You are on page 1of 6

Samantha Scheidell 

PHYS 101 
Howard Demars 
 
 
 

Black Holes 
 

 

Samantha Scheidell 
PHYS 1010 
Black Holes 
 
A black hole is a region of space that has a gravitational pull so strong that no 
matter can escape. Light is the fastest moving thing in the universe and not even it can 
escape a black hole. Since everything, including light, is absorbed by a black hole the 
only way to see them is to look for an area of space that is void of any light or 
substance. Black holes aren’t a one size for all thing. There are ones potentially the size 
of a single atom and then there are those that could be millions of times bigger than our 
earth. Size does not always determine mass, but mass does determine the gravitational 
pull. 
Mass is the amount of matter that an object or substance has in it. You are the 
same mass here on earth as you are on the moon. The only thing that changes 
between here and there is your weight. Because the moon has less mass than the earth 
it has less gravitational pull on your body which causes you to way less. With a black 
hole a large amount of mass is inside a small amount of space and that gives it an 
incredible gravitational pull on objects around it.  
There are three different types of black holes known today. They are primordial 
black holes, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes. Each of these types are 
determined by their size and mass with primordial being the smallest and supermassive 
being the largest.  

 

Primordial black holes are still only hypothetical, none have been found to exist. 

It’s believed that these types of black holes were not created by a star collapsing in on 
itself but instead that they were formed after the Big Bang by sound waves. The current 
theory is that after the big bang theory the areas that were densest with the sound 
waves collapsed into black holes.  
The next type black hole is a stellar black hole which is the potential end result of 
stars with a very large mass. When the core of a star has used all of its components up, 
the energy production stops and the core collapses on itself. This collapse results in an 
explosion called a supernova. NASA has often said that the supernova is the biggest 
explosion in the entire universe. After the explosive supernova, a black hole remains. 
Because the explosion blew some matter away the ending mass of these black holes 
are usually only a few times heavier than our sun.  
Supermassive black holes, as the name suggests, contain much more mass than 
a stellar black hole. These black holes are thought to exist at the center of most 
galaxies. How these particular black holes are formed isn’t known but a few theories 
have been proposed. One theory says that they are the result of many stellar black 
holes being pulled together to form a more massive, singular black hole. Another states 
that over billions and billions of years a stellar black hole absorbed so much matter that 
it has grown to a supermassive size.  
Up until 1972 it was a general belief that black holes drew in everything that 
crossed the event horizon and that nothing was able to escape from it’s powerful grips. 
Jacob Bekenstein was an israeli physicist that originally suggested emission of particles 

from a black hole but in 1974 Stephen Hawking worked out the exact equation of 
radiation from a black hole. 
 

“Virtual particle pairs are constantly being created near the horizon of the black 

hole, as they are everywhere.  Normally, they are created as a particle­antiparticle pair 
and they quickly annihilate each other.  But near the horizon of a black hole, it's possible 
for one to fall in before the annihilation can happen, in which case the other one 
escapes as Hawking radiation.”(Schmelzer 1997). Hawking radiation is the release of a 
particle back into the surrounding space of a black hole. This discovery that black holes 
do emit radiation and are not as black as one might think. Because Hawking Radiation 
is such a small reaction, it is very difficult to observe. A bigger black hole is pulling so 
much heat and matter into it that a tiny amount of energy released through radiation is 
almost impossible to notice.  
Hawking radiation has also been called the evaporation of a black hole. 
Evaporation of a black hole would only occur if the amount of radiation that was emitted 
exceeded the amount of matter that was pulled in. Since the rate of loss of energy from 
hawking radiation is so small it would take billions and billions of years for a black hole 
to wither away to nothing.  
As you research the topic of black holes a popular question pops up again and 
again. What would happen if a human being was to fall into a black hole? Since there 
are no black holes near enough to earth to observe this, theories have been formed on 
what would happen. 

Tidal forces are a force of gravity that are not constant for every part of the object 
that it’s pulling on. If you were to head towards a black hole head first there would be 
more pull on your head than your feet. As it pulls at different strengths for the different 
areas of your body you become stretched or spaghettified. The mass per area is what 
determines the gravitational pull of an object. A small black hole with a large mass will 
have more gravitational pull and so the effect of spaghettification would be greater than 
if you were to fall into a supermassive black hole. Death by spaghettification depends 
on the mass of the black hole. A smaller black hole could cause you to rip apart before 
even crossing the event horizon while a supermassive black hole wouldn’t tear you to 
shreds until after passing the event horizon. Size and mass are proportional to the 
effects that the black hole has on your body. 
In popular media black holes are often portrayed as a gateway into an alternate 
universe or simply another area of space. While that idea is exciting and creates 
enthralling motion pictures, it isn’t probable. The gravitational forces that a black hole 
emits are so strong that even if there was a possibility of something waiting on the 
other, there would be no hope of reaching it. As you entered into and attempted to travel 
through the black hole, you would be ripped to shreds.  
Black holes are mysterious, yet captivating, discrepancies in space and time that 
are far from being completely understood. The uncertainty of them is what makes them 
so fascinating. As science progresses and we are able to learn more about them and 
their causes, a greater understanding of our universe will come about. 
 
 

 

Bibliography 
 
Dunbar, B. (n.d.). What is a Black Hole. Retrieved July 25, 2016, from 
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5­8/features/nasa­knows/what­is­a­black­hol
e­58.html 
 
Supermassive Black Hole. (n.d.). Retrieved July 25, 2016, from 
http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/cosmos/S/Supermassive Black Hole 
 
Redd, N. T. (n.d.). Black Holes: Facts. Retrieved July 25, 2016, from 
http://www.space.com/15421­black­holes­facts­formation­discovery­sdcmp.html 
 
Scoles, S. (2016, July). Black holes. ​
Discover,​
 ​
37​
(6), 26­29. Retrieved from 
http://web.b.ebscohost.com.libprox1.slcc.edu/ehost/detail/detail?vid=3&sid=90c94631­3
e51­450c­a088­73394ae9718c@sessionmgr106&hid=115&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3Q
tbGl2ZQ==#AN=115370404&db=aph 
 
Hansson, J. (2016, May). Black Holes ­ Any Body Out There. ​
Electronic Journal of 
Theoretical Physics,​
 ​
1235​
, 91­94. Retrieved from 
http://web.b.ebscohost.com.libprox1.slcc.edu/ehost/detail/detail?vid=5&sid=90c94631­3
e51­450c­a088­73394ae9718c@sessionmgr106&hid=115&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3Q
tbGl2ZQ==#db=aph&AN=115931419 
 
Schmelzer, I. (1997). Hawking Radiation. Retrieved July 25, 2016, from 
http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/BlackHoles/hawking.html