You are on page 1of 8

 

 
Bruce Bangerter 
Julia Ellis 
CJ ­ 1010 
30 July 2016 
Police Use of Deadly Force 
What Goes Into A Police Decision To Shoot? 
 
On March 20th, 2013 Ryan Rogers was shot and killed by a police officer who said he 
fired his weapon because Rogers attempted to run the officer over with his vehicle. However, 
evidence showed that the officer fired at least one round when he was no longer in danger. The 

shooting was ruled to be unjustified.​

On August 11th, 2014 police responded to a call of a man with a gun. When they arrived, 
the officers ordered the suspect to get on the ground. The man ignored them and continued to 
walk away. A few moments later, he turned towards the officers and reached behind him. After 
Dillon Taylor was killed, it was learned that he was unarmed, and was wearing headphones and 

could not hear the commands of the officers. The shooting was ruled to be justified.​

A twelve year old boy by the name of Tamir Rice was shot and killed on November 

22nd, 2014 when he pulled a BB gun on police officers. The shooting was ruled to be justified.​

On July 5th, 2016 police officers responded to another call of a man with a gun. The 
suspect was eventually tasered, and when that didn’t work the officers took him to the ground. 
After a short struggle, the officers claimed the man was reaching for a gun and killed him. A gun 

was recovered from Alton Sterling’s body. The investigation in this shooting is still ongoing.​

 

There are many more similar examples that have been portrayed by news outlets. These 
stories have been followed by extensive debates on social media regarding whether or not these 
fatalities have been justified. However, it is readily apparent that most of the people on facebook, 
twitter, and reddit do not understand the policies, procedures, training, and even the laws that 
dictate whether a shooting is justified. Nor do these people seem to understand the mechanics of 
a gunfight­­the stress involved in a life or death situation and the speed at which it happens. It is 
my goal to explain a few of these things to help people make more informed opinions before 
jumping to condemn an officer of the law who should be given the same benefit of the doubt as 
any criminal­­innocent until proven guilty, and innocent if reasonably justified. 
First off, let us look at what the law says in regards to deadly force by peace officers. 
Because each jurisdiction has different laws, and I do not have time or space to discuss them all 
separately, I will only be discussing those laws of the state of Utah. Understand, however, that all 
jurisdictions have fairly similar laws, and those of Utah can be considered to be a common and 
standard example of the laws of other places. 
The use of deadly force by peace officers in Utah is discussed in the Utah Legal Code, 
Title 76 Chapter 2 Part 4 Section 404. It is as follows: 
(1)

“A peace officer, or any person acting by the officer’s command in providing aid and assistance, is justified 
in using deadly force when: 
(a)
The officer is acting in obedience to and in accordance with the judgment of a competent court in 
executing a penalty of death under Subsection 77­18­5.5(2), (3), or (4); 
(b)
Effecting an arrest or preventing an escape from custody following an arrest, where the officer 
reasonably believes that deadly force is necessary to prevent the arrest from being defeated by 
escape; and 
(i) the officer has probable cause to believe that the suspect has committed a felony 
offense involving the infliction or threatened infliction of death or serious bodily injury; 
or 
(ii) the officer has probable cause to believe the suspect poses a threat of death or serious 

 

bodily injury to the officer or others if apprehension is delayed; or 
(c) the officer reasonably believes that the use of deadly force is necessary to prevent death or serious 
bodily injury to the officer or another person. 
(2) If feasible, a verbal warning should be given by the officer prior to any use of deadly force under Subsection 

(1)(b) or (1)(c)” ​

To simplify this­­an officer is authorized to use deadly force in any situation where they 
reasonably believe that another person will use deadly force against the officer or a third party. 
Otherwise, deadly force is ​
not ​
authorized. Officers are trained to recognize possible threats and 
act accordingly. 
A police officer cannot know that you are reaching behind your back to retrieve your 
wallet. He cannot know that the reason you jerked towards your bag is because cops have always 
made you nervous and you need your inhaler. She cannot know that the gun you are holding is 
fake, nor can she know that you aren’t going to shoot it­­and an officer doesn’t have time to wait 
to find out. Action is always faster than reaction, and it takes less than two seconds for a person 
5​
to draw a gun and fire it.​
 ​
If an officer cannot see what you are reaching for, he has to assume 

that you are going for a weapon, and that you intend to use it. 
The consequences of hesitating to shoot are severe. On Monday, January 12th, 1998 
Deputy Kyle Dinkheller conducted a ‘routine’ traffic stop. The man was acting erratically, and 
Deputy Dinkheller called for backup. Before other officers arrived, the man produced a rifle. 
When Deputy Dinkheller demanded that the man drop the weapon, he was shot several times and 
killed. Deputy Dinkheller was survived by his expectant wife and one­year­old daughter. 

(Andrew Brannan was found guilty and executed in 2015).​

 

Police officers have to make the decision to shoot in a fraction of a second, and there are 
many factors to consider when making that decision. Is it dark? Raining, snowing, or foggy? Is 
the suspect bigger or stronger than I am? Do they have a weapon, or might they have a weapon? 
Is there more than one person that I need to deal with? Are other officers close enough that I can 
rely on them to help me, or am I on my own? How tired am I, and do I have any injuries? Does 
the suspect have an impaired mental state, either due to drugs or illness? What is the severity of 
the crime they are suspected of? Have I already given them orders, and have they complied with 
those orders? Are there innocents nearby that I need to protect? Do I have time to use my taser 
and risk it failing? Is there distracting noise, such as bystanders yelling at me that the suspect 
didn’t do anything wrong, or that this is police brutality? What will be the legal consequences of 
shooting this person, and what will be the personal consequences if I don’t? Does the suspect 
have a known criminal history? And then there are a dozen or more questions besides. All of 
these need to be considered within that less­than­a­second window between recognizing that the 
suspect might pose a threat, and them killing you. No one can analyze that amount of 
information that quickly, and so the only safe option is for the officer to assume that the suspect 
has a weapon and intends to use it. Because if the person does have a weapon, and the officer 
hesitates, the officer will be dead. And there are no saves, checkpoints, reloads, respawns, or 
second chances in real life. 
The other argument that people like to make is “Why didn’t the officer shoot him in the 
leg instead of killing him?” Or, “Why didn’t they just shoot the knife out of his hand? And why 
did they have to shoot him so many times, isn’t one bullet enough?” 

 

The first of those questions is easy to answer, as anyone with a very basic knowledge of 
human anatomy will be able to tell you, both the arms and the legs have major arteries running 
through them. If an officer were to shoot someone in a limb, the chances of striking one of those 
arteries is high. The result is that the person will still die, except that it will be agonizing over 
half a minute rather than nearly immediately like a shot to the heart or the head would do. 
The other questions can be answered with some statistics. According to the FBI, in 2012 
2,275 police officers were assaulted with firearms. Of those 2,275, only 223 were injured during 
4​
those assaults­­that’s less than 10% of the assaults resulting in injury.​
 And since many of those 

assaults would have involved more than one shot fired, we can estimate somewhere around a 7% 
hit rate for criminals. Of course, police officers tend to spend more time on the range than 
criminals. Let’s go ahead and give them the benefit of the doubt and say that an officer hits 20% 
of the rounds that he fires. This means that, even when shooting at center of mass (we can 
assume the vast majority of the assaults cited by the FBI were criminals trying to kill police 
officers, and therefore were shooting at center of mass, so our 20% also applies to center of 
mass), an officer will need an average of five rounds to hit his target. Average isn’t good enough 
when your life is at stake, so it is perfectly reasonable for an officer to empty his fifteen round 
magazine into a suspect. It isn’t brutality­­it’s life insurance. 
As for why police don’t shoot weapons out of hands, let’s do that math as well. My hand 
(and by extension, any knife or gun I am holding in my hand), only covers about one twelfth of 
my torso. Taking our 7% center of mass hit rate, a criminal would only have a 0.58% chance of 
hitting my hand or my weapon. Taking our extremely generous 20% hit rate that we gave to our 
officers here, that factors to 1.67% hit chance. So now, instead of needing an average of five 

 

rounds to hit a suspect’s center of mass, they need an average of ​
sixty rounds to shoot a weapon 
out of someone’s hand.​
 Average still isn’t good enough, so we multiply that number by three like 
we did before, and it would require almost ​
two hundred​
 rounds to reliably shoot a person’s 
weapon. ​
No one has time to shoot two hundred rounds in the two seconds that it takes the 
bad guy to pull out a weapon and shoot back! 
 
Ultimately, the law is written to allow police officers to defend themselves and others 
from deadly force, and physics and human limitations make shooting to wound a situation that is 
only realized through pure dumb luck. This leaves only the options of police officers shooting to 
kill, or dying because they didn’t. Hopefully next time you see a news article about an officer 
‘murdering’ an ‘unarmed’ person, you will take a moment to consider the facts before 
condemning the officer who just wanted to see his baby girl again. 
 
 
 
 
 
Bibliography 
1. Alberty, Erin, and Marissa Lang. "Dillon Taylor Killing Was Justified." ​
The Salt Lake 
Tribune​
. N.p., 1 Oct. 2014. Web. 30 July 2016. 
 

 

2. "Deputy Kyle Wayne Dinkheller." ​
ODMP RSS​
. Officer Down Memorial Page, n.d. Web. 30 
July 2016. 
 
3. Hinkel, Dan, and Jennifer Richards. "Two Chicago Police Shootings into Vehicles Ruled 
Unjustified by Oversight Agency ."​
Chicagotribune.com​
. N.p., 21 July 2016. Web. 30 
July 2016. 
 
4. "Officers Assaulted." ​
FBI​
. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 July 2016. 
 
5. Tueller, Dennis. "The Police Policy Studies Council." ​
The Police Policy Studies Council​

N.p., 2014. Web. 30 July 2016. 
 
6. "Understanding the Stress Response." ​
Harvard Health​
. Harvard University, 18 Mar. 2016. 
Web. 29 July 2016. 
 
7. "Utah State Legislature." ​
Utah State Legislature​
. Utah State Legislature, 12 May 2015. Web. 
29 July 2016. 
 
8. Williams, Timothy, and Mitch Smith. "Cleveland Officer Will Not Face Charges in Tamir 
Rice Shooting Death." ​
The New York Times​
. The New York Times, 28 Dec. 2015. 
Web. 30 July 2016. 
 

 

9. Yan, Holly, and Joshua Berlinger. "Baton Rouge Officer: Alton Sterling Reached for a Gun 
before He Was Shot." ​
CNN​
. Cable News Network, 13 July 2016. Web. 30 July 2016.