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Medical Report on Khaleesi

Courtesy: Dr. Kyle Jones, Southridge Animal Hospital


FOX 4 Editors Note: Individual names and a phone number have been redacted for privacy.
Here is the complete Medical and Surgical Report on Kahleesi, the female Pit Bull brought in by the
firemen.
On 1/13/16, an emergency admittance was done here at Southridge Animal Hospital in Denton Texas, by
my Head Technician, Alyson France, and myself Dr. Kyle Jones. "Kahleesi" was a female Pit Bull, 57 lbs,
in serious but stable condition. She was underweight, had evidence of having produced multiple litters of
puppies, and had the most severe laceration to her ventral cervical (neck) area I have ever seen in 34
years of practicing veterinary medicine. We ran a brief battery of tests and also found her to have
heartworms, and intestinal hookworms. The laceration itself on the ventrum of neck appeared fresh,
within the last 48 hours, and extended from the 2 oclock position, all the way around to the 10 oclock
position, averaged 4 inches in depth, exposing both carotid arteries (within a 1/16 of an inch of each) and
the trachea completely. The entire wound itself was extremely linear and smooth, not jagged or torn, and
obviously not self-inflicted, nor was from a dog fight.
Kahleesi spent 2 1/2 hours in surgery, and with over 300 sutures both internal and external, her neck
muscles and tissue were reconstructed. She was placed on antibiotics and after recovering from her
injury, 2 weeks later she was treated for Heartworms, parasites, and spayed. She went on to recover and
is an extremely sweet and healthy dog.
My opinion concerning the injury:
A wound of this severity is extremely unusual, because most patients won't make it to the hospital. They
are dead at the scene. Due to the linear smooth nature of the laceration only two things could cause this.
A four inch bladed knife applied by a right handed person from left to right when standing behind and
above the victim, or being tied up with an extremely fine wire or poly plastic line ( think piano type wire or
deep sea fishing line). Either way, the victim suffered from at the minimum, an abusive restraint, or at the
maximum, a physical attack. I found no fibers or foreign material in the laceration to support any other
material type other than wire or fishing line, which would leave no evidence of their presence once
removed.
I verify that this is a complete and accurate accounting of my experience with the case.
I hope this helps clarify any issues you may have Detective Sanchez.
Sincerely,
Dr Kyle Jones
Chief of Staff
Southridge Animal Hospital
Denton, Tx
940.891.0611