . " (Longfellow.)
Sent b y LEONARD G . B U N D Y F O R D .

T o e a c h o f t h e a b o v e a Consolation P r i z e of a h a n d s o m e b o o k has b e e n a w a r d e d .

Cards o f m e m b e r s h i p a r e n o w b e i n g p r i n t e d and b a d g e s are being p r e p a r e d . T h e l a t t e r will b e o f b r o n z e o n l y in three f o r m s — a brooch for c a p o r coat, a pendant for the w a t c h - c h a i n , a n d a tie-pin. T h e d e s i g n s e l e c t e d is a v e r y p r e t t y o n e , as will Ve seen n e x t m o n t h when a reproduction o f it will b e g i v e n . W h e n r e a d y , these b a d g e s will b e o n sale t o m e m b e r s a t Id. e a c h , p o s t free. I n t h e meantime, those w h o have a p p l i e d f o r m e m b e r s h i p c a r d s a n d b a d g e s are a s k e d t o w a i t until the orders f o r these h a v e b e e n c o m p l e t e d b y t h e m a k e r s . T h e list of w o u l d - b e m e m b e r s is b e i n g p o s t e d u p d a i l y , a n d there will b e as little d e l a y a s p o s s i b l e in d e a l i n g w i t h t h e n u m e r o u s applications.

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T h i s m o n t h I a m offering a Prize o f H A L F A G U I N E A f o r t h e b e s t little e s s a y o f 5 0 0 words o n " A n Ideal Friendship." T h e s u b j e c t f o r this is t o b e c h o s e n f r o m s o m e b o o k in w h i c h s u c h a friendship is d e s c r i b e d , a n d I w a n t e s s a y i s t s t o g i v e their r e a s o n s w h y t h e friendship in question appeals t o t h e m . I n s t a n c e s o f i d e a l friendships a r e numerous, o f course. The story o f David a n d J o n a t h a n springs a t o n c e t o o n e ' s m i n d . T h e r e are o t h e r instances t o h e fennd in f a m o u s b o o k s , s u c h as " T o m B r o w n e ' s S c h o o l d a y s " a n d " T h e H i l l " : the c h o i c e is a w i d e o n e . R e m e m b e r t h a t the prize i s to b e a w a r d e d f o r t h e best essay, a n d d o n o t d e v o t e t o o m u c h s p a c e t o the telling of the s t o r y y o u m a y select. T h i s c o m p e t i i ion c l o s e s o n F r i d a y , F e b r u a r y 2 8 . A s in o t h e r c o m p e t i t i o n s , should there be a large n u m b e r In t h e N o v e m b e r p a r t , i t will b e r e ­ of entries, several C o n s o l a t i o n Prizes Willi m e m b e r e d , a prize of F I V E SHILLINGS was bo awarded. offered t o the sender o f the q u o t a t i o n m o s t * • • suitable f o r t h e h e a d i n g t o this p a g e . T h e A m o n g the n e w features o f c o m i n g n u m ­ t a s k o f selection f r o m the m a n y r e c e i v e d w a s bers I s h o u l d like t o a n n o u n c e a stirring no e a s y o n e , b u t after d u e c o n s i d e r a t i o n I have awarded the prize t o serial story o f a d v e n t u r e entitled " S c a r r e d Cliff I s l a n d , " b y A . F e r g u s o n , a writer w h o s e A. F . FRANCIS, s h o r t stories in t h e " B . O . P . " h a v e w o n him 22 I p s w i c h R o a d , m a n y admirers a l r e a d y . On the c o n c l u s i o n Stowmarket, of " B e t w e e n t h e T w o , " also, will b e c o m ­ m e n c e d a fine serial b y F . H . B o l t o n . T h i s for the lines p r i n t e d u n d e r the C l u b R o o m will be called " U n d e r the E d g e o f the E a r t h , " ' heading this m o n t h . A m o n g those which and will be f o u n d t o surpass e v e n this w r i t e r ' s c a m e near t o w i n n i n g t h e p r i z e , I m a y p o p u l a r y a r n , " I n the H e a r t o f the Silent mention the following : — Sea." L o o k o u t f o r these splendid s t o r i e s , a n d tell all y o u r c h u m s a b o u t t h e m . " T e a c h us d e l i g h t i n s i m p l e things, THE OLD BOY. A n d m i r t h t h a t h a s n o b i t t e r springs ;

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who appeared greatly dis­ t u r b e d in m i n d and anxious to speak. "Halloa!" c r i e d Jenner, a c k n o wlcdging the m a n ' s b o w , " I think I've seen y o u b e f o r e — o n the l i n e . " " Very prob­ a b l y , sir, c o n ­ sidering I often use the horse o f iron in the p r o s e c u t i o n o f m y master's business. I t is flattering t o m y soul t o be r e c o g n i s e d b y y o u . " Superior English, though somewhat grotesque and grandiloquent. " T h a t ' s all right. N o w , o u t with i t . " " M y n a m e is T i r o o m a l a c h a r i a r , sir, English c l e r k t o Serrioor R a j a h ; his sole retainer c o n v e r s a n t w i t h suzerain t o n g u e . Y o u are w e l l k n o w n t o his highness b y r e p o r t as n o t a b l e N i m r o d , a n d being-aware t h a t y o u are i g n o r a m u s in vernaculars, t h e R a j a h selected m e t o i n t e r v i e w ; so 1 h a v e d o n n e d suitable r a i m e n t t o a p p e a r before y o u . " O h , c o m e t o the p o i n t , m a n ! " inter­ r u p t e d m y friend i m p a t i e n t l y . " I n short, a c a l a m i t y has o c c u r r e d , sir. Y o u k n o w t h a t b e c a u s e o f g o u t the R a j a h has f r e q u e n t l y invoiced services o f S u r g e o n Major Burgh from neighbouring c a n t o n m e n t of M a n d i p o r e , a n d t h a t a c e m e n t e d friend­ ship exists b e t w e e n his highness a n d m e d i c a l officer ? " " Y e s , y e s ! b u t w h a t a b o u t the c a l a m i t y ? " " I a m c o m i n g t o it, sir. Y o u h a v e h e a r d t h a t three years a g o , while S u r g e o n - M a j o r was o n first o c c a s i o n en r o u t e t o visit m y master he c h a n c e d t o c a p t u r e a c u b o f tiger in j u n g l e n e a r Serrioor ? " " Yes." " A n d t h a t the g e n t l e m a n t o o k c u b t o M a n d i p o r e where he has n u r t u r e d the beast, a n d e r a d i c a t e d f e r o c i t y , sir ? " " So I believe." " Before D r . B u r g h w e n t l a t e l y o n three m o n t h s ' l e a v e , he p a i d R a j a h t e m p o r a r y final visit, bringing w i t h h i m the tiger—n o w fine s p e c i m e n o f feline, a n d w h i c h he requested his highness t o cherish d u r i n g o w n e r ' s a b s e n c e in E n g l a n d , as n o o n e w a s f o u n d at M a n d i p o r e willing for s a m e ? " " Y e s , I h a v e heard o f t h a t t o o . " " M y master g l a d l y u n d e r t o o k fostering office, a n d there w a s n o t r o u b l e till this g e n t l e m a n " — p o i n t i n g a t me—•" has c o m e t o Serrioor, w h e r e u p o n J o e , as the tiger is n a m e d , a s s u m e d a c r u s t y mien, refusing all meats, a n a b y c o m p r e s s i n g h e a d in t h e collar he has e s c a p e d i n t o forest. Imme­ d i a t e l y , m y master sent searching parties t o re-catch J o e , b u t on n o p r e t e x t w h a t e v e r were t h e y t o injure o n e hair o f his tail. T h e R a j a h p r o m i s e d a b u n d a n t largess, a n d t h e parties started in high spirit, while his highness supplicated d e i t y t o g r a n t t h e m aid, for he d r e a d e d t o tell such d o l e f u l n e w s t o D r . B u r g h w h e n he c o m e s t o c l a i m p e t animal. B u t searchers all failed, a n d o n l y i n f o r m a t i o n t h e y h a v e gathered is t h a t r u n a g a t e has fled h i t h e r w a r d s . T h a t is the calamity, sir." " W h i c h y o u c o u l d h a v e p u t in half t h e number of words ! " growled Jenner. " H o w e v e r , what d o y o u want with m e a b o u t it V " " H i s h ' g h n e s 3 b e l i e v e s , sir, t h a t y o u w i t h your w o o d - c r a f t i n e s s will r e c o v e r Joe. F u r t h e r m o r e , R a j a h has i n s t r u c t e d m e t o beg your acceptance of two thousand rupees if s u c c e s s f u l ; a n d t a k i n g y o u r assent f o r g r a n t e d , m y m a s t e r has given o r d e r s f o r his t w o a r e n a e l e p h a n t s w i t h m a n y trust­ w o r t h y varlets t o b e here b y m o r n i n g l i g h t . T h a t is all, s i r . " " S o I s h o u l d h o p e . V e r y fine o f the R a j a h m a k i n g u p his m i n d t h a t I ' d agree ! A n y h o w , w e m a y g e t s o m e f u n o u t o f it, eh—Guthry ? " I concurred. A s s o o n as T i r o o m a l a c h a r i a r w a s d i s ­ missed, J e n n e r w r o t e the f o l l o w i n g wire t o t h e M a n d i p o r e station-master, a n d s h o w e d it t o m e : " S e n d s i x large a n d strong o n i o n nets b y m o r n i n g l o c a l . " " W h a t e v e r f o r ? " I a s k e d , staring. " Y o u duffer ! " he l a u g h e d ; " a r e n ' t we t o c a t c h t h o b r u t e w i t h o u t ' injuring o n e h a r o f his t a i l ' ? a n d d o y o u t h i n k t h a t a p a m p e r e d tiger t h a t has b e e n s t u d y i n g h u m a n wiles f o r three 3-ears w o u l d w a l k i n t o a c a g e - t r a p , or t u m b l e i n t o a p i t f a l l , — e v e n if w e h a d t i m e t o m a k e o n e o r the o t h e r ? " " T h e n h o w are y o u g o i n g t o m a n a g e ? " " W e shall h a v e t o b e a t r o u n d a n d t r a w l f o r h i m : h o m u s t n o t b e hurt, so nets are t h e o n l y m e a n s ; o n c e he gets a c l a w i n t o t h e meshes t h e rest will b e e a s y . W e c a n n o t t h i n k o f o u r rifles." I p a r t l y s a w t h e force o f his r e a s o n i n g : t h e nets w o u l d b e j u s t the t h i n g s . Mandi­ pore produced a superior o n i o n which, packed for export in rough baskets, were piled o n sideless t r u c k s a n d s e c u r e d b y e n v e l o p i n g nets, b e c a u s e if shut u p i n c l o s e d v e h i c l e s t h e b u l b s w o u l d d e t e r i o r a t e for want of ventilation.
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T seemed fated t h a t J e n n e r a n d I s h o u l d share in a d v e n t u r e . Horreseo referens ! because it was o f a peculiarly hair-rais­ ing nature, a n d m i g h t h a v e e n d e d in tho extinction of o n e or b o t h o f us, b u t for " the sweet little c h e r u b t h a t sits u p aloft " t o keep watch o v e r others besides " p o o r J a c k . " Nuggrum, a small railway s t a t i o n a n d village, was t o be m a d e t h e starting-point of a short fuel b r a n c h . I arrived there first—in the morning, t o c o l l e c t l a b o u r f o r the preliminary j u n g l e - e r t t i n g , w h i c h h a d t o be done before a single b e n c h - m a r k c o u l d b e placed. Finding N u g g r u m village t o consist of o n l y a f e w huts a n d a handful o f people, I rode o n b y the forest t r a c k t o Serrioor, a nativo t o w n s o m e four miles t o the north, left w o r d with the chief p o l i c e official to send a h u n d r e d w o o d c u t t e r s t o Nuggrum sharp, a n d r e t u r n e d t o the r a i l w a y station in time t o m e e t J e n n e r as he s t e p p e d from the m i d d a y local. W e d o u b l e d u p in the t i n y w a i t i n g - r o o m , m a d e ourselves c o m f o r t a b l e , a n d necessarily indulged in a l o t of " s h o p " talk, p o r i n g o v e r plans, specifications, e t c . S o the r e m a i n d e r o f the d a y p a s s e d ; n i g h t c a m e o n ; n o trains wero due for s o m e h o u r s ; hush reigned w i t h o u t ; all nature r e p o s e d in the silvery effulgence of a three-quarter m o o n ; w e finished dinner, and were a b o u t ad­ j o u r n i n g t o the verandah for a post-prandial s m o k e when the quiet was b r o k e n b y the r a c k e t of cart-wheels m i n g l e d with the usual v e r n a c u l a r vituperations hurled b y the d r i v e r at his bullocks. T h e c a r t s t o p p e d at t h e b a c k gate ; we heard the travellers being i n t e r v i e w e d b y S o m a s o o n d r u m the stationmaster, a n d presently t h a t f u n c t i o n a r y a p p e a r e d at our d o o r . " S i r , " said he, addressing Jenner, " a B r a h m i n emissary from Serrioor R a j a h has c o m e with message for y o u r h o n o u r . " " F o r m e ? H o w d i d the R a j a h k n o w o f m y b e i n g here ? " " S o m e subjects of h i m m a y h a v e w i t ­ nessed y o u r arrival t o - d a y , sir, a n d so c o n ­ v e y e d n e w s with fleetness." " B r i n g h i m in, s t a t i o n - m a s t e r . " T h e R a j a h ruled o v e r a little j u n g l e state, with Serrioor as his capital. H e was a g o o d s o r t ; o r t h o d o x , fond of the English, a n d unspoilt b y trips t o E u r o p e . H e h a d been a martyr t o g o u t , but t h a n k s t o western treatment was s l o w l y i m p r o v i n g . S o m a s o o n d r u m ushered in the emissary, a sleek, middle-aged B r a h m i n , richly dressed,

I

B y s i x n e x t m o r n i n g all w a s bustle. Not o n l y h a d the Serrioor e l e p h a n t s — K h o o s t i e and Kussruth—arrived, escorted b y a c r o w d of n a t i v e s w i t h s t i c k s a n d t o r c h e s , b u t s o m e N u g g r u m villagers were w a i t i n g t o i n f o r m us that during the past night they had o b ­ served two tigers p r o w l i n g o u t s i d e their cactus fencing. " The m o r e the merrier!" shouted J e n n e r w i t h glee. " T h e n w e shall h a v e t o t o t e a l o n g o u r rifles after a l l ! " " Yes ! " I added sardonically, " take o n e tiger for t h e o t h e r : p o t J o e a n d net the w i l d o n e ! " " A h — s o w e m i g h t ! then w e m u s t t r y and catch both. N o w , Mr. T h i n g u m b o b , w h a t h a v e y o u really g o t t o h e l p us with ? " " T h e arena elephants for y o u r e q u i t a t i o n , sirs ; a b o u t t w o hundred k n a v e s to c a r r y o u t y o u r will, a n d these b o n d s , derelicted b y J o e , " i n d i c a t i n g a m a s s i v e steel collar and

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c h a i n of English make, carried by a man o n his shoulder. " A l l right. W e shall start after breakl a s t at a b o u t ten o ' c l o c k , b y w h i c h t i m e s o m e nets t h a t I h a v e o r d e r e d will a r r i v e b y train from M a n d i p o r e . " T h e l o c a l b r o u g h t t h e nets : w e g o b b l e d d o w n o u r breakfast, w e n t o u t i n t o t h e s t a t i o n y a r d a n d set to w o r k . M y friend h a d s c a r c e l y o p e n e d his lips t o m e s i n c e rising ; a sure s i g n t h a t he was e v o l v i n g s o m e s c h e m e . 1 had great faith in h i m , s o p u t n o q u e s t i o n s . " N o w y o u — w i t h the c r a c k - j a w n a m e , m u s t e r y o u r c h a p s for a p a l a v e r ! " W h i l e T i r o o m a l a c h a r i a r was d o i n g this, behold ! two Nuggrum cowherds, who had been early astir, c a m e racing in w i t h t h e n e w s t h a t t h e y h a d s t u m b l e d across a partially-eaten buffalo w h i c h m u s t h a v e b e e n killed d u r i n g t h e n i g h t ! " Where ? " queried Jenner—through the B r a h m i n , w h o d i d all t h e translating. " T h e y say a b o u t a mile f r o m here, sir, in a b o s k y dell, w i t h s o m e trees, b y a w a t e r pool." H a h ! a l i k e l y p l a c e f o r t h e tigers t o n o o n in, eh ? " " Y e s , sir ; there will b e shelter f r o m sun, w i t h water, a n d residue o f buffalo c o r p s e at hand." " E x a c t l y . N o w a s k t h e S e r r i o o r fellows if t h e y '11 be a b l e t o tell J o e f r o m t h e o t h e r . " I t w a s plain t o m e t h a t t h e r e p o r t o f a w i l d tiger b e i n g also r o u n d had t a k e n t h e stiffening o u t o f t h e R a j a h ' s retainers ; f o r n o w , after m u c h m u r m u r i n g a m o n g t h e m s e l v e s , their s p o k e s m a n replied in t h e n e g a t i v e ; this, w i t h a v i e w t o g e t t i n g off t h e v e n t u r e . " W e l l then, tell t h e m t h a t t o m a k e sure, w e m u s t try a n d n a b b o t h . " " Abbahl ( g o o d gracious !) " t h e y c h o r u s e d , shaking their heads. J e n n e r s a w i t n o w . " L o o k here, M r . T i r o o - w h a t ' s - y o u r - n a m e , if t h e y ' r e g o i n g to show funk, I have done, and y o u m a y g o b a c k t o tho R a j a h a n d tell h i m s o . " " B y n o m e a n s , sir : a l l o w m e t w o m i n u t e s a n d I will infuse c o u r a g e o f D u t c h m a n ; n o t with d r i n k i n g s , but b y fatherly e x ­ hortation." Whereupon Tiroomalachariar in i g n o r a n c e o f m y o w n c o m m a n d o f several l o c a l d i a l e c t s " let o u t " a t t h e c r o w d in language that would have caused a Billings­ g a t e porter t o turn green w i t h e n v y . H o w ­ e v e r it had t h e desired effect, a n d t h e fellows engaged—though reluctantly—to d o their best. " V e r y g o o d . N o w tell t h e m t h a t w e are t o c a t c h J o e i n t a c t ; w h i l e as t o t h e j u n g l e tiger, w e m u s t t a k e o u r c h a n c e ; b u t if w e see b o t h , a n d y o u r c h a p s c a n tell t ' o t h e r f r o m w h i c h , so m u c h t h e b e t t e r . " Yes, they understood. " W e l l , here are s i x nets. M a k e s i x parties o f five m e n , a r m e d w i t h l o n g b a m ­ b o o s ; e a c h p a r t y , in line, h o l d a n e t spread before t h e m o n t h e b a m b o o - h e a d s . We will surround the s p o t w h e r e t h e ' k i l l ' o c c u r r e d ; t h e n t h e net-parties, w i t h t o r c h b e a r i n g beaters b e t w e e n t h e m , will all c l o s e i n o n the p o i n t , so t h a t if t h e tigers, o n e o r t w o , are inside the s u r r o u n d , t h e p r o b a b i l i t i e s are t h e y will m a k e a b o l t o f it, a n d d a s h a t t h e nets rather t h a n at t h e beaters h o l d i n g t h e t o r c h e s . D i r e c t l y t h e tiger t o u c h e s a n e t , all t h e carriers h a v e t o d o is t o t h r o w i t f o r w a r d and h o p clear, w h e n t h e beast will e n t a n g l e himself s o o n e n o u g h , a n d w e c a n further s e c u r e h i m . J o e o r j u n g l e tiger, if a n y o n e is m a u l e d , I '11 see t h a t t h e R a j a h compensates him." T h e Brahmin explained the a b o v e , and w h e n he c a m e to the last s e n t e n c e , all hesitation v a n i s h e d , T i r o o m a l a c h a r i a r d r a m a t i c a l l y o b s e r v i n g , " T h e y will l i b a t e t h e i r l i f e - b l o o d , sir ! "

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Otvn

Taper.
g a i n e d w i t h his hind-legs. W e held o n w i t h teeth a n d toe-nails," Jenner and I t a k i n g it c o o l l y ; T i r o o m a l a c h a r i a r in a very agony, supine on Kusjruth's p a d , was c l u t c h i n g the ropes, and m i n g l i n g his a b u s e o f t h e recalcitrant beast with ap­ peals t o t h e g o d s for s u c c o u r . Of c o u r s e there was d a n g e r : t h e weaker c o m b a t a n t m i g h t turn b r o a d s i d e o n , where­ u p o n t h e stronger w o u l d certainly attack in flank a n d perhaps upset his adversary, when w o e b e t i d e his rider o r riders. A g a i n , i n their b l i n d fury, the elephants m i g h t h i t c h us — strangers — d o w n with their t r u n k s a n d t r a m p l e t h e breath o u t of o u r b o d i e s ; t h e y m i g h t shift t o under the trees, when w e w o u l d b e crushed b y t h e branches or s w e p t off o u r seats. I n spite, h o w e v e r , o f these p o s s i b i l i t i e s I, w h o was m o s t a t h o m e o f the three, c o u l d n o t help feeling a m u s e d : Jenner in front of m e , c l i n g i n g t o the p a d - r o p e , a n d a d d i n g his E n g l i s h a n a t h e m a s t o m y H i n d e e ; T i r o o m a l a c h a r i a r ' s T e l u g u profanities a n d p i o u s ejaculations ; t h e fierce breaching of the s t i i v i n g elephants, p u n c t u a t e d b y the c l i n k - c l a n k of J o e ' s steel c h a i n that dangled f r o m o u r " s a d d l e - b o w " ; the a w e d l o o k s a n d ejaculations o f t h e beaters w h o , l i k o the generality o f u n t u t o r e d natives in a crisis, g a z e d helplessly o n ; all these were e n o u g h t o m a k e a c a t laugh. H o w e v e r , after the s c r i m m a g e had lasted s o m e minutes I t h o u g h t it t i m e t o call a halt, so b a w l e d t o the idiots o n f o o t t o separate t h e belligerents b y t h r o w i n g a lighted torch b e t w e e n t h e m . T h i s t h e y d i d , and it answered: nevertheless, apprehensive o f b e i n g interrupted b y m o r e elephantine tussles, J e n n e r ordered t h e B r a h m i n t o t a k e his beast t o the station, and there a w a i t o u r return. T i r o o m a l a c h a r i a r v o w e d t h e feat t o b e b e y o n d h i m , but fortunately a beater, w h o k n e w s o m e t h i n g o f Kussruth, c a m e f o r w a r d , and causing h i m t o sit, c l a m b e r e d on t o his n e c k , b a d e h i m rise, and g u i d i n g t h e a n i m a l with a s w i t c h , t o o k t h e b a c k track as h a r d as he c o u l d pelt. N o w , w e resumed business. T h e w o r d travelled r o u n d : the torch-bearers and netm e n k e e p i n g t o u c h and gradually c l o s i n g in, a d v a n c e d through the jungle, d o d g i n g the few trees and y e l l i n g l i k e fiends. A l l w e n t well, and w e w e r e just e m e r g i n g o n t o t h e glade w h e n a tiger b r o k e f r o m a c l u m p of t h i c k e t , i g n o r e d t h e nets, c h a r g e d l i k e a flash t h r o u g h t h e line o f m e n , and upsetting several l i k e ninepins disappeared to o u r rear ! " Go on ! " s h o u t e d Jenner, p o i n t i n g a h e a d ; " l e t ' s b e suro t h o o t h e r o n e ' s n o t i n here ! " I repeated t h e o r d e r i n v e r n a c u l a r ; it w a s passed o n , and again the circle set in m o t i o n . W e s a w the sheen o f t h e p o n d , a n d c l o s e t o it the remains o f t h e buffalo. A s w e c a m e i n t o the o p e n , a n o t h e r tiger p o p p e d o u t f r o m s o m e tall grass, and m a d e straight for o n e o f t h e nets : I t h o u g h t w e had g o t him! B u t n o , for he s u d d e n l y s w e r v e d , a n d t h r o w i n g all his e n e r g y i n t o the s p i i n g , s h o t c l e a n o v e r t h e wall o f beaters and mizzled in t h e opposite direction! A s p l e n d i d sight, and s p l e n d i d l y d o n e . T h e b a w l i n g c e a s e d , a n d all l o o k e d u p t o us f o r instructions. " Guthry ! " c r i e d Jenner, " a s k the beggars t o s a y w h i c h w a s J o e : t h e y ' v e seen t h e m b o t h n o w . " I p u t the q u e s t i o n t o the Serrioor m e n , b u t n o o n e c o u l d s p e a k with certainty. S m a l l w o n d e r , t h o u g h t I , for t h e felines s e e m e d a l i k e as t w o peas i n the transient glimpse we had caught of t h e m ; so, it b e i n g a toss-up, w e d e c i d e d t o g o after n u m b e r o n e . N o w , b e a t i n g in line, still led b y the N u g g r u m villagers, w e presently [reached

" V e r y g o o d . I a n d M r . G u t h r y will ride one elephant; y o u follow o n the other." O u r beast was K h o o s t i e ; t h e B r a h m i n ' s Kussruth. W e started; t h e N u g g r u m villagers, c a r r y i n g t o r c h e s , i n t h e v a n , g u i d i n g us t o t h e " b o s k y d e l l " ; t h e t w o e l e p h a n t s in single file n e x t , a n d t h e S e r r i o o r f o l k s in t h e rear. O n a p p r o a c h i n g t h e g l a d e w e h a l t e d , a n d arranging o u r forces c o m m e n c e d c u r v i n g r o u n d , s t a t i o n i n g t h e n e t parties at i n t e r v a l s , a n d filling t h e g a p s w i t h torch-bearers. In d u e c o u r s e , w h e n t h e s u r r o u n d was c o m p l e t e d w e g a v e t h e w o r d right a n d left t o c l o s e i n a n d m a k e a great h u l l a b a l o o . A t this j u n c t u r e s o m e t h i n g threatened t o m a r t h e whole affair: o u r mahouts (Mahomedan elephant-keepers) s t r u c k , a v e r r i n g t h e y h a d n e v e r b e e n o u t after tiger, a n d w e r e afraid. Tiroomalachariar unwillingly substantiated their statements. " I t is true, sir," s a i d h e , " t h a t t h e y are n o v i c e s in t h e art o f j u n g l e warfare, b u t 1 s u b m i t t h e p o o r c o w a r d s c a n b e s p a r e d , as these elephants are v e r y o b e d i e n t , a n d will h e e d o u r c o m m a n d s . " T h e t r e m b l i n g mahouts w e r e t o l d t o g o : t h e y c l a m b e r e d d o w n w i t h t h e m o s t sur­ prising alacrity, and disappeared liko " greased l i g h t n i n g . " W e l l , I s u p p o s e it was o w i n g t o t h e absence of their keepers, the din of the beaters a n d t h e s m o k y heat o f t h e i r n o w ignited torches, that the pachyderms became e x c i t e d , f o r n o s o o n e r h a d the mahouts c l e a r e d t h a n t h e a n i m a l s b e g a n fidgeting a n d trumpeting, and K h o o s t i e facing round at his fellow, t h e t w o e y e d e a c h other, flour­ ishing their trunks and emitting a g r u m b l i n g n o i s e . I k n e w w h a t this p o r ­ t e n d e d : t h e y w e r e b e n t o n a fight! J e n n e r h a d n o e x p e r i e n c e o f elephants : I h a d . " Here ! I say, Guthry ! " cried my c h u m w h o s t r a d d l e d the front half o f t h e p a d , " w h a t are t h e y g o i n g t o d o ? " " F i g h t , " I replied p i t h i l y . " H i — y o u son of a gun ! " he shouted t o t h e B r a h m i n w h o , nathless his assurances as to the docility of our mounts, n o w looked a l a r m e d a n d c l u n g b l o o d - s u c k e r fashion t o the pad-rope, " they want to fight! We d i d n ' t c o m e o u t here for t h a t ! T a l k t o y o u r brute, and y o u — G u t h r y , to this one ! Y o u k n o w the l i n g o . " Accordingly, the Brahmin and I broke into apostrophising our respective animals. " Ah-ah-ah ! " shrieked Tiroomalachariar in T e l u g u , " Woorookoondoo, gardedhee I Siggoo laydu ? Pani meeda vutchituppoodoo potlardthavoo ? Tsaloo t Nillabuddoo ! ( S t o p quiet, j a c k a s s ! H a v e y o u no shame ? W h e n c o m e o u t o n d u t y will y o u fight ? E n o u g h ! S t a n d s t e a d y !) " I added m y quota in Hindee, the language t h a t d o m i c i l e d elephants are m o r e accus­ t o m e d t o , their keepers b e i n g generally Mahomedans w h o speak that tongue: " Khoostie, baywakoof ! Shurrarrathee kurnay jathay kya ? Theree bap ha butchay, buss kuroo 1 Yeh apus may laddnay ke wukht nahin I ( K h o o s t i e , y o u g o o d - f o r - n o t h i n g , are y o u g o i n g t o m i s b e h a v e ? S o n o f y o u r father, h a v e d o n e w i t h it. T h i s is n o t t h e t i m e for y o u t o fight e a c h o t h e r !) " B u t n o , t h e silly brutes w o u l d t a k e n o d e n i a l ; o u r w o r d s h a d n o effect, a n d w e w e r e afraid t o e n f o r c e t h e m b y using t h e c r u e l goad that hung from the pad-rope. T h e p a i r e v i d e n t l y i m a g i n e d t h e y w e r e at o n e of t h e i r arena p e r f o r m a n c e s : t h e y w e r e t o o w r o u g h t u p t o o b e y us, a n d s e e m e d bent o n h a v i n g it o u t . W a r i l y a p p r o a c h i n g till their foreheads almost touched, they suddenly closed; heads raised in line with their b a c k s , short tusks clashing, and trunks flourished aloft, as t h e y s h o v e d o n e a n o t h e r t o a n d fro a c c o r d i n g t o t h e purchase e a c h

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reached a small p a t c h o f t h i c k u n d e r g r o w t h , where t h e g u i d e s p o i n t i n g t o a d i s p l a c e m e n t l o w d o w n i n t h e foliage, said it must, h a v e just b e e n m a d e b y t h e tiger, s e e k i n g c o v e r . T e l l i n g t h o beaters t o k e e p u p , w e u r g e d t h e e l e p h a n t i n t o t h e p a t c h , when i m m e ­ d i a t e l y t h e q u a r r y streaked o u t f r o m t h e farther s i d e a n d s p e d a w a y i n t o t h e j u n g l e b e y o n d . B a w l i n g and y e l l i n g , t h e line hurried o n , and i n a f e w m i n u t e s c a m e t o a cluster o f b i g g i s h r o c k s l y i n g together—w i t h passages between t h e m ; an i d e a l p l a c e f o r a n o t h e r surround, w h e r e w e i n s t a n t l y prepared t o m a k e o n e , w h i c h u n l u c k i l y w a s n o t t h e c a s e , f o r t h e nets h a d been rolled i n t o bundles, t h e m e n b e c a m e m i x e d , a n d there was n o t i m e t o r e f o r m . A n o t h e r thing, repeated d i s a p p o i n t m e n t h a d disgusted us, a n d there w a s n o t m u c h " g o " left in a n y o n e . H o w b e i t , w e called o n t h e fellows t o enter a m o n g t h e r o c k s : t h e m o r e p l u c k y o b e y e d , and in a f e w s e c o n d s w e — f r o m o u r c o i g n o f vantage—• spied the feline steal o u t f r o m t h e o t h e r s i d e of t h e b o u l d e r s , a n d slink i n t o t h e a d j a c e n t bushes. W e n o t e d t h a t he ran as if t h o r o u g h l y c o w e d , trailing his tail, and n e v e r so m u c h as g i v i n g o n e b a c k w a r d g l a n c e . T h i s a d d i t i o n a l s e t - b a c k g a v e t h e finishing t o u c h , f o r t r u t h t o tell w e were a l r e a d y " f e d u p " b y o u r repeated failures. However, w e w e n t o n , b u t in a half-hearted fashion, and were j o l l y glad t o hear an e n g i n e whistle, w h i c h b e t o k e n e d t h a t w e were n o t far f r o m the r a i l w a y . A f e w s c o r e y a r d s m o r e , the forest t h i n n e d ; v o i c e s o f m e n a n d c a t t l e reached o u r ears, a n d finally w e d e b o u c h e d o n t o t h e station clearing, tired, hungry, and dispirited. " N o w for a t u b a n d s o m e t h i n g t o e a t ! " m u t t e r e d Jenner, as K h o o s t i e sat d o w n a n d w e s l i p p e d off h i m . " I s a y , tell t h e c r o w d to v a m o o s e to the village, and be ready at d a w n t o - m o r r o w m o r n i n g , w h e n w e '11 h a v e a n o t h e r try. T h e tigers are n o t l i k e l y t o q u i t till t h a t buffalo is all eaten u p . " E v e r y o n e w e n t a w a y . W e felt v e r y c h e a p , f o r t h e setting sun p r o v e d t h a t w e h a d been o u t , foodless a n d drinkless, for e i g h t hours, w i t h n o t h i n g t o s h o w for it. " T h e r e ! " c o n t i n u e d m y c h u m , flinging his sun h a t i n t o o n e c o r n e r and J o e ' s chain i n t o a n o t h e r ; " I ' m famished. Bothered if w e g o o u t t o - m o r r o w w i t h o u t a b a s k e t o f l u n c h and a mussuck (skin) o f w a t e r ! " W o b a t h e d , p u t o n c o o l c l o t h e s , and t a c k l i n g o u r d i n n e r e n j o y e d it t h o r o u g h l y . I n e v e r so realised the t r u t h o f the o l d a d a g e , " H u n g e r is the b e s t sauce " as o n t h a t o c c a s i o n . A f t e r the m e a l w e d r a g g e d o u r l o u n g e c a m p chairs i n t o the m o o n l i t v e r a n d a h , where w e s m o k e d and c h a t t e d , n o t intending t o turn in till t h e n o r t h e r n mail train passed at 10.20 P . M . W e l l , m y c o m p a n i o n g r a d u a l l y lapsed i n t o silence, a n d w h e n an u n m i s t a k a b l e snore p r o c l a i m e d h i m t o be asleep, I g o t u p a n d w e n t inside, t o write a c o u p l e o f letters t h a t I wished t o send b y the i n c o m i n g mail. W h i l e so engaged, a m i d a stillness t h a t c o u l d a l m o s t be felt, I s u d d e n l y heard the c r e a k of a c h a i r ; m y c h u m , n o d o u b t , had stirred in his. I c o n t i n u e d writing till m y n a m e u t t e r e d b y J e n n e r in a strangely u n n a t u r a l t o n e m a d e m y heart b o u n d . I a m e n d o w e d with a certain a m o u n t o f p r e s e n c e o f m i n d ; it s e r v e d m e a t this juncture. W i t h o u t replying, I noiselessly g a i n e d m y feet, p i c k e d u p m y l o a d e d rifle, and c r e e p i n g t o the o p e n d o o r p e e p e d c a u t i o u s l y r o u n d the corner. W h a t d i d I seo ? M y friend in his c h a i r — m o t i o n l e s s as a l o g , while close o n the further side o f h i m squatted a tiger! Involuntarily I breathed a p r a y e r ; then t o full-cock and j e r k m y snider t o s h o u l d e r was the w o r k o f a m o m e n t , a n d in the n e x t I

The

"Boy's

Oban

Taper.
he r e s o l v e d t o sail right in and give himself u p ; d i d n ' t y o u , J o e ? " stroking the great sleek h e a d , o u t o f which the yellow-green e y e s r e g a r d e d us so benignly. N o d o u b t J e n n e r was right in these premises. " A n d the o t h e r tiger ? " I a s k e d , after a p a u s e . " Oh, he f o u n d it getting t o o h o t for h i m . U n l i k e J o e , he has all his wild instincts, l o o k i n g o n m a n as his natural e n e m y ; s o he h o o k e d i t . " " A n d t h e c r o w d f r o m Serrioor ? " " W o '11 send t h e m b a c k with J o e t o ­ morrow." " W h a t a b o u t the t w o thousand rupees ? " I inquired, w i t h a grin. " A3 e, t h a t ' s a consideration, and as the offer c o m e s s p o n t a n e o u s l y from the R a j a h , and he c a n afford to shell it out, t'll a p p l y f o r p e r m i s s i o n t o a c c e p t the money_, but on one condition." . " W h a t ' s that ? " " T h a t y o u let m e g i v e y o u half." " W h y , y o u d i d it a l l — I m e r e l y l o o k e d on." " Y o u deserve t o g o shares, Guthry, for s h o w i n g nerve just n o w . H a n g it, m a n ! 'twas the m o s t c o l d - b l o o d e d fix for y o u as well as for m e . N o d e n y i n g t h a t y o u — while in safety—literally w a l k e d into the l i o n ' s d e n t o hand m e the chain, especially as y o u d i d n o t k n o w it was J o e . I, in a measure, c o u l d n o t h e l p k e e p i n g m y head. I was nailed, as it were, so had n o alternative. I tell y o u c a n d i d l y that w h e n roused b y the r o u g h t o n g u e rasping m y face, with the great c h u m p so close t o mine, I just said m y prayers." " S o d i d I, o l d man, w h e n I c a m e o u t and s a w the p r e d i c a m e n t y o u were i n , " I murmured gravely.
T

w o u l d h a v e p u l l e d trigger h a d n o t the c l i c k of t h e c a t c h a p p r i s e d J e n n e r o f m y p r o ­ p i n q u i t y a n d m y i n t e n t i o n , f o r slightly t u r n i n g t o w a r d s m e he s a i d — n o w in his o r d i n a r y v o i c e , " D o n ' t fire, G u t h r y ! " " D o n ' t fire ! " I e c h o e d — w i t h the p i e c e still a t m y shoulder, and u n a b l e t o c r e d i t m y senses. " N o . A r c y o u g a m e t o c o m e nearer ? " " Y e s ! " I eaid, t h o u g h I w o u l d h a v e preferred p l u g g i n g the tiger f o r t h w i t h . " I t h i n k it is J o e : he a w o k e m e b y licking m y face ; s o if y o u '11 h a n d m e the chain I 'li try a n d n a b h i m . D o n ' t c h u c k i t . " A l l this c o o l l y and c o l l e c t e d l y ! " Is it J o e ! " I faltered ; " s u p p o s e i t ' s the other ? " " The other wouldn't lick a fellow. Any­ h o w , b r i n g the c h a i n , a n d if he g o e s for m e w h e n I t r y t o collar h i m , t h e n loose off. Y o u w o n ' t hit m e so c l o s e . " M y feelings c a n b e t t e r b e i m a g i n e d than d e s c r i b e d . T o r t u r e d w i t h dire misgivings I s t o l e b a c k , t o o k the chain in m y left h a n d , and with rifle in t h e o t h e r , again a p p r o a c h e d the chair : the weird g r o u p were in statu quo. O h , t h a t awful t i m e ! I m o m e n t a r i l y e x p e c t e d the beast cither t o b u r y his fangs in J e n n e r ' s t h r o a t , o r taking a flying l e a p o v e r t h e chair, fasten o n t o m e ! N o , he d i d n e i t h e r : I stole n e a r e r ; Stripes m a d e n o sign b e y o n d erecting his ears a n d r e g a r d i n g m e ; b u t there w a s n o b u n c h i n g , n o tail-flicking—sure preludes t o a spring. T h e m o o n l i g h t penetrating the shaded verandah did not allow of m y c l e a r l y n o t i n g the e x p r e s s i o n o n the tiger's face a n d thus j u d g i n g t h e state o f his temper. A t last I r e a c h e d the chair, a n d m e c h a n i c a l l y h a n d i n g the chain t o m y friend, I w h i p p e d the rifle into p o s i t i o n , a n d w i t h finger o n trigger prepared t o s h o o t . " N o w , old J o e , " muttered Jenner, o p e n i n g the c o l l a r - h o o p ; " y o u 're my prisoner ! " saying w h i c h he s n a p p e d it o n t o the a n i m a l ' s n e c k , sprang u p , swiftly b e l a y e d the chain r o u n d the verandah s u p p o r t o p p o s i t e h i m , a n d l o ! t h e trick w a s d o n e ! J o e , for there w a s n o question n o w t h a t it was he, so far f r o m resenting his capture, s e e m e d p l e a s e d : he f a w n e d o n Jenner, and w h e n I sidled u p , the b r u t e arched his b a c k , s t u c k his tail in the air, a n d r u b b e d against m y legs like a n y d o m e s t i c tom-cat! • O h , the relief ! T h e tension w a s o v e r , and w h e n w e had e x c h a n g e d a silent heartfelt g r i p , m y c o m ­ rade said, " I see h o w it is : J o e prefers whites t o b l a c k s : he has learnt t o d o so t h r o u g h B u r g h , and p l u m p s for c a p t i v i t y rather than f r e e d o m . " " Evidently s o . " " T h e p o o r c h a p was m a k i n g the best of a bad j o b at Serrioor till y o u t u r n e d u p there. H e scented B u r g h t h r o u g h y o u , so b e c a m e restive, a n d m a n a g e d t o slip his c o l l a r . U n a c c u s t o m e d t o l i b e r t y , he must h a v e b e e n clumsily lifting y o u r trail b a c k here till he m e t the j u n g l e tiger, w h e n the t w o frater­ nising r e s o l v e d t o h a v e a g o o d time t o g e t h e r , and killed that buffalo as a c o m m e n c e m e n t . " " A case o f e v i l c o m m u n i c a t i o n s c o r r u p t i n g g o o d m a n n e r s , " I laughed. " E x a c t l y ; b u t this o n e was all at sea, y o u b e t , a n d the o t h e r beast d i d the kill.' W e l l , if w e had h a p p e n e d o n J o e w i t h o u t the elephants, the m o b , the torches, the nets and the c o n f o u n d e d r u m p u s , m y idea is t h a t J o e w o u l d h a v e greeted us with a smile ; or if left t o himself he w o u l d p r o b a b l y h a v e sniffed us o u t here y e s t e r d a y and v o l u n t a r i l y surrendered ; b u t y o u see, w e c h a s e d h i m from pillar t o p o s t , c o w e d h i m , and he h a d n o c h a n c e t o t h i n k o v e r things till w e s t o p p e d the beat. T h e n , w h e n he f o u n d all quiet, a n d the j u n g l e tiger n o l o n g e r at his e l b o w ,
1

Weather Note.—A Threatening HOnight!

"Betbueen the

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725.

L o c o e s .
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BLACK.

W h i t e t o p l a y a n d m a t e in three (3) m o v e s . a u t h o r of t h i s t h r e e - m o v e r has ' p u b l i s h e d a c o l l e c t i o n of his 120 p r o ­ blems, a n d s a y s it is a p r e s e n t t o himself for his fiftieth b i r t h d a y , w h i c h w a s o n S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 1912. T h e d i r e c t m a t e s are in f r o m 2 t o 6 m o v e s , t h e self-mates i n 3, 6, 7, 8, 9 a n d 12 m o v e s , t h e 10 r e t r a c t o r s
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a r e also c l e v e r , a n d t h e d r a w s a n d wins show pretty moves. A s i m p l e a n d fine self-mate is K B l ; L C 5 ; N E 2 ; O B 2 . K B3 ; P C7. White compels Black to m a t e in s i x m o v e s . A m o n g the retractors is this o n e : — K C 2 ; M G 4 ; 0 H I . K E3 : L G2 ; M F4, G3 ; 0 B 2 , E4 ; P E 5 ; and t h e s t i p u l a t i o n s are : (1) W h i t e r e t r a c t s his last m o v e ; ( 2 ) B l a c k t h e n r e t r a c t s his last m o v e , a n d (3) p l a y s s o t h a t ( 4 ) W h i t e m a t e s on the m o v e . A s h o r t p l a y f o r a d r a w is i n K F 4 ; L E 5 ; P F 6 , K G 8 ; L 118 ; P E 6 , F 5 , F 7 . W h i t e t o p l a y and d r a w . T h e b o o k is n e a t l y b o u n d , a n d c a n b e o b t a i n e d f o r 2s. <5d. ( p o s t free) f r o m M r . C. D . L o e o c k , Braeside, K i n g ' s R o a d , Berkhamstcd. S o l u t i o n of N o . 7 2 4 . 1, P — B 4 K x K t . 2, R c h e c k s , a n d 3, K t m a t e s . T h i s is t h e English notation, but the solutions t o K l e t t ' s f o l l o w n o w i n t h e a l p h a b e t i c a l n o t a t i o n , in w h i c h t h e letters f r o m K t o P are u s e d f o r t h e six k i n d s of p i e c e s , n a m e l y K = K , L = Q , M = R , N = B, 0 = K t , P = P. 1, 0 A 8 , K D 5 ( o r a, b, e, d). 2, L C 3 , — . 3, L E 5 , 0 C 7 { . (a) K C 5 . 2 , L B 4 f , K D 5 . 3, 0 C 7 { . (6) P E 3 . 2, L B 4 f , K D 5 . (c) P D 6 . 2 , 0 C7 ; K C 5 , P D 5 . 3, L E 3 , 0 E 6 { . (d) P D 5 . 2 , L D 2 f , K 0 5 . 3, L B 4 J . 1, N H 3 , K C 5 ( a ) . 2 , N F l , P D 5 (b). 3, N B 4 f , K D 4 . 4 , P E 3 J . (6) K D 5 . 3, P E 4 f , K C 5 . 4 , P D 4 J . (a) P C 5 . 2 , K B 5 , N C 6 f . 3, K B 6 , — . 4, P E4J.

1, L F 2 , P E 5 (a, b). 2 , L F l , P C 5 . 3, M : H 5 f , P : H 5 . 4 , L A 6 + . (a) P C 5 . 2 , L:F3. (6) P : H 4 . 2 , L E 3 t , P G 5 . 3, L D4. T h e K B 7 is c l e v e r l y p l a c e d t o prevent other solutions. I, M H 6 , P C 5 ( a ) . 2, M H I , P:B4. 3, M A l , P B 3 . 4 , P : B 3 J . (a) P C 6 . 2 , M : C 6 , M : B 4 . 3, M D 6 f , M B 5 . 4, M l 1, O B 6 ; N H 8 ( a , b). 2, K G l , P D 4 . 3, P F 4 t , P : F 3 . 4 , P : D 4 J . (a) 0 C 2 . 2, 0 F8, 0 : E 3 f . 3, P : E 3 , — . 4, L , OJ. ( t ) N G 7 . 2 , 0 : G 5 , — . 3, L J . 1, N B 5 , P B 6 ( i . b). 2, K H 6 , 0 : D 2 . 3, L E 2 , P E 4 . 4 , L , H 5 J . (a) O A 5 . 2 , LF1, PB6. 3, L D 3 f . (6) O B 2 . 2 , L B 6 , O C4. 3, L : B 7 f , K C 5 . 4 , 0 E o J . 1, L A 8 , M H 4 ( a , 6, c ) . 2 , 0 G 4 , M : G 4 (d, e, / ) . 3, P C 4 , — . 4 , LJ. (d) K F 5 . 3, 0 : G 3 t , — . 4, L i (e) M : H 5 . 3, L C 8 f , K—. 4, LJ. ( / ) O F 7 . 3, O G 7 J . (a) P F l , L. 2, L C6f, K F5. 3, K D 7 , L:E2. 4 , L E 6 1 . (fc) K F 5 . 2, K D 7 , P F3. 3, P E 4 f , K : E 5 . 4, L D 5 J . (c) 0 F 7 . 2, 0 : F 7 , O G l . 3, L C 8 f , K : F 7 . 4, L G 8 J . 1, N A 8 , N B 8 ( a ) . 2, N G l , K C5 (b, c, d). 3, L D 4 f , K : D 4 . 4 , P F 4 J . (6) K C 7 . 3, O F 7 , — . 4 , L J . (c) K : E 5 , 3, N H 2 f , K F 5 . 4 , N E 4 1 {d) M E 8 . 3, O F 7 f , K C 7 . 4 , L C 4 t (a) M:A8. 2, L : B 4 t , K D 5 . 3, L D 2 t , K C 5 . 4, P B4+. T h e s o l u t i o n s of t h e f i v e - m o v e r s will be given next time.

Between the X w o
A Story o f G r a m m a r School
CHAPTER XIX.—CRESSINGTON S

By SERCOMBE GRIFFIN,
1

L.ife.

Avlhor of " The Mad Yatheht," A (Joorkha's Kookri," " The Dumb Chief," etc., etc.

PROPOSAL.

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m r a n e w - c o m e r w a s Cressington. J_ Cyril t o o k o u t his w a t c h . It was p a s t seven o ' c l o c k , a n d o l d R u p e r t had k e p t his w o r d and c o m e t o t h e P a v . t o m e e t h i m . W i t h the e x c e p t i o n o f Cyril, t h e boys present were startled at t h e intrusion, a n d s c a r c e l y k n e w h o w t o r e c e i v e t h e senior, t o w h o m m o s t of t h e m were f o r b i d d e n t o talk, a n d w h o had so s u m m a r i l y dispersed their first m e e t i n g in t h e B l a c k H o l e .

W i t h t h e m e r e s t g l i n t o f r e c o g n i t i o n in C y r i l ' s d i r e c t i o n , C r e s s i n g t o n a d d r e s s e d the assembled Society, saying h o w glad he.was t o meet t h e m again under such pleasant circumstances, that bygones had better r e m a i n b y g o n e s , a n d t h a t he h o p e d he m i g h t b e a l l o w e d t o remain. " V e r y g o o d of y o u to c o m e , " remarked C y r i l in a friendly w a y . " H o w did y o u k n o w about our meeting here ? " q u e r i e d Peters, r a t h e r b l u n t l y . Terry O'Brien, Arthur Brice, Bishop, W a r d e n , a n d Charles H i g g s n o d d e d in s y m p a t h y w i t h t h e latter r e m a r k . Cressington replied : " T h a n k s , y o u c h a p s , f o r y o u r tacit a g r e e m e n t a b o u t m y s t o p p i n g here. A h , as t o h o w I k n e w t h e m e e t i n g was b e i n g h e l d . " Cyril listened w i t h all his ears ; he h a d s h o w n Cressington t h e n o t i c e . " Y o u members of a secret society ought t o b e v e r y careful w h e n y o u fling a w a y y o u r invitations. I n future, t e a r u p all y o u r notices into tiny scraps that can't be s m o o t h e d o u t and read. If o n l y o n e of t h e masters, G i b b i e f o r i n s t a n c e , h a d seen t h a t n o t i c e , a n d read, as I d i d , t h a t a m e e t i n g w a s b e i n g held here t o - n i g h t , t h e r e w o u l d h a v e b e e n a fearful r o w . Y o u k n o w well e n o u g h t h a t I a m n o t t h e s o r t t o split o n y o u ; I ' v e h e l p e d y o u w i t h m a n y a lark u p t o the t i m e of t h e C a v e A d v e n t u r e , s i n c e w h i c h little m i s c a l c u l a t i o n I h a v e b e e n s h e l v e d . H o w e v e r , I b e a r n o ill-will, a n d I repeat, let b y g o n e s b e b y g o n e s . " " G o o d o l d Cressington ! " — i t s o u n d e d like Cyril's voice. " Thanks, y o u chaps. N o w y o u ' d better

c o n t i n u e y o u r d e l i b e r a t i o n s , " said t h e senior, s e a t i n g himself o n t h e e d g e o f t h e roller. " I v o t e o l d R u p e r t t a k e t h e c h a i r , " said C y r i l . " W e h a v e a b o u t h a d o u r fill o f P e t e r s ' silly r o t . P e t e r s is a l w a y s g o i n g t o let off fireworks—but they're always d a m p and fizz o u t . " Peters budged not an inch, remembering h o w " Sling W o l f " h a d a c t e d w h e n t h e U p a t e m Chief h a d w h i r l e d a t o m a h a w k r o u n d his h e a d . H e resented Falkland's allusions t o d a m p fireworks. " Damp fireworks! Y o u c h a p s are s o d u l l ; y o u n g F a l k l a n d , h a v e n ' t y o u e v e r lit a d a m p firework, a n d w a i t e d f o r it t o g o off. Y o u w a i t a n d w a i t a n d wait, a n d it n e v e r does b a n g ; but, Brethren of the G o r y T h u m b , h a v e y o u n o t felt y o u r hearts s t a n d still— waiting, and waiting, and waiting ? Y o u , all o f y o u , h a v e y o u r e x c i t e m e n t , w h e t h e r it bangs o r not. N o w I was a b o u t t o p r o v o t h a t Charlie H i g g s w a s t h e villain w h o m i x e d the bicycles, and " I t w a s t h e " v i l l a i n " himself w h o inter­ r u p t e d . H e Hung himself o n t h e m e r c y , and at t h e feet, of Cressington. " Please h e l p m e , C r e s s i n g t o n , " c r i e d t h e boy. " Peters made m e say I had m i x e d u p t h e b i c y c l e s ; he k e p t t o r t u r i n g m e till I did. H e g a v e ' K n u c k l e s , ' and ' Spiners,' and ' Electric Shocks,' and " " S h u t u p , y o u little s n e a k , " i n t e r r u p t e d t h e senior, cuffing H i g g s ' ear with o n e h a n d , a n d p u s h i n g P e t e r s off the roller w i t h t h e other. " L e t ' s hear t h e c a s e against P e t e r s . Y o u C y — F a l k l a n d , let's hear w h a t y o u ' v e got to say."

270

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Taper.

" M r . C h a i r m a n C r e s s i n g t o n — a n d gentle­ men—barring Springfield: I think that we've a l l h a d e n o u g h o f P e t e r s ' silly g a m e s , " declaimed Cyril. " N o t but what I s h o u l d like t o see t h e c h a p — o r c h a p s , w h o a c c i d e n t a l l y g o t B r i c e m i x e d u p w i t h his bicycle which, had i t only been properly screwed up, would not have ended i n poor B r i c e h a v i n g t o b e ill in b e d f o r so l o n g w h i c h I d o n ' t s u p p o s e t h e c h a p w h o d i d it, " C y r i l was g e t t i n g h o r r i b l y i n v o l v e d , a n d s o C r e s s i n g t o n c a m e t o his rescue : " I t is r e a l l y w a s t e o f t i m e t o h e a r further e v i d e n c e ; P e t e r s is e v i d e n t l y g u i l t y o f f o o l i n g y o u a l l ; w e ' l l finish h i m o f f . " V e r y p r o m p t l y P e t e r s was c o n d e m n e d a s an asinine (Cyril's c o n t r i b u t i o n ) , i n c o m p e t e n t ( C r e s s i n g t o n ' s a d d i t i o n ) , cruel ( H i g g s ' tearful share), blood-and-thundery (Terry's scorn­ ful phrase), i d i o t i c a l l y m a d (Springfield's realistic a d d i t i o n ) , silly, b u t m e a n s t o d o right ( B r i c e ' s f o r g i v i n g c o n t r i b u t i o n ) , y e t o u g h t t o b e k i c k e d ( B o b s ' belligerent d e ­ c l a m a t i o n ) , a n d shall b e k i c k e d ( P a r r y ' s p o i n t e d r e m a r k ) , b y all o f us ( B i s h o p ' s c o m ­ prehensive conclusion), duffer—with which last w o r d W a r d e n c o n c l u d e d t h e v e r d i c t . Springfield a n d B o b s w a n t e d t o a d m i n i s t e r

p u n i s h m e n t t o their c o n d e m n e d president Is Cressington g o i n g t o " l a n d " h i s fish t h e n a n d there, b u t P e t e r s b e g g e d in t o n e s , again ? H e o n l y fished for Cyril b e f o r e , t r e m b l i n g w i t h e m o t i o n , t h a t " it m i g h t b e a n d n o w h e has quite a shoal i n v i e w . g r a n t e d t o t h e s e n t e n c e d o n e t o settle his W a t c h !) affairs ere he suffered his ill-merited e n d . " " W e l l , friends, P e t e r s has m a d e a p r e t t y " R e m e m b e r . B r e t h r e n of t h e O o r y T h u m b , " mess of this Secret S o c i e t y , " said Cressington, said P e t e r s , w h o s e e m e d t o rather e n j o y carefully w a t c h i n g h i s a u d i e n c e b y t h e t h e sensation of b e i n g " c o n d e m n e d " : " R e ­ p r o c e s s of, n o w a n d again, casually shifting m e m b e r , t h a t t h e s e n t e n c e d o n e is p e r m i t t e d t h e little lantern, so t h a t the light m i g h t t o settle his affairs a n d — g e t a final b r e a t h p l a y o n e a c h b o y i n turn. " B u t I d o n ' t of air ere he die ; e x c e p t , of c o u r s e , w h e n see w h y a Secret S o c i e t y s h o u l d n ' t b e a j o l l y it's a c a s e o f w a l k i n g t h e p l a n k . " g o o d t h i n g ; we put up with a jolly lot of injustice a t s c h o o l . T h e masters a r e i n ­ " A n d t h e n t h e y g e t a b r e a t h o f sea air, c l i n e d t o t a k e a d v a n t a g e o f their p o w e r s ; eh, P e t e r s ? " said C r e s s i n g t o n , w h o w a s f o r i n s t a n c e , B i s h o p g o t k e p t i n after s u m m o n i n g all his p o w e r s t o gain t h e f a v o u r m o r n i n g s c h o o l for a w h o l e h o u r , o n l y b e c a u s e of h i s hearers. " Let's defer Peters' he c o u l d n ' t d o a L . C . M . s u m r i g h t — w h i c h lynching for a few minutes." is rank i n j u s t i c e . " " I prithee t h a n k t h e e f o r t h y c l e m e n c y , g o o d sir," said t h e r o m a n t i c Peters, s i m p l y " Merry didn't keep m e in because I revelling i n t h e s i t u a t i o n , f o r h a d n o t c o u l d n ' t d o it, b u t b e c a u s e — b e c a u s e I tried " Cornet Sackville, T h e G a y C a v a l i e r " t o crib the answer from W i t l e y , " put i n thus answered the wicked R o u n d h e a d w h o B i s h o p bashfully, b u t a t least honestly. c o m m u t e d the sentence of death b y hanging " A n d besides " — c o n t i n u e d Cressington, t o o n e o f i m p r i s o n m e n t f o r life ? i g n o r i n g t h e i n t e r r u p t i o n — " there are m a n y o t h e r sorts o f injustices t h a t Secret S o c i e t i e s " O h , d r y u p , y o u P e n n y - H o r r i b l e , " said c a n d e b a t e a b o u t a n d p u t right. A n d just C r e s s i n g t o n , w h o h a d o t h e r fish t o fry. t h i n k w h a t r i p p i n g larks c a n be carried o u t (Readers have followed Cressington's b y e i g h t o r ten fellows w o r k i n g t o g e t h e r i n fishing m a n o e u v r e s as r e c o r d e d in C h a p t e r V I .

Schoolboys' International rootiiiili juta-fch*
(Played at Cardiff In April, 1912.)

•The English Team.
Top row: (Gloucester). P . 0 . Patrick (Leicester). J . Porster (Birmingham). S . W . C . MiUa H . 0 JaooD ( B i r m i n g h a m ; , P . Gaxdnei (Bristol). iw B .James 3. A . R a n l i n g s W. (Bristol). F. Blackley (Exeter). F . L . J . B r o w n (Coventry). F . W. D a v i e s A Lorden

Second r o w : (Rugby).

(Cheltenham,

(Gloucester),

J. Glower (Coventry).

C . A . Vallis (Bristol).

W . T . T e d d s (Leicester;.

G . H . Sewlas

(Leicester).

"Bettoiteen the Ttgro.
secret. F o r instance, t h e c h a n c e s are t h a t the B i c y c l e B i z was •" " B u t that w a s a c a d d i s h j o k e , " said T e r r y stoutly, g l a n c i n g a t A r t h u r B r i c e , w h o sat next him o n the lawn-mower. " A bit r o u g h o n B r i c e — t h a t j o k e w a s , " allowed Cressington. " T h o u g h t h e c h a p d i d n ' t think, p ' r a p s , that Brice would get hurt," added someone else—surely i t was Cyril's v o i c e . " N o , as o u r friend P a r r y — d o n ' t interrupt, P a r r y — a s o u r friend P a r r y remarks, p r o ­ b a b l y tho jokers never thought, when they m i x e d u p the bicycles, that Brice would get a little t a p o n his soft h e a d , " said Cressington, w h o realised that his y o u n g friend C y r i l was p u t t i n g his f o o t — o r at least his v o i c e — i n t o it m o r e often t h a n was wise. " B u t , \ o u c h a p s , we'ro g e t t i n g a w a y from the s u b j e c t . T h e discussion is a b o u t o u r S e c r e t S o c i e t y . " T e r r y s w a l l o w e d an i m a g i n a r y a c i d - d r o p t h a t s e e m e d t o rise in his t h r o a t ; h e y e a r n e d t o s a y something, but he k n e w n o t h o w t o s a y i t : Cressington was t r y i n g t o " b o s s " t h e m again, a n d t h e y , h a d b e e n w a r n e d against him ; it's difficult for a j u n i o r t o g o against a s e n i o r ; b u t , w h e n a senior was leading a w a y y o u r c h u m , well, y o u m u s t d o s o m e t h i n g . T h u s reasoned T e r r y , a n d t h u s he s p o k e : " I say, Cressington, w e c a n ' t b e a S e c r e t Society as long as outsiders are listening t o what wo say. Can we ? " Cressington readjusted the l a n t e r n : s o m e o f " t h e fish" s e e m e d t o b e d o d g i n g the n e t . T h o senior followed tho drift of T e r r y ' s q u e s t i o n . It was Cyril w h o p u t f o r t h a h e l p i n g h a n d t o aid the angler. " I p r o p o s e , " said Cyril, c h a m p i o n i n g one friend, a n d t h u s o p p o s i n g t h e o t h e r , " that o l d R u p e r t b e f o r m a l l y e l e c t e d a member of the Secret Society of V e n g e a n c e . " This p r o p o s a l was a k n o c k - d o w n b l o w for T e r r y . Cyril—his c h u m C y r i l — w a s backing u p Cressington. I f he—Terry—• resisted Cressington, h o was g o i n g against his c h u m Cyril. W h a t w a s h o t o d o ? — for he l o v e d Cyril w i t h all the w a r m t h o f his Irish heart, w i t h the p u r e s t r e n g t h of a b o y i s h friendship. . . . H e l e a n e d o v e r a n d s p o k e in A r t h u r B r i c e ' s ear : " A r t h u r , I say ! M y folks s a y Cressing­ ton's a rotter." Brice n o d d e d a c q u i e s c e n c e ; but what c o u l d b e d o n e ? H o w c o u l d he, o n e o f the T h i r d F o r m , daro t o c o n t e n d w i t h a monitor ? ( A n o t h e r " fish " is u n e a s y , C r e s s i n g t o n . Often o n e fish c o m m u n i c a t e s his a l a r m t o a wholo shoal. B e w a r y , 0 a n g l e r !) B r i c e loaned across the l a w n - m o w e r a n d spoke t o B o b s : " I say ! Cresaington o u g h t n ' t t o b e here. M y folks said I m u s t never g o with h i m a g a i n . " B o b s was a b o r n fighter ; h o liked t h e clash of contest, e n j o y e d himself w h e n i n o p p o s i t i o n . T o tackle Cressington w o u l d b e an impossible fight alone, b u t T e r r y w o u l d j o i n h i m , and Springfield, a n d B r i c e , p e r h a p s . B o b s considered " larks " a l m o s t a necessity of s c h o o l life, b u t " larks " a m o n g s t t h e m ­ selves were t o b e preferred t o " larks " s u c h as Cressington p r o p o s e d ; s o m e h o w it d i d n ' t seem r i g h t t h a t a senior s h o u l d c o n c e r n himself w i t h the j u n i o r s ' d o i n g s . Thus t h o m i n d s o f B o b s , B r i c e a n d T e r r y were m u c h exercised as t o w h a t t h e y o u g h t t o d o , a n d their u p r i g h t , clean y o u n g souls were s t r i p p i n g for the fray. S o m e h o w t h e y felt as if a n e n e m y were striving t o m e s h them. M e a n w h i l e Cyril was p r o c l a i m i n g the g o o d parts o f t h e n e w c a n d i d a t e for election : Cressington was o n e w h o c o u l d tell y o u a thing o r t w o , w h o k n e w what was what a n d didn't mind saying so, who could give y o u a taste of g r o w n - u p fun. T h u s s p a k e C y r i l ,
T

271
d e c e n t as t o t r o u b l e a b o u t us in t h e T h i r d , ' defiantly e x c l a i m e d Cyril. " N o , " retorted B o b s , " the other S i x t h F o r m g o w i t h fellows their o w n size, if t h e y are a n y g o o d . " N o w t h e last r e m a r k m a y h a v e b e e n s o m e ­ w h a t a m b i g u o u s , b u t Cressington k n e w t h a t it w a s m e a n t f o r a reflection u p o n himself. ( T h e fish are e s c a p i n g . Cressington, y o u must give y o u r net a twist.) " I d o n ' t w a n t t o frighten y o u fellows, b u t b e f o r e y o u g o a n y further, I w a n t t o r e m i n d you that I a m a monitor, and ought t o r e p o r t this affair t o S a n d y ; y o u ' v e n o r i g h t t o c o m e trespassing here. B u t , a s I s a y , t h o u g h S a n d y m i g h t c a n e t h e l o t o f y o u for it, I d o n ' t see a n y t h i n g w r o n g in it, being,, as it were, o n e o f y o u r s e l v e s , a n d e n j o y i n g a g o o d spree. N o w I was t h i n k i n g " Brice, inwardly quaking, b u t outwardlycalm, had c o m e alongside o f tho speaker and interrupted with, Please, Cressington, we had better g o , h a d n ' t we ? T h e n t h e y can talk over our election." I t w a s B o b s w h o a d d e d " Clear o u t , Cressington ! " muttered in a low tone. Cressington caught t h e remark, a n d stretching o u t a n arm, he inserted h i s fingers in t h e n a p e o f B o b s ' c o a t . S t r u g g l i n g v a i n l y , B o b s w a s held a s p r a w l in t h e s e n i o r ' s g r a s p . T e r r y ' s Irish b l o o d b o o m e d i n h i s ears, a n d h e flung h i m ­ self u p o n C r e s s i n g t o n , fighting f u r i o u s l y . Cressington e a s i l y d e a l t w i t h t h e t w o T h i r d Form boys. " T o tho rescue ! " cried the peaceful B r i c e ; while W a r d e n , c o n t e n t e d l y l y i n g o n his b a c k o n a f o r m t u r n e d upside d o w n , began t o d e c i d e h o w he m u s t rise f r o m h i s p o s i t i o n o f l u x u r y , a n d p u n c h t h e inter­ fering s e n i o r . A n d if c o m f o r t - l o v i n g W a r d e n t h u s p r e ­ p a r e d t o rise a n d slay, the o t h e r m e m b e r s of t h e S e c r e t S o c i e t y o f V e n g e a n c o w e r e ripe for the c o n f l i c t .
(To be continued.)
r

the soul of him n o t quite upright, n o t quite clean, a n d therefore n o t s o s e n s i t i v e i n contact with b a d intention. (Cressington m a y h a v e o n e fish unsus­ p i c i o u s o f t h e net, b u t t h e o t h e r s are t a k i n g a l a r m , a n d unless h e a n g l e s e v e r s o w a r i l y h e will n e v e r l a n d t h e w h o l e s h o a l . ) " W e l l , y o u c h a p s , " said t h e senior, a s Cyril finished his o r a t i o n , " I t h a n k y o u o n e a n d all for t h e w e l c o m e a c c o r d e d m e t h r o u g h y o u r s p o k e s m a n , a n d I will d o m y b e s t t o b e a w o r t h y m e m b e r o f this S e c r e t S o c i e t y . W e ' l l have some giddy jokes. Y o u ' r e all f e l l o w s w i t h s o m e g o in y o u , n o t h i n g soft o r straitlaced a b o u t y o u ; so I guess " B r i c e felt t h e n e t w a s c l o s i n g o n t h e m , a n d h e burst o u t with, " Please C r e s s i n g t o n , y o u and I haven't been properly elected yet. Perhaps they want t o talk a b o u t it, we oughtn't to stop, did we ? " B r i c e , i t will b e r e m e m b e r e d , w a s o n l y attending the meeting as a visitor. H i s r e m a r k d r e w d o w n C r e s s i n g t o n ' s displeasure. " Shut u p , y o u impertinent 3'oung m o n k e y ! " exclaimed he. ( T h o a n g l e r realises t h a t a t least o n e fish is n o t t o b e c a u g h t , a n d i t nettles h i m . ) " It's beastly a w k w a r d , Cressington, y o u k n o w , " T e r r y ventured t o remark a t this juncture. " M y folks, e v e r since y o u lost us in t h e D e v i l ' s C a v e , s a y I m u s t n ' t g o w i t h you." " Then, get o u t ! " retorted Cressington. (Cressington r e c o n c i l e s himself t o t h e f a c t t h a t o n e o r t w o fish m u s t b e a l l o w e d t o e s c a p e lest t h e y d i s t u r b t h e w h o l e s h o a l . ) " T e r r y ' s b e e n e l e c t e d a m e m b e r , " p u t in Peters, s o i t isn't h i m t h a t o u g h t t o leave this c o u n c i l - c h a m b e r , b u t — er — s o m e o n e else." " Y o u f o r c e d yourself o n u s , " p u t in tho belligerent B o b s . " Y e s , w e d i d n ' t a s k y o u t o c o m e , Cress­ i n g t o n , " said Springfield, seeing a c h a n c e o f a quarrel. " ' T i s n ' t m a n y o f t h e S i x t h w h o are s o

I ® *

The

Came of
{See Coloured Plate

Scout-Tracking.
presented with February Part.) a n y o b s t a c l e ( w a l l , forest, lake o r m o u n t a i n s ) until h e becomes possessed of a n aeroplane, to b e explained hereafter. The t r a c k e r " then spins the tee-to-tum and m o v e s his t r a c k e r t h e n u m b e r of s q u a r e s t h r o w n , his o b j e c t b e i n g t o c a p t u r e o n e of t h e s c o u t s b y t h r o w i n g a n u m b e r which will t a k e h i m on to a s q u a r e occupied b y a scout. T h e e x a c t n u m b e r ( n e i t h e r m o r e n o r less) t o t a k e h i m o n to t h e o c c u p i e d s q u a r e m u s t be t h r o w n . S h o u l d t h e t e e - t o - t u m s t o p u p o n o n e of the d i v i s i o n s m a r k e d A 3 o r A 6 ( c o l o u r e d y e l l o w ) , in the case of e i t h e r " s c o u t " o r " t r a c k e r , " the aeroplane is m o v e d either three or six squares a s the case m a y be. W h e n either "s c o u t " o r " t r a c k e r " b e c o m e s possessed of a n a e r o p l a n e h e can disregard t h e obstacles. I t w i l l b e f o u n d t h a t t h e a e r o p l a n e s " fit i n " t o t h e scouts and trackers so that both m a y b e m o v e d together. Here again the exact number must b e thrown t o bring the aeroplanes o n t h e 3couts o r trackers, o r t h e trackers a n d scouts o n to t h e a e r o p l a n e s . I n t h e first f o u r t h r o w s m a d e b y t h e " s c o u t " all f o u r s c o u t s m u s t b e m o v e d o u t o f c a m p . Should this b e impossible owing t o a nobstacle, h e misses his t h r o w . N e i t h e r t h e " s c o u t " n o r t h e " t r a c k e r " m a y goover a square already occupied unless h o h a s a n aeroplane. W h e n the " tracker " captures a scout he has to take h i m t o t h e c e n t r e (one o f tho nine c e n t r e squares^. T h e " s c o u t " t h e n s t a r t s a g a i n f r o m h i s c a m p a n d the' " t r a c k e r " from the centre. T h e " s c o u t " thus starting again from c a m p must, with the next throw, m o v e out of c a m p . T h e n u m b e r required t o carry a scout into the opposite camp (one o f t h e t e n squaresforming the c a m p ) m u s t be t h r o w n ; should a greater n u m b e r b e thrown h e m u s t m o v e another scout. A s c o u t c a n n o t b e c a p t u r e d before he has left t h e c a m p .
i (

HE n e w g a m e of Scout - Tracking, which h a s been specially designed for t h e " B . O . P . , " will p r o v e of grea t interest to boys w h o appreciate a g a m e o f skill. F i r s t o f a l l m o u n t t h e " b o a r d ' * o n mounting board and t h e " s c o u t s " on "Bristol" board. T h o tee-to-tum should b em o u n t e d on extra thick cardboard. Carefully cut out t h e" scouts," the " trackers," and t h e " aeroplanes," and then cut down t h e dotted lines a n d b e n d u p s o t h a t all o f t h e m s t a n d upright upon t h e round bases. Cut out the tee-to-tum very accurately and thrust a pointed match through t h o centre s o t h a t 11 projects about a quarter of a n inch. I t will b e f o u n d t h a t t h e t e e - t o - t u m n o w s p i n s if t w i r l e d w i t h t h e t h u m b a n d forefinger, a n d w h e n i t s t o p s , i t rests u p o n one of the divisions m a r k e d 1 t o 6 a n d A 3 o r AO. E v e r y t h i n g i s n o w r e a d y for p l a y i n g . H o w TO P L A Y . T h e g a m e is f o r t w o o r f o u r p l a y e r s . If t w o b o y s are playing, o n e takes the p a r t of ' s c o u t " a n d t h e o t h e r of " t r a c k e r . " T h e " s c o u t " t a k e s o n e set of f o u r s c o u t s a n d p l a c e s t h e m o n t h e f o u r s q u a r e s of t h o s a m e c o l o u r in f r o n t of t h e c a m p . T h e " t r a c k e r " t a k e s o n e of t h e s c o u t s t h a t a r e s h o w n s i t t i n g o n a T , w h i c h are called " trackers." T h e tracker is placed o n tho centre squares. The " s c o u t " and the "tracker" h a v e each an aeroplane, which isplaced o n the square corresponding t o the colour o f the aeroplanes in t h e corners opposite t h e c a m p s . T h e boy who is taking the part of the scouts now spins t h e t e e - t o - t u m a n d m o v e s o n e o f his s c o u t s t h e n u m b e r of s q u a r e s s h o w n o n t h e d i v i s i o n o n w h i c h the t e e - t o - t u m rests, t h e o b j e c t being to g e t his s c o u t s into t h e o p p o s i t e c a m p w i t h o u t thern being c a p t u r e d by the tracker. S u p p o s i m ; a 4 i s t h r o w n b y t h e *• s c o u t , " h e m o v e s a n y o n e o f h i s s c o u t s f o u r s q u a r e s e i t h e r m .t straight line or diagonally, t i e m u s t HOC m o v e o v e r
1

For each scout that the tracker captures a n d takes h o m e he counts two, and each scout that gets into t h e h o m e c a m p scores six. T h e w i n n e r is t h e b o y who t i r s t r e a c h e s a n u m b e r c h a t is d e c i d e d u p o n b e f o r e h a n d . E i g h t e e n is a g o o d n u m b e r for a s h o r t g a m e , t w e n t y f o u r o r t h i r t y for a l o n g g a m e . T h e s a m e conditions apply when four are playing. T w o iads t a k e the p a r t s of trackers a n d t w o of s c o u t s .

272

The

Hoy's

Otoun Taper*

Our
TO SUPPLANT THE EAGLE.
T H E S t a t e of W a s h i n g t o n h a s c h o s e n f o r its seal t h e D o w n y W o o d p e c k e r in p l a c e of t h e o l d d e v i c e of t h e Bald Eagle. T h e Eagle, selected s y m b o l of so m a n y l a n d s , is of c o u r s e t y p i c a l of t h e k i n g s h i p of t h e s t a t e , and h a s l i t t l e t o d o w i t h t h e E a g l e of n a t u r a l i s t s . But t h e W o o d p e c k e r , s a y s a w r i t e r i n Bird Notes and News, h a s b e e n c h o s e n for his o w n g o o d d e e d s . H e is A m e r i c a ' s f r i e n d as t h e c a r e t a k e r of t h e forests, w h i c h A m e r i c a is learning t o v a l u e n o w t h a t settlers, l u m b e r m e n , a n d fire h a v e d e s t r o y e d s o m a n y a l e a g u e of t h e a n c i e n t woodlands. H u m a n agencies of destruction m a y b e c h e c k e d , fresh trees m a y b e p l a n t e d ; but no State decree h a s a n y effect o n t h e destruction w r o u g h t b y insect-borers, except decrees for the protection of birds. I t is t h e l i t t l e W o o d p e c k e r ' s s h a r p ears a n d b r i g h t e y e s t h a t rind o u t t h e borers a n d their e g g s ; and W a s h i n g t o n shows her gratitude o n her n e w seal.

Note

Book.
a little fellow he could cut a n d p u t together a wellfitting p a i r of s h o e s f o r h i s s i s t e r ' s d o l l s , w a s n o b a d tailor, a n d c o u l d m a k e a m i n i a t u r e barrel t h a t w a s perfectly water-tight. H e r e m e m b e r e d these trivial f a c t s a s a v a l u a b l e p a r t of h i s i n c i d e n t a l e d u c a t i o n . H e s a i d h e o w e d m u c h of h i s d e x t e r i t y i n m a n i p u l a t i o n t o t h e training of e y e a n d h a n d g a i n e d in these childish plays.

h i s k n o w l e d g e of t h e h a u n t s a n d h a b i t s o f fishes, he and his b r o t h e r A u g u s t e b e c a m e t h e m o s t a d r o i t of young fishermen, using processes all their o w n , a n d b e i n g q u i t e i n d e p e n d e n t of h o o k , line, or n e t . T h e i r h u n t i n g - g r o u n d s were t h e holes a n d crevices b e n e a t h t h e s t o n e s o r i n t h e w a t e r - w a s h e d w a l l s of the lake shore. N o such shelter w a s safe from their c u r i o u s fingers, a n d t h e y a c q u i r e d s u c h d e x t e r i t y t h a t w h e n b a t h i n g t h e y c o u l d s e i z e t h e fish e v e n i n t h e open water, attracting t h e m b y little arts t o which t h e fish s u b m i t t e d a s t o a k i n d o f f a s c i n a t i o n . Such a m u s e m e n t s are n o d o u b t the delight of m a n y a l a d w h o lives in t h e country, b u t t h e y illustrate t h e u n i t y of A g a s s i z ' s i n t e l l e c t u a l d e v e l o p m e n t f r o m b e g i n n i n g t o end. H i s pet animals suggested questions, to answer w h i c h w a s t h e t a s k of h i s life ; a n d h i s i n t i m a t e s t u d y of t h e f r e s h - w a t e r fishes o f E u r o p e , l a t e r t h e s u b j e c t of o n e o f I n s i m p o r t a n t w o r k s , b e g a n w i t h h i s first c o l l e c ­ t i o n f r o m t h e L a k e of M o r a t . As a b o y h e a m u s e d h i m s e l f a l s o w i t h a l l k i n d s of handicrafts o n a s m a l l scale. T h e carpenter, the cobbler, t h e tailor were then as m u c h developed in h i m as the naturalist. I n Swiss villages it w a s t h e h a b i t in those days for the tradespeople to g o from house to h o u s e in t h e i r different v o c a t i o n s . The shoemaker c a m e t w o o r t h r e e t i m e s a y e a r w i t h all h i s m a t e r i a l s , and m a d e shoes for the whole f a m i l y b y the d a y ; the t a i l o r c a m e t o fit t h e m f o r g a r m e n t s w h i c h h e m a d e i n the house ; the cooper arrived before the vintage to repair old barrels a n d h o g s h e a d s or t o m a k e n e w ones, and t o r e p l a c e w o r n - o u t h o o p s ; i n s h o r t , t o fit u p t h e cellar for t h e c o m i n g season. A g a s s i z s e e m s to h a v e profited b y these lessons as m u c h as b y those he learned f r o m his father ; a n d w h e n

*

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deeds, n o t in not years; on a

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in thoughts, not *

A THOUGHT.
" W E In We Who five in breaths; feelings, lives t h i n k s m o s t , feels t h e noblest, a c t s t h e b e s t . " (Philip J. Bailey.) figures dial; H e most should count time b y heart-throbs.

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FOR had rescuing

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years who

A

GREAT NATURALIST'S HOOD.

BOY­

SOME BOY HEROES.
a d r o w n i n g c h i l d of s e v e n fallen i n t o a d e e p s t r e a m , G e o r g e S m i t h , a g e 1 3 , the a scholar at Silver Street Council School, E d m o n t o n , h a s b e e n presented w i t h a silver w a t c h a n d chain, g i f t of t h e p a r e n t s o f t h e r e s c u e d b o y , i n t h e of t h e a s s e m b l e d b o y s of t h e s c h o o l . Charles Johnson, fully dressed into a newsboy, the river at age 13, w h o Blyth, and recently dived a while saved since presence

IT does n o t a p p e a r t h a t L o u i s A g a s s i z , the g r e a t naturalist, h a d as a child a n y precocious predilection for s t u d y , b u t h i s l o v e of n a t u r a l h i s t o r y s h o w e d itself almost from infancy. In " T h e Life and Correspondence of A g a s s i z , " b y E l i z a b e t h C a r y A g a s s i z , h i s c h i l d i s h a m u s e m e n t s are described. W h e n a v e r y little fellow h e h a d , b e s i d e s h i s c o l l e c t i o n o f fishes, a l l s o r t s o f p e t s : birds, field-mice, hares, rabbits, a n d guinea-pigs, w h o s e families he reared with the greatest care. Guided by

rescued a child f r o m a burning house, has

five-year-old b o y w h o hud fallen into t h e w a t e r p l a y i n g o n a raft.

lighter
T H E d a n g e r of e x p l a i n i n g all o n e ' s t r o u b l e is well illustrated b y the following incident. A kind-hearted old gentleman had found a small b o y crying, and s t o p p e d t o see w h a t w a s t h e m a t t e r . " W h y are y o u crying, m y little lad ? " he asked. hit an' an* the " B o o h o o 11 " said the boy. " Billy Smith m e ; an' father hit m e because I let Billy hit m e ; Billy S m i t h hit m e again because I told father ; now f a t h e r '11 h i t m e a g a i n b e c a u s e B i l l y h i t m e second time." W h e n t h e c o u n s e l f o r t h e d e f e n d a n t t o o k t h e floor a d i a l o g u e e n s u e d w h i c h is t h u s r e c o r d e d in " W i t a n d H u m o u r of B e n c h a n d B a r . " " W h a t are y o u doing ? " asked the justice, as d e f e n d a n t ' s counsel b e g a n his a r g u m e n t . " " G o i n g t o p r e s e n t o u r side of t h e c a s e . " the O N t h e b a n k s o f a r i v u l e t n e a r S t r a b a n e is a s t o n e with this singular inscription, which w a s n o d o u b t i n t e n d e d for t h e i n f o r m a t i o n of strangers travelling b y that road : — " T a k e notice, t h a t w h e n this s t o n e is o u t of s i g h t it is n o t safe t o ford t h e r i v e r . " T h i s recalls the f a m o u s finger-post w h i c h is s a i d t o h a v e b e e n erected b y o r d e r of a S u r v e y o r of K o a d s in Kent:— " T h i s is a b r i d l e - p a t h t o F a v e r s h a m . If y o u read this, y o u h a d b e t t e r keep t h e m a i n r o a d . " can't

" I d o n ' t w a n t t o h e a r b o t h sides," replied t h e justice. I t has a tendency to confuse the court."

THE
A SCHOOL-INSPECTOR in the North of England asked a child m a p r i m a r y s c h o o l t o tell h i m as n e a r l y a pilgrim to be. deal," as possible w h a t h e understood was and a the reply. to the inspector, not " 1 go sir, about a good deal, b u t I a m man," was the

ONLY SAFE COURSE. '

" A p i l g r i m is a m a n w h o g o e s a b o u t a g o o d This seemed not quite satisfactory he said, " Please, addition. pilgrim." I mean a good

T H E supervisor w h o w a s a l w a y s giving t h e children i n s t r u c t i o n s a s t o w h a t t o d o i n c a s e o f fire u s u a l l y m a d e his visits t o the school alone ; b u t o n e d a y there w a s a b o a r d m e e t i n g , a n d five s u p e r v i s o r s descended o n the class at once. The children h a d been well drilled b y their t e a c h e r , and f r o m p r e v i o u s e x p e r i e n c e t h e y k n e w j u s t wha*t Mr. W a l e s would ask them. S o after a painful period of hesitating answers and mistakes with the other v i s i t o r s , i t w a s a g r e a t relief t o s e e M r . W a l e s rise t o address them. '* Y o u h a v e l i s t e n e d s o a t t e n t i v e l y to the other g e n t l e m e n , " said their friend, " a n d told t h e m w h a t y o u k n o w on the subjects they have chosen, w h a t would y o u d o if I w e r e t o m a k e y o u a l i t t l e s p e e c h ? " " F o r m a line a n d march down-stairs," the chorus, w i t h b e a m i n g faces. chanted

eager

A ORY on deck. of

of " M a n o v e r b o a r d 1 '* s t a r t l e d t h e p a s s e n g e r s I n a n i n s t a n t o n e of t h e c r e w , w i t h a to the drowning man, leapt shout over­ the

encouragement

board, s w a m swiftly n i c k of t i m e .

t o his side, a n d s a v e d h i m in

"• Y o u a r e a h e r o ! " pair " 6ee, were No, hauled chum, I suppose ? " sir! "

s a i d o n e of t h e p a s s e n g e r s , a s t h e the deck. tar; " Your " but, best you M R S . H O U S E F U L L : " W h y , c h i l d r e n , w h a t is all this noise about ? " L I T T L E J I M M Y : " I t ' s all r i g h t , m a m m a . We've had g r a n d p a and U n c l e H e n r y locked u p in the c u p ­ b o a r d for a n h o u r , a n d w h e n t h e y g e t a little angrier I'm g o i n g to p l a y going i n t o the lions' c a g e . "

dripping to the

gasped

modest

sir, h e ' d

got m y

boots o n ! "

AT a trial b e f o r e a n Irish j u s t i c e t h e plaintiff's attorney h a d m a d e an eloquent a n d logical a r g u m e n t .

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