You are on page 1of 3

Bruce Bangerter 

John Olsen 
BIO 1090 
Taking Sides III: 
Can an Overemphasis on Eating Healthy Become Unhealthy? 

 
TAKING SIDES ANALYSIS (10 points) 
Name:​
 Bruce Bangerter 
Course:​
 BIO 1090 
Book:​
 Taking Sides readings 
Issue number:​
 3 ​
Title of issue:​
 Can an Overemphasis on Eating Healthy Become Unhealthy? 
1. Author and major thesis of the Yes side.  
Lindsey Getz claims that ​
all​
 foods have a place in a healthy diet, and councils against ‘too 
much of a good thing.’. 
2. Author and major thesis of the No side.  
Chris Woolston takes the side that the only major problem with our diet is the amount of food 
we eat. 
3. Briefly state in your own words two facts presented by each side.  
Getz admits that orthorexia is not an officially recognized medical condition. She also 
mentions that our culture has painted some foods as inherently ‘good’ and others as innately ‘bad.’ 
Woolston points out that the average American caloric intake has increased by 304 calories 
a day from two decades ago. He also points out that 66% of Americans are considered to be 
overweight.  
4. Briefly state in your own words two opinions presented by each side.  
Getz says that many children who have parents with orthorexia are at a higher risk of 
orthorexia themselves. She continues this line of thought by saying that parents should focus on 
teaching their children moderation. 

Woolston’s primary argument is itself an opinion: the major problem with our diet is that we 
eat too much. He also says that humans will always crave sweets. 
5. Briefly identify as many fallacies (lack of reasoning or validity) on the Yes side as you can.  
Ms. Getz does a good job of avoiding fallacies. She makes a number of assumptions based 
on limited data or opinions on what is best, but that those are not logical fallacies. 
6. Briefly identify as many fallacies on the No side as you can.  
The only fallacy Woolston makes that I can find is at the beginning. He mentions that the 
average American eats 304 calories more than was the average 25 years ago­­enough for each 
person to gain 31 extra pounds each year. But then he says that many Americans seem to be 
gaining even more than that. He is technically correct­­because many people eat more than the 
average amount. But many people also eat less than the average amount. You can’t cite an average 
and then act surprised when some (or ‘many;’ both can refer to the same actual number) scale 
higher than average. 
7. All in all, which author impressed you as being the most empirical in presenting his or her 
thesis? Why? 
Despite my dislike of the agenda Getz is clearly pushing, she does use more data than Mr. 
Woolston. Yes, Woolston cites a greater number of numbers, but much of his data is either 
tangential or ultimately irrelevant. 
8. Are there any reasons to believe the writers are biased? If so, why do they have these 
biases?  
At the beginning of her article, Getz refers to the reader discussing the issue of orthorexia 
with their clients. This gives away that she is writing the article to persuade a specific industry. Ergo, 
she’s selling something. Woolston doesn’t seem to have any biases, except maybe being somewhat 
uninformed regarding the fact that nutrition depends on more than just numbers of calories 
consumed. 
 
9. Which side (Yes or No) do you personally feel is most correct now that you have reviewed 
the material in these articles? Why? 

Again, despite Getz’s obvious agenda, I have to take her side. It is more rational, backed 
by more data, and simply makes more sense than Woolston’s arguments.