sg_09 | School Bus | Bus

student

parent
guide
2009 - 2010
An in-depth look at programs, services,
and other important information
from your Douglas County
Public School System.
Douglas County School System
PUBLISHED BY CHAPEL HILL NEWS & VIEWS
5929 Stewart Parkway
Douglasville, GA
Business Hours
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Mission The mission of the Douglas
County School System is to provide a quality
education for all students in a safe, supportive
environment.
Vision Our vision is to build a commu-
nity of lifelong learners that become responsible
individuals, independent thinkers, and productive
citizens.
GoALs
• To provide a challenging, comprehensive
instructional and curricular program for all learn-
ers.
• To provide a school environment that is
safe and supportive and enhances the learning
process.
• To improve communication throughout the
school community.
   
BELiEFs We believe that we must...
• Understand how children and adults learn
and continue learning.
• Build communities of lifelong learners.
• Cultivate the leadership potential of
every employee, student, and parent in
our school system.
• Be creative, energetic visionaries
who respond quickly to diverse and
evolving issues.
• Meet the needs of our
stakeholders (students, parents,
employees and community).
• Maintain efficient and effec-
tive administrative processes for
instruction, operations, human
resources and sound fiscal manage-
ment.
   
The Douglas County Board of Education and Chapel Hill News & Views would like to thank the commu-
nity minded businesses which have made this Student & Parent Guide possible. Through their advertising
support, the school system was able to provide this important information to all of the students, and their
parents, in the public school system in Douglas County at no cost to the taxpayers of Douglas County.
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
7
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
We are very pleased to once again partner with Chapel Hill News and
Views to bring you this special Student and Parent Guide for the 2009-2010
school year. Our mission is to provide a quality education for our students
in a safe, supportive environment. The success of our educational system
is a team effort and depends ultimately on the commitment of our
stakeholders: students, parents, educators, businesses, civic and religious
organizations, as well as other community supporters. Having access to
the information in this guide will help you become better informed and
involved with our schools.
Your support and assistance is needed as we work to challenge
our students to reach higher and maximize their educational success.
For many years we have known that family participation in a child’s
education is twice as predictive of student’s academic success as family
socioeconomic status. Research findings from The Parent Institute’s six
key facts indicate that:
• The family provides the child’s primary educational environment.
• Involving parents in their children’s formal education improves
student achievement.
• High scoring schools and districts have high levels of parent
involvement.
• Benefits last a life-time and are not confined to early childhood
or the elementary level; there are strong effects from involving parents
continuously through middle and high school.
Welcome to a New Year
• Minorities have
the most to gain.
Children from low-
income and minority
families benefit greatly
when schools involve
parents. Parents do
not have to be well
educated to help.
• Schools and
homes are connected.
We cannot look at the
school and the home
in isolation from one
another; we must see
how they interconnect to each other and the world at large.
I urge you to “Be There” for your own child, grandchild, relative or other
child in your life. Whether you have school-age children or not, I ask you to
“Be There” for children as a mentor, role-model or supporter for the many
students in our school district who don’t have a caring adult in their lives.
You can “Be Their” favorite teacher in the everyday moments of life.
Please join me and school system staff in making this the best school
year possible for your child.
Don Remillard, Superintendent
By Donald J. Remillard, Superintendent
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
A five member elected board governs the Douglas County School Sys-
tem. The Douglas County Board of Education is charged with the power
of authority to maintain, finance, and make policies to govern the pub-
lic schools within its jurisdiction. The superintendent is appointed by the
board and is charged with the responsibility of administering the public
school program of the Douglas County Board of Education.
Members of the 2009 Board of Education and their election districts
are: Jimmy Bartlett, District Two, Chairman; Mike Miller, District One; Larry
Barnes, District Three; Dr. Sam Haskell, District Four, Vice Chairman; and
Jeff Morris, District Five. Donald J. Remillard is the Superintendent.
Members of the Douglas County Board of Education have a combined
total of 30 years of service. All are current on training requirements for
Board members in Georgia. Terms of Board members began as follows:
Chairman James Bartlett, 1999; Mike Miller, 2009; Larry Barnes, 2003; Vice
Chairman Dr. Sam Haskell, 1997; and Jeff Morris, 2009.
Regular meetings of the Board are scheduled on the first and third
Monday of each month (with exceptions) in the Board Room of the Cen-
tral Office Administrative Building, 9030 Highway 5, Douglasville, Georgia.
Exceptions to the regularly set dates are primarily based on school system
holidays.
Board meetings are called to order at 6:00 p.m., and then move directly
into executive session. At 7:00 p.m. the public session is reconvened.
During Board meetings, the Superintendent recognizes the outstand-
ing accomplishments of students, parents, volunteers and staff members.
The Superintendent’s Spotlight schedule for the 2009-2010 school year
is as follows: School level Teachers of the Year, August 3; Yeager Middle
School, August 17; Eastside Elementary School, September 8; Douglas
County High School, September 21; Bright Star Elementary School and
National School Lunch Week, October 5; Holly Springs Elementary School,
National School Bus Drivers Appreciation Day, and Red Ribbon Week, Oc-
tober 19; Stewart Middle School, November 2; Alexander High School, No-
vember 16; and Factory Shoals Elementary School, December 7.
During the second semester, the following recognitions are sched-
uled: Communities in Schools of Douglas County, Performance Learn-
ing Center, National Mentoring Month, Partners in Education and Public
Education Trust Committee Member Recognition, first meeting in Janu-
ary; Chestnut Log Middle School, second meeting in January; College and
Career Institute, Career and Technical Education Week, first meeting in
February; Lithia Springs High School, Board of Education Member Recog-
nition, Music, Art and Drama in Our Schools Month, National Breakfast
Week, and Exceptional Children Month, first meeting in March; Mason
Creek Middle School, second meeting in March; Chapel Hill High School,
Governor’s Honors and Young Georgia Authors, second meeting in April;
Mason Creek Elementary School and National School Nurse Week, first
meeting in May; and Chapel Hill Middle School, second meeting in May.
Other recognitions are added as needed during the school year.
Members of the Board of Education
   
4586 Timberidge Dr.
Suite 200
Douglasville, GA 30135
770-949-7400
2041 Mesa Valley Way
Suite 100
Austell, GA 30106
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Official 2009-2010 School Calendar
August 6 First student day
September 4 Progress reports issued
September 7 Holiday for students and all employees
September 16 High school ½ day early release
September 17 Middle school ½ day early release
September 18 Elementary school ½ day early release
October 8 Assessment period ends
October 12 Holiday (except 240 employees)
October 13 Student holiday/Professional learning
day (School)
October 14 Report cards issued (K-8); Mid-term
report (9-12)
November 13 Progress reports issued
November 23 - 24 *Holidays (Make up days if necessary)
(except 240 employees)
November 25 - 27 Holidays for students/all employees
December 17, 18 High school ½ day early release after
testing
December 18 End first semester (89 days);
Assessment period ends
December 21 - January 1 Holidays (except 240 employees)
December 22 – January 1 240 day employee holidays
January 4 Student holiday/Professional learning
day (System)
January 5 *Student holiday/Teacher work day
January 6 Students return
January 6 Report cards issued (K-12)
January 18 Holiday for students/all employees
February 5 Progress reports issued
February 15 - 19 *Holidays (Make up days if necessary)
(except 240 employees)
March 3 High school ½ day early release
March 4 Middle school ½ day early release
March 5 Elementary school ½ day early release
March 17 Grading period ends
March 22 Report cards issued (K-8); Mid-term
report (9-12)
April 2 *Student holiday/Professional learning day
April 5 - 9 Holidays for students/all employees
April 28 Progress reports issued
May 27, 28 High school ½ day early release after
testing
May 28 Last student day (91 days)
May 31 Holiday for all employees
June 1 - 3 Post planning
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Table of Contents
Welcome to New Year 4
Members of the Board of Education 6
2009 - 2010 Calendar 8
Attendance Policy 11
School Phone Directory 12 - 13
Dress Code 14 15
School Transportation 16
Bus Information 18 - 20
School Attendance - It’s The Law 22
Health Readiness 24
School Closings 24
2009 - 2010 Student Testing Calendar 26 & 28
Release of Information to Military Recruiters and
Officials of Institutions of Higher Learning 28
Equal Employment/Educational Opportunities 28
Safety & Emergency Preparedness 30
School Hours 30
Random Drug Testing 31
General Information 32 - 33
Prevention Programs for Drugs, Gangs and
Violence 32 - 33
Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act 34, 36 & 38
Student Enrollment 40
Student Discipline 41
Elementary School Articles 42 - 53
Annette Winn Elementary 42
Arbor Station Elementary 42
Beulah Elementary 43
Bill Arp Elementary 43
Bright Star Elementary 43 - 44
Burnett Elementary 44
Chapel Hill Elementary 44 & 46
Dorsett Shoals Elementary 46 - 47
Eastside Elementary 47
Factory Shoals Elementary 48
Holly Springs Elementary 48 - 49
Lithia Springs Elementary 49 - 50
Mason Creek Elementary 50
Mirror Lake Elementary 50 - 51
Mt. Carmel Elementary 51
New Manchester Elementary 52
North Douglas Elementary 52
South Douglas Elementary 52
Sweetwater Elementary 53
Winston Elementary 53
Middle School Articles 54 - 56
Chapel Hill Middle 54
Chestnut Log Middle 54 - 55
Factory Shoals Middle 55
Fairplay Middle 55
Mason Creek Middle 55
Stewart Middle 55 - 56
Turner Middle 56
Yeager Middle 56
High School Articles 57 - 59
Alexander High 57
Chapel Hill High 57 - 58
Douglas County High 58
Lithia Springs High 58 - 59
Performance Learning Center 59
College & Career Institute 59
BRIDGES: Connecting Students with the Means
to Graduate 60
Brighten Academy 60
21st Century Community Learning Centers After School
Program Grants 61
Food Service Information 62
After School Program 63
Special Needs Preschool 63
Public Education Trust, Inc. 64
2009 - 2010 School Level Teachers of the Year 65
Georgia Marketing Teacher of the Year 66
Georgia School Psychologist of the Year 66
SAT Online Prep Course 66
Partners in Education 67
Character Education 68
Athletics 69
Take Time to Mentor 69
Partners in Education Shadow Day: A Valuable Learning
Experience 70
Health Matters 70
School Councils 70
   
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P
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Winston Academy
CHILDCARE CENTER
7425 Bankhead Hwy.
(next to Winston Elementary)
www.winstonacademy.net
770-949-7462
Are You looking for a Christian learning environment for your child and NOT just a daycare? At
Winston Academy, we teach our children learning skills from infancy to help build strong
foundations in school and later on in life. Studies show children learn better in smaller class
sizes with small teacher/child ratios.
Here at Winston Academy, we have built our foundation on these principles. Our teachers are
teachers-not babysitters. We interact constantly with our kids. Never will you see our
teachers sitting around watching - they are always interacting with your child! TV’s are not
in the classrooms. We only allow TV on special occasions.
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Increased education-
al accountability and
changes in Georgia Law
have led to a greater
emphasis on school
attendance. Outlined
below is a summary
of the attendance
policy for the Douglas
County School Sys-
tem for all students in
grades K-12. Please read
carefully and if you have
questions, contact the principal
of your child’s school.
Any time your child is absent or tardy to
school, you must provide within three days a written excuse stating the
reason for the student’s absence. After the 10th day of absence due to
illness, the excuse must come from a medical doctor. Students will be
excused only for the following reasons:
1. Personal illness or attendance in school endangers the health of
the student or others or conditions rendering attendance impossible or
hazardous to student health or safety.
2. A serious illness or death in a student’s immediate family neces-
sitating absence from school.
3. A court order or an order by a governmental agency, including a
pre-induction physical examination for service in the armed forces, man-
dating absence from school.
4. Religious holidays, necessitating absence from school.
5. Suspension from school or other actions by the school system that
prohibits a child from attending school for a period of time.
6. One day for voter registration.
7. Students sent home from school with head lice will be excused
for the day sent home and one more day per occurrence. Any additional
absences will be unexcused.
8. Students will be counted present when they are serving as pages
of the Georgia General Assembly.
Students shall be in attendance for a minimum of one-half of the re-
quired instructional time to be counted as present for the entire day.
Every parent, guardian or other person residing in Georgia is required
either to enroll and send children in their care and charge, between the
ages of six and 16 to a public or private school or provide a home study
program for these children which meets the requirements as set forth in
law. Any student who is subject to compulsory education requirements
and is deemed to be truant is subject to progressive disciplinary conse-
quences. Students who accumulate more than 10 school days of unex-
cused absences in any semester may be ineligible for an instructional
permit or driver’s license. Students who already possess an instructional
permit or driver’s license may have such suspended (O.C.G.A. 40-4-22).
Any parent, guardian, or other person residing in this state who has
control or charge of a child or children enrolled in the Douglas County
School System who accumulates more than five (5) unexcused absences
in violation of the Compulsory Education Law, (O.C.G.A. 20-2-690.1) shall
be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof, shall be subject
to a fine not less than $25.00 and not greater than $100.00, imprisonment
not to exceed 30 days, community service or any combination of such
penalties, at the discretion of the court having jurisdiction.
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
|J
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
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SCHOOL OF DANCE
 ALEXANDER HIGH
6500 Alexander Parkway
Douglasville, GA 30135
Nathan Hand, Principal - Grades: 9-12
770.651.6000 / FAX 770.920.4514
 ANNETTE WINN ELEMENTARY
3536 Bankhead Highway
Lithia Springs, GA 30122
Mary Woodfn, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3100 / FAX 770.732.5625
 ARBOR STATION ELEMENTARY
9999 Parkway South
Douglasville, GA 30135
Melissa Joe, Principal - Grades K-5
770.651.3000 / FAX 770.920.4314
 BEULAH ELEMENTARY
1150 Burnt Hickory Road
Douglasville, GA 30134
Sheila Miller, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3300 / FAX 770.920.4331
 BILL ARP ELEMENTARY
6550 Alexander Parkway
Douglasville, GA 30135
Donna Pritchard, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3200 / FAX 770.920.4213
 BRIGHT STAR ELEMENTARY
6300 John West Road
Douglasville, GA 30134
Dale McGill, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3400 / FAX 770.920.4124
 BURNETT ELEMENTARY
8277 Connally Drive
Douglasville, GA 30134
Joyce Bass, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3500 / FAX 770.920.4348
 CHAPEL HILL ELEMENTARY
4433 Coursey Lake Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
Yvonne Kidney, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3600 / FAX 770.920.4254
 CHAPEL HILL HIGH
4899 Chapel Hill Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
Sean Kelley, Principal - Grades: 9-12
770.651.6200 / FAX 770.947.7512
 CHAPEL HILL MIDDLE
3989 Chapel Hill Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
Bill Foster, Principal - Grades: 6-8
770.651.5000 / FAX 770.920.4242
 CHESTNUT LOG MIDDLE
2544 Pope Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
Nicole Keith, Principal - Grades: 6-8
770.651.5100 / FAX 770.920.4557
 COLLEGE AND CAREER INSTITUTE
4600 Timber Ridge Drive, Building D
Douglasville, GA 30135
Mandy Johnson, Director
 DORSETT SHOALS ELEMENTARY
5866 Dorsett Shoals Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
Kacia Thompson, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3700 / FAX 770.920.4263
 DOUGLAS COUNTY HIGH
8705 Campbellton Street
Douglasville, GA 30134
Connie Craft, Principal - Grades: 9-12
770.651.6500 / FAX 770.920.4456
 EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY
8266 Connally Drive
Douglasville, GA 30134
Lisa Dunnigan, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3800 / FAX 770.920.4086
 FACTORY SHOALS ELEMENTARY
2300 Shoals School Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
Tommy Shadinger, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.3900 / FAX 770.920.4377
school.Phone.Directory
DOUGLAS COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM - 9030 Highway 5 | Douglasville, GA 30134
| Phone: 770.651.2000 | School Zones: 770.651.2400
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
|7
   
 FACTORY SHOALS MIDDLE
3301 Shoals School Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
James Allen, Principal - Grades: 6-8
770.651.5800 / FAX 770.920.4356
 FAIRPLAY MIDDLE
8311 Highway 166
Douglasville, GA 30135
Monte Beaver, Principal - Grades: 6-8
770.651.5300 / FAX 770.920.4599
 HOLLY SPRINGS ELEMENTARY
4909 West Chapel Hill Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
Stefanie Cosper, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4000 / FAX 770.947.7615
 LITHIA SPRINGS ELEMENTARY
6946 Florence Drive
Lithia Springs, GA 30122
William Marchant, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4100 / FAX 770.732.2699
 LITHIA SPRINGS HIGH
2520 East County Line Road
Lithia Springs, GA 30122
Larry Ruble, Principal - Grades: 9-12
770.651.6700 / FAX 770.732.2644
 MASON CREEK ELEMENTARY
3400 Johnston Road
Winston, GA 30187
Kathleen French, Principal - Grades K-5
770.651.4900 / FAX 770.920.4282
 MASON CREEK MIDDLE
7777 Mason Creek Road
Winston, GA 30187
Kay Davis, Principal - Grades 6-8
770.651.2500 FAX 770.920.4278
 MIRROR LAKE ELEMENTARY
2613 Tyson Road
Villa Rica, GA 30180
Cathy Swanger, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4300 / FAX 770.947.3842
 MT. CARMEL ELEMENTARY
2356 Fairburn Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
John McGill, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4200 / FAX 770.920.4471
 NEW MANCHESTER ELEMENTARY
2242 Old Lower River Road
Douglasville, GA 30135
Sandra Shuler, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4400 / FAX 770.947.3830
 NORTH DOUGLAS ELEMENTARY
1630 Dorris Road
Douglasville, GA 30134
Fran Davis, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4800 / FAX 770.920.4590
 PERFORMANCE LEARNING CENTER
4600 Timber Ridge Drive, Building C
Douglasville, GA 30135
Donita Cullen, Academic Coordinator
770.651.6475 / FAX 770.920.4200
 SOUTH DOUGLAS ELEMENTARY
8299 Highway 166
Douglasville, GA 30135
Casey Duffey, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4500 / FAX 770.920.4477
 STEWART MIDDLE
8138 Malone Street
Douglasville, GA 30134
Dewayne Jackson, Principal - Grades: 6-8
770.651.5400 / FAX 770.920.4229
 SWEETWATER ELEMENTARY
2505 East County Line Road
Lithia Springs, GA 30122
Teresa Martin, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4600 / FAX 770.732.5972
 TURNER MIDDLE
7101 Junior High Drive
Lithia Springs, GA 30122
Eric Collins, Principal - Grades: 6-8
770.651.5500 / FAX 770.732.2698
 WINSTON ELEMENTARY
7465 Highway 78
Winston, GA 30187
Wiley Dailey, Principal - Grades: K-5
770.651.4700 / FAX 770.920.4177
 YEAGER MIDDLE SCHOOL
4000 Kings Highway
Douglasville, GA 30135
Garrick Askew, Principal - Grades: 6-8
770.651.5600 / FAX 770.947.7374
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
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As the Douglas County
School System strives to pre-
pare students for the future,
one of the issues that gener-
ates much discussion is ap-
propriate dress for students.
The student dress code is de-
signed to ensure that students
are appropriately dressed for
school and that clothing, hair,
make-up and jewelry does not
distract from the educational en-
vironment or pose a safety concern
for others. The Douglas County School
System expects every student to dress and
be groomed in accordance with acceptable com-
munity standards of cleanliness, good taste and appropriateness. Many fads
and fashions may be worn in other environments but are not appropriate for
school.
Below are the dress codes for elementary and middle/high school students.
The school administration reserves the right to determine if a student’s dress
is too casual, too revealing, or too distracting from the learning environment
to be considered appropriate for school. The health and safety of all students
will be taken into consideration when making decisions regarding appropri-
ate/inappropriate attire. The school administration has the final say in what is
appropriate and inappropriate for school wear.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DRESS CODE
Every student enrolled in the Douglas County School System is expected to
observe a standard of grooming and dress consistent with the level of formal-
ity of the school setting. Certain items of dress are not considered appropri-
ate and therefore, are not acceptable, and could result in a child having to
call parents at home or work to bring more appropriate clothing. Examples
include (but are not limited to) the following: hats, visors, hoods pulled up,
sweatbands, skull caps, bandanas or other head garments including non-pre-
scription sunglasses worn inside the building; beach or shower shoes, bare
feet, flip flops, rubber and/or metal cleats; shoes with any type of wheels or
other rolling apparatus; clothing that shows the bare midriff, bare back or the
bare shoulders; tank tops (shoulders must be covered; arm holes tight fitting)
are permitted only for students in K, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades; tank tops are not
permitted in 4th and 5th grades; see-through or mesh clothing unless worn
over other apparel; clothing or articles advertising or displaying the insignia
of drugs, tobacco, or alcoholic beverages shall be prohibited; clothing with
profane or obscene language or symbols displayed, or clothing which pro-
motes violence; gang related appearance, clothing or objects are prohibited;
all pants which are not worn at the waist; heavy coats or raincoats inside build-
ings and classrooms; heavy chains or dog collars around the waist or neck, or
attached to a wallet; shorts, dresses and skirts that are too tight, too short, (five
inches from the top of the kneecap) or not worn at the waist are not permitted;
pajamas, bedroom shoes or other sleepwear; and holes or patches above the
knee.
Good taste and good judgment should be used by parents and students
alike in the selection of school dress. Many “fads” in dress are not appropri-
ate.
The school administration reserves the right to determine if certain other
items are too casual, too revealing or too distracting from the learning environ-
ment to be considered appropriate for school. The health and safety of all
students will be taken into consideration when making decisions regarding
appropriate/inappropriate attire, including the tucking of shirts.
Some exceptions to these guidelines may be made for special activity
days such as field days and character costume days as determined by the
school principal. Special accommodations may also be made for health rea-
sons. Total days for exceptional dress must be limited to no more than 5%
2009 - 2010
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Student & Parent Guide
|/
of the student calendar (9 days) due to impact on the learning environment.
Exceptions should be announced to students and parents well ahead of the
date. Clear explanations of what will and will not be allowed must be included
in the announcements.
MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL DRESS CODE
Pants and shorts-length must be appropriate; size appropriate-waist, seat
and inseam; must be hemmed or cuffed; and cannot be altered from their
original form. Appropriate wear would be khakis, jeans, warm-ups and shorts
(three inches from the top of the kneecap as measured by a 3x5 index card).
Skirts and dresses-Skirts must be size appropriate and be worn at the
waistline; dresses must have sleeves; slits in skirts must be appropriate (no
slit above the three inch rule); and cannot be altered from their original form;
dresses must have sleeves; skirts over leggings must meet the three inch
rule.
Shirts and blouses-Must be size appropriate; long or short sleeved, dress
shirt, polo type, (no sleeveless, no tank tops, no halter tops, no spaghetti
straps); T-shirts, or sweatshirts must have no writing, pictures, or graphics
that unreasonably attract the attention of other students or cause disruption
or interference with the operation of the school (e.g., vulgarity, sexual innu-
endo); shirttails must be below the belt line even with arms raised above the
head or when the student is seated; for males shirttails must be tucked in; and
cannot be altered from their original form. Appropriate wear would be polo
shirts, T-shirts, sweatshirts.
Shoes-All students must wear appropriate shoes (examples: dress, tennis,
sandals, clogs); rubber and/or metal cleats are not allowed in school or on
buses.
Undergarments-Appropriate undergarments must be worn at all times; un-
dergarments of any type must not be exposed.
Accessories-Belts are optional and are to be proper length tucked into belt
loops; belts may be required for students having difficulty with wearing pants
at the waist.
NOT APPROVED FOR SCHOOL WEAR AT THE MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL
LEVEL:
Unnatural colored hair; or any hairstyle which causes a distraction to the
learning environment; pants that touch the ground or floor; wide legged pants,
skin-tight pants; form-fitting clothing; holes above the knee; pants, dresses,
skirts, shorts, and shirts that have frayed ends; see-through clothing; deep-
scooped necklines; clothing that shows the bare midriff, bare back or bare
shoulders; bare feet; pajamas, bedroom shoes, or other sleepwear; articles of
clothing which advertise or display the symbols of drugs, tobacco products
or alcoholic beverages; clothing which displays, or implies profane, obscene,
vulgar, or racially offensive language or symbols; emblems, insignia insignias,
badges, tattoos or other symbols where the effect thereof is to unreasonably
attract the attention of other students or cause disruption or interference with
the operation of the school; hats, sunglasses and caps, visors, sweatbands,
skull caps, do rags, hooded sweatshirts and jackets with the hoods pulled up,
headbands and bandanas, etc. are not to be worn in the school building (all
hats and caps shall be properly stored during the school day); chains hanging
from wallets or clothing; dog collars or electronic belt buckles; exposure of un-
dergarments of any type; visible piercing type jewelry or paraphernalia (other
than the ears) including tongue piercing is not allowed; display or wearing of
any gang articles, paraphernalia or clothing that can be construed as being
gang related (e.g., bandanas, sweatbands, head rags, etc.); jewelry that is of-
fensive; distracts or is studded or pointed, including “grills” and heavy chains;
handwriting on clothing or body; clothing worn in a manner inconsistent with
the intended design (ex.: exposure of clothing designed and sold as undergar-
ments, rolled up pants legs, bandanas used as belts, etc.); shoes with any type
of wheels or other rolling apparatus.
Exceptions: Uniforms for school related activities are acceptable if ap-
proved by school administrators. Female cheerleaders must wear warm-ups
under cheerleading uniforms except during games and pep rallies. School ad-
ministrators may alter the dress code for special occasions or extracurricular
activities. Parents of students who require an exemption from the dress code
for religious, cultural, or short-term medical reasons may make application to
the principal.
These guidelines were developed to give parents and students a clear un-
derstanding of what is expected in the school setting. If you have questions,
please contact the principal of your child’s school.
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School Transportation
The Douglas County School Transportation Department makes avail-
able school bus service for more than 24,500 students enrolled in Doug-
las County Schools who reside in the school district of the school they are
attending. School transportation is provided in conformance with pupil
transportation policies and procedures established by the State Board of
Education and the Douglas County Board of Education.
The school system operates over 240 buses serving more than 440
routes averaging over 10,000 miles daily. Most drivers have an elementary
school route and either a middle or a high school route. Some drivers,
such as our Special Needs Drivers, may serve several different schools in
both their morning and afternoon routes. Transportation is also provided
for a wide variety of school-related activities.
Douglas County’s school bus fleet meets all national and state safety
specifications. Each bus undergoes an annual safety inspection by the
Georgia Department of Motor Vehicle Safety, as well as a monthly safety
inspection conducted by our own Transportation fleet mechanics. The
Georgia D.M.V.S. also conducts random safety checks throughout the
year.
Bus drivers complete an intensive training program and must pass
the road and written test required to secure a commercial driver’s license
(CDL), with Passenger, School Bus, and School Bus Watch endorse-
ments. They undergo a physical examination before employment, includ-
ing a drug test, and again at the beginning of each school year. They are
also subject to random drug testing throughout the school year.
|0
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
School transportation is a privilege and to maintain this privilege, a
student must abide by established bus conduct rules. A pupil’s transpor-
tation privilege may be suspended or revoked if conduct creates a disrup-
tion or safety hazard on the school bus. The principal or his/her designee
handles all disciplinary action taken for misconduct on the school bus.
Only authorized personnel are allowed aboard a school bus. Autho-
rized personnel include the driver, transportation department employees,
pupils, approved school system personnel, chaperones, and law enforce-
ment officers.
Written authorization from a parent, with the signature of a local school
administrator must be presented to the bus driver in order for a student to
leave the school bus at any stop other than his/her regular stop. On occa-
sion a pupil may ride on a bus that they are not regularly assigned if there
is space available and the pupil has written authorization from a parent
signed by a local school administrator.
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Need Information?
For information regarding:
• Your bus route or schedules, call the school.
• A bus service problem or concerns, call the Transporta-
tion Office at 770.651.2400.
The Transportation Office is open Monday – Friday from
7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
   
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
67
Partners in Education
The Douglas County
School System invites you
to join Partners in Educa-
tion - A program that offers
you the opportunity to share
your expertise, time, ideas
and your experience to enrich
the students in your community.
Partners agree to specific goals and
activities for the benefit of students.
During the 2008-2009 school year, there were
324 active partnerships in the program.
The Partners in Education Committee is comprised of business repre-
sentatives and representatives from several schools. Ms. Vicki Harshbarg-
er, GreyStone Power Corporation, currently serves as the Chairman of the
committee.
Upcoming Partners in Education events include:
• Fall Kick-Off – August 20, 2009
• Winter Workshop – January 20, 2010
• Year-End Recognition – May 20, 2010
All events will start at 8:00 a.m. and the locations will be announced
later.
How Can My Business Help Students?
Opportunities are virtually unlimited. These are just a few ways you can
help:
• Assist/support school activities.
• Provide tutoring and classroom help.
• Give certificates/awards for academic achievement, perfect atten-
dance, and good citizenship.
• Bring your skills into the classroom teaching employment readiness
and presentation on curriculum-related topics.
• Donate supplies and equipment.
• Award mini-grants to teachers.
• Provide teacher of the year recognition and/or host teacher apprecia-
tion events.
How Does It Work?
There are two types of partnerships designed to fit the needs of the busi-
ness and the school.
Partners in Education
The Partners in Education Program is to encourage greater student
academic designed achievement by developing partnerships between indi-
vidual schools and area businesses, industries and community groups.
It also involves an on-going commitment between a business and a
school that grows and develops throughout the school year. The school
and partner develop a comprehensive plan of action which will:
• Support and enrich the education of students
• Encourage and support the school staff.
• Recognize and reciprocate the contributions of the partner.
Partners At Large
This type of partnership gives businesses the opportunity to work with
a specific program, curriculum, or group across several schools. The rela-
tionship between a school and business is limited to the offered program.
It can be as simple as donating excess or outdated materials, or being a
major contributor to a major project. It is not an ongoing relationship with
one school.
Participant Benefits
Regardless of which partnership you choose, the most important result
of your company’s participation will be to broaden the learning experience
of students by exposing them to your staff, your business, and to actual
business situations.
Businesses also gain heightened public awareness and the per-
sonal satisfaction that comes with having a role in the process which
molds our future work force.
Direct benefits include:
• A better educated work force
• An opportunity to become known
• Recognition in school and community publications
• The introduction of your company to the school community
Many businesses report a positive effect on the morale of everyone
involved and an increase in the visibility to potential customers.
How Can My Business Be a Partner?
It’s Simple! First consider:
• Are you and your employees interested in helping a school?
• What are the resources your company has to offer - human and
material?
• How many employees can participate?
• How much time can your company invest in partnership activities?
• What age group do you prefer: elementary, middle, high school or
a system-wide partnership?
• What school is most convenient to your business?
If you are interested, please call the Douglas County Board of Edu-
cation at 770.651.2037.
Make the call and join Douglas County’s Partners in Education Pro-
gram today!
The Douglas County Partners in Education Program is a cooperative ef-
fort between the Douglas County School System in partnership with busi-
nesses and organizations in the Douglas County/Douglasville area.
ÌÛ
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Bus Conduct Rules
   
School bus transportation is a privilege afforded pupils by the Board
of Education. It is not a right. To protect the safety and well-being of
all involved, pupils must adhere to established bus conduct rules. Bus
transportation privilege may be revoked if the pupil does not observe
bus conduct expectations.
Bus Conduct rules
1. Students must always conduct themselves in an orderly manner
and obey all bus safety rules.
2. All students are under the jurisdiction of the driver while aboard
each bus. Students should respect others at all times.
3. The driver is responsible for seating arrangements on each bus.
4. Students are to remain seated while bus is in motion.
5. Students must refrain from loud talking, horseplay, throwing ob-
jects on or from the bus, or doing anything that will detract from the
driver’s attention. Students must also refrain from fighting, threats of
violence, or verbal conflicts.
6. Anyone damaging a bus will be responsible for restitution.
7. All parts of the body must be kept inside the bus at all times.
8. Smoking, chewing gum, eating, or drinking on the bus is not
permitted.
9. It is the responsibility of the driver and each rider to help keep
the bus clean.
10. The use of profanity on the bus will not be allowed.
11. Students will be picked up and delivered at their regular des-
ignated site each day. Written requests from the parent or guardian
will be filed with the principal if it becomes necessary for a student to
depart a bus other than at his/her regular stop. The principal will autho-
rize the driver to make such a stop. Exceptions may be made if a safety
hazard is involved.
12. Buses are provided for transporting stu-
dents: therefore, large objects such as boxes, rec-
reation equipment, large band instruments, etc.
should not be on a bus.
13. Students must refrain from inappropriate display of affection.
14. School authorities make assignments to specific buses.
15. Students are expected to abide by the Douglas County School
System Student Conduct Behavior and Discipline Code.
16. Students shall not possess or use objects such as mirrors, la-
sers, flash cameras, or any other lights or reflective devices in a man-
ner that might interfere with the school bus driver’s operation of the
school bus.
This also includes the usage of any electronic devices during the op-
eration of a school bus in a manner that might interfere with the school
bus communications’ equipment or the school bus driver’s operation
of the bus.
BUs sUsPEnsion
A pupil found guilty of certain offenses may be suspended from the
bus for a period up to the remainder of the school year.
sTUDEnT DisCiPLinE
The school bus is an extension of the classroom. The school day
begins when the student enters the bus and ends when the student
leaves the bus. It is the responsibility of the Principal (not the driver)
to determine and enforce disciplinary actions and notify the parents.
Student management has as its objective securing desirable behavior
from all students riding the bus.
Bus misconduct falls into two categories: 1) general violation of bus
conduct rules, and (2) serious misconduct
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
Ì|
   
sTUDEnT DisCiPLinE PRoCEDUREs
To protect the safety and well-being of all riders, pupils must follow
bus conduct rules. Students who insist on violating the Bus Conduct
Rules will be disciplined as follows:
General or Minor Offenses (Level 3)
Behavior such as chewing gum, talking loudly, standing while the
bus is in motion, bringing food or beverages on the bus, cell phone
use, etc. is considered a general or minor offense. Prior to turning in a
Discipline Referral form, the driver will attempt to resolve less serious
problems him/herself.
1st Offense - Driver will first request the student to correct his/her
behavior and counsel with the student after the other students are off
the bus.
2nd Offense - Driver will file a Discipline Referral form with the Prin-
cipal or the school’s designated discipline administrator.
Serious or Major Offenses (Level 1 & 2)
More serious or major offenses will result in moving to the 2nd Of-
fense step or may require immediate attention by the Principal and/or
Law Enforcement, or Resource Officer. Level 2 offenses are behaviors
of a less serious nature, but serious enough to merit involvement by the
school principal to correct on the first violation event. A Level 1 offense
requires immediate attention by the Principal and/or Law Enforcement,
or Resource Officer. Examples of Level 1 offenses include (but are not
limited to) weapons, illegal substances, assault, threats or intimidating
behavior towards another student, bus driver, or bus monitor.
Level 2 - 1st Offense - Driver files a discipline referral form with the
Principal or the school’s designated discipline administrator identify-
ing the student involved and the offense.
Level 1 - 1st Offense - Driver notifies Transportation to have the Prin-
cipal or designated discipline administrator meet the bus or, depending
on severity of incident, calls for law enforcement officers to come to the
bus’ location.
sEVERE WEATHER EMERGEnCY CLosinG
oF sCHooLs
The Superintendent is authorized to close schools in cases of emer-
gencies or severe weather. WSB Radio and TV are the stations first
notified of emergency announcements for the Douglas County School
System.
Emergency Suspension of School Activities
Abnormal conditions sometimes occur which require temporary
suspension of school activities. These possible conditions include in-
clement weather (ice and snow storms); failure of power, gas, or water
supply, and breakdown of heating system.
Some situations affect only one school while in other cases several
or all Douglas County Schools may be involved. In all instances the
safety, welfare, and health of students and employees are the basic fac-
tors considered in making a decision as to whether or not to suspend
temporarily the normal activities of a school day.
The Superintendent has the responsibility of making decisions on
suspension of school activities. If the Superintendent is not available, a
person designated by the Superintendent will assume this responsibil-
ity. School principals will be notified of such action by the most expedi-
ent direct means, either by telephone or personal contact
BUs LoADinG ZonEs
Bus loading zones at the schools are restricted to school buses only
during the 30 minutes immediately before and after school. Cars in the
bus lanes present a serious safety hazard for pupils. To protect pupils,
unauthorized vehicles in bus loading zones are subject to ticketing.
Bus information
continueD on PaGe 20
ÌÌ
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
sERViCE PRoVisions
• Bus service is provided to and from a pupil’s home and school.
Service to other locations, such as after school daycare/babysitter, is
provided only if the destination is located within the student’s assigned
school district. Bus service is not provided to or from business loca-
tions (other than daycare). No exceptions.
• Bus conduct rules must be obeyed. Failure to do so may result in
suspension of bus privileges.
• Parents are responsible for their children going to and from the
bus stop and while waiting at the bus stop.
• Written permission from a parent, signed by the principal, is re-
quired for a child to ride a bus on which he is not assigned or to leave
the bus at a stop other than his assigned stop.
• Pupils must be at their designated bus stop when the bus arrives.
Buses cannot wait for latecomers.
• Only authorized persons may board or ride a school bus.
• Items too large to fit in a pupil’s lap, glass, weapons, firecrackers,
pets, gum, drinks, food or candy, electronic devices, and hazardous ma-
terials are not permitted on the bus.
on-sTREET BUs sERViCE
Buses are routed along major streets. For a bus to be routed down a
street off the trunk route, the following two criteria must be met:
1. A child’s walking distance to the nearest bus stop is
a. greater than .2 mile or more for elementary school students;
b. greater than .3 mile or more for middle or high school students.
2. The street is safe for bus travel and has a safe bus turnaround.
BUs sToPs
• Drivers are not permitted to deviate from their route without per-
mission from a route supervisor.
• State regulations require bus stops to be spaced at least one-tenth
(.1) mile or more apart. Exceptions are allowed only in response to a
safety hazard.
• Buses are not permitted to travel on closed or flooded roads. Bus
stops served by such a road will be temporarily relocated to the closest
safe location. Service will be restored once conditions permit.
• Bus stops on the routes are not always the same as the previous
year. Buses are not to be routed on private property (this includes most
mobile home parks and apartment complexes).
• A student will be returned to school if it is obvious there is no one
home and the norm is for someone to be at home.
• If a student has no key, objects to disembarking the bus, or if the
stop/home looks different than usual, the driver will radio for instruc-
tions from the school administrator.
• If the normal routine is for no one to be at home or at the stop, the
student will be allowed to disembark alone.
Parents can help us by:
• Making sure your child is at the bus stop five minutes early.
• Review bus safety rules with your child and stress the necessity of
observing them.
• Teaching your child to obey the bus driver.
• Cooperating with school officials and school bus drivers regarding
appropriate conduct of your child at the bus stop and on the bus.
• Helping your student understand that student behavior on school
buses is considered an extension of classroom behavior.
• Educating your children on the rules of school bus safety.
• Reminding your child to walk on the sidewalk, or the shoulder of
the road, on the way to the bus stop and not on the traveled portion of
the road.
• Reminding your child to wait in a safe place, well off the road, until
the bus comes to a stop.
• Students should not move toward the bus until the bus and all traf-
fic have stopped. Students should stop and look before crossing the
road when preparing to board or depart the bus. It is very important to
look – do not expect approaching traffic to stop.
• Periodically remind your child of the importance of mannerly and
orderly behavior at the bus stop. Periodically check on students at the
bus stop.
• Accompanying very young children to the bus stop and meeting
them on their return from school when possible.
sAFE RiDinG
Safety Rules for Students
1. Dress for the weather – umbrella and raincoat for rain; coat and
gloves when cold.
2. Never stand or play in the road. Wait for the bus a safe distance
from the road.
3. Always use the handrail when boarding or leaving the bus.
4. Remain seated and keep head/hands inside when the bus is mov-
ing. Your seat is designed to protect you in the event of an accident.
5. Never try to reach for anything under or beside a bus. Ask your
driver for help.
6. Observe silence when approaching and while stopped for rail-
road crossings so the driver can hear if a train is coming.
7. Look carefully before crossing the road. Do not assume a car will
stop for you – wait to be sure it is stopped before crossing. Watch for
your driver’s signal before crossing the road.
8. Always cross in front of the bus – NEVER behind it!
9. Talk quietly while on the bus. Do not “horseplay”. Your driver must
give full attention to driving to ensure your safety.
Bus information
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AVAILABLE ON THE
CITI HEALTH CARD
ACCOUNT
̪
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Victorious
Kidz Academy
“Where early years are learning years”

Excellent Infant
& Toddler Care

Before & After
School Care

Aordable

Quality Sta

Open 6am to 7pm
6544 Malone Road
Douglasville
www.victorious-kidz.org
770-947-5489
Georgia education law requires that all children, ages six through 16, attend school regularly. Making
sure that students are at school each day is the parent’s responsibility. However, the importance of
school attendance goes beyond meeting the letter of the law. In order for children to be successful,
they need to be in school and on task every day. This is more important now than ever before. At-
tendance and academic achievement go hand-in-hand. The curriculum in Georgia schools is simply
more challenging than it used to be and students who are frequently absent can have serious
academic problems.
All students must take a series of important state tests that measure their abilities in all subjects.
Students who come to school each day and work hard score better on tests. Being in class each
day leads to more exposure to the curriculum and a better chance for academic success. Making
sure your child is at school every day is one of the most powerful ways parents can ensure success in
elementary, middle, and in high school.
Making school attendance a priority can also help your child learn good work and study habits. Getting
to school each day on time prepares them to meet future responsibilities. Parents teach valuable lessons when
the importance of arriving at school on time every day is stressed.
There are things you can do to ensure good attendance:
1. Make academics a priority. Let your children know that you expect them to go to school every day and do their best. Learning should be “job
one.” There may be occasional sick days, but young, healthy children rarely need to miss more than a few days each year.
2. Help your child get organized. Create a space in your home for storing backpacks, books, and other supplies. Develop a routine where
children gather school materials the night before. This will make mornings less hectic and help them get out the door and onto the bus on time.
Getting organized can also help create a calmer atmosphere at home, leading to better attitudes and openness to learning when children arrive
at school.
3. Set reasonable bedtimes. Reinforce bedtimes for your children and encourage them to get up and get ready on their own. (A loud alarm
clock can be a useful tool in this effort!) A work first, play later policy can also help make sure homework is done before sports activities, friends,
or computer games.
4. Make medical and other appointments during non-school hours whenever possible. Schedule family vacations during school holidays or
during the summer so that students aren’t missing important lessons and struggling to make up missed work.
5. Keep track of your child’s absences and write an excuse if your child is sick. If absent, make sure your child gets all make up work com-
pleted. If there is a problem, seek the help of the guidance counselor or teachers at your child’s school.
   
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Christmas
in Lithia
24th Annual
Lithia Springs High School
2520 E. County Line Rd.

Lithia Springs
November 14 - 15
Saturday 10am - 5pm  Sunday 12pm - 5pm
Indoors
Free Admission & Parking
Quality Artists & Craftsman
Attention Artists & Craftsman
If you would like to be an exhibitor, please e-mail
ChristmasinLithia08@bellsouth.net or visit www.christmasinlithia.us
for an application
770.651.6817 | www.christmasinlithia.us
Ìc
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Family Owned & Operated
Open
Monday
- Friday
8:00am
to 6:00pm
Peace of Mind
Warranty
Also Wex & Voyager
DOUGLAS COUNTY
AUTOCARE
770-942-5533
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2205 Fairburn Road

770.942.5533
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Nationwide 12 Month/
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Batteries
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Brakes
Tune-Ups
Oil Changes
Shocks
Struts
CV Joints
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Air Conditioning

Large Selection of Tires
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Road Service & Towing
Transmission Service

Computer Diagnostic
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LEARNING SOURCE
Childcare Facility
Ages 6 Weeks to 4 Years
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Computer Training
Entrepreneurial Skills
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Fine Arts
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5977 Stewart Pkwy. - Douglasville
Douglasville Town Center across from the Post Oce
770-947-9090
asic ducational tandards & utorials
Extended Hours - With 24 Hour Availability
Health Readiness
The recent outbreak of Novel (H1N1) Influenza, also referred to
as the swine flu, caused concern for many. The outbreak spread
globally and was declared a pandemic by the World Health Orga-
nization. The Douglas County School System shared the concern
and worked closely with the public health department and the De-
partment of Education in responding. In anticipation of the outbreak,
much planning had occurred over the past two years. The school
system’s response benefitted greatly because of prior planning and
the relationships established with local and state responding agen-
cies. Since the outbreak, the response plan of the school system has
been revised to prepare for the possibility of future outbreaks.
Federal and State health agencies are concerned about another
flare-up of Novel (H1N1) Influenza occurring this fall. That flare-up
could be of the same severity - or possibly much worse. We therefore
need your help to prevent the spread of illness in our schools – not
just swine flu, but any kind of virus. There are everyday actions you
can take to stay healthy, and we ask that you please encourage your
children to follow these simple steps too.
• Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or
sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. Cough or sneeze
into your upper sleeve if no tissue is available.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you
cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread that
way.
• Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
• Keep sick children home from school and limit contact with oth-
ers to prevent spread of infection.
Staying informed during a health crisis or event is vital. To fa-
cilitate this, we will post information on our website at www.douglas.
k12.ga.us and on Comcast Channel 24. Parents are encouraged to
sign up for the “Notify Me” link available on the district or your school
site for immediate notification of news updates. Other informative
websites are the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, www.
cdc.gov, and CDPH, www.cobbanddouglaspublichealth.org.
   
Employees, students and the general public are hereby notified
that the Douglas County Board of Education does not discriminate
on the basis of sex, race, religion, national origin, handicap or age
in its education programs, activities or employment practices.
When schools must be closed due to weather or
emergency, metro Atlanta radio and television sta-
tions and local Comcast Cable Channels 23 and
24 are asked to broadcast the announcement no
later than 6:30 a.m., if possible.
Please listen for these announcements and keep
all school system telephone lines clear for emer-
gencies. Make up days, if needed, for the 2009-2010
school year will be November 23 and 24, January 5,
February 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19, and April 2.
sCHooL CLosinGs
Ì0
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
2009-2010 Testing Calendar
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TESTING DATES

Aug. 2009
Georgia Kindergarten Inventory of
Development Skills

Sept. 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010
Georgia Alternative Assessment

Sept. 28, 2009 - Oct. 6, 2009
Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Jan. 19, 2010 - March 1, 2010
Assessing Comprehension & Communication
and English State to State Administration

March 3, 2010 (Make-up March 4)
Georgia Fifth Grade Writing Assessment

March 15, 2010 - March 26, 2010
Georgia Third Grade Writing Evaluation

April 14, 2010 - April 27, 2010
Criterion - Referenced Competency Test

June 2010
Criterion-Referenced Competency Test
Summer Retest
MIDDLE SCHOOL TESTING DATES

Sept. 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010
Georgia Alternative Assessment

Sept. 28, 2009 - Oct. 6, 2009
Iowa Test of Basic Skills
(ITBS 8th Grade only) Administration

Jan. 20, 2010 (Make-up Jan. 21)
Middle Grades Writing Assessment
8th Grade Only

Jan. 19, 2010 - March 1, 2010
Assessing Comprehension & Communication
and English State to State Testing

April 14, 2010 - April 27, 2010
Criterion-Referenced Competency Test

June 2010
Criterion-Referenced Competency Test
Summer Retest
HIGH SCHOOL TESTING DATES

Aug. 17, 2009 - Aug. 21, 2009
End-of-Course Test (Mid-Month Online)

Sept. 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010
Georgia Alternative Assessment

Sept. 14, 2009 - Sept. 18, 2009
Georgia High School Graduation Test
Fall Retest

Sept. 21, 2009 - Sept. 25, 2009
End-of Course Test (Mid Month Online)

Sept. 30, 2009 (Make-up Oct. 1)
Georgia High School
Writing Assessment - Main Admin.

Oct. 10, 2009
SAT @ Douglas County High School

Oct. 14, 2009
PSAT

Oct. 19, 2009 - Oct. 23, 2009
End-of-Course Test (Mid Month Online)

Nov. 7, 2009
SAT @ Chapel Hill High School

Nov. 14, 2009
PLAN 10th Grade

Nov. 9, 2009 - Nov. 13, 2009
Georgia High School Graduation Test
Winter Retest

Dec. 1, 2009 - Dec. 14, 2009
End-of-Course Test (Paper Pencil & Online)

December 2009
Remedial Education Program Testing

Jan. 19, 2010 - March 1, 2010
Assessing Comprehension & Communication
and English State to State Testing

Jan. 23, 2010
SAT @ Chapel Hill High School

Feb. 8, 2010 - Feb. 12, 2010
End-of Course Test (Mid-Month Online)

Feb. 24, 2010 (Make-up Feb. 25)
Georgia High School
Writing Assessment Retest

March 8, 2010 - March 12, 2010
End-of-Course Test (Mid-Month Online)

March 15, 2010 - March 19, 2010
Georgia High School Graduation Test
Main Admin.

April 29, 2010 - May 14, 2010
End-of-Course Tests

May 1, 2010
SAT @ Lithia Springs High School
continueD
880 Crestmark Drive, #200
Lithia Springs, GA
770.941.8662
www.DouglasWomensCenter.com
Serving Douglas, Cobb, Paulding,
Carroll, Fulton, SW Atlanta,
Camp Creek Parkway
Conveniently Located at I-20 &
Thornton Road
Offering Excellence in Obstetrical & Gynecological Care
D
Douglas Women’s Center
SENSITIVE CARE FOR WOMEN BY WOMEN
Lisa Ortenzi, MD, FACOG

Kimberly Kuncl, MD, FACOG
Vidya Soundararajan, MD, FACOG

Sholah Pittman, MD, FACOG
Sara Gorham, CNM

Lew-ann Parham, RNC, WHNP
Mammographer: Carol Smith

Ultrasonographer: Jean Hildebrandt

Health Education

Hysteroscopy

Hormone Studies

Mammography

Infertility

DEXA Bone Density Scans

Bladder Incontinence

Minimally Invasive Surgery

Sexually Transmitted Disease
Testing

In-House Laboratory

Menopausal Management

Obstetrical Care

“New” Pap Smear/HPV

Ultrasound

Amniocentesis

Teen Care

Birth Control Management

Peri-Menopausal
Management

Hair Removal

Skin Rejuvenation

Spider Vein Removal

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
2009-2010 Testing Calendar

May 2010
Advance Placement Testing

May 2010
Remedial Education Program

July 12, 2010 - July 16, 2010
Georgia High School Writing Test
Summer Retest

July 14, 2010
Georgia High School Graduation Test
Summer Retest

July 21, 2009 - July 23, 2009
End-of-Course Test - Summer Retest
*All Dates are Subject to Chnage
Release of Information to Military Recruiters and
Officials of Institutions of Higher Learning
Congress recently passed legislation that
requires high schools to provide to military re-
cruiters, upon request, access to high school
students and information on those students.
Both the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB Act)
of 2001 and the National Defense Authoriza-
tion Act for Fiscal Year 2002 reflect these re-
quirements.
In accordance with those Acts, military
recruiters are entitled to receive the name,
address and telephone listing of high school
students. The NCLB Act of 2001 also allows
institutions of higher education access to the
same information. A parent of a high school
student may request that his or her student’s
name, address and telephone listing not be re-
leased without prior written parental consent.
Such requests must be made in writing and
presented to the high school principal or his
or her designee.
Federal law prohibits discrimination on the basis of age, race, color or
national origin (Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964); sex (Title IX of the
Educational Amendments of 1972 and the Perkins Act of 1998); or disabil-
ity (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Americans With Dis-
abilities Act of 1990) in educational programs or activities receiving federal
financial assistance.
Employees, students, parents and the general public are hereby notified
that the Douglas County Board of Education does not discriminate in any
educational programs or activities or in employment policies.
The following individuals have been designated as the employees respon-
sible for coordinating the Board’s efforts to implement this nondiscriminato-
ry policy: Title VI Coordinator: Associate Superintendent Curriculum/Instruc-
tion; Title IX Coordinator: Associate Superintendent/General Administration;
ADA Coordinator: Chief Operating Officer; and Section 504 Coordinator: Co-
ordinator of Special Education.
Inquiries concerning the application of Title VI, Title IX, Section 504 or
ADA of the policies and practices of the Board may be addressed to the
person listed above at the Douglas County Board of Education, P. O. Box
1077, Douglasville, Georgia 30133, 770.651.2000; to the Regional Office for
Civil Rights, Atlanta, Georgia 30323; or to the Director, Office for Civil Rights,
Education Department, Washington, D.C. 20201.
Additional information is available in the Douglas County Board of Educa-
tion Policy Manual. The policy manual may be accessed from the Douglas
County Board of Education web site at www.douglas.k12.ga.us.
Equal Employment/Educational Opportunities
Safety & Emergency
The mission of the Douglas County School System is to provide a
quality education for all students in a safe, supportive environment.
A safe and effective learning environment is paramount to the suc-
cess of students. The safety of our students and staff members is
the highest priority of our school system and many measures are
in place and monitored to keep students and staff safe on a daily
basis. Such measures include: photo ID badges for all employees,
security cameras in all schools, School Resource Officers in each
middle and high school, BLAST (Bringing Life and Skills Together)
officers assigned to each elementary school, AED’s (Automated Ex-
ternal Defibrillators) located in each school, hand held metal detec-
tors in middle and high schools, identification required for student
checkout, requiring all visitors to sign in, and video surveillance on
school buses. We maintain a great working relationship with our lo-
cal sheriff, police and fire department, which is vital to ensuring the
safety of our students.
If you have concerns about your child’s safety, please contact
the principal of the school your child attends. An anonymous local
School Safety Hot-Line has also been established to report knowl-
edge of anyone or anything that could endanger the lives of stu-
dents and/or faculty of any school. The local School Safety Hot-Line
number is 770.651.2395. The Georgia Department of Education also
provides a hotline, which will be answered by a staff member or the
Georgia Bureau of Investigation. The State Safety Hot-Line number
is 1.877.SAYSTOP.
Being prepared for a crisis or emergency is as important as pro-
viding a safe environment on a daily basis. It is important that par-
ents and the rest of the community know that our schools are pre-
pared in the event of an emergency or crisis. We work closely with
federal, state and local emergency management agencies that are
planning our community’s response to potential threats. Crisis and
Safety plans are developed each year at the county and school level
and approved by the Office of Homeland Security and the Georgia
Emergency Management Agency. Crisis plans provide step-by-step
guides for how principals and administrators should respond to a
wide variety of scenarios ranging from tornados and fire to hazard-
ous material spills. Flexibility in the event of an emergency is a key
component of each school’s plan. Schools practice response drills
several times during the school year.
It is imperative that schools be able to contact parents in the
event of emergency or crisis. Having accurate and current phone
numbers, including cell phones, as well as email addresses on file
at all times at school is vital for emergency notification purposes.
Through careful planning, training, and practicing, as well as our
partnerships with local law enforcement, fire departments, EMT,
and the community, we will continue to make safety in our schools
our top priority.

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
770-949-5018
finalcutsportswear@att.net
Alyce Furr
770.480.7215
Kaci Davis
404.775.8201
www.FinalCutSportswear.com
Preparedness
School Hours
Elementary school
8:00 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.*
Middle/High school
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.*
*Hours may vary. Please contact your school for
additional information.
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
JJ
   
The Douglas County School System has implemented random
drug testing of high school students. Any students participating in
privileged activities will be subject to random drug testing at any point
during the school year. Privileged activities include, but are not lim-
ited to, any interscholastic activity, such as sports, any interscholastic
extracurricular activity, such as band or clubs, and student parking on
campus. In short, any student involved in any extracurricular activity
will be subject to random drug testing.
The testing is conducted at all four high schools and the Perfor-
mance Learning Center on a random basis. An independent lab con-
ducts all tests in the presence of a school administrator. Students are
selected using a computer generated random numbering system pro-
vided by the independent lab. A student’s refusal to test is treated as a
positive test result. The tests measure the following drugs: marijuana,
cocaine, amphetamines, methamphetamines, and opiates. The test
results are instant, with the exception of steroids. Any positive results
are forwarded to a Medical Review Officer who will determine through
an interview with the parents or guardian if there is a valid medical
reason for the drug to be in the student’s system. The final result of the
findings will be sent back to the school administrator, who will notify
the student and parents of the results and consequences.
Consequences of positive results range from a twenty day suspen-
sion to permanent suspension from activity or privilege.
1st offense - 20 day suspension from privilege
2nd offense - 1 year suspension from privilege
3rd offense - Permanent suspension from privilege
Before returning to the privileged activity, the student must submit
to another drug test paid for by the student. Any positive results at
the time of the follow up test will be considered the student’s second
positive drug test result. (A copy of the official policy can be found in
the student handbook and on the Douglas County School System web
site)
A safe and effective learning environment is paramount to the suc-
cess of students. Drug use and abuse are detrimental to the physical,
emotional and mental well being of students. Drug abuse seriously
interferes with the academic and athletic performance of students and
creates an unhealthy learning environment. The Random Drug Testing
Program will have a positive effect on our schools, community and stu-
dents by serving as a deterrent and offering assistance to students who
have drug issues. An important element of the program is the availabil-
ity of student/parent counseling for any student who may test positive
and desire intervention. The Teen SHARP Program is an alcohol and
drug education program for students and family members supported
by the Douglas County School System. Students testing positive will
have the opportunity to take advantage of Teen SHARP program.
Random Drug Testing

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
The Douglas County School System is a public school district of
over 24,500 students in grades kindergarten through twelfth grade
in 32 schools. There are currently 20 elementary schools, eight mid-
dle schools, four high schools, a Performance Learning Center pro-
gram and a College and Career Institute. Two new schools opened
this year, Mason Creek Elementary School and Mason Creek Middle
School, on adjoining campuses at Mason Creek Road and John-
ston Road in the Winston area. Site preparation work is underway
on our fifth high school located on Georgia Highway 92/166. The
projected opening date is 2011.
With over 3,365 employees, the Douglas County School System
is the county’s largest employer. The school system’s goal is to pro-
vide a challenging, comprehensive instructional program that will
enable our students to become lifelong learners. We believe that
it is important to prepare students for life after high school gradu-
ation. During their high school years, students are offered many
opportunities to prepare for postsecondary education and/or future
careers. Opportunities include:
International Baccalaureate (IB) Program: This rigorous pro-
gram offers academically able students an opportunity to earn a
high school diploma and an IB Diploma. Successful completion
of specified course work and examinations may enable students
to earn credit or advance placement at colleges and universities
around the world. The program’s first graduating class is now in its
senior year. “Moving toward this first IB class’ graduation – seeing
the students’ growth, teacher and student commitment and team
approach of all is the most rewarding and challenging experience
of my thirty-five years in education,” states Corinne Barnes, IB Co-
ordinator. Please contact 770.651.2147 for additional information.
Douglas County College and Career Institute (CCI): A joint col-
laborative of the school district, West Georgia Technical College
and the Douglas County Chamber of Commerce, the CCI opened
this year for high school students and adults. The program will in-
tegrate academics and advanced technical career education pro-
grams. Please call 770.947.7209 for more information.
Advance Placement (AP) Courses: All four high schools each of-
fer between 10 and 15 College Board administered AP classes. Stu-
dents who earn AP credits with a high enough score can receive
college credit and stand out in the college admissions process.
College Enrollment Programs: Our high school students can
earn college credit and high school credit at the same time through
dual enrollment or earn college only credit through the joint enroll-
ment program.
Performance Learning Center (PLC): High school students who
are not succeeding in a traditional setting are able to earn credits
in a business-like learning environment on the West Georgia Tech-
nical College campus through the Douglas County PLC’s integrat-
ed online and project based curriculum. Over 147 students have
earned high school diplomas since the program opened in 2006.
You may contact 770.651.6475 for further information.
Federal and state accountability measures are implemented
locally that require high levels of performance by educators, stu-
dents, and parents. The goals of the Douglas County School Sys-
tem are: to provide a challenging, comprehensive instructional and
curricular program for all learners; to provide a school environment
that is safe and supportive and enhances the learning process; and
to improve communication throughout the school community.
The formula for academic success involves the students, par-
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DC GYMNASTICS
AND DANCE
8709 Hospital Drive
|
770-949-8011
(Located Across from the Douglas County Courthouse)

Ballet/Tap 3 and Up

Parent/Tot 14mo. - 2 yrs.

Jazz/Hip Hop 5 & Up

Gymnastics 3 & Up

Cheerleading 5 & Up

Tumbling 10 & Up
www. dc gymanddanc e. c om
emai l : dc gymanddanc e@yahoo. c om
Fall Classes
(Start the week of August 10th)
$
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Registration
Office Hours:
Mon. - Thurs.
9am to 12pm
& 4pm to 8pm
Exp. 08/31/09
General Information
   
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
J7
   
ents, teachers, staff, and the community working together. The
Douglas County School System’s excellent teachers are enthusiastic
professionals who strive to maximize each student’s achievement.
The Douglas County School System is fortunate to have powerful
community support. All schools have active parent teacher organiza-
tions and/or booster clubs. The Partners in Education program pro-
motes student achievement through over 324 relationships between
local businesses and schools. The school system also receives sup-
port from the Public Education Trust Foundation through classroom
initiative mini-grants and scholarships for students. We have a strong
MATCH mentoring program with over 379 one-on-one relationships
between adult community volunteers and students.
The MATCH Mentoring Program serves students in all schools,
kindergarten through 12th grade. The program provides students
with an opportunity to experience a meaningful relationship with a
responsible, caring adult role model in order to increase the chances
they will be successful in school, complete their education and grow
up to be contributing citizens in their community. Call 770.651.3445
for more information.
After-school programs are offered in all elementary schools and
some middle schools. They provide a safe, relaxed and enjoyable
environment for students, allowing them time for enrichment activi-
ties, recreation, social interaction with peers and homework help in
a supervised, structured environment. Parents should contact their
child’s school for information about the program and fee structure.
For more information on the Douglas County School System, visit
the website at www.douglas.k12.ga.us or call the main number at
770.651.2000. For bus route information or attendance zones (must
have specific address) call 770.651.2400.
General Information
Prevention Programs for Drugs,
Gangs, and Violence
Douglas County Schools are involved with several prevention
programs related to drugs, gangs, violence, and other destructive
behaviors. School resource officers are employed in each middle
and high school. BLAST (Bringing Life and Skills Together) officers
are assigned to each elementary school. The TEEN Sharp Pro-
gram is an alcohol and drug education program for students and
their family members. The SUPER Stop Program is a family-based
program to prevent alcohol and other drug-related violence.
The school system performs random drug-testing for high
school students involved in privileged activities. The Youth Against
Violence Program is a gang and violence prevention program
available to students and parents. SAVE (Substance Abuse and
Violence Education) is a community organization that involves the
school system. Help Line telephone numbers are provided in the
school handbook. Other resources are available through school
counselors.
Please contact your student’s school if you have questions. The
local school safety hotline number is 770.651.2395. The Georgia
Department of Education also provides a hotline which will be an-
swered by a staff member or the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.
The State Safety Hotline number is 1.877.SAYSTOP.
   
   
Jc
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords parents/
guardians and students over 18 years of age (“eligible students”) cer-
tain rights with respect to the student’s education records.
These rights are outlined below:
1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records
within 45 days of the day the District receives a request for access: Par-
ents/guardians or eligible students should submit to the school princi-
pal (or appropriate school official) a written request that identifies the
record(s) they wish to inspect. The principal will make arrangements
for access and notify the parent/guardian or eligible student of the time
and place where the records may be inspected.
2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s educa-
tion records that the parent/guardian or eligible student believes are
inaccurate or misleading. A parent/guardian or eligible student who
believes the student’s record contains an error may request its correc-
tion by submitting a written explanation of the error and the basis for
believing it to be in error to the principal or his/her designee, who shall
investigate and determine whether or not to amend the record. If the
matter cannot be resolved, a parent/guardian or eligible student may
request a hearing pursuant to federal regulations at 34 C.F.R. § 99.21-
99.22 as well as applicable state regulations. If the hearing results in
a determination that the record contained erroneous information, it
shall be corrected and the parent/guardian or eligible student shall be
informed in writing of the correction; if the information contained in
the record is determined not to be erroneous, the parent/guardian or
eligible student may place a statement in the record commenting upon
the contested information and stating the basis for disagreement. The
statement shall thereafter be disclosed whenever the portion to which
it relates is disclosed.
3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable infor-
mation contained in the student’s education records, except to the ex-
tent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent: One exception
which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school offi-
cials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person
employed by the District as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or
support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforce-
ment unit personnel); a person serving on the School Board; a person
or company with whom the District has contracted to perform a special
task (such as an attorney, auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or
a parent/guardian or student serving on an official committee, such as
a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school of-
ficial in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate
educational interest if the official needs to review an education record
in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request,
the District discloses education records without consent to officials of
another school district in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
   
CONTINUED ON PAGE 36
This voucher is for new patients only and is good toward any procedure
our office provides. Offer valid one time per family. Offer expires
05/31/10. School Guide
J0
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Edu-
cation concerning alleged failures by the Douglas County School
District to comply with the requirements of FERPA: The name and
address of the Office that administers FERPA are: Family Policy
Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland
Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-4605.
Release of Directory Information
The Douglas County School District has designated the follow-
ing information as directory information:
1. Student’s name.
2. Student’s date of birth.
3. Student’s participation in official school clubs and sports.
4. Weight and height of student if he/she is a member of an ath-
letic team.
5. Dates of attendance at the Douglas County School System
schools.
6. Awards received during the time enrolled in the Douglas
County School System.
7. Photographs
8. Program of Study
9. School System Security Video/Audio Tapes except when tapes
are used in a disciplinary, juvenile or criminal matter.
In addition to the directory information listed above the federal
No Child Left Behind Act provides that the school district shall
provide, on a request made by military recruiters or an institution
of higher education, access to secondary students addresses and
telephone listings. Unless you, as a parent/guardian or eligible stu-
dent, request otherwise, this information may be disclosed to the
public upon written request. You have the right to refuse to allow
all or any part of the above information to be designated as direc-
tory information and to be disclosed to the public upon request. If
you wish to exercise this right, you must notify the principal of the
school at which the student is enrolled in writing within 15 days
after the first day on school roll.
PROTECTION OF PUPIL RIGHTS AMENDMENT (PPRA)
Definition of Terms Used in PPRA
“Instructional Material” - Instructional material that is provided
to a student, regardless of format, including printed or representa-
tional materials, audio-visual materials, and materials in electronic
or digital formats (such as material accessible through the Inter-
net). The term does not include academic tests or academic as-
sessments.
“Invasive Physical Examination” - Any medical examination that
involves the exposure of private body parts, or any act during such
examination that includes incision, insertion, or injection into the
body, but does not include a hearing, vision, or scoliosis screening.
“Personal Information” - Individually identifiable information in-
cluding: (1) a student or parent’s first and last name; (2) home ad-
dress; (3) telephone number; or (4) social security number.
Requirements
No student shall be required to submit to a survey, analysis, or
evaluation that reveals information concerning:
1. Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s
parent;
CONTINUED ON PAGE 38
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
2. Mental or psychological problems of the student or the stu-
dent’s family;
3. Sex behavior or attitudes;
4. Illegal, anti-social, self-incriminating, or demeaning behav-
ior;
5. Critical appraisals of other individuals with whom respon-
dents have close family relationships;
6. Legally recognized privileged or analogous relationships,
such as those of lawyers, physicians, and ministers;
7. Religious practices, affiliations, or beliefs of the student or
student’s parent; or
8. Income (other than that required by law to determine eligibil-
ity for participation in a program or for receiving financial assis-
tance under such program), without prior written consent of the
parent or eligible student.
A parent of a student may, upon request, inspect any survey
created by a third party containing one or more of the items listed
as (1) through (8) above before the survey is administered or dis-
tributed by a school to a student and may choose to opt the student
out of participation in the survey. The Superintendent shall develop
procedures for: (1) granting a request by a parent for reasonable
access to such survey within a reasonable period of time after the
request is received, and (2) making arrangements to protect stu-
dent privacy in the event of the administration or distribution of a
survey to a student containing one or more of the items listed as
(1) through (8). The requirements of PPRA do not apply to a survey
administered to a student in accordance with the Individuals with
Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
A parent of a student may, upon request, inspect any instruc-
tional material used as part of the educational curriculum for the
student. The Superintendent shall develop procedures for granting
a request by a parent for reasonable access to instructional materi-
al within a reasonable period of time after the request is received.
Parents shall be notified prior to the administration of physi-
cal examinations or screenings that the school may administer to
students. This notice shall offer the parent the opportunity to opt
the student out of any non-emergency, invasive physical examina-
tion or screening that is (1) required as a condition of attendance;
(2) administered by the school and scheduled by the school in ad-
vance; and (3) not necessary to protect the immediate health and
safety of the student, or of other students.
The parent of a student shall be notified prior to the commence-
ment of activities involving the collection, disclosure, or use of per-
sonal information collected from students for the purpose of mar-
keting or for selling that information (or otherwise providing that
information to others for that purpose). Such notice shall offer the
parent the opportunity to inspect, upon request, any instrument
used in the collection of such information before the instrument is
administered or distributed to a student and to opt the student out
of such activities. The Superintendent shall develop procedures
that: (1) make arrangements to protect student privacy in the event
of such collection, disclosure, or use, and (2) grant a request by a
parent for reasonable access to such instrument within a reason-
able period of time after the request is received.
ªÌ
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Welcome to Douglas County Schools. We want to assist you in
making your student enrollment efficient and easy. Students cur-
rently enrolled in our system will have their school records move
up to the next grade or the appropriate school for their attendance
zone. Kindergarten students and those new to the system will need
to enroll at the Central Registration Center.
The Central Registration Center is located at the Douglas County
Schools Central Office Annex at 4841 Highway 5 (the former Bill
Arp Elementary school site). Student registration is available each
day, Monday through Friday.
The Central Registration Center is open year round to register all
new and returning students to the Douglas County School System.
Open daily from 8:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.,
parents must register at the Central Registration Center before a
student is enrolled in their home school.
To Register We Must Have:
• Birth Certificate
• Georgia Immunization Form 3231 (marked complete for school
attendance)
• Georgia Ear, Eye & Dental Form 3300
• Social Security Card or Waiver
• Parent/Guardian Photo ID
• Custody/Guardianship Papers – If applicable
• Withdrawal Form or Last Report Card
• Middle & High School - Must Bring Discipline History
• High School – Must Bring Transcript
Proof of Residence:
• IF YOU RENT - Current lease AND Current Utility or Connection
Receipt (within the last 30 days)
• IF YOU OWN – Current Mortgage Statement or Tax Bill AND
Utility or Connection Receipt (within the last 30 days)
• Multi-Residence Form – If living with family or friends signed
by owner or leasee and notarized
• Douglas County Car Tag Receipt
Additional information can be obtained at the Douglas County
School System web site www.douglas.k12.ga.us. Parents who
come with completed forms and required documentation will move
quickly through the process. Please call 770-651-2050 if you have
any questions about the registration process.
Please be reminded to check with your doctor or the local health
department to complete and update your students’ immunization. It
is required that all students’ immunization is in 100% compliance.
Here’s what the Georgia law requires:
“No child shall be admitted to or attend any school or facility in
this state unless the child shall first have submitted a certificate of
immunization to the responsible official of the school or facility…..
“Any responsible official permitting any child to remain in a school
or facility in violation of this Code section, and any parent or guard-
ian who intentionally does not comply with this Code section, shall
be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be
punished by a fine of not more than $100.00 or by imprisonment for
not more than 12 months.”
To read the full text of the law, O.C.G.A. 20-2-771, go to http://
health.state.ga.us/programs/immunizations/schools.asp.
   
Chapel Hill Road (Target Plaza) | 770-942-0282
fall colors
are in the air
available at
student Enrollment
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
ªJ
PROOF

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ACCREDITED
__school_amount__ schools in the __city_1__ area!
Call 1.800.PRIMROSE or visit www.primroseschools.com to
find your neighborhood Primrose School.
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__address_1__  |  __city_1__   
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__address_2__  |  __city_2__
 __phone_2__
__school_name_1__  |  __phone_1__
__school_name_2__  |  __phone_2__
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School Name
Address | City, State Zip | Phone
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Passionate teachers.
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Our teachers love Primrose as much as our children do. Our proprietary,
accredited curriculum assures that children are nurtured emotionally,
physically and intellectually.
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4460 Brookmont Parkway  |  Douglasville, GA  30135  |  770­577­8181
www.primrosebrookmont.com
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Each Primrose School is privately owned and operated. Primrose Schools and The Leader in Educational Child Care are trademarks of Primrose
School Franchising Company. ©2008 PSFC. All rights reserved.
student Discipline
The purpose of the Douglas County School System’s Discipline Code is
as follows: To ensure an environment for teaching and learning which is
protected from disruption and harassment; to provide information to stu-
dents and parents about rules and regulations (expected student conduct)
of the school system and possible penalties for violations of these rules and
regulations; to provide uniform administrative and disciplinary procedures
in the local schools; to provide for enforcement of school disciplinary rules
when the student is on school property, in attendance at school or at any
school sponsored activity or engages at any time or place in conduct that
has a direct effect on maintaining order and discipline in the schools.
These rules are designed to notify students as to the types and range
of behavior expectations. Every specific variation of conduct may not have
been included. Consequently, students should expect to be disciplined
for misconduct that is so obviously inappropriate, particularly in light of
societal expectations and the scope of these expectations that a specific
expectation need not be written for every conceivable variation of behavior
that directly affects the orderly mission of the school.
Local school administrators have broad discretion to determine con-
sequences for student misconduct at the local school level. The range
of consequences for misconduct that can be assigned by a local school
administrator may include without limitation, student conference, parent
conference, before or after school detention, In-School Suspension, Satur-
day School, Out-of-School Suspension up to 10 days per incident, referral
to a Student Disciplinary Tribunal Hearing which may result in Long-Term
Suspension or expulsion and, depending upon the severity of the offense,
law enforcement officials may be contacted.
Parents and guardians are encouraged to inform their children that
certain acts of misconduct could result in legal charges. Please explain
   
to your student(s) that for certain acts of underage sexual conduct and
other crimes, a minor may be tried as an adult. It is the responsibility of
the student and the student’s parents/guardians to demonstrate behavior
that is appropriate at all times.
Certain offenses are so serious in nature that these may be grounds
for long-term suspension/ expulsion/permanent expulsion, denial of en-
rollment, or long-term bus suspension. These offenses include: posses-
sion, or use of, or threat to use weapons, look-a-like weapons, dangerous
instruments, or explosive/implosive devices; terroristic threats; riotous
behavior; possession, use, or distribution of drugs, or possession, use or
distribution of drug paraphernalia; distribution of over the counter drugs,
look-a-like drugs, or alcoholic beverages; physical or verbal assault on a
school employee; assault/battery; bullying; arson or destruction of prop-
erty; sexual battery and other sexual offenses; sexual harassment; com-
puter trespass; chronic disciplinary problems; any act which substantially
disrupts the orderly conduct of a school; any act, whether school related
or non-school related, on-campus or off-campus, which could result in
the student being criminally charged with a felony and which makes the
student’s continued presence at school a potential danger to persons or
property at the school or which disrupts the educational process; and
gang related activities; falsifying, misrepresenting, omitting, or errone-
ously reporting information regarding instances of alleged inappropriate
behavior by a teacher, administrator, or other school employee toward a
student.
The full discipline code can be found in the Student Handbook and
at the Douglas County School System website: www.douglas.k12.ga.us.
Please review this information with your child to reinforce the need for
appropriate behavior.
ªª
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Elementary Schools
   
out the best in students! We celebrate their aca-
demic, social, and physical successes.
Our philosophy at Arbor Station is to reward
exceptional effort and achievement. Arbor Station
Bears have many opportunities to be recognized
for superior work, good behavior and exceptional
attendance. A student must read 15 books and
pass an Accelerated Reader test with 80% cor-
rect to earn a puzzle piece. Kindergarteners will
receive puzzle pieces for fluency on sight words.
The students’ names are read during morning
announcements. It is our expectation for each
student to earn one puzzle piece each semester.
Students demonstrating exemplary behavior at
least 18 days during a grading period will receive
a treat and fun time in the gym. Students with no
tardies and no absences each quarter receive a
special breakfast during homeroom.
This year the staff and faculty at Arbor Station
are focusing on two goals. The first and most im-
portant is to increase the academic achievement
of all students. The second is to improve atten-
dance. I hope you will join with us in striving to
achieve these goals.
Ms. Melissa Joe is our principal and Ms. Feli-
cia Hall is our assistant principal. For additional
information, please call us at 770.651.3000 or
visit our website at http://arborstation.dce.schoo-
linsites.com.
acter traits in our students. Students are selected
by showing these qualities. Students receive posi-
tive phone calls home and are eligible to receive the
“Mystery Motivator”.
Our After School Program (ASP) is for students
in kindergarten through 5th grade. During this
time, students are provided time to work on their
homework. They are given time to play and interact
with others. Information about the program is avail-
able on our website.
Annette Winn has a very dedicated staff, highly
qualified teachers and wonderful support from our
Partners in Education, PTO, mentors, and parents.
We will continue to build a community of lifelong
learners that become responsible individuals, inde-
pendent thinkers, and productive citizens.
Ms. Mary Woodfin is our principal and Ms. Patty
Hadley is the assistant principal. If you have any
questions, please call our school at 770.651.3100 or
visit our website at http://annettewinn.dce.schoo-
linsites.com.
ARBOR STATION ELEMENTARY
Bringing Out the Best in Students
Arbor Station Elementary School is anticipating
another great year. It is our mission to facilitate op-
timal learning in a secure and nurturing environ-
ment that empowers students to become responsi-
ble and productive citizens. We believe in bringing
ANNETTE WINN ELEMENTARY
You Can’t Spell AWESome Without ME
At Annette Winn Elementary, students come
first in all decisions made concerning our
school. Actions planned will reflect our goal and
belief that all students can and will learn. We are
committed to preparing our students to set and
achieve personal goals throughout life.
Student achievement is our primary focus.
We hold high expectations for all students and
staff. School wide goals are set each year to im-
prove achievement in all academic areas.
We are a community oriented school, in
which our programs expand outside the school
walls into our community. Feel free to stop in
and visit our Parent Outreach Facilitator, Mrs.
Denine Pope, in our parent resource center. Mrs.
Pope has planned many parent workshops and
events for the 2009-2010 school year. Through-
out the year, we have several different projects
that show our students how to give back to the
community. Our canned food drives help sup-
port our local food banks. We welcome com-
munity members to volunteer at our school in
the form of mentoring students, as a Partner in
Education (PIE), or participating in other events
such as “Real Men Read.”
Annette Winn is excited about the Principal’s
“200” club to promote citizenship and good char-
   
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
ª7
CONTINUED ON PAGE 44
BEuLAh ELEMENTARY
Bringing Out the Best in Students
We have many things to be excited about this year. Our school has
undergone extensive renovation this summer. Our “new” school is beau-
tiful! The staff cannot wait to
show off our new facility to
our students, parents, and
community. Additionally, we
welcome new staff members.
Ms. Sheila Miller will return
as our new principal and Mr.
Joe Pennington will be joining
us as our assistant principal.
Ms. Cher Algarin will serve as our academic lead teacher and Ms. Sheryl
Daniell is our physical education teacher and Road Runner sponsor.
We are honored to host the county’s only English/Spanish Dual Lan-
guage program, where some kindergarteners and first graders learn their
grade level content in two languages! Ms. Shana Alonso and Ms. Diane
Saylors will make up our first grade immersion team. Ms. Chris Word, Ms.
Kim Munoz and Ms. Anne Keys will continue the program in kindergar-
ten. We are proud of the academic progress of our kindergarteners who
participated in the program last year and look forward to their continued
success in first grade.
We are extremely lucky to have the remainder of our staff return to
guide our students toward another successful academic year. Beulah
will also offer opportunities for students to participate in extracurricular
activities. We will continue to sponsor Road Runners, the Safety Patrol,
Junior Beta Club, Chorus, Student Council and Readers Are Leaders. We
welcome all our returning Bees and our new Bees to the hive “where we
all work together to make learning take flight.”
If you need additional information, we invite you to stop by our school,
call us at 770.651.3300 or visit our website at http://beulah.dce.schoolin-
sites.com.
BILL ARP ELEMENTARY
We are ready to begin an exciting new school year. The building is
clean and shiny and classrooms are arranged and decorated in anticipa-
tion of welcoming students to Bill Arp, home of the Patriots.
We have many exciting plans for the 2009-2010 school year. Four
special days have been scheduled to celebrate different areas of the cur-
riculum. Students will participate in an exciting reading program, Read
Across America. We have plans for special teams and clubs such as Cho-
rus, Road Runners, Art Club, Reading Bowl, and Science Olympiad,
Each nine weeks we recognize students and classes at a grade level
assembly. Children are recognized for perfect attendance, citizenship and
for reaching predetermined academic goals. Selected classes receive
the Diamond Dustpan, the Delightful Diners Award, and the Golden Book
Award. Each of these is a coveted award. Information about the award as-
semblies will appear in both the newsletter and on the calendar.
Bill Arp offers an affordable after school program. If you are interested
in the after school program and would like more information, please con-
tact the after school staff at 770-651-3204. The faculty and staff of Bill Arp
look forward to a wonderful 2009-2010 school year.
Our principal is Ms. Donna Pritchard and our assistant principal is Ms.
Julie Pierce. For additional information, please contact us at 770.651.3200
or visit our website at http://billarp.dce.schoolinsites.com.
BRIGhT STAR ELEMENTARY
Bright Star Elementary School shines bright with many illuminating
activities throughout the school year. The annual talent show provides our
students with the opportunity to sparkle in the spotlights of the Douglas
County High School Theater. The students look forward to the event each
year. Many of them start asking about the show the first day of school.
Elementary Schools
   
ªc
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
CONTINUED ON PAGE 46
Historically, the talent show
production has been sched-
uled for early May, but this
year we are planning the
extravaganza in early fall.
The talent show consists of
individuals and groups that
have the desire to share their
gift of entertainment. Several
teachers guide the selection committee. Our May production included
dance routines, recorder solos, singing solos, duets, trios, and karate
exhibitions. We had students representing all grade levels. It is amazing
how much talent shines in the halls of Bright Star!
Another star that shines at Bright Star is the After-School Program.
The program provides students with the opportunity to complete home-
work, reading, on-level and advanced tutoring, recreational and arts ac-
tivities, and community service. The students are provided with a snack
prior to starting their extended day. The students are provided homework
assistance for one hour each day. Differentiated tutoring is provided
for students in third, fourth and fifth grades. Ninety-five percent of the
students who attended these tutoring sessions met or exceeded on the
Spring 2009 Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT). Bright Star
Elementary After-School Program (ASP) works with local story tellers
to provide students with extended knowledge of literary comprehen-
sion through varying dramatization. The Bright Star Elementary School
ASP hours of operations are 3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. The cost is $8.00 per
day with a family registration fee of $10.00. Drop-ins are welcome. If you
would like to receive more information about Bright Star ASP, please
contact the school at 770.651.3400.
Ms. Dale McGill, principal, and Ms. Janice Duvall, assistant principal,
invite you to stop by the school and join the Bright Star community. For
additional information, please call 770.651.3400 or visit our website at
http://brightstar.dce.schoolinsites.com.
BuRNETT ELEMENTARY
Home of the Tiger Cubs
Burnett Elementary is an active community focused on learning col-
laboratively. Our mission is Excellence without Excuse! High expecta-
tions for staff and students are defining features of Burnett.
We begin the new school year with a bright and shiny “face lift” fol-
lowing our summer building renovation.
Student learning is enhanced through our standards-based curricu-
lum, the Georgia Performance Standards. Burnett’s instructional pro-
gram provides equitable opportunities to learn and enables every stu-
dent to master challenging content, skills, and learning strategies. Our
teachers are “Highly Qualified” and frequently participate in professional
learning to enhance and support school improvement efforts.
At Burnett, we believe in rewarding success in the areas of academ-
ics, attendance, athletics, and good character. Students are selected to
participate in the News Crew, Beta Club, Student Council, School Cho-
rus and various other school programs.
We look forward to working with your child(ren) here at Burnett – an
exciting place to learn, grow, and excel!
Our principal is Ms. Joyce Bass and the assistant principal is Ms. Te-
resa Abbey. For further information, you may contact us at 770.651.3500
or access our school on the following website: www.douglas.k12.ga.us.
chAPEL hILL ELEMENTARY
Seize the Day
Seize the elementary school day moment by moment. The school day
consists of a starting time and an ending time with a lot of time in be-
tween. The time in between is the instructional time which we educators
Elementary Schools
KARATE IS THE BEST THING YOU
CAN DO FOR YOUR CHILD! TM
Why Karate Instruction Will
Benefit Your Child
Mile High Karate’s program works
hand-in-hand with a child’s school
work, providing improved self-
discipline, self confidence, mental
alertness, and goal setting skills.
Young people are taught at Mile
High Karate that through dedicated
intense work, all worthwhile goals
in life are possible. Parents have
attributed our program with
improved grades as a direct result of
the increased achievement, motiva-
tion, self-direction, and self-
confidence provided by the
program.
Help Your Child Set Positive
Goals
It is important for each child to learn
to set short-term, intermediate and
long-term goals. At Mile High
Karateevery child’s goal is the Black
Belt. Black Belt is a symbol of
excellence in martial arts and an
important tool for instructors and
parents to use for developing desire,
tenacity and for teaching the impor-
tance of follow-through in any
activity.
Mile High Karate Will Help
Your Child Get Better
Grades
All young people in the program are
required to bring copies of their
grades from school, complete parent
teacher intent to promote forms and
complete exam qualification forms
prior to testing.
For a FREE Report:
How to Build Unshakable
Self-Confidence in Your Child
Visit: www.FreeKarate.com
Mile High Karate instructors work hand-
in-hand with school teachers and parents
to insure a well-balanced and focused
development process for each child.
“No-Strings Attached FREE
OFFER!”
Take advantage of Our Special Offer!
You Will Receive:
FREE Beginner Trial Lessons
($89.00 Value)
2 weeks of group lessons in our beginners
class no strings attached.
FREE Student - Parent Conference
($39.97 Value)
Before or during the introductory program,
we will meet with you to discuss your
child’s needs and progress.
FREE Official Mile High Karate Uniform
($89.97 Value)
After your child’s second visit to the karate
school, he or she will be presented with an
official Mile High Karate Uniform that is
theirs to keep—no charge!
FREE “See the Impact” DVD
($49.97 Value)
This special video presentation shows you
first hand the progress of our students and
the benefits of our program. You’ll also see
an exclusive interview with Grand Master
Stephen Oliver as he discusses the philoso-
phy of our school and regular outcomes of
our students.
FREE “In Their Own Words” CD
($20.07 Value)
Be a “fly on the wall” and listen in to
parents just like you, as they discuss their
children’s accomplishments and their
thoughts about our program!
Over a $288.98 Value
FREE!
Douglasville
8889 Hwy. 5 Douglasville, GA 30134 (770) 942-0227
ª0
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
try to use to make a difference in the lives of kids. A missed moment or a
disruption causes children to lose instructional time which cannot be re-
peated or recreated. Arriving to school and being in class before the school
bell rings at 8:00 is critical.
There are many reasons a child may be late to school; however, few rea-
sons are acceptable. Students wander in late because older siblings fol-
low a middle school or high school bell schedule that has a later starting
time. Extra-curricular night activities like baseball and cheerleading keeps
children out late and he/she often arrive late to school so they can catch
a few more winks of sleep. Some children are late as a result of disorga-
nization on the part of the caregiver. These are all reasons students may
miss instructional time which negatively impacts their opportunity to learn.
These disruptions also negatively impact the students who did arrive on
time. When a child who is tardy enters the classroom, instruction or proce-
dures may have to be halted in order to get that child on track with the other
children. At Chapel Hill Elementary School (CHES), we had over 3,535 tardy
arrivals during the 2008-2009 school year. Another disruption that negatively
impacts the learning environment is early check-outs in the afternoon.
Sometimes caregivers err on the side of convenience when it comes to
early checkouts in the afternoon. It is more convenient to pick up a child
from the school office rather than wait in the hot car-rider line. However,
the repercussions for that moment of convenience are long reaching. Typi-
cally these kinds of disruptions begin after 2:00 p.m. These early checkouts
cause the office staff to have to interrupt classes via the intercom to request
that child come to the office. The intercom stops learning for that moment.
If the teacher has to stop teaching to give the child parent notes, newslet-
ters or homework assignments then learning has been disrupted for many
moments. At CHES, we had 4,550 early checkouts for the year. It is really a
very selfish thing to do.
Show your child and other children that you value their educational
   
needs. Show them that they are important enough to arrive to school on
time. Give them the benefit of an entire instructional day by allowing them
to attend for a full day. It is hard to quantify the impact of 180 full days of
instruction, but I know it has to be powerful. Seize the day and respect the
day.
The administrative team at Chapel Hill Elementary consists of Ms.
Yvonne Kidney, principal, and assistant principals Mr. Robert Blevins and
Ms. Kelli Spencer. For additional information, please call 770.651.3600 or
visit our website at http://chapelhill.dce.schoolinsites.com.
DORSETT ShOALS ELEMENTARY
We at Dorsett Shoals would like to welcome back our returning students
and new students to our school. We hope that you have enjoyed your sum-
mer and are ready to begin another exciting year. During my first year as
principal, I am truly looking forward to getting to know you by working to-
gether. It is my goal to continue with the friendly school-family partnership
that makes Dorsett Shoals such a wonderful learning environment where
your child will grow academically as well as socially.
Our goals this year are the continuation of efforts to increase our scores
in all areas of the Georgia CRCT; to integrate writing across the curriculum;
to differentiate instruction; and to increase parent involvement. In addition,
attendance is another area on which we would like to focus. It is very im-
portant that your children are present and here at 8:00 a.m. In order to ac-
complish our goals, we must have rigor+relevancy+relationships=results
to be successful.
Communication between home and school is an essential component
for student success. Dorsett Shoals Elementary School offers a variety of
ways for you to support your children and our school. Our PTA is an ex-
tremely dedicated organization that works tirelessly to support our school.
Elementary Schools
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
ª¬
   
Slam students spent the morning at Stars and Strikes in Hiram and then
had lunch at Five Guys restaurant on Chapel Hill Road.
Each month, homeroom teachers choose a “Brilliant Bear.” These are
the students of the month for each classroom. Parents are invited to eat
lunch with the student during the Brilliant Bear luncheon. At the end of the
year, each teacher chooses a Brilliant Bear of the Year. These students and
parents participate in a special luncheon.
Students are encouraged to be at school everyday. Each month, we will
have a special token that will be given at lunch for those students who have
perfect attendance. Also, Allyn Farnsworth with Horace Mann Companies
will be donating two bicycles that will be raffled off for students who earn
Perfect Attendance at the end of each semester. Students have the oppor-
tunity to earn two chances at winning a bicycle.
We have a very special partnership with Southern Patio, one of our Part-
ner’s in Education. They built a school in China and one of our classes was
chosen to communicate with the class through letter writing. Some of the
workers from China visited our school in December and they shared their
culture with our students. Southern Patio also sponsored all of our awards
at the end of the school year.
Parents are an integral part of our program. We encourage our parents
to volunteer in the classroom or school and become involved in PTA. Our
school has an excellent Parent Resource Center. Mrs. Tarmira Muhammad
is our Parent Outreach Facilitator and will be glad to help parents in any
way possible.
Our principal is Ms. Lisa Dunnigan and the assistant principal is Ms.
Melanie Manley. For further information, you may contact the school at
770.651.3800 or visit our website at http://eastside.dce.schoolinsites.com.
We welcome our new Eastside Bears and look forward to seeing our return-
ing students soon!
Elementary Schools
We invite you to become a part of the Dorsett Shoals PTA as an active mem-
ber. In addition, you may want to volunteer in the classroom, become a
mentor, and/or serve on the school council. Your active participation and
involvement in school events/activities makes all the difference in the suc-
cess of our school.
Our faculty and staff have worked throughout the summer to prepare for
our students. Their dedication and willingness to do “whatever it takes” is
to be commended. We are truly looking forward to a successful year with
you!
Ms. Kacia Thompson is our principal and Ms. Sharon Mucha is our as-
sistant principal. For additional information, please call us at 770.651.3700
or visit our website at http://dorsettshoals.dce.schoolinsites.com.
EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY
We look forward to the 2009-2010 school year, and we welcome our East-
side Bears! Our theme for Eastside is “We are College Bound, where goals
are set and met.” Our goal is to prepare the foundation that attending col-
lege is an expectation for all students, right from the start of kindergarten.
This year we will have a career fair and also a career wax museum where
our 5th grade students will choose a profession, research it and tell about
the professional during the wax museum.
Eastside offers many clubs and extracurricular activities for our stu-
dents. We have a Girl Scout Troop for grades K-5th. Other clubs offered
are cheerleaders, Unity Dancers, Science Club, Art Club, Beta Club, Drama
Club, Photography, and Eastside Boys Club. The Grand Slam Club is our
most coveted award for the entire school year. Students that qualify for the
Grand Slam Club have exhibited excellent behavior inside and outside of
the classroom, have perfect attendance and have mastered all the stan-
dards on the report card by the 4th quarter. These students earn a special
award that is announced at the end of the year. This school year, the Grand
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Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
Elementary Schools
FAcTORY ShOALS ELEMENTARY
Welcome to the 2009-2010
school year at Factory Shoals
Elementary School, home of the
Dolphins! We are excited to be
starting another great school
year here at the Factory. We
serve students in grades Kinder-
garten through 5th grade. In addition to our core academic instruction, we
offer all students the opportunity to participate in Art, Music, and Physical
Education each week. We are also the home of one special needs pre-kin-
dergarten class and HAVEN Academy.
As professional educators, we recognize that each of our students pos-
sess a unique learning style. Our goal each day is to provide a quality and
rigorous curriculum that is designed to meet the individual needs of our
diverse learners. As always our main focus this year will be to increase the
academic achievement of all of our students. This year our teachers will
continue to plan and work collaboratively together to examine student work
and assessment data. They will then use this information to drive their daily
instruction.
At Factory Shoals we recognize the importance of parental involvement
in the total school program. We offer many opportunities for parents to be-
come involved at school. Some examples of parental involvement opportu-
nities are PTA, parent volunteer, mentoring program, and room parent. We
encourage all parents and members of the community to join us this year
for such events as our Fall Festival, the annual Science Fair, the PE Dance,
Chorus concerts, and various other activities. Please monitor our school
website throughout the school year for opportunities to become involved
in your school.
We are excited for the chance to serve the students and parents of the
Factory Shoals community. Our teachers are committed to providing a
high standard of instruction in a safe and nurturing environment. Together
we can achieve our goals of academic success for all.
Our principal is Mr. Tommy Shadinger and the assistant principal is Ms.
Tara Cowins. For additional information, please contact us at 770.651.3900
or visit our area of the school system website at www.douglas.k12.ga.us.
hOLLY SPRINGS ELEMENTARY
Welcome to the home of the Holly Hawks. We are a school that is focused
on excellence in academics, character, and
service. At Holly Springs, our students have
achieved success with the support of com-
mitted teachers and staff members, parents,
dedicated community members, and excep-
tional partners in education. Over the past
10 years, Holly Springs Elementary and our
learning community have worked together
for the success of each individual student.
We set high expectations for our students in the areas of academics and
character. We use continuous monitoring of our instructional strategies
through benchmark tests, pre and post tests, daily observations, unit as-
sessments in conjunction with student progress monitoring to make sure
that each student is on track for success. We use an active teaching learn-
ing model that stresses mastery learning which requires re-teaching many
times to accomplish our goals. We know our students needs and we tailor
our instruction to meet their personal needs. When all stakeholders are
working for the same common goals, success will be achieved.
We work collaboratively with Chapel Hill High School on a regular basis.
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
7|
   
Elementary Schools
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The football team from Chapel Hill High School models the importance of
reading and staying in school to our students. another program that
works with students and teachers on a daily basis is the youth appren-
ticeship program (these are students who are considering pursuing a ca-
reer in education). The Science Department has an ongoing partnership
with Holly Springs which in turn has resulted in increased student achieve-
ment in the area of science. We held our first science fair in May of 2008
with over 80 students participating. Several of our students went on the win
awards at the county science fair. It is with this collaboration and working
with the community that our school has achieved continued success.
Test scores represent one form of student success. We are extremely
proud of our April 2009 CRCT scores. We have a continued focus to move
our students from the meets category to the exceeds category. As a school
we had 93.5% of our students meet and exceed in math with 57.8% of our
students exceeding, in reading we had 97.0% of our students meet and
exceed with 53.5% exceeding, and in science we had 94.7% of our students
meet and exceed with 49.4% exceeding.
Early childhood education is where the foundation of success begins.
Parent involvement is one key to success for our students. Parents are al-
ways willing to volunteer here at our school by being room mothers, stuffing
hawk eyes, reading with students, working the book fair, proctoring for tests,
sending in items for class projects and parties, just to name a few ways
parents support our school. Through our wonderful PTSO organization and
School Council, the students are afforded a campus that is totally focused
on them. Our motto here at Holly Springs is “It’s all about the children”. We
want everything we do on a daily basis to reflect this motto. Our Partners in
Education have supported our school by offering incentives for students as
well as teachers and staff members throughout the year.
Our principal is Ms. Stefanie Cosper and our assistant principal is Ms.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 50
Alesia Stanley. We welcome you to visit our school and become an involved
part of your child’s education. For additional information contact us at
770.651.4000. We would like to encourage you to visit our website at http://
hollysprings.dce.schoolinsites.com.
LIThIA SPRINGS ELEMENTARY
Welcome to Lithia Springs Elementary School (LSES). You will find a
family atmosphere at LSES with a kind and dedicated staff that shares a
commitment to provide a quality educational opportunity for your child. It is
our desire at LSES for you to have a successful school year. Our mission is
to teach responsibility in an environment of respect and dignity. We believe
that we have the best students, and that they deserve the best teachers.
We are very pleased with the academic accomplishments of our stu-
dents. Due to the hard work of our parents, teachers, staff members, and
students, we were able to increase our mathematics scores on the CRCT.
We once again made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) under the “No Child
Left Behind Act”. In the upcoming year, we will continue to focus on improv-
ing the writing instruction that our students receive. We have implemented
the “Six Traits” of writing in all grades. This model of writing instruction
will help students become accomplished writers. We will also continue to
advance our mathematics and language arts instruction, using formative
assessments to help focus student learning.
We have an open door policy at LSES. It is our desire that our school
be an integral part of the community. As such, parents are welcome to vol-
unteer in classrooms and encouraged to be active in the education of their
child(ren). Parents are a child’s first teacher and are vital to helping them
reach their fullest potential.
We also encourage you to become a mentor. There are so many negative

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
Elementary Schools
influencers today to which our students are exposed. Becoming a mentor
allows our parents and community members an opportunity to have a posi-
tive influence on our students. For those interested in becoming a mentor
for one of our students, please contact the school counselor.
We look forward to the new school year and working toward the contin-
ued success of our students.
Our principal is Mr. William Marchant and Ms. Karna Kelly is the assis-
tant principal. For additional information on our school, please contact us
at 770.651.4100 or visit our website at http://lithiasprings.dce.schoolinsites.
com.
MASON cREEK ELEMENTARY
Mason Creek Elementary’s faculty and staff are eager to open for the
2009-2010 school year. Mrs. Kathleen French, principal, and Mrs. Dawn Tay-
lor, assistant principal, promise that Mason Creek Elementary’s first school
year will be an exciting adventure for all. Teachers and students will enjoy
the benefits of the latest technology provided in every classroom includ-
ing LCD projection units, wireless internet and mini 9 notebooks. Teachers
will use technology to engage students in their learning and provide experi-
ences that might not otherwise be possible on a regular basis. For instance,
students can experience a virtual field trip through the Smithsonian to see
the accomplishments of great Americans such as Benjamin Franklin (inven-
tor/author/ statesman), Thomas Jefferson (Declaration of Independence),
Meriwether Lewis and William Clark with Sacagawea (exploration), Harriet
Tubman (Underground Railroad), Theodore Roosevelt (National Parks and
the environment), and George Washington Carver (science).
Kindergarteners can take a virtual tour of New York Harbor to see the
Statue of Liberty, third graders could view a podcast on Paul Revere (inde-
pendence), Frederick Douglass (civil rights), Susan B. Anthony (women’s
rights), Mary McLeod Bethune (education), Franklin D. Roosevelt (New Deal
and World War II), Eleanor Roosevelt (United Nations and human rights),
Thurgood Marshall (civil rights), Lyndon B. Johnson (Great Society and vot-
ing rights), and Cesar Chavez (workers’ rights) in order to gain a deeper
understanding of the topics they study in social studies. Fifth graders can
view a podcast on physical and chemical changes in matter to actually see
those changes rather than read about them or hear the teacher lecture.
Discovery Streaming provides opportunities to view video clips related to ev-
ery subject area in every grade level based upon the Georgia Performance
Standards. Technology is a huge part of children’s lives today and making
better use of technology in the classroom is most relevant to them. We are
excited to provide this to our students.
Students will be happy to know that Mason Creek Elementary will open
with a playground for our primary students and a playground for our 3rd
through 5th grade students. Our teachers will sponsor many clubs such
as Road Runners, Chorus for 4th and 5th graders, Math Marvels, Science
Stars, Junior Beta Club, Reading Bowl and more. This is a new beginning
for all of us. Together we can make this new beginning great and set the
tone for the years to come!
For additional information, please contact us by phone at 770.651.4900
or visit our website at http://masoncreek.dce.schoolinsites.com.
MIRROR LAKE ELEMENTARY
At Mirror Lake Elementary School we are very excited about the start of a
new school year! Our mission is to provide students with the essential skills
necessary to become self motivated, lifelong learners. We are committed to
providing a safe, nurturing, challenging and fun learning environment for
all students. We believe that when teachers, staff, parents, and business
partners work together, the school will be successful.
We are so proud of our 2008-2009 Reading Bowl Teams led by Diereshe
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   
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
7J
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Elementary Schools
Collins, Natalie Benton, Allison Piepmeier and Beth Collins. The Chapter
Book team won first place in the Douglas County Kathy Brock Read-
ing Competition. They went on to compete at The University of West
Georgia at the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl where they won second
place. They also came in second place at the Regional Reading Bowl
in Henry County.
In addition to our Reading Bowl Team, we are planning to offer
several extra-curricular activities this year to enhance the curriculum.
The students can participate in the Math, Reading, Art, or Running
Club. We also offer a Drama and Chorus Club where students will end
the session with a performance. Fifth graders who have outstanding
academic achievements will be invited to join the Junior Beta Club.
Mirror Lake has an affordable after school program. The after school
program will provide activities to expose children to the fine arts and
culinary arts.
At Mirror Lake we believe that reading fluently and mastering basic
math addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts is critical
to overall school success. Each student is expected to read 30 books
each school year. When this task is completed, the child’s name will
be announced over the intercom. We have a Math Maniacs incentive
program for students to challenge them to complete 20 math equa-
tions in one minute. As each child becomes a Math Maniac, their
picture is placed on the Math Wall of Fame.
Our principal is Mrs. Cathy Swanger and our assistant principal is
Mrs. Chandell Johnson. For additional information, please contact us
at 770.651.4300 or visit our website at http://mirrorlake.dce.schoolin-
sites.com.
MT. cARMEL ELEMENTARY SchOOL
Welcome to Mt. Carmel Elementary School (MCES) – where family is
an integral part of the tradition of our school. This school was recognized
in the Spring of 2007 as a Georgia School of Excellence.
The technology department is to be commended, as well as our Board
of Education, for a commitment to quality technology education. Tech-
nology replaced computers in our classrooms and added five projection
systems to elementary schools throughout Douglas County.
During the past school year, the school was fortunate to have the
entire school’s bulletin and chalk boards replaced with brand new mag-
netic white boards through the diligent efforts of our PTA. The PTA also
facilitated the installation of a new marquee placed at the entrance of
the car rider line in an effort to better communicate upcoming school
events. The PTA also funded the installation of a new outside classroom
facility.
When the students return this fall, they will find 10 classrooms with
brand new carpet having been installed this summer.
During the upcoming school year, there will be a MCES Student
Council formed. It will be comprised of student representatives from
the third through fifth grade. It is our belief that students elected to the
student council will provide a wonderful leadership training opportunity
of service for our students. This group of student leaders is tomorrow’s
community, state and world leaders!
Principal Dr. John McGill states that he is fortunate to be able to work
with such a wonderfully dedicated group of professional educators,
devoted and caring parents, and super students. Mt. Carmel believes
in the power of family and seeks to maintain that positive atmosphere
through the daily operations of the school. Come see us – the excitement
is catching!
Our assistant principal at Mt. Carmel Elementary is Ms. Heather
Stewart. For additional information, you may contact us at 770.651.4200
or visit our website at http://mtcarmel.dce.schoolinsites.com.

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
Elementary Schools
NEW MANchESTER ELEMENTARY SchOOL
If you are a new resident or a returning family, we are happy to have you
and are looking forward to the new school year! How can parents help their
children be successful in school?
First of all, maintain communi-
cation with the teacher. Parent and
teachers working together are a dy-
namic duo! Both of you want what
is best for the child; both of you have
unique resources and abilities to
support him/her. You can contact the
teacher through email, voicemail, or the old-fashioned way, writing notes!
Make sure your child is keeping up with both class and homework. Ef-
fort goes a long way toward achieving academic goals. It is not up to you
as parent to do the work for the child. However, it is the responsibility of
the adults in the child’s life to make sure he completes the work to the best
of his ability.
While we are talking about homework, please provide a place to do it. It
should be a reasonably quiet place, maybe the kitchen table while you are
preparing dinner or a desk in the child’s room. If the homework time and
place become routine, you will have fewer issues with completing assign-
ments and happier family times at home.
Another important routine that will help your child is a regular bedtime.
Even though your child may say he is not tired or sleepy, studies have
shown that children need much more sleep than you might think. Sleeping
nine or ten hours is good for elementary age children.
After students are up and ready to go, don’t forget breakfast. Avoid
overly sweet cereals or sweet rolls. The breakfast of champions contains
protein and whole grains and maintains energy for the morning. The prob-
lem with too much sugar is that students get an immediate burst of energy
and then crash in a couple of hours. No time to cook breakfast? We serve
breakfast at school from 7:15 a.m. - 7:45 a.m.
The administrators of New Manchester are Dr. Sandra Shuler, Principal,
Mrs. April Gaines, Assistant Principal, and Mrs. Robbin Washington, As-
sistant Principal. You may contact us at 770.651.4400 or visit our website at
http://newmanchester.dce.schoolinsites.com. Please let us know how we
can help you meet your educational goals for your child.
NORTh DOuGLAS ELEMENTARY SchOOL
At North Douglas we are getting ready for a fantastic school year. This year
brings many opportunities in the area of academics as we continue to imple-
ment a standards-based program for grades K-5. The high expectations that
we have established are of the utmost importance in order for the students to
meet the standards of excellence that we aspire for them to achieve.
Parents and guardians play a key role in the educational success of our
student. We encourage you to always demand the best from your student. Your
student should have homework every day. Train them to show you their work.
Also remember that reading comprehension is key to school success so we
encourage parents to read with their students nightly. In addition, we suggest
the following tips for student success: a) reflectively listen to your child, b)
designate an area for homework, c) establish a routine and keep them; and, d)
be actively involved in school events.
Parents, make sure you talk to your children about self-discipline. School
rules are taught beginning on the first day of school. Teachers will review the
school code of conduct with students on the first day of school and your stu-
dent will bring the student handbook home for you to review and discuss with
them. Please talk with your children about self-discipline and appropriate be-
havior for the school environment.
We look forward to working with you for the 2009-2010 school year. Students,
we hope you are ready to start working hard and making positive choices daily.
Everyone at North Douglas will work together so that you can be a successful
student and make your parents and guardians proud. We are excited and look
forward to getting to know you and getting started to work on the first day of
school because learning is a priority at North Douglas.
Our principal is Ms. Fran Davis and our assistant principal is Ms. Kim John-
son. For additional information, you may contact us at 770.651.4800 or visit our
website at http://northdouglas.dce.schoolinsites.com.
SOuTh DOuGLAS ELEMENTARY SchOOL
South Douglas Elementary welcomes all new and returning students
to a year of high expectations. This year we will be “shooting for the STARS”
(Students Targeting And Reaching Standards). Our mission is to provide a
foundation that will enable all students to become lifelong learners and pro-
ductive members of society. At South Douglas we encourage everyone to get
involved.
There are many opportunities to volunteer to participate. Plan to become
part of our fantastic Parent Teacher Organization (PTO). The PTO is involved in
fundraising efforts and helps to organize many events at the school. Parents
are always welcome at South Douglas. Please check in at the office for a visi-
tors pass. If you are visiting a classroom please make prior arrangements with
the teacher.
Attendance is an important factor in every child’s education. Our instruc-
tional day begins promptly at 8:00 a.m. Any student arriving at that time or later
will need to be signed in by a parent in the office. Students may be dropped off
in the car rider line as early as 7:20 a.m.
Communication between home and school is essential. The school news-
letter, The Bear Facts, is the vehicle through which most school news is com-
municated. Please read and post the newsletter so you can keep up with im-
portant dates. The school website is a valuable resource for parents. To view
the school website, please go to http://southdouglas.dce.schoolinsites.com.
School administrators are Mr. Casey Duffey, principal, and Mr. Paul
Spence, assistant principal. The school phone number is 770.651.4500.
   
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
77
Elementary Schools
their families, to a great 2009 -2010 school year. Winston Elementary
has been educating students since 1925 and has experienced many
changes through the years. Its reputation as a strong school comes
from its community, the heart of the school. Once again, we look to
our community and ask that our students, parents, and teachers
commit to working together to meet and/or exceed the learning goals
and to keep the spirit of Winston alive. It is going to be an amazing
year!
Parents, you are always welcome at Winston. Please check in at
the office for a visitor’s pass and be sure to introduce yourself or
say hello to Mr. Dailey, the Principal, Ms. Calderara, the Assistant
Principal, or any of the friendly office personnel and faculty. Morning
announcements begin at 7:50 a.m. where students are recognized
for various accomplishments. Instruction does begin promptly at 8:00
and any student arriving at that time or later will need to be signed in
by a parent. We encourage you to get involved and maintain contact
with your child’s teachers.
Parent-Student-Teacher conferences, PTO (WESCO), frequent
communication and volunteering in your child’s classroom are some
of the ways to participate in your child’s educational development.
We care about each child. With your help, we will continue to make
Winston the best learning place ever.
Please be sure to read the Parent and Student Handbook, visit our
website regularly at www.winston.dce.schoolinsites.com or call us at
770.651.4700. Welcome families and friends!
   
SWEETWATER ELEMENTARY SchOOL
Sweetwater Elementary celebrates success! The school’s mis-
sion statement, “Determined to excel – Dedicated to a lifetime
of Learning,” permeates the school’s learning environment. The
Learning Community, parents, students, staff, business partners
and mentors, of Sweetwater participate in PTA meetings, Family
Fun Nights, the Annual Knight Awards (recognition of students,
parents, business partners and staff), and parenting workshops.
Staff members are continually involved in professional learning
throughout the school year.
Sweetwater Elementary students’ participate in: Pizza Hut’s
Read to Succeed Program; Six Flags 600 Minute Reading promo-
tion; Douglas County Spelling Bee; Douglas County Science Fair;
Douglas County Writing Fair; and Special Olympics. Students’ are
recognized for achieving grade level AR goals annually. Students’
attendance is recognized weekly, quarterly, semi-annually and an-
nually. Students who demonstrate outstanding academic achieve-
ment, character and attendance are recognized quarterly and have
the opportunity to become members of their grade level court dur-
ing our Knight Awards recognition program in May.
Students audition to be a part of ENCORE!, a show choir of stu-
dents from fourth and fifth grades. A newly formed dance team,
Knight Steps, was established during the 2008-09 school year. Stu-
dents in 1st - 5th grades auditioned to be part of this inaugural
group. Other opportunities for students include: Safety Patrol, Flag
Corp, Transportation Corp and Road Runners.
Each spring students share their talents with our own version
of “American Idol” called “Knight Idol.” Students audition their
special talents. Families and guests enjoy the evening of entertain-
ment on the school grounds around our outdoor stage area. Other
spring events include grade level field days and a Medieval Faire.
Our Medieval Faire is a day of learning activities celebrating the
renaissance time period.
Lithia Springs High School students enrolled in child develop-
ment courses work with Sweetwater Elementary students to pro-
vide additional support in reading and math. High school students
work with students in the classroom alongside the teacher.
Sweetwater Elementary has one of the largest after school pro-
grams in the Douglas County School System. About 200 students
stay daily to receive assistance with homework or tutoring in read-
ing, writing and math. After school services are provided daily until
6:00 p.m.
Ms. Teresa Martin is our principal and Ms. Cassia Milhollin is our
assistant principal. If you have questions, please call our school of-
fice at 770.651.4600 or visit our website at http://sweetwater.dce.
schoolinsites.com.
WINSTON ELEMENTARY SchOOL
Winston Elementary is ready to open the doors to an excit-
ing new school year. The hallways are shiny, the classrooms are
adorned to seize inquisitive minds, and our highly qualified teach-
ers and staff are ready to begin. Welcome to Winston, home of the
Wildcats, a place where students face learning head on, a place
to meet the challenges of high expectations, and a place where
students experience success.
We wish to welcome new and returning students, along with
7c
Student & Parent Guide
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2009 - 2010
middle Schools
   
for those of you new to Chapel Hill Middle School.
1. Support Chapel Hill’s High Expectations for
your student:
• Support our focus on academics, positive stu-
dent behavior, and consistent school attendance.
• Trust us, work with us, and your child will have
every opportunity to grow and achieve.
2. Read and discuss the following with your
student:
• CHMS Student Handbook.
• Team Rules and Procedures.
• Georgia Performance Standards www.geor-
giastandards.org
3. Establish a 1-2 hour homework/study time
each night:
• We ask all parents to spend a few minutes
with their student each night and review his/her
homework by going through the agenda and then
looking at the homework assignment. This is the
best method for being actively involved in your stu-
dent’s education on a daily basis. After reviewing
your student’s agenda book and homework, please
sign the agenda.
• Each student should read his/her Accelerated
Reader (AR) book 20 to 30 minutes nightly.
4. Actively communicate with the school:
• Visit the school website to keep up with impor-
tant dates/events.
• Communicate with the teachers using the
chAPEL hILL MIDDLE
The Chapel Hill Middle School (CHMS) faculty
is excited about the start of the 2009-2010 school
year! We have many exciting events prepared
for our Wildcats! Chapel Hill has successfully
met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) since the
inception of the program in 2003-2004. CHMS
student test scores are at an all-time high, while
discipline referrals are at a 5-year low. We believe
that the current student success can be attribut-
ed in part to the increased teacher collaboration
and our Sixth Grade Academy.
Mr. Bill Foster, the CHMS Principal, is proud
of the students and parents represented in the
diverse Chapel Hill community. The Chapel Hill
student body is made up of very hardworking
and high-achieving students. Mr. Foster credits
the students’ many successes to the hard work
of CHMS students, parents, and teachers work-
ing together cooperatively.
Mr. Foster shares the following helpful hints
agenda book.
5. Join the PTSO and volunteer to help out!
• Don’t wait to be called. Complete a PTSO
volunteer form. We welcome your help!
Dr. Jolene Morris and Ms. Amy Ludlow are
our assistant principals. For further information,
you may contact the school at 770.651.5000 or
visit our website at www.chapelhill.dcm.schoo-
linsites.com.
chESNuT LOG MIDDLE
I would like to take this time to introduce
myself. My name is Dr. Nicole A. Keith and I be-
came Principal of Chestnut Log Middle School
in January 2009. Before I became Principal, I
served as Assistant Principal of Chestnut Log
for four years. The 2009-2010 school year will
be my first full year as Principal and I am very
excited.
Chestnut Log Middle School has a lot of
great and exciting activities that we offer stu-
dents throughout the school year such as; 4-H,
Spanish Club, French Club, Champ Program,
and 25 Book Campaign. We also offer com-
petitive softball, football, basketball, soccer, and
track for seventh and eighth grade students who
are academically eligible.
For the 2009-2010 school year, our main fo-
cus will be parent involvement. We are actively
   
2009 - 2010
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Student & Parent Guide
7/
MiDDLE Schools
recruiting parents to come in our school and actively volunteer. If you are
interested in volunteering at our school please call me at 770-651-5100.
Our assistant principal is Mr. Gregory Williams. For further information
about our school, please call 770.651.5100 or visit our website at http://
chestnutlog.dcm.schoolinsites.com.
FAcTORY ShOALS MIDDLE
Welcome to Factory Shoals Middle School (FSMS). The 2009-2010 school
year will be our third year of striving for Knight P.R.I.D.E. – Personal Respon-
sibility In Developing Excellence. We are continuing on our journey to take
a personal responsibility in cultivating young minds and provide them with
the tools to be successful young adults. We look forward to getting to know
you and working with you.
There are several things that will make the transition to FSMS a little
easier. On the first day of school your child received a school handbook.
This is a very important reference for the students and the parents. They
will also receive an Agenda Book which you will need to check and sign
each night. This is our main source of communication between teachers
and parents. You will then know what assignments are expected of your
child and you will know if any teachers have written any notes to you. This is
assigned as a textbook and should be kept in textbook condition. There is a
$10.00 replacement fee for lost Agenda Books.
FSMS offers a wide variety of clubs and sports activities for students.
Students are offered incentives throughout the year through the Gold, Sil-
ver and Bronze Knight Incentive cards which are earned by maintaining
high academic standards and good behavior. Attendance is essential for
learning. Your child must be present in order to learn and progress aca-
demically. Encourage your child to be present daily.
Parents are an essential part of providing students with a successful
educational experience. Programs are offered through our counselors to
help parents during these transitional years. We welcome parents to FSMS
and invite you to join our PTA. Whenever you are in the building, please stop
at the office first, sign in, and get a badge.
Please visit our website for more detailed information on the school
expectations and activities at http://factoryshoalsmiddleschool.dcm.schoo-
linsites.com or you may access it through the Douglas County Schools
website at www.douglas.k12.ga.us. Should you have further questions you
are welcome to contact the school office at 770-651-5800. Our principal is
Mr. James Allen and our assistant principals are Mr. Denny Bailey and Ms.
Annette Riley. Have a great year at Factory Shoals Middle School.
FAIRPLAY MIDDLE
This school year, Fairplay will experience great change. Due to the open-
ing of Mason Creek Middle School, Fairplay’s student enrollment will drop
over 500 students. Our faculty will decrease by half. Though the changes
are drastic and we will miss the students and staff we are losing, our staff
and community are looking forward to this new year. We are committed to
providing the same quality education we have given in the past and we are
excited about the challenges the changes will bring. The mission of Fairplay
Middle School is “To Ensure Learning.” That simple phrase is the founda-
tion of everything we do. If you are the parent of a rising 6th grader or if you
are new to the area and you are curious as to what Fairplay is about, let me
share with you a couple of things that makes Fairplay special. First, we have
an outstanding, experienced faculty. I am confident you will be pleased with
the level of instruction your student receives. You will be encouraged with
the accessibility of our teachers and their willingness to work with you and
keep you informed.
A second thing that makes Fairplay special is closely related to the first.
We really want our parents to be involved in our school. We know we are bet-
ter at what we do when we have the support and help from our parents. We
ask that you get involved in PTO and our volunteer program. We also want
you to communicate with us. We use agendas to give daily communication
as to assignments and homework. You can use the agenda to write notes
back to us. All our teachers have voicemail and email. Email addresses can
be found on our website at http://fairplay.dcm.schoolinsites.com.
Sixth grade is a great year for students and parents. Your willingness to
communicate and work with us will go a long way in helping the transition
to be a great one.
The administrators at Fairplay Middle School are Mr. Monte Beaver,
principal, and the assistant principal is Ms. Angela Carter. For additional
information, you may contact us at 770.651.5300.
MASON cREEK MIDDLE
Welcome Wolves!! We are excited to begin our first year at Mason Creek
Middle School (MCMS). Our building is a state of the art school with out-
standing technology offered to our students and staff. We have overhead
LCD projectors in every classroom, laptops for teachers and students, two
traveling computer labs and two stationary computer labs. While our build-
ing and campus are magnificent it’s what’s inside the building – the people
- that we feel will make a tremendous difference not only in Douglas County
but within the greater scope of our state and our country. Our faculty and
staff believe that all students should be treated with dignity and respect
and through loving and caring relationships students can achieve great
success!
MCMS offers many activities and we encourage students to get involved.
We have numerous sports including football, basketball, softball, soccer,
cheerleading and track. In addition to sports, we have various clubs which
students can join including but not limited to Art Club, Reading Bowl, 4-H
Club, Priority Club and Junior Beta Club. We know the importance of work-
ing together with our community members to help our students achieve
success not only in the classroom but also in the community. In order to
help our students, we encourage our parents and community members
to support our school by joining our PTSA, volunteering in classrooms or
the media center, mentoring students and supporting our fundraising ef-
forts. We encourage our parents, students and community members to
visit our website at http://masoncreek.dcm.schoolinsites.com. Our website
contains a lot of valuable information and resources including teacher and
staff email, classroom assignments and projects, and information on clubs
and activities. You can also sign up for NotifyMe where you can be notified
via email or text of any important school news.
Kay Davis is our principal and our assistant principals are Jamell Bar-
rett and Pegi McCauley. Once again, we are excited for our opening year
and look forward to working together to achieve success for our students
and our community. You may reach us at 770.651.2500 if you have any ad-
ditional questions.
STEWART MIDDLE
We welcome another school year remembering the accomplishments of
the past year, renewing our goals for this upcom-
ing year, all the while laying the stepping stones
for a bright and promising future for our students
and the community. As always, we welcome the
community to come and get to know their com-
munity school better. We sponsor a series of com-
munity forums, academic, athletic and parent
involvement activities. We have programs that
will keep your child(ren) involved in differentiated
remediation and enrichment, those of which will
prove to help your child with understanding how the subject area lessons
are vital to their future.
If Stewart is the choice for you and your family, please consider the fol-
lowing. As parents, it will be your goal to work with the teachers while un-
derstanding that learning does not only take place in the classroom, but
also in the home. As teachers, we understand that each child comes with
CONTINUED ON PAGE 56
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MiDDLE Schools
   
24
Education Information on Comcast
Channel 24
The Douglas County School System posts in-
formation of interest to parents and the public on
Comcast Public Access Television Channel 24.
Items of interest regarding the school system are
posted on the channel. Please view the channel
often for updated information.
a different background, which therefore gives that child a different perspec-
tive on the world. Teachers bring learning to life through imagination, real
world application and modeling. As administrators we charge everyone
with setting the bar high enough for our children to reach, making it acces-
sible and attainable. We support our families and teachers by encouraging
them to remember that children want and need a path. Our doors are open
to all who see the vision of a successful future for their child(ren) and are
proud to share in the commitment of success for your children.
Our school offers many opportunities and programs for your children to
grow socially, physically, emotionally and academically. We will continue to
offer quality education and resources suited to fit the needs of the diverse
school atmosphere. Our teachers and staff members coordinate a range
of events to accommodate our students and parents in numerous areas
where they may have a need for better understanding and interaction be-
tween our school and community. We offer a Saturday Academy, which
provides our students with an extended learning opportunity based on the
CRCT. Our CHAMPS after school program is a scholarship program that
is funded through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant.
It gives students an opportunity to experience learning through smaller
groups, hands on and real life application. The students participate in both
enrichment activities (cooking, physical education, social skills, and more)
while engaging in remedial sessions (math, reading, social studies, lan-
guage arts, and science).
Our continued progress is due to academic improvements and in-
creased community relations. We need you to continue our steady rise to
greatness. Please stop by our school to find out how you can be involved
by becoming a Partner in Excellence, a mentor or by just volunteering your
time. Your time will mean the success of our school.
We encourage you to drop by Stewart Middle School and meet our
faculty and staff. Our principal is Mr. Dewayne Jackson and our assistant
principals are Ms. Laura Bolenbaugh and Mr. Sean Roach. For additional
information, please contact us at 770.651.5400 or visit our website at http://
stewart.dcm.schoolinsites.com.
TuRNER MIDDLE
Turner Middle School welcomes you. The middle school years are an
exciting experience in the development of the young adolescent. Much of
the current research regarding the middle-grade years refers to the middle
school experience as a “turning point” in their lives. Turner represents a
community that has high expectations for students and provides equal
support for students as they move through early adolescence. At Turner,
we believe that “Together we can make a difference!” Families, community,
students and staff are all part of our learning community. Working together
to guide our students to be independent thinkers and lifelong learners are
among our goals. The instructional program addresses both the develop-
ment of the young adolescent and the demand for academic preparations
as students move into a diverse, multicultural, information-driven society.
The three years spent in middle school are crucial years in each child’s
academic, physical, social, intellectual, and emotional development. It is a
launching pad to higher education. The decisions made during these years
contribute to a child’s success in high school and beyond. Every decision is
important. False starts, poor grades and lack of effort can put a student at
risk early in their middle school experience. In addition to the daily school
subjects, Turner students are involved in many activities.
Turner’s staff is highly professional, very diverse, and provides students
with a rich and exceptional middle level experience that focuses on guid-
ing and facilitating the learning process in a safe learning environment.
At Turner all students are invited to take an active part in learning through
personal responsibility and effort. The school community works hard to cre-
ate an environment with lots of opportunities and support.
A great deal can be accomplished when we work together. With team-
work, the middle-level years can be productive and successful. We take
pride in the school community we have developed here and invite you to
contact us about any aspects of our program that may interest you. Your
involvement is critical to the success of our school. At Turner we commit to
creating an environment which focuses on Pride, Achievement, and Excel-
lence.
Our principal is Mr. Eric Collins and our assistant principals are Dr.
Sherritta Campbell and Mr. John Rowe. For further information, please
contact us at 770.651.5500 or visit our website at http://turner.dcm.schoo-
linsites.com.
YEAGER MIDDLE
Welcome to the 2009-2010 school year! We are excited to have you as a
member of the Yeager Middle School (YMS) community this year. Working
together with you, we hope that this will be an enriching and rewarding
year in your student’s K-12 educational experience.
YMS’ students, parents, and community stakeholders have much to be
proud of. During the 2008-2009 school year, YMS was designated a Georgia
Lighthouse School to Watch. This is a prestigious honor, which comes in
recognition of the hard work at continuous improvement by the students
and staff at YMS as well as the school’s focus on the total needs of the
middle school child. In addition, YMS is also home to the reigning county
middle school football champions. This past year, two YMS students also
won first place at the regional science fair. YMS’ reading bowl team and its
Beta Club garnered several individual awards during the past school year
as well. Through the academic and extracurricular activities at YMS, there
are many opportunities for your student to get involved and excel! We look
forward to many more achievements to come.
On August 13 at 5:30 p.m., YMS will hold its first school council meeting
for the year. YMS has one parent- member vacancy on its school council
this year. As a result, the August 13 meeting will provide an opportunity
for parents interested in running for school council to address the general
electing-body of parents. All Yeager parents are invited to attend.
In closing, as you help prepare your student for the transition from
summer break to the fall semester of middle school for 2009-2010, please
remember to:
• Check the school web page for supply lists.
• Be sure to review the student handbook and discipline code with your
student.
• Expect the best each day!
Dr. Garrick Askew is our principal and the assistant principals are Ms.
Debra Snow and Dr. Shirley Sullivan. Please let us know how we can help
you meet your educational goals for your child. For additional information,
please contact us at 770.651.5600 or visit our website at http://yeager.dcm.
schoolinsites.com.
HiGH Schools
   
graduation and beyond is based on your actions
and the decisions you have made prior to this
year. So much of what happens this school year
is based upon YOU.
Your teachers will be at school every day to
offer you the support and the opportunities you
need to be as successful as you wish to be. So
many students do not take full advantage of
what the beginning of school has to offer. Are
you going to make a positive first impression on
your teachers and your classmates sending the
message that you are the type of student that
brings out the best in others? Are you going to
be the type of student who does not waste time
or wait until the last minute to exceed expecta-
tions? Are you going to be involved in activities
that promote scholarship, leadership and com-
munity service? Are you going to be the student
who sets the bar and challenges others to excel
as you do? Will you be one of those students
who demonstrate all the things I have just men-
tioned? I sure hope so.
The opportunities are endless and it is never
too late to make a difference. Why not start
now? I encourage you to set the bar high the
first few weeks of school and each week there-
after working hard to surpass the expectations
of the week before. Work hard to get better at
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faculty and staff, strong degree programs... exciting athletics,
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See the difference it makes when
success is still measured one student
at a time! Come For a Visit!
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770-720-5526
One student at a time...
ALEXANDER hIGh
Welcome to Alexander High School, where
our mission is to provide a quality education for
all students in a safe, supportive environment.
We offer a family friendly school designed to
serve our students and parents in being suc-
cessful to meet the challenges of the 21st cen-
tury. We are proud to announce that Alexander
made Adequate Yearly Progress as defined by
the No Child Left Behind Act (2001), and in-
creased our graduation rate by 6% from the pre-
vious school year. We celebrate the concerted
efforts of our teachers and staff, our students,
parents, and community leaders for helping to
make our school successful in its endeavor to
provide rigorous academic programs, along
with a variety of extracurricular activities.
We offer a host of opportunities where all
students can capture the spectrum of the high
school experience. One of our unique assets
includes a Freshman Mentoring Program in
which our junior/senior students are paired
with a 9th grader to help them transition to high
school successfully. They meet to discuss chal-
lenges that many freshmen face, which can
include academic and social issues. Another
initiative underway is our Adopt- a-Junior Pro-
gram which is designed to foster a supportive
and nurturing relationship between juniors and
2009 - 2010
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Student & Parent Guide

staff members. It is our belief that students thrive
in educational environments where they have at
least one supportive staff member that helps them
navigate their pathway through high school and
beyond.
Alexander is home to region and state champi-
onship titles. Chad Starnes and Ethan Blackstock
hold state championship titles for our wrestling
team, while our track and field state championship
titles are held by Andre Carter, Cameron Reid, and
Jordan Cole. In football, Kevin Mitchell received all
state honors. Our Mock Trial Team garnered the
region championship title, while Mike Hindley,
Ryan Papin, and Drew Milhollin competed nation-
ally in Network Design in Anaheim, California.
We look forward to an exciting year filled with
a host of wonderful opportunities. We dedicate
ourselves to the pursuit of excellence as we soar
to new heights. Our principal is Mr. Nathan Hand
and the assistant principals are Mr. Rob Alford, Mr.
Stephen Beatty, Mr. George Chip, and Ms. Kenja
Parks. If you have questions, please feel free to
contact us at 770.651.6000 or visit our school web-
site at www.alexander.dch.schoolinsites.com.
chAPEL hILL hIGh
Wow, is the summer over already? Where did it
go? Well, it is time for you to prepare for the start
of a new school year. So much of your success at
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2009 - 2010
with an SAT score above 2200. The DCHS Hi Q
Team competed at the state level before being
defeated by Westminster. Graduating seniors
amassed $1.5 million in scholarships, and many
of these students chose to join the armed ser-
vices before getting their postsecondary educa-
tion.
DCHS is looking forward to the start of a new
school year. Schedules are provided to students
on the first day of school. On that day, students
report directly to their advisement classes
where they receive a class schedule, a student
handbook, and any other information pertinent
to attending school. DCHS is on a 4 X 4 block
schedule which means that students attend
four ninety-minute classes each semester and
can earn up to eight credits per school year. The
school day begins at 8:35 each morning and
ends at 3:35 p.m. Both breakfast and lunch are
available daily at a nominal cost to students.
There are a variety of clubs and athletic op-
portunities for all students. Freshmen and new
students will receive a club handbook that
provides detailed information on these oppor-
tunities. Parents also have opportunities to
participate via the School Council and through
athletic and fine arts booster clubs as well as
serving as mentors to students in need. School
events are posted on our school website, and
HiGH Schools
we encourage both parents and students to par-
ticipate whenever possible. Parents are always
welcome.
Our administrative team is principal Con-
nie Craft and assistant principals Erika Coo-
per, Reba Haynes, Nathan Langlois and Andre
Weaver. For additional information, you may
contact us at 770.651.6500 or visit our website
at http://douglascounty.dch.schoolinsites.com.
LIThIA SPRINGS hIGh
As Lithia Springs High School (LSHS) begins
the 2009-2010 school year, we would like to wel-
come you as part of the LSHS family. Freshmen
students, you are beginning a new adventure.
Our mission is to see you and every student re-
ceive the best education possible. Therefore, we
invite you and your parents to be an active part
of our team. We welcome you to visit our school
and challenge your children to get involved in a
variety of activities that are offered. It is very im-
portant for parents to support their children in
making good academic choices and good deci-
sions overall. Please check on your child’s prog-
ress often through e-mail, phone calls, parent
portal, or personal conferences with teachers.
Also, we have parent newsletters that will be
mailed or sent home with students throughout
the school year. These newsletters will provide
all times for there is no same…if you are not
getting better you are getting worse! A wise old
man that I knew as a kid once told me that good
things happen to those who work hard. It seems
the older I get the wiser he becomes.
Our principal is Mr. Sean Kelly and our as-
sistant principals are Ms. Jennifer Baggett, Mr.
Homer Hector, Mr. Gary Morris and Ms. Stefanie
Stinchcomb. If you would like additional infor-
mation regarding Chapel Hill High School, you
may contact us at 770.651.6200 or visit our web-
site at http://chapelhill.dch.schoolinsites.com.
Start the new school year with a focus on
hard work and achievement…everything else
will take care of itself.
DOuGLAS cOuNTY hIGh
Douglas County High School (DCHS), the
home of the Tigers, is proud to be the oldest
high school in the county. In addition to provid-
ing a full academic program that includes both
honors and Advanced Placement (AP) classes,
DCHS is also home to the International Bacca-
laureate Program (IB). The school offers a full
array of athletics and clubs that support a well
rounded high school education.
In 2009, DCHS students competed both aca-
demically and athletically. Preston Cobb was
the STAR student for both DCHS and the county
HiGH Schools
   
2009 - 2010
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Student & Parent Guide
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formance Learning Center, please contact your high school graduation
coach or the PLC at 770.651.6475.
For more information, please contact Dr. Donita Cullen, Academic Co-
ordinator (Principal) at 770.651.6475 or by email at donita_cullen@doug-
las.k12.ga.us.
cOLLEGE AND cAREER INSTITuTE OPENS
By Mandy Johnson, Director of High School Programs
What is the CCI?
The College and Career Institute (CCI) is a collaboration between the
Douglas County School System, West Georgia Technical College, and
the Douglas County Chamber of Commerce. The CCI will provide op-
portunities for students to receive both high school and college credit
through dual enrollment. Students can also receive high school credit
in two high school courses. Students will gain technical skills that in-
crease job prospects whether headed directly into the job market or on
to college. The CCI building is located on the West Georgia Technical
College campus.
What is Dual Enrollment?
Dual Enrollment programs are operated in a partnership between
WGTC and secondary school systems. Students must first meet the re-
quirements of their local school system to establish eligibility for par-
ticipation in any Dual Enrollment program with West Georgia Technical
College. If eligible, students must meet college entrance requirements
and, upon successful completion of required coursework, will receive
both high school and college credit.
Program Participation Requirements For Dual Enrollment
• To participate, a high school student should:
• Be a high school junior (11th grade) or senior (12th grade), and on
track for graduation.
• Be 16 years of age or older.
• Meet with his/her high school counselor to determine eligibility for
a Dual Enrollment program.
• Meet the minimum score requirements, for student’s program of
choice, on any of the following:
o ASSET
o Compass
o SAT (Verbal/Critical Reading: 430 and Math/Mathematics: 400)
o ACT (English: 18 and Math: 16)
• Complete admissions dual credit agreement/signature page, and
WGTC application.
•Complete HOPE funding application at www.GAcollege411.org.
Courses Offered
• Auto Tech
• CAD
• Computer Information Systems
• Cosmetology
• Dental Assisting
• Early Childhood Development
• Graphic Arts (high school credit only)
• HVAC
• Law Enforcement
• Patient Care Assisting
• Patient Care Tech
• Pharmacy Assistant
• Broadcast Video (high school credit only)
• Welding
For more information, please go www.douglas.k12.ga.us or email
CCI@douglas.k12.ga.us
you with information about events and activities. The newsletters will also
be found on the school’s web site. The Freshman Academy Program will
be a highlight for the 2009-2010 school year and the faculty and staff has
eagerly anticipated your arrival.
Programs focusing on academic success and growth for ninth grade
students are in the forefront of education across the nation. The recogni-
tion of an increased dropout rate has led to research and program imple-
mentation. Research supports the theory that the ninth grade year is the
year that can determine if a student will become a high school graduate
or a high school dropout. Thus, focusing on the ninth grade students and
their success has become a priority in schools across the country.
Lithia Springs High School will continue to join other schools in the
district in identifying the needs of ninth grade students and implement-
ing programs to help them be successful immediately upon entering high
school. The Freshman Academy will utilize the strengths of veteran teach-
ers and eagerness to make a difference of new teachers in staffing the
Academy. Programs such as reading incentives, character education, life
skills instruction, and field trips will be incorporated to provide an overall
positive experience for the transitional year from middle to high school.
We are glad to have you with us this year, and we want to assure you
that we will do our best to help your child experience academic, social,
and emotional growth. With your help and cooperation, this should be
an excellent year.
Mr. Larry Ruble is our principal and the assistant principals are Mr.
Alton Bias, Mr. Lee Collins, Ms. Sarah Fredenburg and Ms. Michal Sims.
The administration and faculty here at LSHS look forward to meeting the
Class of 2013 and helping make your Freshman Year Count!
For additional information, please call 770.651.6700 or visit our school
website at http://lithiasprings.dch.schoolinsites.com.
PERFORMANcE LEARNING cENTER
The Performance Learning Center (PLC) is a small, non-traditional
high school program. The PLC is made possible by a partnership between
the Douglas County School System and Communities in Schools – a lead-
ing community-based organization in the nation that helps young people
stay in school. The partnership allows the district to offer Douglas County
families a high school program for students that need an alternative set-
ting to meet their academic goals.
The PLC creates a business-like environment where students complete
assignments using online, computer –based curriculum infused with
project-based learning. In addition, PLC students have opportunities to
participate in job shadowing experiences, service learning, youth appren-
ticeship, mentoring, and dual enrollment with technical and four-year col-
leges.
Since opening in August 2006, the Douglas County Performance
Learning Center has served over 300 high school students with more than
90% of eligible seniors earning a high school diploma.
The Douglas County PLC earned recognition at both the state and
national levels in 2008. The PLC was recognized for having the highest
average student daily attendance and highest graduation rate among Per-
formance Learning Centers nationwide.
In addition to the academic success experienced by PLC students, they
have had the opportunity to participate in a number of enriching activities.
Students participated in September Saturdays, hosted a legislative visit,
and tutored students at two Douglas County elementary schools.
This year, the Performance Learning Center will be staffed with an aca-
demic coordinator, services coordinator, administrative assistant, and five
learning facilitators. The staff and students are looking forward to another
successful year. If you are interested in applying for admission to the Per-

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
BRIDGES: Connecting Students with the
Means to Graduate
2009-2010 marks the second year of the $2.8 million Smaller Learning Com-
munities (SLC) grant from the U. S. Department of Education. The grant is
called BRIDGES, which is an acronym for Building Rigor in Douglas to Gradu-
ate Every Student. It is designed to improve student achievement by sponsor-
ing events, activities, and programs that help students succeed in high school
and prepare for post-secondary success. BRIDGES connects students with
the means to graduate and helps them determine a plan for the future.
During the first year of implementation, BRIDGES served students in a
number of ways. Each high school offered free after-school tutoring twice a
week with transportation, a free SAT and ACT practice test session, and other
academic enrichment activities for students. BRIDGES took students to the
Skills USA Career Expo, the Atlanta National College Fair, West Georgia Tech-
nical College, the University of West Georgia, and Southern Polytechnic State
University. There were also academic field trips to the Chick-fil-A corporate
office, the Georgia Aquarium, the Bodies Exhibit, and Dialog in the Dark.
BRIDGES joined with Partners in Education (PIE) to coordinate two Shadow
Days for nearly 250 students who had the opportunity to learn about differ-
ent occupations and industries from local businesses. Activities like these are
planned for year two of the BRIDGES grant.
BRIDGES also provides support to each high school’s Freshman Acad-
emy, including a three-day camp for rising 9th graders during the summer.
The Freshman Camp helps students transition into high school by previewing
academic classes and providing enrichment activities to make students feel
connected. This year’s Camp was held in July with nearly 400 students partici-
pating. Last week, each school held a Freshman Fiesta for incoming students
and a parent night.
There is something for everyone in BRIDGES and this year will be no ex-
ception. For more information about activities and events, go to the school
system website www.douglas.k12.ga.us or contact Ruby Byers at 770.651.2078
or BRIDGES@douglas.k12.ga.us. Each high school has a BRIDGES College
and Career Coach who coordinates the grant activities.
BRIGhTEN AcADEMY
Brighten Academy is looking forward to its fourth year as Douglas Coun-
ty’s only K-8 charter school. After graduating our first group of 8th graders
in 2009, we anticipate having another great year as we implement changes
to better meet the needs of our students, families, and staff. For example,
we are restructuring our middle school to include a 6th Grade Academy,
along with more traditional 7th and 8th grade middle school programs. We
are also excited to launch a new physical fitness program this year, while
maintaining our commitment to teach Spanish in all grade levels.
We also welcome several new staff members to our Brighten family. Ms.
Darlene Wheeler joins us as our receptionist. She is anxious to meet our
students and families as she welcomes all back to school. Mr. Robert Kelley
will teach math and science to our 6th grade students. Mr. Kelly’s impres-
sive blend of educational philosophy and experience should compliment
Brighten’s mission. In second grade, Ms. Rachel Garner will bring great
enthusiasm and creative energy to her instruction, while Ms. Sandi Gore
will implement several new initiatives as the leader of physical education
classes. After years of service to Brighten as our music teacher, Mrs. Laura
Rogers will instruct 7th and 8th grade students in language arts. Given her
familiarity with school, she should have no problem staying “tuned in” to the
needs of the children.
Brighten Academy is a public charter school, open to all residents of
Douglas County. The school works closely with the Douglas County School
System and the Georgia Department of Education to ensure compliance
with all requirements of the ‘No Child Left Behind’ laws and the goals out-
lined in the school’s charter. We hold open registration every February, and
interested parents can obtain more information about our school at www.
brightenacademy.com.
The Curriculum Director, Lisa McDonald, is one of the school’s original
founders, and she will be happy to answer any questions about Brighten.
Mrs. McDonald can be reached at 770-615-3680 or by email at lmcdonald@
brightenacademy.com.
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
cJ
21st Century community Learning
Centers After School Program Grants
We currently administer three state funded grants during after
school program hours called the 21st Century Community Learning
Center (CCLC) Grants. All three programs target students who are in
need of additional academic assistance at selected sites. Students
must apply for available slots and meet selection criteria. Charac-
teristics of qualifying students includes: academic performance is
below grade level; the student does not meet state standards on
tests; and/or failing grades in one or more subjects/classes.
The 21st CCLC Program provides federal funds to local schools
and organizations to operate after school programs for the purpose
of
• Providing opportunities for academic enrichment and tutorial
services for students.
• Offer students a broad array of additional services, programs,
and activities to reinforce and complement the regular academic
program.
• Offer families of 21st CCLC students opportunities for literacy
and related educational development.
The elementary school grant called SMART (Students Maximiz-
ing After School Resource Time) was awarded in the fall of 2004.
The SMART program serves 75 students per site at Annette Winn,
Burnett, Eastside, and Sweetwater Elementary Schools. The focus
of this program is to provide a safe after school environment, rein-
force skills taught, and additional opportunities to increase student
achievement. This grant ended on June 30, 2009 and we have sub-
mitted a new application to the Georgia Department of Education.
The new grant application announcements are not expected until
mid to late August of 2009.
The middle school grant was awarded in the fall of 2006 and is
called CHAMP (Champion High Achievement in Middle School
Performance). CHAMP serves 60 students per site at Chestnut Log,
Stewart, and Turner Middle Schools. The focus of this program is
to provide middle school students an opportunity to catch up on
lacking skills, participate in healthy after school program activities
that are challenging, enriching, and focused on fostering student
success.
The high school grant was awarded in the summer of 2007 and
is called CHAMP2 (Champion High Achievement to Maximize Po-
tential). CHAMP2 serves 50 students per site at Douglas County
and Lithia Springs High Schools. The focus of this program is to
help offset the academic struggle that occurs in the transition from
middle school to high school and students falling behind on credits
by targeting at-risk 9th-12th grade students.
All three programs provide qualifying students with a wide vari-
ety of after school activities such as academic tutoring, homework
assistance, academic enrichment activities, and cultural/fine arts
education, career pathways, technological and character educa-
tion. Students get to participate in yearly field trips and hear speak-
ers on topics such as life skills, drug awareness, and violence/gang
prevention. Students in the program receive a daily snack and are
provided with transportation home each day.
For more information about the 21st Century Learning Center
Program please contact Mitzi Teal, 21st CCLC Project Director at
770.651.2039 or email her at mitzi.teal@douglas.k12.ga.us. You may
contact individual schools regarding student eligibility and qualifi-
cation requirements.
   
Food service Information
The Food Service Department of the Douglas County School Sys-
tem offers every child attending school breakfast, lunch, and in many
schools an after-school snack. The department also offers a number
of other services to the students including the menu nutrient analysis,
carb counts, and special diet counseling. Detailed information includ-
ing menus can be found on the school district web-site, www.douglas.
k12.ga.us.
Due to the sharply rising fuel prices and food costs the meal prices
for the 2009-2010 school-year will be as follows:
Breakfast
All grades - $1.00
Adult Breakfast - $1.60
Lunch
Elementary School - $1.65
Middle School - $1.75
High School - $1.80
Adult Lunch - $2.50
The Cafeteria Cash online payment system will be available again
in 2009-2010. If you have a credit card and your child’s student ID num-
ber you can take advantage of the system. Prepayment assures you
that the money intended for your child’s school meals gets into your
child’s account. You won’t need to worry about lost, stolen, or unintend-
ed spending of your child’s lunch money. The Cafeteria Cash system
can be accessed at www.cafeteriacash.com.
Free and reduced price meal applications will be distributed by
each school at the beginning of the school year. Applications should
be turned in as soon as possible. In the event that your family circum-
stances change during the school year, applications are always avail-
able from the school office or from the school’s food service manager.
Parents with children that require special diets must submit a doc-
tor’s note to the school detailing the child’s needs. Under most circum-
stances, the school will be able to meet your child’s needs. In some cir-
cumstances it is advisable for the family to provide the child’s meals.
The Food Service Department encourages parents to review
menus and the nutrient content each
week. This is an excellent opportu-
nity to teach health and good
eating practices. New foods
or recipes will be offered
throughout the year and
we ask that you encour-
age your children to try
something new. The
food service staff is
committed to continu-
ing to offer high qual-
ity and nutritionally
balanced food choices
every day.
   
You have the power to save electricity — and money. Making simple changes to
improve the energy effciency of your home may require some short-term energy of
your own, but will pay off in long-term savings.
At GreyStone Power, we want to help you manage your energy costs. For
more information about how to save money on your electric service bill, visit
www.greystonepower.com. Your cooperative is not the only one with power.
You have it, too.
You have the power to control your energy costs.
www.greystonepower.com www.greystonepower.com


Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
c7
9486 Highway 5
Arbor Square Shopping Center
770.920.1099
4924-G South Cobb Dr.
Smyrna
770.432.3801
6590 Tara Boulevard
Jonesboro
770.961.5286
1368 Atlanta Rd.
Marietta
770.432.1815
Mariachi Band
Tuesdays 6:30pm to 9pm
Purchase of 2 Combination
Dinners 1-30 & 2 Drinks
Dine in only. No carryouts. Limit 1 per table. Not valid with any other discount, on
steaks or fajita meals, or on Fridays. Monterrey’s Highway 5.
Purchase of 2 Lunch
Specials & 2 Drinks
Dine in only. No carryouts. Limit 1 per table. Not valid with any other discount, on
steaks or fajita meals, or on Fridays. Monterrey’s Highway 5.
Lunch Specials Everyday! 11am to 3pm
Open Mon. - Thurs. 11am to 10pm
Fri. 11am to 10:45pm, Sat. 11am to 10:30pm & Sun. 11am to 10pm
Serving Smyrna
for 30 years
Serving Douglasville
for over 28 Years
Monterrey - Highway 5 - Supporting our Local Schools
After School Programs
All elementary and most middle schools offer After School Pro-
grams (ASP) which are designed to provide a safe, relaxed, and enjoy-
able environment for its elementary and middle school students dur-
ing after school hours.
Our ASP provides enrichment activities, social interaction with
peers and homework help in a well supervised, structured setting
for its elementary (K-5) and middle (6-8) school students. Students
participating must be enrolled in the school. Eligible students with
disabilities who enroll in the After School Program will be provided
reasonable accommodations and/or modifications in order to afford
them meaningful access to the program. Accommodations are con-
sidered reasonable where the provision of them would not result in a
fundamental alteration of the program or the services offered by the
program or create an undue financial or administrative burden. The Af-
ter School Program does not provide educational services to students
and is not intended to be an educational program.
Average program hours are 3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday and may vary depending on each site. Our programs are closed
on holidays, teacher workdays, conference days, early release days,
and summer break. Students wishing to participate must have a cur-
rent registration sheet on file. For detailed program information and
hours please contact your child’s school.
PROGRAM FEES
$10.00 registration fee per family
$8.00 tuition per day, per child (regardless of amount of time in the
program).
Tuition is due weekly in advance and can be given to the ASP office
staff between the hours of 3:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
As funds are available, partial scholarships for the ASP may be
available to students based upon need. Financial Assistance Applica-
tions are available at each individual school after school program site.
The Douglas County School System After School Program is made
possible through the generous support of United Way of Metropolitan
Atlanta, Communities in Schools of Georgia, Communities in Schools
of Douglas County, and through student tuition.
For additional information contact Mitzi Teal, Executive Director of
Communities in Schools of Douglas County at 770.651.2039 or contact
individual schools for ASP registration or questions.
special needs Preschool
We are looking forward to another great year in Special Needs Pre-
school! We now have a new program name: LEAP (Learning & Early
Assessment for Preschoolers). We will continue to evaluate and serve
children with disabilities, and work with daycares and Pre-K programs
throughout the county to provide early interventions for children at risk.
If you have a concern about your child’s development, please call
the LEAP Program at 770.651.4337. You may have concerns with your
child’s vision, hearing, speech sounds, language development, motor
skills, social/behavioral skills, or early learning/readiness skills. If you
have concerns in any of these areas, please call. We are here to assist
you in providing early intervention services for your child.
The LEAP program provides vision screenings, hearing screenings,
speech screenings and developmental screenings for preschoolers
in Douglas County. In addition, our program provides vision therapy
services, services for children with hearing impairments, services for
children with developmental delays, speech therapy, physical therapy
and occupational therapy for children who meet eligibility criteria for
these programs.
   
cc
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Enrichment, Encouragement, Recognition and Reward – these are a few
of the ways that the Douglas County Public Education Trust Fund, Inc. (PET)
supports the students, staff and schools of the Douglas County School Sys-
tem. PET was formed in 1993 and is celebrating 16 years of service. With the
support of individuals, corporate and community organizations, the founda-
tion has awarded hundreds of thousands of dollars over the years in grants
and scholarships to assist students, teachers and programs not already
funded by local, state and federal dollars.
PET’s mission is to generate, monitor and dispense funds; to provide fi-
nancial support to programs for enrichment; and to encourage, recognize
and reward excellence in the students and staff of the Douglas County
School System. Funds come from a variety of sources including personal and
business donations, honorariums and memorial gifts, endowments, grants,
and fund raising events.
During the 2008-2009 school year PET awarded $13,750 in scholarships
and $11,972.42 in classroom initiative mini-grants to teachers. All Douglas
County Teachers of the Year also received financial recognition from PET.
Two major benefactors stepped forward during the 2006-2007 school year
to partner with PET and offer scholarships for high school students planning
to pursue post-secondary schools. The Billie Yancey Memorial Scholarship
was established in honor of the late Ms. Yancey by her family. The endow-
ment funds a scholarship for a student from each of the four high schools
in Douglas County. This year’s recipients of the scholarships received $1,250
each. They are Zachary Cowart, Alexander High School; Taylor Poltzer, Chapel
Hill High School; and Sarah Head, Lithia Springs High School.
First Commerce Community Bank also partnered with PET to fund two
$2,000 scholarships that are renewable each year by the recipients based on
their achievement in college. The first year recipients were Andrew McCarty
of Alexander High School and Sonia Serrano of Chapel Hill High School. The
second year recipients were Alexis Boddy of Chapel Hill High School and
Claire Burns of Douglas County High School.
In celebration of their 25-year anniversary, Gold’s Gym offered a $500 schol-
arship to a Class of 2009 graduating senior from each of the high schools
in the Douglas County School System. This year’s recipients are: Alixanna
Burg, Alexander High School; Rosemary Gay, Chapel Hill High School; Ed-
ward Preston Cobb, Douglas County High School and Kevin Magby, Lithia
Springs High School.
A total of $11,972.42 in Classroom Initiative Mini-Grants was awarded by
PET to 13 teachers in eight schools for use in 2009-2010. Among the projects
funded by the grants were: Hats Off To Reading and Tag, You’re It! at Bright
Star Elementary School; Problem Solving with Chess and Jingle Jamming
with Grammar at Dorsett Shoals Elementary School; Every Day Counts Part-
ner Games at Holly Springs Elementary School; Leveled Book Room, Vocabu-
lary Acquisition, Reading Comprehension Game, Language and Literacy for
School and Home; and Learning to Write in the Lower Grades at Mirror Lake
Elementary School; Mathapalooza at New Manchester Elementary School;
Reading Success at Sweetwater Elementary School; The Peach Bowl at Win-
ston Elementary School; Reading Enriched by Adult Community Helpers,
Kids Discover Project; Listen and Learn Together and Math a la Cart at Ma-
son Creek Middle; and Economic Crisis 2009 Tools for Survival at Alexander
High School.
The PET Board is chaired by Tim Williams, Vice President of Corporate Ad-
ministration, GreyStone Power Corporation. Other board members are Terry
Baggett, Athena Bryant, Sissy Bunch, Julian Carter, Verline Dennis, Jean
Fouts, Jimmy Haddle, Paul Hawkinson, and Betty Shows.
If you are interested in making a donation or serving as a PET Board Mem-
ber or committee volunteer, contact Tim Williams at 770.370.2038 or tim.wil-
liams@greystonepower.com, or Douglas County School System Community
Relations Director Karen Stroud, 770.651.2037or karen_stroud@douglas.
k12.ga.us.
Horse Riding Lessons
Beginner to Grand Prix
Horse Starting and Training
Full Board Available
Shows and Clinics
16 Stall Horse Barn
with Lounge
Large Covered Arena
with Mirrors
Full and Small Sized
Dressage Arenas
Round Pen
Jumps and Trails
Leslie O’Neal Olsen
Owner, Trainer, Clinician
USDF Grand Prix
Silver & Bronze Medalist
USEF Level “R” Judge
395 Powell Chapel Rd.
Villa Rica, GA 30180
Barn: 770-459-1417
Karen Mackay - Manager:
404-406-7922
DressageSimplySouthern.com
Classical Training For The Horse And Rider
Public EDUCaTion Trust, Inc.
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
c/
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less rlan rvo miles íiom 1annei Neuical Cenrei. µioviues
iesiuenrs oí rle Caiiollron communiry virl a convenienr anu
losµiraLle locarion íoi ieceiving µosr-acure caie íolloving
losµiralizarion oi long reim caie vlen rle rime aiises.
156 Pine Knoll Diive
Caiiollron. GA
Plone: (¯¯0) S32-S243
WWW.CYPRESSHEALJHCARE.NEJ
Pine KnoII Nutsing c RehabiIiIaIion CenIet
Ior a tour and/or more inIormation please call or go online at...
Pine Knoll oííeis nor only µiogiessive ielaLilirarion seivices
anu rle Lesr in long-reim caie. Lur also a comíoiraLle
lomelike enviionmenr íoi youi loveu one ro enioy. We µlan
inuiviuually íoi rle caie µioviueu íoi youi loveu one
incluuing some oí rle seivices anu ameniries lisreu Lelov.
156 Pine Knoll Diive
Caiiollron. GA
Plone: (¯¯0) S32-S243
Pine Knoll Nursing and Rehab is located just minutes from
downtown Carrollton and less than two miles from Tanner Medical
Center. We provide residents of West Georgia and East Alabama
with a convenient and hospitable location for subacute rehab, as
well as outpatient rehab.
Pine Knoll features its own transportation and dedicated driver for
resident outings, the latest in new release DVDs showing daily,
wireless internet and a dedicated computer for resident use. In
addition, Pine Knoll offers the latest in rehab and wound care
techniques. Come for a tour today and meet our friendly staff.
At Pine Knoll Nursing and Rehab Center, our mission is to manage illness with skill and
compassion and provide peace of mind to residents and families through knowledge and respect of
individual choices, while promoting optimum recovery for our residents.
We strive to provide resources for the total health and well being of all people in our care and
employment, while recognizing and respecting the individual value of each one.
The 2009-2010 Douglas County Teacher of the Year selection process
officially began recently with individual schools selecting a teacher to rep-
resent their school in the program. The selected teachers came together
on June 1 at a workshop designed to assist them as they complete their
applications.
Karen Stroud, Community Relations Director, hosted the workshop and
advised the teachers, “The candidate for Douglas County Teacher of the
Year should be an extremely dedicated, knowledgeable and skilled teacher
who is planning to continue in active teaching status in Douglas County.”
Mr. Myron Terry, 2008-2009 Douglas County Teacher of the Year, was the
guest speaker. He extended his congratulations to the group and stated
what a great honor it was for them to have been chosen to represent their
school. He provided words of encouragement and advice to the teachers
as they make preparations to complete their applications. Mr. Terry ad-
vised the group that he felt privileged to have been able to represent Fac-
tory Shoals Middle School and be chosen as the Douglas County Teacher
of the Year.
Teacher of the Year applications were completed by July 31, 2009. A se-
lection committee will choose the top six candidates, two from each level.
The selection committee will then interview these candidates and observe
them teaching in a classroom setting. The Douglas County Teacher of the
Year will be named on October 15 at First Baptist Church of Douglasville.
The reception will begin at 4:30 p.m. and the public is invited to attend.
The school level teachers of the year are as follows: Ryan Adams, Al-
exander High School; Cenci Suber, Annette Winn Elementary School;
Joyce Fagelman, Arbor Station Elementary School; Tracy Moore, Beulah
Elementary School; Jonathan Casey, Bill Arp Elementary School; Kelda
Brewer, Bright Star Elementary School; Lisa Broadhead, Burnett Elemen-
tary School; Jennifer Petty, Chapel Hill Elementary School; Swati Shah,
Chapel Hill High School; Angela Haynes, Chapel Hill Middle School;
Nina Hollis, Chestnut Log Middle School; Tabitha Brown, Dorsett Shoals
Elementary School; Mark Henson, Douglas County High School; Lauren
Cook, Eastside Elementary School; Karen Daniel, Factory Shoals Elemen-
tary School; Gillian Phillips, Factory Shoals Middle School; Rhonda Da-
vis, Fairplay Middle School; Leslie Rutledge, Holly Springs Elementary
School; Amos Bishop, Lithia Springs Elementary School; Michael “Moe”
Bruner, Lithia Springs High School; Jennifer Catlin, Mirror Lake Elemen-
tary School; Kelly Witt, Mt. Carmel Elementary School; Darnita Williams,
New Manchester Elementary School; Sharon Crenshaw, North Douglas
Elementary School; Thomas Bruno, South Douglas Elementary School;
Juanito Redwine, Stewart Middle School; Dina Doty, Sweetwater Elemen-
tary School; Chris Willis, Turner Middle School; Alicia Williams, Winston
Elementary School; and Ashleigh Smith, Yeager Middle School.
2009 – 2010 School Level
Teachers of the Year
c0
Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
   
Georgia Marketing
Teacher of the Year
Congratulations to Stacey Orr, Cha-
pel Hill High School, who was named
the 2009 Marketing Teacher of the Year
by the Georgia Marketing Education
Association. Ms. Orr is a marketing
teacher at Chapel Hill High School.
The purpose of this award is to
recognize teachers who are providing
outstanding career and technical edu-
cation programs for students in mar-
keting. Recipients of this award have made significant contributions
toward innovative, unique and novel programs that are serving to im-
prove and promote marketing and career and technical education.
Ms. Orr was honored in July at the Georgia Association for Career
and Technical Education Conference. Congratulations Ms. Orr.
   
Georgia School
Psychologist of the Year
We extend our congratulations to
Kim Evans who has been named the
2009 School Psychologist of the Year
by the Georgia Association of School
Psychologists.
Ms. Evans exhibits leadership, ef-
fectiveness and determination in her
work not only with Douglas County stu-
dents and staff but with everything she
is involved with. We are very proud of
Kim and feel honored to have her as a part of the Douglas County
School System.
Ms. Evans currently serves as the Advocacy Chair for the Georgia
Association of School Psychologists. She was recently selected by
the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) as a 2008
“Difference Maker” on Behalf of Children.
   
sAT online Prep Course
Free SAT Online Prep Classes are offered to all Georgia high
school students in grades 9-12. Students can sign up for the course
by obtaining a passcode from their guidance counselor. Once regis-
tered, students do not need to re-apply since the subscription for the
course rolls over from year to year as long as the student is actively
using the site. After registering, students can access the course 24
hours a day, seven days a week.
The online resource provides an in-depth class that helps stu-
dents fully understand the SAT’s math, critical reading, and writing
sections. Course features include:
• Interactive instruction organized into 18 lessons
• Personalized score reports
• Six official practice tests and hundreds of practice questions
• Automated essay scoring
Further information may be obtained from a student’s high school
guidance counselor or by calling the Georgia Department of Educa-
tion at 404-656-6854.
   
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide

Partners in Education
The Douglas County
School System invites you
to join Partners in Educa-
tion - A program that offers
you the opportunity to share
your expertise, time, ideas
and your experience to enrich
the students in your community.
Partners agree to specific goals and
activities for the benefit of students.
During the 2008-2009 school year, there were
324 active partnerships in the program.
The Partners in Education Committee is comprised of business repre-
sentatives and representatives from several schools. Ms. Vicki Harshbarg-
er, GreyStone Power Corporation, currently serves as the Chairman of the
committee.
Upcoming Partners in Education events include:
• Fall Kick-Off – August 20, 2009
• Winter Workshop – January 20, 2010
• Year-End Recognition – May 20, 2010
All events will start at 8:00 a.m. and the locations will be announced
later.
How Can My Business Help Students?
Opportunities are virtually unlimited. These are just a few ways you can
help:
• Assist/support school activities.
• Provide tutoring and classroom help.
• Give certificates/awards for academic achievement, perfect atten-
dance, and good citizenship.
• Bring your skills into the classroom teaching employment readiness
and presentation on curriculum-related topics.
• Donate supplies and equipment.
• Award mini-grants to teachers.
• Provide teacher of the year recognition and/or host teacher apprecia-
tion events.
How Does It Work?
There are two types of partnerships designed to fit the needs of the busi-
ness and the school.
Partners in Education
The Partners in Education Program is to encourage greater student
academic designed achievement by developing partnerships between indi-
vidual schools and area businesses, industries and community groups.
It also involves an on-going commitment between a business and a
school that grows and develops throughout the school year. The school
and partner develop a comprehensive plan of action which will:
• Support and enrich the education of students
• Encourage and support the school staff.
• Recognize and reciprocate the contributions of the partner.
Partners At Large
This type of partnership gives businesses the opportunity to work with
a specific program, curriculum, or group across several schools. The rela-
tionship between a school and business is limited to the offered program.
It can be as simple as donating excess or outdated materials, or being a
major contributor to a major project. It is not an ongoing relationship with
one school.
Participant Benefits
Regardless of which partnership you choose, the most important result
of your company’s participation will be to broaden the learning experience
of students by exposing them to your staff, your business, and to actual
business situations.
Businesses also gain heightened public awareness and the per-
sonal satisfaction that comes with having a role in the process which
molds our future work force.
Direct benefits include:
• A better educated work force
• An opportunity to become known
• Recognition in school and community publications
• The introduction of your company to the school community
Many businesses report a positive effect on the morale of everyone
involved and an increase in the visibility to potential customers.
How Can My Business Be a Partner?
It’s Simple! First consider:
• Are you and your employees interested in helping a school?
• What are the resources your company has to offer - human and
material?
• How many employees can participate?
• How much time can your company invest in partnership activities?
• What age group do you prefer: elementary, middle, high school or
a system-wide partnership?
• What school is most convenient to your business?
If you are interested, please call the Douglas County Board of Edu-
cation at 770.651.2037.
Make the call and join Douglas County’s Partners in Education Pro-
gram today!
The Douglas County Partners in Education Program is a cooperative ef-
fort between the Douglas County School System in partnership with busi-
nesses and organizations in the Douglas County/Douglasville area.
   

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Character Education
Our school system strives to build a common set of values
among students, staff, and the community by focusing each week
on a different character concept like diligence, courage, coopera-
tion, and fairness. Our schools are not only attempting to teach
about the concepts but are also trying to encourage students to
apply the concepts in their daily lives.
We have been involved in many activities in a system-wide effort
to help our community. Many schools get involved with projects
such as food drives during the holidays to help meet the needs of
families. Several high schools have sponsored Red Cross blood
drives and all schools participate in United Way and Relay for Life
charities.
Character Education can improve the atmosphere of schools
by teaching students to live by positive values and help make a
difference in our society. It is a part of the curriculum and can help
our students, families, schools, and community succeed. The state
has adopted a set of character concepts that schools work with the
family and community to teach. The character words for the 2009-
2010 school year are listed below.
Week of August
3rd - School pride: the proper delight or satisfaction in your
school’s achievements and status
10th - Punctuality: being on time, prompt; arriving at the right
time
17th - Leadership: guiding and showing the way for others
24th - Respect for others: to think a lot of someone and valuing
beliefs and rights of others
31st - Gratitude: the act of being thankful to somebody or showing
appreciation toward another
Week of September
8th - Honesty: being truthful and fair
14th - Patience: wait calmly without complaining
21st - Sportsmanship: the ability to take winning or losing without
gloating or complaining
28th - Self control: the willpower to control actions and emotions
Week of October
5th - Respect for authority: valuing and respecting others in official
positions
12th - Obedience: willingness to follow instructions and doing what
you are told
19th - Self respect: ability to demonstrate a positive opinion of your-
self
26th - Trustworthiness: dependable and reliable
Week of November
2nd - Caring: ability to show concern and care for others
9th - Patriotism: respect and devotion to one’s country
16th - Cooperation: working together for a common purpose
30th - Cheerfulness: good humored, bright and pleasant
Week of December
7th - Kindness: friendly, considerate, and willing to help others
14th - Generosity: willingness to share and not be selfish
Week of January
4th - Fairness: honest and just.
11th - Citizenship: demonstrating individual rights and privileges as
citizens of the United States
18th - Tolerance: respecting the individual differences, views, and
beliefs of others
25th - Courtesy: polite and well mannered toward others
Week of February
1st - Compassion: showing concern and sympathy for others
8th - Loyalty: true and faithful to love, promise, duty, or other obliga-
tions
22nd - Noble: morally good, superior in character or nature
Week of March
1st - Perseverance: to work hard without giving up
8th - Courage: to meet a challenge without giving into fear
15th - Creativity: having imagination and inventiveness
22nd - Diligence: Working hard in a careful, steady manner
29th - Determination: to carry out a purpose with great willpower
and purpose
Week of April
12th - Integrity: adhere to a code of values
19th - Respect for the Environment: appreciating our responsibility
to the environment
26th - Cleanliness: maintaining neatness and tidiness
Week of May
3rd - Appreciation: expression of admiration, gratitude, and value
10th - Responsibility: carrying out a duty or task carefully or thor-
oughly
17th - Friendship: supporting and relationship with another
24th - Review of all words
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
/|
For Children & Adults
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Obesity
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Autism
Brain/Spinal Trauma
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1899 Lake Road - Suite 222  Hiram, GA 30141
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Remember those role models from your childhood who
were always there when you needed them: your friend’s par-
ents, your babysitter, the youth director at church, or that
special teacher who took you under her wing? These are the
people that shape and mold children’s lives and one of these
people just might be you! Mentoring is a great way to become
involved, engaged and make a difference in someone’s life.
Mentors provide encouragement, advice, and friendship to
students in the Douglas County School System.
The MATCH Mentoring Program is a school-based mentor-
ing program that connects students in Douglas County with
a caring adult. We are looking for adults who want to make a
difference by giving just one hour a week of their time to men-
tor. After submitting an application, successfully completing
a background check and attending a training class, mentors
will be matched with a student at the school of their choice.
Every school in our district needs mentors! If you are inter-
ested in becoming a mentor, please contact 770.651.3445 or
mentor@douglas.k12.ga.us.
Take Time To Mentor
   
Opportunities to participate in scholastic and interscholastic
activities are numerous for all eligible middle and high school
students. Students participating in interscholastic sports and fine
arts at school tend to have higher grade-point averages, better at-
tendance rates, lower dropout rates and fewer discipline problems.
The activities provide students expanded learning opportunities
which include teamwork, respect for self and others, the desire to
win, mental and physical self-discipline, and pride in their school
and community.
All four high schools in the Douglas County School System are
members of the Georgia High School Association (GHSA) and
abide by its by-laws as well as regulations of the Board of Educa-
tion. Alexander, Douglas County and Lithia Springs High School
compete in Region 5-AAAA. Chapel Hill High School competes
in Region 4-AAAAA. The objective of the GHSA is the promotion
of education in Georgia from a mental, physical, and moral view-
point, to standardize and encourage participation in athletics, and
to promote sportsmanship and an appreciation for and study of
music, speech, and other fine arts through Region and State com-
petitions. All eight middle schools in the Douglas County School
System compose the Middle School Athletic Conference and abide
by the by-laws established for the conference as well as applicable
regulations of the GHSA and the Douglas County Board of Educa-
tion.
Participation in interscholastic activity programs in the Douglas
County School System is entirely voluntary. The opportunity to par-
ticipate in the program is extended to all eligible students who are
willing to assume the responsibilities congruent with the privilege.
Students must meet residency and academic requirements and
abide by the Douglas County Code of Conduct. Before participat-
ing, students are required to have a GHSA Pre-participation Physi-
cal Form completed by a medical doctor, and complete the Doug-
las County School System Release/Emergency Medical Form. All
forms are available from local schools. High school students par-
ticipating in interscholastic activities, as well as other privileged
activities, are subject to random drug testing. Each school has an
Athletic Director which can offer assistance in regards to sports
and programs offered at each school.
Vital to the success of our interscholastic programs is com-
munity and parental support. Interscholastic activities are funded
through ticket revenues as well as fund raisers. Parents are en-
couraged to join booster clubs for respective sports and programs
to assist in raising funds and offering support in other ways. In
doing so, we can ensure the continuation of providing quality pro-
grams for our students.
Douglas County coaches and athletes are expected to abide by
the highest standards of fair play and sportsmanship. Our goal is
to make the most positive contribution possible to the physical,
emotional, and social well being of students by providing opportu-
nities to participate in a variety of sports, programs and activities.
ATHLETiCs

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
Partners in Education Shadow Day:
A Valuable Learning Experience
By Ruby Byers, BRIDGES SLC Grant Coordinator
Partners in Education (PIE) and the BRIDGES grant are teaming
up to coordinate
two Shadow Day op-
portunities for our
students in the 2009-
2010 school year.
Shadow Day allows
high school students
the opportunity to
spend time with a lo-
cal business to learn
about an industry or occupation in which the student is interested.
Shadow Day gives students the opportunity to see different occu-
pations within a business, learn about day-to-day operations, and ask
questions of their hosts. Students have to complete an application
packet, a resume, and obtain teacher recommendations as part of the
selection process through their high school. Surveys revealed that 97%
of students who participated in Shadow Day last year believed it was a
valuable experience and 99% would recommend a friend to participate
in future Shadow Day events. Ninety-two percent of the students were
able to identify what they are learning in school now that will be used
on the job later.
Most Shadow Day students learned something new, including one
student who learned there were more jobs at a hospital than a doctor or
a nurse. Another was surprised to learn how much math and science
are involved in treating our water. Some students even learned about
themselves, like the one who commented, “It surprised me that I would
really want to own my own business one day.”
PIE Shadow Day could not exist without the support and commit-
ment from local businesses that served as host sites. One hundred per-
cent of the hosts believed the experience was valuable for the students.
One host commented that Shadow Day gives students exposure to real
work experiences. By sharing about his practice, a local dentist said
it gave him the opportunity to tell his story with the hope of helping
students decide on their own future. For another host it was an “oppor-
tunity to brag about the company I work for!”
Shadow Day will take place in October and February. Please contact
Ruby Byers at 770.651.2078 or BRIDGES@douglas.k12.ga.us for more
information or if you are interested in hosting a student at your place
of business.
   
   
Your student’s health and safety is always important to us at Douglas
County School System (DCSS). We recognize the unique relationship
between healthy students and quality learning. Our school system em-
ploys seven full-time Registered Nurses (RN’s) to help provide oversight
for all health related issues within the schools. In addition, each school
has a designated “health monitor” who assumes day-to-day manage-
ment of health related issues within their school. The health monitor is
an unlicensed employee who is trained in basic first aid and medication
administration.
If your child has a chronic medical illness or condition which may
require treatment or monitoring at school (diabetes, seizures, severe
asthma, sickle cell disease, etc.) please inform your school’s health
monitor. They will arrange an appointment with one of our school RN’s
to assist in developing a care guide for your student.
You have been asked to complete a health information form for your
student. Please insure you complete this and return it to school as soon
as possible. This form provides us with valuable information should your
child become ill and/or injured while at school. Please remember that
in many cases, those “alternate” phone numbers we ask for are very
important, should we not be able to reach you during the school day.
The student handbook which you received also contains valuable in-
formation regarding medication administration at school. While we as-
sist with administering medication to those students who must receive
them during school hours, we must have the appropriate permission
forms completed. We recognize it is one more “form” to have completed,
but for safety reasons, we kindly ask your cooperation in this matter.
As the school year begins, we have many students who suffer asthma
symptoms at school. If your child has asthma, please review with him
or her appropriate asthma management, to include taking preventive
medications at home as prescribed by their doctor. We encourage our
students with asthma to keep a rescue inhaler with them at all times,
even during school (with appropriate permission form completed).
While we like to see students healthy and attending school regularly,
we recognize that at times it may be more appropriate for students to
remain home when they are ill. If your student has a fever, as well as
other signs of illness such as nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, sore throat,
coughing, aches, congestion, fatigue, unexplained rashes, etc., it may
be more appropriate for them not to return to school until the signs/
symptoms of illness have resolved.
Communication with school personnel is very important if there are
health related issues that could impact your child’s education. Please
feel free to share any of these concerns with school staff. Your child’s ed-
ucation, as well as their health and safety, is always a priority with us.
HEALTH MATTERs
school Councils
Parent and community support is an important component of successful education reform. Local school councils were created by law in Geor-
gia to involve teachers, parents and businesspersons in local school issues focusing on student achievement.
Every public school in Georgia has a local school council consisting of:
• A number of parents so that such parents make a majority of the council and at least two are businesspersons
• At least two certified teachers
• The principal
• Other members as specified in the council’s bylaws
The Georgia General Assembly has amended the school council law to provide flexibility in membership, meetings, elections, and trainings. The
changes also provide clarity that school councils are to focus on student achievement and school improvement.
2009 - 2010
|
Student & Parent Guide
/J
Douglas County School System’s first Student Media Festival was
held in March. The purpose of the festival was to stimulate student
interest and involvement in all types of media production. This was
accomplished by providing an opportunity for students to show their
work to an interested audience, to have their work critiqued by a panel
of expert judges, and to be stimulated by the work of other students.
There were ten projects entered in the competition with a total of
35 students participating in the festival. Four teams advanced to the
Regional Competition of the state Student Media Festival and each
scored 90 points or higher. We offer our congratulations to all these
students and their sponsors.
The Student Media Festival Committee members were Ms. Wendy
Grey, Technology Department, Ms. Mandy Johnson, Director of High
School Programs at the Douglas County College and Career Institute;
and Ms. Patti Morton, Media Specialist at Chapel Hill Elementary
School.
In the Live Action Category for Middle and High School, Michael
Davis and Brittany Sparks from Factory Shoals Middle School won
first place with their project entitled “Obey The Rules: No Running!”
sTUDEnT MEDiA fEsTiVAL
These students also scored 98 out of a possible 100 and went on to
compete at the International Student Media Festival. Their sponsor
was Ms. Sarah Renard.
The following Photography Club students from Eastside Elemen-
tary School finished in first place in the Sequential Stills Category:
James Autry, Kelsey Beard, Jordon Cherry, Cody Cochran, Caylin Da-
vison, Marlon Frances, Michael Hayes, Christopher James, Lisette
Lindley, Mark Monroy-Garcia, Jade Posten, Cody Reese, Hunter Wal-
ton and Amanye Wilkerson. Their sponsor was Ms. Lisa Lindley. The
title of their project was “CRCT Do’s and Don’t’s”
In the Live Action Category, Chris Kauffman, Farhan Lakhani
John Robbins, and Angel Love-Robbins from Mt. Carmel Elementary
School finished in first place. The title of their project was “How to
Stay Active.” These students were sponsored by Ms. Linda Crew.
In the Middle and High Division, Roman Psymenov from Factory
Shoals Middle School won first place in the Sequential Stills Cat-
egory. The title of his project was “What Happens When Cheating
Starts.” Ms. Pipar West sponsored this project.
   
   
We currently administer three state funded grants during after
school program hours called the 21st Century Community Learning
Center (CCLC) Grants. All three programs target students who are in
need of additional academic assistance at selected sites. Students
must apply for available slots and meet selection criteria. Characteris-
tics of qualifying students includes: academic performance is below
grade level; the student does not meet state standards on tests; and/
or failing grades in one or more subjects/classes.
The 21st CCLC Program provides federal funds to local schools and
organizations to operate after school programs for the purpose of:
• Providing opportunities for academic enrichment and tutorial
services for students
• Offer students a broad array of additional services, programs,
and activities to reinforce and complement the regular academic pro-
gram; and
• Offer families of 21st CCLC students opportunities for literacy
and related educational development
The elementary school grant called SMART (Students Maximiz-
ing After School Resource Time) was awarded in the fall of 2004. The
SMART program serves 75 students per site at Annette Winn, Burnett,
Eastside, and Sweetwater Elementary Schools. The focus of this pro-
gram is to provide a safe after school environment, reinforce skills
taught, and additional opportunities to increase student achievement.
This grant ended on June 30, 2009 and we have submitted a new ap-
plication to the Georgia Department of Education. The new grant ap-
plication announcements are not expected until mid to late August
of 2009.
The middle school grant was awarded in the fall of 2006 and is
called CHAMP (Champion High Achievement in Middle School Per-
formance). CHAMP serves 60 students per site at Chestnut Log, Stew-
art, and Turner Middle Schools. The focus of this program is to provide
middle school students an opportunity to catch up on lacking skills,
participate in healthy after school program activities that are chal-
lenging, enriching, and focused on fostering student success.
The high school grant was awarded in the summer of 2007 and is
called CHAMP2 (Champion High Achievement to Maximize Potential).
CHAMP2 serves 50 students per site at Douglas County and Lithia
Springs High Schools. The focus of this program is to help offset the
academic struggle that occurs in the transition from middle school to
high school and students falling behind on credits by targeting at-risk
9th-12th grade students.
All three programs provide qualifying students with a wide vari-
ety of after school activities such as academic tutoring, homework
assistance, academic enrichment activities, and cultural/fine arts
education, career pathways, technological and character education.
Students get to participate in yearly field trips and hear speakers on
topics such as life skills, drug awareness, and violence/gang preven-
tion. Students in the program receive a daily snack and are provided
with transportation home each day.
For more information about the 21st Century Learning Center
Program please contact Mitzi Teal, 21st CCLC Project Director at
770.651.2039 or email her at mitzi.teal@douglas.k12.ga.us. You may
contact individual schools regarding student eligibility and qualifica-
tion requirements.
21ST cENTuRY cOMMuNITY LEARNING cENTERS AFTER SchOOL PROGRAM GRANTS
DOUGLAS COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM - 9030 Highway 5 | Douglasville, GA 30134
| Phone: 770.651.2000 | School Zones: 770.651.2400
THE CULTURAL ARTS COUNCIL OF DOUGLASVILLE/DOUGLAS COUNTY
8652 Campbellton Street Douglasville, Georgia 30134 -- 770.949.2787 -- www.artsdouglas.org ___
FALL 2009 CLASSES & WORKSHOPS
FOR CHILDREN & ADULTS
NEW! PRIVATE STRINGS LESSONS
Violin & Viola – Beginning to Advanced Classes
Cello & Bass - Beginning Classes
Eleanor Bennett
(All ages)
Beginning 9/10/09
Private lessons will include technique, music reading, music
theory, practice and performance. Lessons are offered to
beginners and those who are continuing their string training.
Thursdays only, $25 per 30-minute session
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE
James Gardner
Mondays, 7 - 8 p.m. (Adults and advanced teens)
9/14-10/12/09
$75 for 5 sessions (limit only 7 students)
PLANTING THE SEEDS OF ART
Tuesdays, 4 – 5:30 p.m. (5-6 year olds)
GROWING ARTISTS I
Tuesdays, 6 – 7:30 p.m. (6-7 yrs and up)
GROWING ARTISTS II
Wednesdays, 4 – 5:30 p.m. (8-10 year olds)
GROWING ARTISTS III
Wednesdays, 6– 7:30 p.m. (10 - 13 year olds)
Tamara Morgan
Beginning 9/8/09
$60 for 4 sessions (materials list provided) Please call CAC
for private child/adult lessons
CERAMICS FOR KIDS
LaVue Vandecar
Mondays, 4– 6 p.m. (6-13 year olds)
9/14 – 10/19/2009
$95 for 6 sessions (materials and firing provided)

POTTERY BASICS: Ceramics for Adults
LaVue Vandecar
Mondays, 6 - 8 p.m.
9/14– 10/19/2009
$95 for 6 sessions (materials and firings included)
PRIVATE PIANO LESSONS
Nancy Whittenburger
(8 years old and up)
Beginning week of 9/14/2009
Please call CAC for scheduling, Mondays only
$25 per 30-minute session
PRIVATE VOICE LESSONS
Nancy Whittenburger
(7th grade through adults)
Beginning week of 9/14/2009
Please call CAC for scheduling, Monday only.
$25 per 30-minute lesson
Register and Pay online today!
www.artsdouglas.org
Learn from the arts & have fun doing it!
MEET OUR TEACHING ARTISTS
Our new violin and strings teacher, Eleanor Bennett
started playing violin at the age of ten and has been
studying music ever since. A trained Suzuki method
teacher and a member of the Cobb Symphony Orchestra,
she has performed with the Atlanta Community
Orchestra, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, and Chattanooga
Symphony Orchestra.
James Gardner first became interested in photography while
studying printing at Santa Monica City College in California, at
a time when printers copied art and type with litho film. He
bought a 35 mm camera and learned how to make
photographs in a darkroom he built in his garage. In 1980, he
moved to Georgia and purchased a Bronica medium format
camera. He started shooting weddings, but he enjoys scenic
photography most of all. The most challenging part of
photography for him was, and still is, learning how to create
an attractive picture. In the late 90’s, he joined the Sweetwater
Camera Club as their webmaster and have since started
shooting with a digital camera.
Tamara Morgan began painting about 30 years ago, trying
out about every medium she could get her hands on through
the years she have also taught classes in decorative painting,
acrylic, oils and watercolor. It never ceases to amaze what
people can achieve when they have the tools, guidance and
inspiration to learn to paint!
LaVue Vandecar, a pottery instructor at South Fulton Arts
Center where she studied with Jean Bean and Paul Craighead
for many years, has a Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood
Education. She also studied at Clayton State College and
Georgia State University. She studied drawing, water color and
sculpture at the Southwest Art Center. LaVue has taught art
at several Vacation Bible Schools, the Woodland Christian
Camp, and Cochran Mills Nature Center. In addition to hand-
building and ceramic surface design, she teaches classes in tie
dying and unfired clay sculpture for children, teens and adults.
Nancy Whittenburger has been a music educator for 37 years.
Her teaching experience has ranged from kindergarten through
college. She retired from the Douglas County Schools in 2006,
where she was the Elementary Music Resource Teacher. The
Douglas County Teacher of the Year in 1991 and 2004, she now
serves as an adjudicator for Georgia Music Educators’
Association. She earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in
Music Education from Georgia State University, with
concentrations in voice and piano. She is currently a field
supervisor for student teachers at Mercer University
For more information on all of our
fall activities, memberships, special events &
facility rentals of the Historic Roberts-Mozley
home for your special celebrations,
visit our website--
www.artsdouglas.org
CALENDAROF ACTIVITIES
SEPTEMBER – DECEMBER 2009
SEPTEMBER 2008
Thursday, September 3rd 6 – 8 p.m.
Opening Reception for FANTASY ART
Paintings, posters & illustrations
by VICTORIA MOORE & BJ RATHOR
On view through September 27th
Cultural Arts Center, 8652 Campbellton Street
Free & open to the public
Sunday , September 13
th
3-5 p.m.
GALLERY TALK & TOUR with
VICTORIA MOORE & BJ RATHOR
Cultural Arts Center, 8652 Campbellton Street
Free & open to the public
Saturday, September 12, 19, 26th 7 – 9 p.m.
Fall CONCERTS ON THE PLAZA –
LATIN RYTHMS
O’Neal Plaza in Historic Downtown Douglasville
Free & open to the public
OCTOBER 2008
Thursday, October 1
st
6 – 8 p.m.
Artists Reception for DOUGLASVILLE CELEBRATES
PHOTOGRAPHY IMAGES OF SHAANXI: Recent
Photographs by HUANG FU
On view through October 30
Cultural Arts Center, 8652 Campbellton Street
Free & open to the public
Sunday, October 4
th
3 - 5 p.m.
GALLERY TALK & TOUR with HUANG FU
Cultural Arts Center, 8652 Campbellton Street
Free & open to the public
Saturday, October 17
th
2 - 4 p.m.
BLUEGRASS & BAR-B-Q
Boundary Waters Aquatic Center,
Hwy 166, Douglas Coutny, Georgia
Free admission, $5 parking fee
Friday, October 23
rd
6 – 9 p.m.
Annual CHILI COOK-OFF
O’Neal Plaza in Historic Downtown Douglasville
NOVEMBER 2008
Sunday, November 8
th
3 – 5 p.m.
RECEPTION & GALLERY TALK & TOUR
for 23RD ANNUAL NATIONAL
JURIED ARTS EXHBITION
Hosted by the Douglas County Art Guild
On view through November 27
Cultural Arts Center, 8652 Campbellton Street
Free & open to the public
Saturday, November 14
th
6 – 10 p.m.
ART AUCTION & GALA
Downtown Conference Center, Douglasville
DECEMBER 2008
Thursday, December 3
rd
5 – 6:30 p.m.
Reception for ANNUAL STUDENT
HOLIDAY CARD EXHIBIT
Children’s art on view through December 18
Cultural Arts Center, 8652 Campbellton Street
Free & open to the public
Friday & Saturday, December 11
th
& 12
th
The Empty Bowls CHRISTMAS LUNCHEONS - 11 a.m. & 1 p.m.
The Empty Bowls - SATURDAY BRUNCH – 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Cultural Arts Center, 8652 Campbellton Street
$12 per person ($10 for CAC members)
Sunday, December 27th 3 – 5 p.m.
KWANZAA CELEBRATION –
Workshop honoring Kuumba (Creativity)
Cultural Arts Center, 8652 Campbellton Street
Free & open to the public
Save the Date!
Come to the Cabaret
Gala & Auction
Saturday, November 14
th
Downtown Conference Center
Tour the Cultural Arts Center
We welcome small groups to visit our facility
and view our current exhibits. Please
contact us to book a tour --770.949.2787.
How does your dentist make you smile?
Give us a call at
770-949-1005
to see how Dr. Joe Hair can make you smile!
6842 Douglas Blvd. Suite K
www. DrJ oeHai r. com

Does he he see you on time, and think your time is as valuable as his?

Does he listen to your concerns, and include you in making decisions?

Does he provide comprehensive dentistry instead of sending
you all over town for everything that isn't a filling?
Hospital Dentistry available for those with
Special Needs or Disabilities that make a traditional
dental appointment impossible.
DOMINO’S PIZZA
SUPPORTS DOUGLAS
COUNTY SCHOOLS!
$
6
99
Large
1-Topping Pizza
CARRYOUT ONLY. Deep Dish
Extra. Limited time Offer. Not valid with any
other offer. Tax may apply. Minimum purchase required.
D699
MIX &
MATCH
Mix & Match 3 or More Medium
1-Topping Pizzas or Oven Baked
Sandwiches
$
5
55
EACH
D555
Minimum 3 Item Purchase. Deep Dish Extra. Limited time offer. Not valid with any other offer. Tax may apply. Minimum purchase required.
DOUGLASVILLE
3695-A Kings Highway
770-949-2277
2163 Fairburn Road
770-920-9200
   

Student & Parent Guide
|
2009 - 2010
770-949-7507
www.GoldsGym.com
ONLY AT GOLD’S GYM
ON HOSPITAL DRIVE
EXPRESS
15
$
A Month
No Commitment
No Salespeople
No Kidding!
GOLD’S GYM
Tanning
only
$
9.99
a month
with membership
Get after school care and an extra
curricular activity for one low price!
After School Program Early Bird Special
$5 off your weekly ASP fee
• Cardio Kickboxing
• Toddler Karate
• Free Fitness Gym
• Japanese Karate
• Children’s Karate
• Adult Karate
• Weapons Classes
• Self Defense
• International
Competition Training
Classes
taught
by World
Champion
Sensei
Samantha
Hostettler
Free Uniform
w/Family Karate Program Pkg. A Enrollment
New Students Only. Limit 1 Per Student.
While Supplies Last. Cannot Be Combined
With Any Other Offer. Exp. 08/31/09.
2145-B W. County Line Rd.  Douglasville  www.ChampionKarateandFitness.com
Promoting
self-defense in a
safe, positive
atmosphere
For first 15 enrolled. Limit 1 Per Student.
Cannot Be Combined With Any Other Offer.
Deposit required to reserve spot. Exp.
08/31/09.
Transportation Provided!

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