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Algebra

Concepts and Applications

Contributing Author
Dinah Zike

Consultant
Douglas Fisher, PhD
Director of Professional Development
San Diego State University
San Diego, CA

Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the
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ISBN: 0-07-868488-9

Algebra: Concepts and Applications (Louisiana Student Edition)
Noteables™: Interactive Study Notebook with Foldables™

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 024 09 08 07 06 05 04

Contents
Foldables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1-1 Writing Expressions and
Equations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1-2 Order of Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1-3 Comm. and Assoc. Properties . . . . . 9
1-4 Distributive Property . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1-5 A Plan for Problem Solving . . . . . . 13
1-6 Collecting Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1-7 Displaying and Interpreting Data . . 19
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Foldables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1 Integers on a Number Line
2-2 The Coordinate Plane . . . .
2-3 Adding Integers. . . . . . . . .
2-4 Subtracting Integers . . . . .
2-5 Multiplying Integers . . . . .
2-6 Dividing Integers . . . . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1 Rational Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2 Adding and Subtracting
Rational Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3 Mean, Median, Mode, Range . . . .
3-4 Equations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5 Solving Equations by Using Models .
3-6 Solving () and () Equations . . . .
3-7 Solving Equations Involving
Absolute Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4-1 Multiplying Rational Numbers . . . . 71
4-2 Counting Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

4-3 Dividing Rational Numbers . . . . . . . 76
4-4 Solving () and () Equations. . . . . 79
4-5 Solving Multi-Step Equations. . . . . . 82
4-6 Variables on Both Sides. . . . . . . . . . 85
4-7 Grouping Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

Foldables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
5-1 Solving Proportions . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
5-2 Scale Drawings and Models. . . . . . 99
5-3 The Percent Proportion . . . . . . . . 101
5-4 The Percent Equation . . . . . . . . . 104
5-5 Percent of Change . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
5-6 Probability and Odds . . . . . . . . . . 109
5-7 Compound Events . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1 Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2 Equations as Relations . . . .
6-3 Graphing Linear Relations .
6-4 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-5 Direct Variation . . . . . . . . .
6-6 Inverse Variation . . . . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . .
7-1 Slope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-2 Point-Slope Form . . . . . . . .
7-3 Slope-Intercept Form . . . . .
7-4 Scatter Plots . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-5 Graphing Linear Equations
7-6 Families of Linear Graphs .
7-7 Parallel and Perpendicular
Lines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Algebra: Concepts and Applications

iii

Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1 Powers and Exponents. . . . .
8-2 Multiply and Divide Powers.
8-3 Negative Exponents. . . . . . .
8-4 Scientific Notation . . . . . . . .
8-5 Square Roots . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-6 Estimating Square Roots . . .
8-7 The Pythagorean Theorem .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-1 Polynomials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-2 Add and Subtract Polynomials
9-3 Multiplying a Polynomial
by a Monomial. . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-4 Multiplying Binomials . . . . . . .
9-5 Special Products . . . . . . . . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-1 Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-2 Factoring: Distributive Property
10-3 Factoring: x 2  bx  c . . . . . . . .
10-4 Factoring: ax 2  bx  c . . . . . . .
10-5 Special Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-1 Graphing Quadratic Functions. .
11-2 Families of Quadratic Functions
11-3 Graphing Quadratic Equations .
11-4 Factoring Quadratic Equations .
11-5 Completing the Square . . . . . . .
11-6 The Quadratic Formula . . . . . . .
11-7 Exponential Functions . . . . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246

iv

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

12-1
12-2
12-3
12-4
12-5
12-6
12-7

Inequalities and Their Graphs . .
Solving () and () Inequalities .
Solving () and () Inequalities .
Solving Multi-Step Inequalities .
Solving Compound Inequalities.
Absolute Value Inequalities . . .
Graphing Inequalities in
Two Variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-1 Graphing Systems of Equations .
13-2 Solutions of Systems of
Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-3 Substitution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-4 Elimination Using () and () . .
13-5 Elimination Using () . . . . . . . .
13-6 Solving Quadratic-Linear
Systems of Equations . . . . . . . . .
13-7 Graphing Systems of Inequalities
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-1 The Real Numbers . . . . . . . . . . .
14-2 The Distance Formula . . . . . . . .
14-3 Simplifying Radical Expressions .
14-4 Radical Expressions: () and () .
14-5 Solving Radical Equations . . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Foldables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vocabulary Builder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-1 Simplify Rational Expressions . .
15-2 Rational Expressions: ()
and (). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-3 Dividing Polynomials . . . . . . . . .
15-4 Combining Rational Expressions
with Like Denominators . . . . . .
15-5 Combining Rational Expressions
with Unlike Denominators . . . .
15-6 Solving Rational Equations . . . .
Study Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Organizing Your Foldables
Make this Foldable to help you organize and
store your chapter Foldables. Begin with one
sheet of 11"  17" paper.
Fold
Fold the paper in half lengthwise. Then unfold.

Fold and Glue
Fold the paper in half widthwise and glue all of the edges.

Glue and Label
Glue the left, right, and bottom edges of the Foldable
to the inside back cover of your Noteables notebook.

Foldables Organizer

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Reading and Taking Notes As you read and study each chapter, record
notes in your chapter Foldable. Then store your chapter Foldables inside
this Foldable organizer.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

v

This note-taking guide is designed to help you succeed in Algebra: Concepts
and Applications. Each chapter includes:

CH

APTER

12

Inequalities

Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you
organize your notes as you study the chapter. You will see
Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study
Notebook to help you in taking notes.

The Chapter Opener
contains instructions and
illustrations on how to make
a Foldable that will help you
to organize your notes.

Begin with four sheets of grid paper.

Fold
Fold each sheet in half
from top to bottom.

Cut
Cut along fold. Staple
the eight half-sheets
together to form
a booklet.

Label
Label each page with a
lesson number and title.

12–1

Inequalities

CH

APTER

BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY
NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you take notes, define
new terms and write about the new concepts in
your own words. Write your own examples that
use the new terms and concepts.

A Note-Taking Tip
provides a helpful
hint you can use
when taking notes.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

Chapter 12

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

12

245

This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 12.
As you complete the study notes for the chapter, you will see Build Your
Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on
these pages. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second
column for reference when you study.

Vocabulary Term

Found
on Page

Definition

Description or
Example

boundary

compound inequality

intersection

quadratic inequalities

set-builder notation

union

246

vi

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

Within each chapter,
Build Your Vocabulary
boxes will remind you
to fill in this table.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

The Build Your Vocabulary
table allows you to write
definitions and examples
of important vocabulary
terms together in one
convenient place.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

half-plane

x  1 a. Each lesson is correlated to the Louisiana GLEs. The weights w that can be measured on this scale can be written as 10  w  65. 18. Exercises: To make a crossword puzzle. 12–1 Inequalities © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Karl’s point totals in the first four of five basketball games were 15. 95. Write x  0 and x  3 as a compound inequality without using and. 3. BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 246) Two or more inequalities that are connected by the words or form a compound inequality. Graph the solution of this inequality. 12–4 Your Turn Write x  2 and x  5 as a compound inequality without using and. Take notes as appropriate.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index.php © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 12-1 Inequalities and Their Graphs 256 Write the letter of the graph that matches each inequality. 4. 3 12-2 Solving Addition and Subtraction Inequalities Write an inequality for each statement.glencoe. go to: www. What score s on the fifth test will give her a mean score of at least 90 for all five tests? STUDY GUIDE Use your Chapter 12 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. and 91. As your teacher discusses each example.  80  t Karl must score more than CH APTER 12 points in the fifth game to have a mean point total of more than BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (page 246) to help you solve Page(s): the puzzle. divided by A veterinarian has a scale for weighing dogs and cats that weigh more than 10 pounds but no more than 65 pounds. follow along and complete the fill-in boxes. 2. A number added to 12 is a minimum of 1. Your Turn Exercises allow you to solve similar exercises on your own. A union is the set of elements in each of inequalities. Algebra: Concepts and Applications Bringing It All Together Study Guide reviews the main ideas and key concepts from each lesson. 265 Algebra: Concepts and Applications vii . Foldables feature reminds you to take notes in your Foldable. 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Lien’s score on the first four of five 100-point tests were 82. 1. x  1 b. An intersection is the set of elements common to inequalities. . 18 less than a number is at most 45. 12. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 5. x  1 c. x  1 d. and 18. Then solve. 16. Then. will give the mean score. ORGANIZE IT Summarize the difference between “intersection” and “union” under the tab for Lesson 12–5. 5 more than a number is at least 15. x  0 and x  3 can be written as x x or . 10  w  65 Rewrite the compound inequality using is the same as w  10 and . 15  12  19  18  t   t  80 64  t  Subtract. 19. Solving Compound Inequalities GLE 14. A-4-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve compound inequalities. 15  12  19  18  t . 85. 7. The mean must be more than ( . A number subtracted from 21 is no less than 2.  . or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 12.12–5 Lessons cover the content of the lessons in your textbook. give examples of when to use each one. word search. Graph and interpret linear inequalities in one or two variables and systems of linear inequalities (A-2-H. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 257 15  12  19  18  t )  Multiply each (16) side by . How many points t must he score in the fifth game to have a mean point total of more than 16? The sum of Karl’s points. Examples parallel the examples in your textbook.

• Draw and label pictures or diagrams to help clarify a concept. Review mentally what you already know about the concept. During this time. • Write your notes as clear and concise as possible.g. Pay attention to words. • Be an active listener. approximately  with w/ therefore  without w/o versus vs and  angle  • Use a symbol such as a star (★) or an asterisk (*) to emphasis important concepts. • Don’t doodle. • When working out an example. . Taking good notes can help you succeed in mathematics. not equal such as i. Focus on what your teacher is saying. viii Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill • Review your notes as soon as possible after class. examples.e. • Don’t use someone else’s notes as they may not make sense. Note-Taking Don’ts • Don’t write every word.NOTE-TAKING TIPS Your notes are a reminder of what you learned in class. ask what your teacher will be discussing in class. Be sure to use your own words. • Don’t lose focus or you will become lost in your note-taking. write what you are doing to solve the problem next to each step. organize and summarize new concepts and clarify misunderstandings. • Before class. The following tips will help you take better classroom notes. and/or diagrams your teacher emphasizes. • Ask questions and participate in class discussion. Listen for important concepts. Word or Phrase Symbol or Abbreviation Word or Phrase Symbol or Abbreviation for example e. The following symbols and abbreviations may be helpful in your note-taking. Place a question mark (?) next to anything that you do not understand. Concentrate on the main ideas and concepts. It distracts you from listening actively.

Staple along the fold. 1 2 Begin with four sheets of 8 "  11" paper.APTER 1 Chapter 1 CH The Language of Algebra Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Algebra Use algebraic expressions and equations Use the order of operations to evaluate expressions Use properties of real numbers to simplify expressions © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Use the four-step plan to solve problems Use sampling and frequency tables. Label the tabs with topics from the chapter. All tabs should be the same size. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 1 . 4 Fold up bottom edges. Be sure to refer to your notes when reviewing for tests. it is important to record important concepts. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. Stack sheets of paper 3 with edges  inch apart. NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you take notes.

CH APTER 1 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 1. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example algebraic expression [al-juh-BRAY-ik] coefficient [CO-i-FISH-unt] conclusion conditional counterexample data deductive reasoning [dee-DUK-tiv] equation [EE-KWAY-zhun] evaluate [ee-val-yoo-WAYT] factors formula [FOR-myu-la] frequency table histogram 2 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill equivalent expressions [ee-KWIV-a-lunt] . As you complete the study notes for the chapter.

Chapter Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition 1 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Description or Example hypothesis [hi-PA-the-sis] if-then statement inductive reasoning [in-DUK-tiv] like terms line graph numerical expression [noo-MARE-ik-ul] order of operations population product quotient sample sampling simplest form © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill simplify stem-and-leaf plot term variable [VARE-ee-a-bul] whole numbers Algebra: Concepts and Applications 3 .

subtraction. . and/or . and along with . the sum of p and 12 Algebra Use algebraic expressions and equations Use the order of operations to evaluate expressions Use properties of real numbers to simplify expressions Use the four-step plan to solve problems Use sampling and frequency tables. and/or . multiplication. the product of 9 and z © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill the product of k and q . D-2-H.1–1 Writing Expressions and Equations GLE 9. P-5-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 2–3) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Translate words into An algebraic expression contains algebraic expressions and equations. b decreased by 6 4 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. write several words or phrases for each of the operations. . and inequalities (A-1-H. used to represent an unknown A numerical expression contains . Model real-life situations using linear expressions. A variable is a number. addition. . and division. along with A factor is a quantity that is being A product is the result of An equation is a mathematical an equals sign (). a. Write an algebraic expression for each verbal expression. Your Turn Write an algebraic expression for each verbal expression. equations. . that contains ORGANIZE IT In your notes. . that are multiplied.

the number of legs on 3 spiders b. WRITE IT 37  s Write one other verbal expression for Examples 5 and 6. the 37 of and by s 5(b  3) 5 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 5 the difference of by the and of b and 3 Your Turn Write a verbal expression for each algebraic expression. Write an expression for each situation. The numerical expression is  or 4(5). 4  (2n) Algebra: Concepts and Applications 5 . the number of legs on m spiders Write a verbal expression for each algebraic expression. Write a numerical expression to represent the amount it eats in 5 months. The algebraic expression is 4  d or . x  7 b. a. Your Turn A spider has eight legs.1–1 A python eats 4 pounds of meat each month. a. Write an algebraic expression to represent the amount it eats in d months.

The product of 8 and d decreased by 9 equals 23. 11.1–1 Write an equation for each sentence. A number x increased by 12 is the same as 27 b.   31 Your Turn Write an equation for each sentence. t 8 20 or  20 Seven less than three times g is 31. The quotient of t and 8 equals 20.   6  30 3 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Write a sentence for each equation. r  10  5 n b. 3z  12  11 The product of decreased by 12 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 6 a. . a. Write a sentence for each equation. j  4  21 more than j is 21.

In your notes. If x  7. then 10  x  10  7. a. a. then a  2  3  2. 14 and 5. (2  4)  2 b. 14  10  2  14  10 and 2. • Use the order of 14  10  2 operations to evaluate expressions. then k  3  7  3. and as indicated by fraction bars. 4  (6  7) 4  (6  7)  4  13 6 and 7. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Property of Equality Your Turn Name the property of equality shown by each statement. Use order of operations to simplify or rewrite variable expressions (A-1-H. Your Turn Find the value of each expression. b. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 7 . 3. then 9  a  4. Do all additions and/or subtractions from left to right. 3  5  2  1 2. Find the values of expressions inside grouping symbols. Do all multiplications and/or divisions from left to right. Property of Equality If a  4  9.1–2 Order of Operations GLE 8. Name the property of equality shown by each statement. summarize the Order of Operations. If a  2  5 and 5  3  2. such as parentheses ( ). A-2-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find the value of each expression.  52 4 and 13.  KEY CONCEPT Order of Operations 1. If k  7. brackets [ ].

 8 Substitution Property  20 Your Turn Evaluate each expression if a  7 and b  1. Properties of Numbers Additive Identity When 0 is added to any number a.1–2 KEY CONCEPTS Properties of Equality Substitution If a  b. (a  2)  4b © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Evaluate xy  8 if x  4 and y  3. then a  c. Identify the property used in each step. Multiplicative Identity When a number a is multiplied by 1. Identify the property used in each step. Find the value of [25  8(12  11)]  11.  b. then Transitive If a  b. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: xy  8  8 Replace x with 4 and y with 3. the product is 0. Reflexive a a Symmetric If a b  a. . then a may be replaced by b. the sum is a. a. 10  a  b 8 Substitution Property Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. [25  8(12  11)]  11  (25  8(  (25   )]  11 Property )  11 Identity  11 Property 3 Property Your Turn Find the value of 30  (6  4)  1  5. BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 2) To evaluate an expression is to find the of an expression by replacing the variables with numbers. the product is a. Multiplicative Property of Zero If 0 is a factor. and b  c.

(4  m)  9  (m   m  (4  )9 Property () ) Property () m  Property () Algebra: Concepts and Applications 9 . Associative Property of Addition and Multiplication The way in which three numbers are grouped when they are added or multiplied does not change their sum or product. Identify the properties used in each step. . Simplify the expression (4  m)  9. a  (2  8)  (a  2)  8 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 3) To simplify an expression. all parentheses first and then add. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Standard 24. 7  (8  k)  (7  8)  k Property of Property of KEY CONCEPTS Commutative Property of Addition and Multiplication The order in which two numbers are added or multiplied does not change their sum or product. 5  4  3  5  3  4 b. Your Turn Name the property shown by each statement.1 Students use properties of numbers to demonstrate whether assertions are true or false.1–3 Commutative and Associative Properties WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Name the property shown by each statement. • Use the commutative 8  (3  4)  (3  4)  8 and associative properties to simplify expressions. subtract. or divide.3 Students use counterexamples to show that an assertion is false and recognize that a single counterexample is sufficient to refute an assertion. Standard 1. a.

7557 75 We found a HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . 3. Page(s): Exercises: 10 . provide a counterexample. so the statement Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill is and 5  7  . 7557 Evaluate each expression separately. A counterexample is an statement is that shows that the . the set of whole numbers is closed under addition and multiplication. provide a counterexample. 2. State whether the statement Subtraction of whole numbers is commutative is true or false. 4. If false. Write two subtraction expressions using the Commutative Property and check to see whether they are equal. and so on. Identify the properties used in each step. BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 2–3) Whole numbers are the numbers 0. 1. KEY CONCEPT Closure Property of Whole Numbers Because the sum or product of two whole numbers is also a whole number. If false. Your Turn State whether the statement Subtraction of whole numbers is associative is true or false.1–3 Your Turn Simplify the expression (12  z)  7.

a. or quotient and variables. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 11 . and c. Use algebraic expressions and equations Use the order of operations to evaluate expressions Use properties of real numbers to simplify expressions Use the four-step plan to solve problems Use sampling and frequency tables. An algebraic expression is in simplest form when it has no like terms and no parentheses. )  (5  )  5m Distributive Property Substitution Property 3(4x  2) 3(4x  2)  (3  )  (3   ) 6 Distributive Property Substitution Property Your Turn Simplify each expression. 7(b  3) b. Algebra (pages 2–3) . • Use the Distributive 5(2  m) Property to evaluate expessions. product. 3(4t  8) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY A term is a number. a(b  c)  ab  ac and a(b  c)  ab  ac.1–4 Distributive Property WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Simplify each expression. The numerical part of a that contains a variable is a coefficient. Expressions whose are the same are equivalent expressions. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill of ORGANIZE IT In your notes. Circle the coefficient in each term. 5(2  m)  (5   KEY CONCEPTS Distributive Property For any numbers a. b. write three examples of terms and three examples of items that are not terms and label each group. Like terms are terms that contain the same such as 2a and 5a.

Property () ) )m Assoc. 3d  5d Page(s): Exercises: 12 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT b. 8p  5p 8p  5p  p Distributive Property  Substitution Property 10k  6m  5k  2m 10k  6m  5k  2m  10k   6m   (10k  )  (6m  (  )k  (  Comm. 6n  7m  4n . a. Property () Distributive Property Substitution Property Your Turn Simplify each expression.1–4 Simplify each expression.

and the time. t © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill I You will earn in interest. You should have about Use sampling and frequency tables. Estimate: 1% of $350 is about 2  Algebra or .1–5 A Plan for Problem Solving WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Use a four-step plan to solve problems. REMEMBER IT Always check to make sure the answer is reasonable. 2% of $350 is per year. EXAMINE Since is the same as the . I  prt I Interest formula   p . So. r . list the seven Problem-Solving Strategies. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 13 . Suppose you deposit $350 into an account that pays 2% interest. the interest rate. so the total amount after five years is or  . at the end of five years PLAN ORGANIZE IT In your notes. the answer is reasonable. You need to find the amount of money. This will Use algebraic expressions and equations be Use the order of operations to evaluate expressions Use properties of real numbers to simplify expressions Use the four-step plan to solve problems in five years. Add this amount to the original deposit. including interest.  SOLVE  in five years. Use the formula I  prt and substitute the known values. How much money would you have in the account after five years? EXPLORE You know the amount of money deposited.

. and nickels? EXPLORE You need to know how many ways you can make without using . How much money would you have in the account after ten years? How many ways can you make 50¢ using quarters. PLAN SOLVE Coin Number Quarters 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Dimes 0 2 1 0 5 4 3 2 1 0 Nickels There are ways to make . dimes.1–5 Your Turn Suppose you deposit $270 into an account that pays 3% interest. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Your Turn How many ways can you make 30¢ using quarters. Make a chart listing every possible combination. and pennies? Page(s): Exercises: 14 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill EXAMINE Check that each combination totals 50¢ and that there are no other possible combinations. dimes.

Is this a good sample? Explain. A sample is a small larger KEY CONCEPT Sampling Criteria A good sample is representative of the larger population. One hundred cable-television subscribers are surveyed to find how much time the average American spends reading. used to represent a much . so that can be made about a population. D-7-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 2–3) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Collect and organize data using sampling and frequency tables. clusters. Your Turn Twenty-five hundred people across the state of Georgia were randomly surveyed to find the average level of completed education. and outliers (D-1-H. Identify trends in data and support conclusions by using distribution characteristics such as patterns. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 15 . Is this a good sample? Explain. and large enough to provide accurate data.1–6 Collecting Data GLE 28. or information. Sampling is a convenient way to data. many of those surveyed would prefer to reading. selected at random. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 2) A frequency table is a table that uses tally marks to and display the of events. D-6-H. No.

so there are fewer categories.1–6 Make a frequency table to organize the data in the chart. Add a title. the intervals are of size STEP 3 Use . STEP 4 Count the tally marks in each row and record this number in the column.S. Record High Temperatures for Selected U. Use intervals of 5. States (°C) 44 48 45 48 38 41 38 49 53 43 48 46 STEP 1 Make a table with three STEP 2 Use 49 41 47 46 57 43 47 41 . marks to record the times in each . States (°C) 2  1 40–44 45–49 55–59 16 Algebra: Concepts and Applications  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  .S. Record High Temperatures for Selected U. In this case.

Attendance 96 25 88 92 38 72 22 34 67 29 27 36 57 76 42 33 75 89 61 65 45 57 26 54 92 82 94 44 49 45 80 37 64 88 91 90 The owners of a bookstore specializing in travel books are looking for a new location. People Tally Frequency © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  5   8 20s      25 30s        32 40s         36 50s     18 60s    11 under 13 teens Algebra: Concepts and Applications 17 . The table at the right shows the number of people who attended each of the shows.1–6 Your Turn A museum featured a musical laser show. Make a frequency table to organize the data. The frequency table below shows the results of their sampling. They counted the number of people who passed by the proposed location during one afternoon.

The frequency table below shows the results of their sampling. Is this a good location for the bookstore? Explain. They counted the number of people who passed by the proposed location during one afternoon. Which group of people passed by the location most frequently? b. people in their in are likely to be interested . Yes.1–6 a. Page(s): Exercises: 18 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . People Tally Frequency under 13  2 teens     16 20s    11 30s   10 40s        34 50s     19 60s      22 a. Your Turn The owners of a children’s shoe store are looking for a new location. Is this a good location for the shoe store? Explain. Which group of people passed by the location most frequently? in their 40s b.

histograms. Use the four-step plan to solve problems Use sampling and frequency tables. D-6-H. Use the graph to predict the percent of the labor force in farming in the year 2010. list four types of graphs that are used to organize data. and outliers (D-1-H. Plot the . Algebra Use algebraic expressions and equations Use the order of operations to evaluate expressions Use properties of real numbers to simplify expressions Draw a by connecting the . Percent of the Labor Force in Farming Percent of the Labor Force in Farming © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Percent 1940 17 1950 12 1960 6 1970 3 1980 2 1990 2 20 Percent Year 15 10 5 0 1940 1960 1980 Year 2000 You can see from the graph that the general trend is that the percent of the labor force in farming is . and stem-and-leaf plots. ORGANIZE IT In your notes. Identify trends in data and support conclusions by using distribution characteristics such as patterns. Draw a axis and a vertical axis and label them as shown below. A line graph is one where is displayed to show . Algebra: Concepts and Applications 19 . Include the . Construct a line graph of the data given in the table.1–7 Displaying and Interpreting Data GLE 28. clusters. D-7-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 3) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Construct and interpret line graphs. A good prediction for the year 2010 might be between .

1 1990 71.1 1950 65. . The table shows the number of people in different age groups who entered a new store during the first hour of its grand opening.6 1970 67. Construct a histogram of the data.1–7 Your Turn Construct a line graph of the data given in the table.4 1930 58. Life Expectancy for Men. REVIEW IT 20 Algebra: Concepts and Applications Age Tally Frequency 1–10  5 11–20   8 21–30      25 31–40        32 41–50         36 51–60     18 61–70    11 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Explain why it is important to use equal intervals when labeling a histogram. Use the graph to predict the years of life expected at birth for men born in the year 2010. 1910–1990 Year Years of Life 1910 48.8 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 2) A histogram uses data from a frequency table and displays it over intervals.

STEP 2 Label equal intervals given in the frequency table on the horizontal axis. Include the title. Age Tally Frequency © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1–10  2 11–20   10 21–30    15 31–40      23 41–50        35 51–60       29 61–70    12 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 21 . STEP 3 For each time interval. Label equal intervals of 5 on the axis.1–7 STEP 1 Draw a horizontal axis and a vertical axis and label them as shown below. Construct a histogram of the data. draw a is given by the whose height . Ages of People Entering Store 40 35 30 25 Frequency 20 15 10 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1– 11– 21– 31– 41– 51– 61– Age Your Turn The table shows the number of people in different age groups who attended a play on opening night.

1–7 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 3) When data is organized into two . 39. stems and leaves. 49. the result is a stem-and-leaf plot. to make the results easier to observe and analyze. so the stems are digits are the Arrange the leaves in numerical . 45. 43 Page(s): Exercises: 22 38  38 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 5 1 1 3 3 4 5 7 7 8 8 8 9 . Make a stem-and-leaf plot of the temperatures. States (°C) The leaves in a stem-and-leaf plot are always single-digit values.S. 46. 50. Record High Temperatures for Several U. Stem Leaf 3 4 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Your Turn Make a stem-and-leaf plot of the heights in inches of the following 3rd graders. 38. 47. 44. 42. 48. 46. 52. 42. 48. 51. REMEMBER IT The table shows the record high temperatures for several states. The 49 43 38 48 . 44 57 41 48 The 38 48 43 47 53 41 45 47 digits are the .

 62 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 23 . five times the difference of x and 4 c. 5(x  4) 1. a.glencoe. the product of x and y divided by 2 5. 400  5[12  9] 7. go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 2–3) to help you solve the puzzle. one half the number r 4. 69  57  3  16  4 8.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. three more than a number n 1 2 b. www. word search. n  3 xy 2 d. To make a crossword puzzle.  3.php 1-1 Writing Expressions and Equations Write the letter of the algebraic expression that best matches each phrase. 17  3  6 24  3  4 9.CH APTER 1 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 1 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. r 2. 1-2 Order of Operations © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Find the value of each expression. Translate two times the sum of x and 3 equals 4. 6. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 1.

There are 14 servings of chips in a bag. Commutative Property of Multiplication e. Closure Property 1-4 Distributive Property 14. 16. 10. Associative Property of Addition 11. Associative Property of Multiplication 12. Tell how you can use the Distributive Property to write 12m  8m in simplest form. 2  (3  4)  2  (4  3) d. 3  6  6  3 a. A 1-ounce serving of chips has 140 calories.Chapter 1 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 1-3 Commutative and Associative Properties Write the letter of the term that best matches each equation. 15. 2  (3  4)  (2  3)  4 b. 2  (3  4)  (2  3)  4 c. Use the word coefficient in your explanation. Commutative Property of Addition 13. Explain how the Distributive Property could be used to rewrite 5(6  4). How many calories are there in a bag of chips? 24 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1-5 A Plan for Problem Solving .

30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1–2 3–4 5–6 7–8 9–10 11–12 Months 20.Chapter 1 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 1-6 Collecting Data The principal needs to decide how to select the students to be polled. Only those students who are in the four classrooms closest to the principal’s office are selected for the poll. In which months was the number of applicants the least? Job Applicants. Make a stem-and-leaf plot of the data. Fox Music Frequency The manager of Fox Music tallied the number of people who applied for jobs at the store. Anderson’s science class recorded the daily high temperature every day for 30 days. 21. Every twenty-fifth student is selected to be polled. 1-7 Displaying and Interpreting Data 19. High Temperature (°F) 68 65 68 70 70 70 65 66 68 72 73 76 75 78 81 78 74 71 72 78 77 74 70 68 67 69 68 66 65 63 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 25 . 17. In which months was the number of applicants the most? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Mrs. 18. Determine whether each is a good sample. Explain why or why not. All of the students are asked to enter through the main doors.

I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. self-check quizzes. • Then complete the Chapter 1 Study Guide and Review on pages 44–46 of your textbook.CH APTER 1 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 1. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. refer back to the specific lesson(s). more examples. • You should complete the Chapter 1 Study Guide and Review on pages 44–46 of your textbook. • You may want take the Chapter 1 Practice Test on page 47 of your textbook as a final check. Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 26 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help.com to access your textbook. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. Visit algconcepts. • You may also want to take the Chapter 1 Practice Test on page 47. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 1 Foldable. • You may also want to take the Chapter 1 Practice Test on page 47. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test.

Stack Stack sheets of paper 3 with edges  inch apart. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Label Label the tabs as shown. 4 Fold Fold up bottom edges. Staple Staple along the fold. 1 2 Chapter 2 Begin with four sheets of plain 8"  11" paper. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 27 . Listen for important concepts being emphasized.CH APTER 2 Integers Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. All tabs should be the same size. be sure to focus on what the teacher is saying. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. Systems of Equations and Inequalities Integers 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 2-1 Graph 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 2-2 Compare and Order 13-3 Substitution 2-3 Add Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-4 2-4 Subtract 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 2-5 Multiply 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 2-6 Divide Graphing systems of inequations 13-7 Vocabulary NOTE-TAKING TIP: When taking notes.

Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example absolute value additive inverse [A-duh-tiv] coordinate [co-OR-duh-net] coordinate plane coordinate system dimensions element graph matrix [MAY-triks] natural numbers negative numbers 28 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill integers [IN-tah-jerz] . Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study. As you complete the study notes for the chapter. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages.CH APTER 2 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 2.

Chapter Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition 2 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Description or Example number line opposites ordered array ordered pair origin [OR-a-jin] quadrants [KWA-druntz] scalar multiplication [SKAY-ler] Venn diagram x-axis x-coordinate © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill y-axis y-coordinate zero pair Algebra: Concepts and Applications 29 .

L. . . or ovals inside a rectangle to show relationships are called Venn diagrams. 4. Then write the above the dot. K –5 30 Algebra: Concepts and Applications –4 M –3 –2 –1 L 0 1 2 3 4 5 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Graph points K. . . KEY CONCEPT Name the coordinates of G. . 4. rational numbers. and M has coordinate 1. whole numbers. 2. L has coordinate 2. To plot points named by numbers on a number line is to graph. H. H is 3 4 5 . Integers Integers are the negative numbers 1. A number line is a line with off to represent numbers. 1. .2–1 Graphing Integers on a Number Line GLE 1. 2. Identify and describe differences among natural numbers. The that corresponds to a point on a number line is a coordinate. Place a on the mark above the number. and irrational numbers (N-1-H. N-2-H. distances marked A negative number is a number less than Diagrams that use . and whole numbers 0. N-3-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 28–29) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Graph integers on a number line and compare and order integers. Natural numbers are the set of whole numbers without the element . 3. and J. . . G –5 –4 –3 J –2 –1 The coordinate of G is 0 1 H 2 . and J is Find each number on a . and M on a number line if K has coordinate 4. 3. integers.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications 31 . Order the temperatures from greatest to least.2–1 Your Turn ORGANIZE IT a. Copy the Venn diagram from page 52 of your textbook under the tab for Lesson 2-1. . . Name the coordinates of P. So. and Z. –3 –2 –1 0 1 2 3 4 5 of 4 on the number line. Be sure to explain the diagram. . Replace in 3 sentence. and C on a number line if A has coordinate 3. . 3 3 is to the WRITE IT –4 4 with  or  to make a true The table shows the high temperature each day for one week in January in a midwestern city. B. 5°. Day Temp. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Graph each on 4. and C has coordinate 5. Graph points A. S. 0 Saturday 7 Sunday 2 –8 –7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 The order from greatest to least is 2°. (°C) Monday 5 Tuesday 1 Wednesday 8 3 Thursday Friday a number line. and 7°. –5 Write an example of a negative number in a real world application. Z –5 P –4 –3 –2 –1 0 S 1 2 3 4 5 Systems of Equations and Inequalities Integers 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 2-1 Graph 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 2-2 Compare and Order 13-3 Substitution 2-3 Add Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-4 2-4 Subtract 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 2-5 Multiply 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 2-6 Divide Graphing systems of inequations 13-7 Vocabulary b. B has coordinate 2.

1 1  The graph of 1 is from unit away . . The table shows the average low temperature each day for one week in January in a northern city. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT a. 3  7 . (°C) Monday 7 Tuesday 5 Wednesday 3 Thursday 5 Friday 1 Saturday 0 Sunday 4 KEY CONCEPT Absolute Value The absolute value of a number is the distance it is from 0 on the number line. Evaluate each expression. 4 2 with  or  to make a true 6 b. 4 Page(s): Exercises: 32 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. Order the temperatures from least to greatest. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 9  .2–1 Your Turn Replace sentence. a. City Temp. 4  5 4  5  The absolute value of 4 is The absolute value of 5 is Your Turn Evaluate each expression. 5 c.

g.and y-axes is the coordinate plane. The ordered pair for point H is . intersection as common solution. Use coordinate methods to solve and interpret problems (e. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The x-coordinate is . 6 5 4 3 2 1 y H –3 –2–1O 1 2 3 4 5 x J K –1 –2 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 33 . An ordered pair is a pair of numbers used to locate any on a The . slope as rate of change.The horizontal number line is the x-axis.2–2 The Coordinate Plane GLE 23. The number in a coordinate pair is the y-coordinate. and the y-coordinate is . midpoint as equidistant) (G-2-H. The number line on a coordinate plane is the y-axis. number in a coordinate pair is the x-coordinate. intercept as initial value. Write the ordered pair that names point H. The point of intersection of the two in the coordinate plane is called the origin. G-3-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 28–29) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Graph points on a coordinate plane. The coordinate system is the formed by the intersection of two perpendicular number lines that meet at their zero points.. The plane containing the x.

0) b. Your Turn Graph each point on a coordinate plane. G(5. move and draw a . © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 2-1 Graph 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 2-2 Compare and Order 13-3 Substitution 2-3 Add Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-4 2-4 Subtract 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 2-5 Multiply 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 2-6 Divide Graphing systems of inequations 13-7 Vocabulary . B(5. It is not located in a Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. Systems of Equations and Inequalities Integers x . 1) is located. • Start at the y . 3) Name the quadrant in which F(0. S(2. • The y-coordinate is 4 units ORGANIZE IT Under the tab for Lesson 2-2. a. So. M D c. O. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Point F lies on the Your Turn Name the quadrant in which each point is located. 4) on the coordinate plane. move O 2 units to the . So. A x O a. • The x-coordinate is V . draw a coordinate plane and label each of the four quadrants as well as the x. 1) .2–2 y Your Turn Write the ordered pair that names each point. D Graph V(2. 4) 34 . A M b.and y-axes. a. H(8.

technology. Give the result the same sign as the integer with the greater absolute value. 9  5 9  5   or 9  5. 5  (8)  Additive Inverse Property The sum of any number and its additive inverse is 0. 67 67 Both numbers are the sum is KEY CONCEPTS . so . find the difference of the absolute values. 7  15 Adding Integers with Different Signs To add integers with different signs. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 35 . Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e. b. 14  (17) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY When one (pages 28–29) algebra tile is paired with one algebra tile.. If the of two numbers is . so the sum is Therefore. • Add integers. add their absolute values. a. Your Turn Find each sum. 9  5  . Give the result the same sign as the integers.g. the result is a zero pair. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Find each sum. paper/pencil) (N-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each sum. the numbers are called opposites or additive inverses. estimation. mental math. . so Both numbers are the sum is . 5  (8) Adding Integers with the Same Sign To add integers with the same sign.2–3 Adding Integers GLE 5. .

2–3 (9)  8 ORGANIZE IT Write an expression that is the sum of one negative integer and one positive integer under the tab for Lesson 2-3. so the sum is Therefore. (1)  9 Simplify 7y  6y. 5  2 b.  7  6  Your Turn Simplify 3a  (5a). a. Your Turn Find each sum. . Tell how you know whether the sum is positive or negative. Systems of Equations and Inequalities Integers 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 2-1 Graph 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 2-2 Compare and Order 13-3 Substitution 2-3 Add 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 2-4 Subtract 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 2-5 Multiply 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 2-6 Divide Graphing systems of inequations 13-7 Vocabulary 9  8   or 9  8. 7y  6y  [  6]y Use the Property. (9)  8  . Page(s): Exercises: 36 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT .

Systems of Equations and Inequalities Integers 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 2-1 Graph 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 2-2 Compare and Order 13-3 Substitution 2-3 Add Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-4 2-4 Subtract 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 2-5 Multiply 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 2-6 Divide Graphing systems of inequations 13-7 Vocabulary 46 464  7  (10) 7  (10)  7  To subtract 10. add .  KEY CONCEPT Subtracting Integers To subtract an integer.. 7  (6) 7  (6)  7   1  8 1  8  1   3  (5) 3  (5)  3   © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill ORGANIZE IT Write an expression that is the difference of two negative integers under the tab for Lesson 2-4. To subtract 6. add . paper/pencil) (N-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each difference. add . add its additive inverse. • Subtract integers. To subtract 5.2–4 Subtracting Integers GLE 5.  Algebra: Concepts and Applications 37 . To subtract 8. add . Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e.g. estimation. mental math. 10  3 10  3  10  To subtract 3. add . technology. Rewrite the expression as an addition expression. add . To subtract 6.

Evaluate m  n if m  5 and n  4.2–4 Your Turn Find each difference. 7  (3)  Write 10  2 as . HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 38 b. 4  6 d.  Write 8  (2) as  8  2  . and r  2. and r  2. a  b  8  (2) a  8. Evaluate p  q  r if p  7. p  q  r  7  (3)  2   2 p  7. and c  5. 8  (2) c. 1  8 f. b  8. 7  (2) e.  10  (2)  a. a. b  2. q  3. 2  (5) Evaluate a  b if a  8 and b  2. Evaluate a  b  c if a  3. Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn . q  3. 9  6 b.

2–5 Multiplying Integers GLE 5. • Multiply integers. . Find each product. 2(7) 2(7)  Your Turn Find each product. paper/pencil) (N-5-H) GLE 26. technology. 10(4) 10(4)  The factors have the The product is sign. 1(8) Algebra: Concepts and Applications 39 .. Perform translations and line reflections on the coordinate plane (G-3-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each product. mental math. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8(6) 8(6)  Your Turn Find each product. The product is KEY CONCEPTS Multiplying Two Integers with Different Signs The product of two integers with different signs is negative. 3(10) a. Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e. 2(2) Multiplying Two Integers with the Same Signs The product of two integers with the same signs is positive. . 4(3) 4(3)  The factors have signs. a. 5(3) b. estimation. b.g.

2(1)(9)(5) Evaluate 4ab if a  3 and b  5. Simplify (3n)(2x). b.2–5 Find 7(3)(6). Will the solution be positive or negative? How do you know?  (5) Replace a with 3 and b with 5. Evaluate 3xy if x  7 and y  3. 7(3)(6)  7(3)  (6)  21(6)  Your Turn Find each product. . © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill (m)(n)  HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . Algebra: Concepts and Applications . a. (4m)(7n)  (4) (7) 4m  (4) 7n  (7) Systems of Equations and Inequalities Integers 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 2-1 Graph 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 2-2 Compare and Order 13-3 Substitution 2-3 Add Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-4 2-4 Subtract 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 2-5 Multiply 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 2-6 Divide Graphing systems of inequations 13-7 Vocabulary  (4)(7) Commutative Property  (4)(7)  Your Turn Page(s): Exercises: 40 a. 4ab  4(3)(5) ORGANIZE IT  Write a multiplication expression using two negative integers under the tab for Lesson 2-5. 3(4)(2) b. 4(3)  12(5)  Simplify (4m)(7n).

12  3 12  3  The signs are . The quotient is KEY CONCEPT Dividing Integers The quotient of two integers with the same sign is positive.2–6 Dividing Integers GLE 5. • Divide integers. The quotient is . a. y Algebra: Concepts and Applications 41 .. Your Turn Find each quotient.g. 3(6)  Divide by . estimation. b 3a 3(6)    b 9 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill   9 Replace a with and b with . x Your Turn Evaluate 5 if x  4 and y  2. technology. paper/pencil) (N-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each quotient. Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e. The quotient of two integers with different signs is negative. 10  5 b. . 35  (7) 3a Evaluate  if a  6 and b  9. 50  (10) 50  (10)  The signs are the . mental math.

the population of the city had fallen to 523. Page(s): Exercises: 42 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT .C. Systems of Equations and Inequalities In the last 5 years at a high school. By 1998.900. Your Turn In 1990.  change in the number of students with no tardies for the entire school year was per . was 606.2–6 ORGANIZE IT In your own words. find the change in the number of students with no tardies. . Find the average change in population for each of those eight years. What was the average change in the number of students without a tardy for each of those 5 years? First. the population of Washington..124. D. divide 220 by 220  The years. summarize the rules for dividing integers under the tab for Lesson 2-6. the number of students with no tardies during the entire school year dropped from 315 to 95. Integers  13-1 Graphing systems of equations 2-1 Graph 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 2-2 Compare and Order 13-3 Substitution 2-3 Add Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-4 2-4 Subtract 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 2-5 Multiply 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 2-6 Divide Graphing systems of inequations 13-7 Vocabulary  220 There were fewer students with no tardies at the end of the To find the average change.

php 2-1 Graphing Integers on a Number Line Refer to the Venn diagram shown. All whole numbers are natural numbers. All whole numbers are integers. 6 3 with  or  to make a true sentence. All natural numbers are whole numbers. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3. 6. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 2. Whole Numbers Integers Natural Numbers 1. word search. Replace each 5. www. 2. go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 28–29) to help you solve the puzzle.CH APTER 2 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 2 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. 1 8 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 43 . To make a crossword puzzle.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. All natural numbers are integers. 3 2 8.glencoe. Write true or false for each of the following statements. 4. 4 5 7.

4) 11. If two numbers are additive inverses. what must be true about their absolute values? 44 16. 3) 10. C(4.Chapter 2 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 2-2 The Coordinate Plane Graph the given points on the coordinate plane shown. A(0. Explain how to add integers with opposite signs. 4  (1) 18. 3  (6) 17. . 9. 1  10 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Find each sum. 7  (10) 19. 14. Explain how to add integers with the same sign. 15. D(6. B(1. 2) 12. 1) 2-3 Adding Integers 13.

Chapter 2 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 2-4 Subtracting Integers Write each subtraction problem as an addition problem. 15  7 22. 17  14 27. 5(8) 31. 34. 20. Then find each difference. 8  19 2-5 Multiplying Integers Find each product. 6(3) 32.  78 37. 15  (4) Describe how to find each difference. 5  (8) 26. (4)(9) 29. 15  12 35. 9  1 35 36. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 28. 24. 8  11 25. 0  11 23. 7(10) Find each quotient. (2)(13) 30. 12 – 4 21.  7 13 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 45 . 4(3) 33.

• Then complete the Chapter 2 Study Guide and Review on pages 86–88 of your textbook. • You may also want to take the Chapter 2 Practice Test on page 89. Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. more examples. Visit algconcepts. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 2. refer back to the specific lesson(s).CH APTER 2 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. • You may also want to take the Chapter 2 Practice Test on page 89. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. • You may want take the Chapter 2 Practice Test on page 89 of your textbook as a final check. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 46 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. self-check quizzes. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test.com to access your textbook. • You should complete the Chapter 2 Study Guide and Review on pages 86–88 of your textbook. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 2 Foldable.

CH APTER 3 Addition and Subtraction Equations Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Chapter 3 Open Cut along second fold to make four tabs. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 47 . Fold Fold the short sides to meet in the middle. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Label Label each tab as shown. Fold Fold the top to the bottom. Begin with a sheet of 11"  17" paper. Rational Mean Numbers Median Mode Range Equations Absolute Value NOTE-TAKING TIP: It is often helpful to review your notes as soon as you can after class.

CH APTER 3 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 3. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example cross products empty set equivalent equations inequality [IN-ee-KWAL-a-tee] mean measure of variation median 48 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill measure of central tendency . As you complete the study notes for the chapter. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study.

Chapter Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition 3 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Description or Example mode open sentence range rational numbers [RA-shun-ul] replacement set sequence [SEE-kwens] solution © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill solving statement unit cost Algebra: Concepts and Applications 49 .

g. Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e. a. mental math. or  to make a true sentence. 2 50 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 1  3 1. . 3(2)(0) 7  (8) 3(2)(0) 7  (8) Find the value of each side. Comparison Property For any two numbers a and b. . with . exactly one of the following sentences is true. a  b ab a  b Replace each 1 with . 7(0) 9  (9) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill So. paper/pencil) (N-5-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 48) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Compare and order An inequality is a mathematical sentence that uses rational numbers. 0 is to the 7  (8). technology.3–1 Rational Numbers GLE 5. KEY CONCEPTS Rational Number A rational number is any number that can be expressed as a fraction where the numerator and denominator are integers and the denominator is not zero. 3 5 1 . and to compare two expressions. estimation. 3 5  3 5 Since 1 is to the of  on a number line. Cross products are the products of the terms of two .. Your Turn Replace each true sentence. 3(2)(0) of 1 on a number line and 0 . or  to make a b.

or 9 This is a decimal.  Your Turn Replace each each sentence true. 6 9 5 5   0. with . and  in order from least to greatest.   7 8  5 7 4 Write . 5.7777 . . 7  12 5  8  4 15   7  12 5  8 4  15 3  10 (7) 12 Find the cross products. 8 So. 7   0. In order from least to greatest.  15 (4) 40  45 5 . So.  3 10 . the fractions in order from least to greatest are . 2 a. Rational Mean Numbers Median Mode Range Equations Absolute Value with . Your Turn Write 2. Include a decimal and one negative number. .  60 7 12 4 15 3 3 10 So.3–1 ORGANIZE IT Replace each Write three examples of rational numbers under the tab for Rational Numbers. .8333 . . 4   5 This is a decimal. . or  to make 9 11 5  7 b. or  to make each sentence true. or 6 This is a decimal. the decimals are © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill . . and 3 in order from least to 3 8 5 greatest. . Algebra: Concepts and Applications 51 .

A package of 36 cookies costs $4. The cost of a package of 24 cookies is $3. Which is the better buy? Explain.29. In each case.1972 or about Since $0.2241 or about per bar. Which is the better buy? Explain. unit cost of package of 12: $2. unit cost of package of 18: $3. unit cost  total  number of Latisha needs to buy snacks for her art club.22.69 and a package of 18 granola bars costs $3. Find the unit cost of each package.79.55.69   0.20 $0. A package of 12 granola bars costs $2. granola bars is the better buy.55   0.3–1 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 49) Unit cost is the cost per unit. the package of per bar. the unit cost is expressed in cents per bar. Page(s): Exercises: 52 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . Your Turn John needs to buy cookies.

• Add and subtract 0.41  (1.3–2 Adding and Subtracting Rational Numbers GLE 5. mental math.3)         (1. (previous course) 10 5 3 10 3 5 5  2  3 10  The LCD is 10. paper/pencil) (N-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each sum.g.  Algebra: Concepts and Applications 53 . Subtract the lesser absolute value from the greater.5  (1.7  12.3)  (  ( )  The signs differ. technology.41  (1.    © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3. Subtract the lesser absolute value from the greater. 0..7  12. estimation. )  3 3 5  2 REVIEW IT Explain the procedure for finding the LCD of two fractions.3) 3. Replace  5  2 3  with 5         . Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e.3) rational numbers.5  (1.3)  Commutative & Associative Properties () Add. The signs differ.

20.4) Find 4. 1 6 5 8 Evaluate c  d if c  5 and d  3.9)  4.3–2 Your Turn Find each sum. Subtract the lesser absolute value from the greater.7  To subtract 5.1  (2. 1 6  5 8  c  d  5  3 1 5  5  3 6 Page(s): Exercises: 54 5 8 5 5 To subtract 3. .8  (5. (3.9 add  The signs differ. Your Turn Evaluate x  y if x  81 and y  42. a. d  3 .2)  (1. 8 8 5 3    or The LCD is 8 .7  (5.5  10.7  (5.4). Algebra: Concepts and Applications 4 5 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT 1 6 c  5.1) 3 5 b. Your Turn Find 8. add 3. 2  5 4 8 c.9) 4.

Leaf Then of the number of children enrolled.3–3 Mean. mode. and range of a set of data. the number is the median. of a set of data is the sum of the data divided by the number of pieces of data. or average. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 55 . First. by the number of items of data. The median is students. The stem-and-leaf plot shows the number of children enrolled in each of 9 gymnastics classes offered at a local recreation center. 15 15 18 number of data items. median. and Range GLE 27. value. (page 48) A measure of central tendency is a number used to describe a set of data because it represents a centralized. Arrange the numbers in order from 4 8 10 Since there is an to . find the Median The median of a set of data is the middle number when the data in the set are arranged in numerical order. Stem 0 1 2 KEY CONCEPTS 4 5 8 0 2 5 5 8 1 2|1  21 Find the mean of the gymnastics data. Determine the most appropriate measure of central tendency for a set of data based on its distribution (D-1-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Find the mean. 4  5  8  10  12  15  15  18  21  9 or Find the median of the gymnastics data. Mode. mean  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Mode The mode of a set of data is the number that occurs most often in the set. or . Mean The mean. Median.

and range in your notes. So. and mode of the aerobics data. find the range of the gymnastics data. . median.  or students. Find the mean. Your Turn Refer to Example 1. subtract the value of the data from the The greatest value is The least value is HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 56 So. . To find the range of the gymnastics data. . Be sure to include an example of each. the set of data students. KEY CONCEPT Range The range of a set of data is the difference between the greatest and the least values of the set. Stem 0 1 2 Leaf 5 7 8 0 3 3 5 6 1 2|1  21 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 48) Measures of variation are used to describe the of the data. Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Include mean. Using the stem-and-leaf plot from Examples 1 through 3. Look for the number that occurs most often. . Your Turn The stem-and-leaf plot below shows the number of people enrolled in each of 9 aerobics classes offered at a local recreation center. median. the range is value. mode.3–3 Find the mode of the gymnastics data. Find the range of the aerobics data. 4 5 8 10 12 15 15 18 21 In this set appears has one mode.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications 57 . or . REMEMBER IT Find the solution of 13  33  4d if the replacement set is {6. Finding the replacements for the variable that results in a sentence is called solving. A set of numbers from which replacements for a may be chosen is called a replacement set. A mathematical sentence like m  5  12 is called an open sentence. and inequalities (A-1-H. D-2-H. . A statement is any sentence that is but not both. A replacement set contains numbers that may result in a false sentence. The solutions of an open sentence are values that make the sentence true. 5. Model real-life situations using linear expressions. P-5-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 49) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Determine whether a given number is a solution of an equation. 4. 3}.3–4 Equations GLE 9. 13  33  4d Value of d © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 6 13  33  5 13  33  4 13  33  3 13  33  Since the solution is True or False? makes the sentence 13  33  4d true. equations.

Your Turn Solve each equation. 456   c (3  4) 5 456   c (3  4) 5 456 c (3  4)  5   5 or . 3(7)  4  z © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill c The solution is HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Evaluate the numerator and the denominator separately. . 4x  7  13 2 Solve each equation. 1. n1 b. 1 from The solution is . a. 2. (Lesson 1-1) h )1 1 3 and 2. 6} and for n is {0. n  2   a. x  [20  (4)(1)] 3 Page(s): Exercises: 58  6 or Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. 3}.3–4 Your Turn Find the solution of each equation if the replacement set for x is {3. . Divide 24 by h . 5. 4. h  [24  (3)(2)]  1 h  [24  (3)(2)]  1 h  (24  REVIEW IT Explain the difference between an expression and an equation.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill STEP 3 Remove the . and on the right you have zero pair. Algebra: Concepts and Applications   2 59 .3–5 Solving Equations By Using Models GLE 11. So. STEP 2 To get the variable tile by itself. . Place variable   t tile and positive   1  square tiles on one t3 side of the mat to represent  . STEP 1 Model t  3  1. add negative square        t     tiles to each side. Place positive square tile on the other side of the mat to represent . • Solve addition and t31 subtraction equations by using models. t3 On the left side you have  1 zero pairs. Use equivalent forms of equations and inequalities to solve real-life problems (A-1-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Use algebra tiles to solve each equation.        t     t33  13 STEP 4 The variable tile is matched with t  t  negative square tiles.

x  4  6 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b.   b          add b  (4)  3 square positive tiles to each side. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 60 Your Turn Use algebra tiles to solve each equation. STEP 3 Remove the .         b         b  (4)  4  (3)  4 STEP 4 The variable tile is matched with   b  1 positive square tile. a. So. p  4  2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill b . Place negative square tiles on the other side of the mat to represent STEP 2 To get   the variable  tile by itself.3–5 b  4  3 STEP 1 Write the equation as b Place   3.   .     b   variable b  (4) tile and   3 negative square tiles on one side of the mat to represent .

8  y   13. Subtraction Property of Equality If you subtract the same number from each side of an equation. y0  y Check your solution. Model real-life situations using linear expressions. a.  (13)  15  15 Replace with . and inequalities (A-1-H.  15  Add to each side.3–6 Solving Addition and Subtraction Equations GLE 9. 8  m  6 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 61 . r0 r Check: r  (13)  15 Write the properties under the tab for Equations. 28  (13)  4. KEY CONCEPTS Addition Property of Equality If you add the same number to each side of an equation. subtraction equations by using the properties of equality. the result is an equivalent equation. D-2-H. the two sides remain equal.7 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 4.7  Add to each side. z  12  5 b.8  y  13. Your Turn Solve each equation.7 4. equations. r  (13)  15 r  (13)  15 r  13  15 r  13  Rewrite the equation. P-5-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve addition and (page 48) When the same number is added to each side of an equation.8  y  13. Solve each equation. Check your solution. the two sides remain equal.

7 x    2 Rewrite  as x Check your solution. x  . 7    Subtract 10 10 from each side. 5 Your Turn Solve each equation. x 2 x    5 10 7   Rewrite the equation.3–6 Solve k  12  6. Check your solution. a. 10 .  5 7 2 Solve x    . y  10  2 Page(s): Exercises: 62 Algebra: Concepts and Applications   4  12 3 11 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT b. Check your solution. k  12  6 k  12   6  k Subtract from each side.

ORGANIZE IT 3 units Write an equation that contains an absolute value under the tab for Absolute Value. Replace d with d  4  3  d  4  3  4  3   3  4  3  3 The solution set is . d4 d  3  d Check: © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Replace d with . 2 1 0 1 2 3 3 units 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 d Rational Mean Numbers Median Mode Range Equations Absolute Value units. Check your solution.3–7 Solving Equations Involving Absolute Value GLE 11. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 63 . Solve d  4   3. Use equivalent forms of equations and inequalities to solve real-life problems (A-1-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve equations involving absolute value. d  4  3 also means d  4  d4 d4 or d  4  d4 or 3 . start at 4 and move units in either direction.  3 3 . to find x on the number line. Solve the equation using methods 1 and 2. d Method 2: Write and solve a compound sentence. Method 1: Use a number line d  4  3 means the distance between d and 4 is So.

3–7 Solve g  3  2  6 To solve the equation. Your Turn Solve and check your solution. y  5  2  7 y  5  2 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises:  7 Add y  5  5 The solution is the y  5  5 is never true. b. 64 Algebra: Concepts and Applications to each side. a. or Your Turn Solve x  3  1  8. . . write a compound sentence and solve it. g3 g3 g3 or 8 g3  8  g g The solution set is . a  2  5 WRITE IT Write an example of an absolute value equation that has no solution. first rewrite the equation. g  3  2  6 g  3 2  6 Add to each side. x  4  3  8 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY A set with (page 48) members is called an empty set. g  3  Next. Solve y  5  2  7. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill First simplify the expression.

 4.CH APTER 3 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 3 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. 7. word search.glencoe. 7 Match the correct inequality symbols at the right with their correct description on the left.  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3-2 Adding and Subtracting Rational Numbers Find each sum or difference.  3. b.    4 6.8  8 1 1 8. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 3. 5  2  Algebra: Concepts and Applications 65 .    6 7.6  5. To make a crossword puzzle. 0. 10. less than or equal to a.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. Explain why .6  and 15 are rational numbers.1  (14. 2.4  8 5 7 9.php 3-1 Rational Numbers 3 1. 2. greater than c. go to: www. 5.3  12. less than d. You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 48–49) to help you solve the puzzle.9) 1 8  15 16 10.

Consider the equation 3n  6  15 with the replacement set {0. Stem 2 3 4 5 6 Leaf 0 2 1 6 0 1 2 3 6 1 1 2 3 8 8 2 5 7 9 9 9 8 8 4|2  42 16. Median. What is the mode? 3-4 Equations 17. 2. What is the median of the data set? 15. the average score c. 14. Complete the chart to find the solution(s) of the equation. mean 11. the score used most often b. and Range Match the measure of central of tendency at the right with its description on the left a. 4. What is the mean? Round to the nearest tenth if necessary. 5}.Chapter 3 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 3-3 Mean. median 12. 0 1 2 3 4 5 66 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 3n  6  15 True or False? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Value for n . How can you tell whether an equation is an open sentence? 18. Mode. 1. 3. mode 13. the middle score d range Use the stem-and-leaf plot shown.

a. For each algebra tile. 26. x  3  12 28. To solve y  9  30 using the Addition Property of Equality. n  8  4 30. n  4  1 23. write the part of the equation that it represents. z  2  5 22. you would subtract from each side. or never true. Write an equation that you could solve by subtracting 32 from each side. always. you would add to each side. 20. To solve x  17  46 using the Subtraction Property of Equality. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 27.  x Solve each equation. 3  m  (6) 29. 3-7 Solving Equations Involving Absolute Value Determine whether each sentence is sometimes. 3  m  7 21. 25. 6  k  1 3-6 Solving Addition and Subtraction Equations 24.Chapter 3 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 3-5 Solving Equations by Using Models 19. Explain. 6   y  7 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 67 . b.

• If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. • Then complete the Chapter 3 Study Guide and Review on pages 132–134 of your textbook. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 3. Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. refer back to the specific lesson(s). I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You should complete the Chapter 3 Study Guide and Review on pages 132–134 of your textbook. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help.CH APTER 3 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 68 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . • You may also want to take the Chapter 3 Practice Test on page 135. refer back to the specific lesson(s). Visit algconcepts.com to access your textbook. self-check quizzes. • You may also want to take the Chapter 3 Practice Test on page 135. • You may want take the Chapter 3 Practice Test on page 135 of your textbook as a final check. more examples. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 3 Foldable. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills.

Unfold Unfold and cut four rows from the left side of each sheet. 69 . from the top to the crease. Multiplication and Division Equations Stack Stack the sheets and staple to form a booklet. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes.CH APTER 4 Multiplication and Division Equations Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Algebra: Concepts and Applications Chapter 4 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Label Label each page with a lesson number and title. Begin with seven sheets of grid paper. 4-1 Multi Rational plying Numbers NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you take notes. record important ideas and examples from each lesson. Be sure to include examples that will help you understand the concepts. Fold Fold each sheet in half along the width.

Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example combination consecutive integers [con-SEC-yoo-tiv] event Fundamental Counting Principle factorial [fak-TOR-ee-ul] grouping symbols identity multiplicative inverses [mul-tah-PLIK-uh-tiv] outcomes reciprocal [ree-SIP-ruh-kul] sample space tree diagram 70 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill permutation [PUR-myu-TAY-shun] . Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study.CH APTER 4 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 4. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages. As you complete the study notes for the chapter.

1)(196) to find the skydiver’s height after he free-falls for 14 seconds. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 71 .1(0.000  (0.000 feet.2.000  (0.05 and 144.7(0.5)(32. Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e.. The product is .7(0. 4.1)(144) to find the skydiver’s height after he free-falls for 12 seconds.000  (144) Multiply 0. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  12.8) A skydiver jumps from 12.000 and 2311. The factors have different signs. After 12 seconds.1)(144)  12. mental math. 9. Solve the equation h  12. a.2(5) numbers.000 feet.5)(32. Multiplying Two Rational Numbers with the Same Sign The product of two rational numbers with the same sign is positive.4–1 Multiplying Rational Numbers GLE 5.4)  The factors have the same sign.2(5)  KEY CONCEPTS Multiplying Two Rational Numbers with Different Signs The product of two rational numbers with different signs is negative. h  12. Your Turn Find each product. estimation. the skydiver’s height is feet. 8. paper/pencil) (N-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each product.5)(32.1.  Add 12. technology.4) 4. • Multiply rational 3.000  Multiply 16. Your Turn A skydiver jumps 12.g. Solve the equation h  12. –3.5(3) b. The product is .5 and 32.000  (0.

17  Rewrite 8 as an improper fraction. 3 7 8     3 7 3 7 8        83   Multiply the numerators and multiply the denominators. Multiply the numerators and multiply the denominators.  The factors have different signs.4–1 KEY CONCEPT Multiplying Fractions To multiply fractions. 1 1 3   3 7  1 1 3    3 7  7 1 Rewrite 3 as an improper 3 fraction. The product is . Multiply the numerators and multiply the denominators. The product is     .   2 3   7 5   2 3     7 5 Write the rules for multiplying rational numbers in your notes. The product is 72 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . multiply the numerators and multiply the denominators. or The factors have the same sign. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 10  1   37 1   . Be sure to include examples. Find each product. The factors have different signs.

2   KEY CONCEPT Multiplicative Property of –1 The product of –1 and any number is the number’s additive inverse. 4 5 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 73 .   (7) 9 1 2   5 6 c. (2.4–1 Your Turn Find each product.    3 3 4 b.2) Commutative Property  (b  y)  Associative Property Simplify.2)(y) 5b  (5)(b).   Your Turn Simplify 1p 3r .2y) (2.2)(y)  (5)(2. 2 4 a. Simplify 5b(2.2y)  (5)(b)(2.2y). 5b(2.

CPUs 4-1 Multi Rational plying Numbers CPU1 There are 74 Algebra: Concepts and Applications Printers Outcomes M1 P1 P2 P3 CPU1. P1 CPU2. M1. M2. She has a list of 2 different CPUs. P3 M3 P1 P2 P3 CPU2. 3 different monitors. M3.4–2 Counting Outcomes BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 70) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Use tree diagrams and the Fundamental Counting Principle to count outcomes. M2. P2 CPU2. one monitor. P3 M1 P1 P2 P3 CPU2. P1 CPU1. M3. P3 different ways. Outcomes are all possible of a counting problem or the results of an experiment. and 3 different printers. P2 CPU1. M2. M3. M3. P3 M3 P1 P2 P3 CPU1. P1 CPU1. and one printer? Make a tree diagram to find the number of combinations. A tree diagram is used to show the total number of possible . M1. P3 M2 P1 P2 P3 CPU2. M1. P2 CPU2. ORGANIZE IT Multiplication and Division Equations Write an example of a counting problem and draw a tree diagram for it under the tab for Counting Outcomes. How many different ways can she choose one CPU. M2. P2 CPU2. M2. P3 M2 P1 P2 P3 CPU1. M1. P2 CPU1. M2. P1 CPU1. M1. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill CPU2 Monitors . M3. M1. Brooke is shopping for a new computer system. P2 CPU1. P1 CPU2. P1 CPU2. The sample space is the list of all possible outcomes. M3.

so the number of different kinds of photo processing is © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises:   or . and photo sizes. 2 different types of sauce. KEY CONCEPT Fundamental Counting Principle If event M can occur in m ways and is followed by event N that can occur in n ways. Suppose one item is selected from each column. How many different kinds of photo processing are possible? Process Time Paper Type Photo Size 1 hour 1 day regular glossy deluxe 3 by 5 4 by 6 There are processing times. paper types. then the event M followed by event N can occur in m  n ways. How many different choices are possible? Meat Topping Bun hot dog hamburger veggie burger ketchup mustard onions wheat white Algebra: Concepts and Applications 75 . How many ways can you order a pizza? BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 70) An event is the subset of the possible outcomes. or .4–2 Your Turn Suppose you can order a pizza with 2 different types of crust. and 4 different types of toppings. Your Turn A concession stand offers the choices shown in the table below.

5)  Numbers have different signs. 14. 2 12   5 2 12    12  5 60 2    76 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 2 To divide by .4–3 Dividing Rational Numbers GLE 5. multiply by the reciprocal of a number.3  (0. paper/pencil) (N-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each quotient. The quotient of two numbers with the same sign is positive. technology. The quotient is KEY CONCEPTS Dividing Rational Numbers with Different Signs or the Same Sign The quotient of two numbers with different signs is negative. The numbers have different signs. 9.8  (1. 8. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Find each quotient.4  (0. BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 70) Two numbers whose product is are called multiplicative inverses or reciprocals.3)  Numbers have the sign.1) Multiplicative Inverse Property The product of a number and its multiplicative inverse is 1. The product is negative. 8  (2. • Divide rational 8  (2.6) b.5) numbers.3  (0.3) 9. Your Turn Find each quotient.. a. The quotient is positive. . Dividing Fractions To divide a fraction by any nonzero number. estimation.g. . Demonstrate computational fluency with all rational numbers (e. multiply by its 5 reciprocal. mental math.

2 2 3 The product is REMEMBER IT If one of the numbers in a division problem is an integer. feet from Algebra: Concepts and Applications 77 . write an example showing how to divide two fractions.   (6)   3 4 b.4–3 3 1 2   7 2 3 1 2    7 1   Rewrite 2 as an improper 7 fraction. Notice how this divides the wall into 3 pieces. 3 8 1 2 a. Your Turn Find each quotient. 1 4 22  3   3  22 14 ft  or The center of each painting should be the wall.  or The numbers have the same sign. Draw a dotted line down the center of each painting. ORGANIZE IT Multiplication and Division Equations Under the tab for Dividing Rational Numbers. Divide the wall length by 3.   1 To divide by . How far from the end of the wall closest to it should the center of each painting be located? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Draw a picture of the 2 paintings and the walls on either side. 3   Two paintings are to be hung on a wall so that the distances between the centers of the paintings is the same as the distance from either center to the end of the wall. write it as a fraction with a denominator of 1. The paintings are both 6 feet wide and the 1 4 wall measures 22 feet across. multiply by its 2 reciprocal. 4-1 Multi Rational plying Numbers .

4–3 Your Turn Larry needs to saw a board into 3 equal pieces. multiply by its reciprocal. 78 . How many inches from each end should he make the cuts? 3 3 Evaluate  if x  . 3    3 Replace 3 by . To divide by 1 3 4 1 . x 4 3 3   x Replace x with 3 Rewrite the fraction as a division sentence. .  Simplify. 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 7 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Evaluate x if x  2. 3 4 The board measures 18 inches long. 12 3   Multiply the numerators and multiply the denominators.

KEY CONCEPT Division Property of Equality If you divide each side of an equation by the same nonzero number. the two sides remain equal. Check the solution. a.5z  22 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 5. • Solve multiplication and 5b  30 division equations by using the properties of equality. Check the solution.5z  z 22 Divide each side by . P-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Solve each equation.4–4 Solving Multiplication and Division Equations GLE 9.  30 24  3g 24  3g 24 3g  Divide each side by g . D-2-H. 5. equations. 3x  39 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 79 . and inequalities (A-1-H. 5b  30 30 5b  Divide each side by . b 5b  30 Check:  30 5 Substitute b  . Check your solution. Your Turn Solve each equation. Model real-life situations using linear expressions.5z  22 5. Check your solution.

2a  21 Brian received a $25 gift certificate from his grandparents for his birthday. How many $2. c 2. List the steps below. She wants to take her guests to a movie that costs $7. Price per package times number of packages equals  c  total cost. 18t  90 c.25 per person. b. he has enough . 4.4–4 WRITE IT Explain how you can recognize when to divide both sides of an equation by a number. Your Turn Allison is planning her birthday party. Write an equation to represent the problem. (Lesson 1-5) 80 money to buy packages. Solve the equation for c.35c  25 c REVIEW IT Any word problem can be solved using the four-step plan. How many guests can she invite? Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Since Brian cannot buy part of a package.35 packages of trading cards can he buy with the gift certificate? Let c represent the number of packages of trading cards. She has $40 to spend on her guests.

Solve each equation. w   6 7 w   6 7  w   7 Multiply each side by .  b  7 3 4 c. m a. Check your solution. 2 5 x  8 2 5 x  8   2 5 x  x (8) Multiply each side by .   12 5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 1 3 b. (6) w Check the solution. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Solve each equation. the two sides remain equal. 4-1 Multi Rational plying Numbers   1 m 2 (9)  Multiply each side by m . Check the solution. 1 9  m 2 ORGANIZE IT 1 9  m 2 Multiplication and Division Equations Write examples showing how to solve multiplication or division equations under the tab for Solving Multiplication and Division Equations. 24   y Algebra: Concepts and Applications 81 .4–4 KEY CONCEPT Multiplication Property of Equality If you multiply each side of an equation by the same number. Check the solution.

4–5

Solving Multi-Step Equations
GLE 9. Model real-life situations using linear expressions, equations, and
inequalities (A-1-H, D-2-H, P-5-H)

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

Solve each equation.

• Solve equations

x 
 4  2
6
x 
 4  2
6

involving more than
one operation.

x 
 4 
6 

2

Add

to each side.

x 
 6
6 

x 

6

x

ORGANIZE IT

Multiplication and
Division Equations

Write and solve an
equation that involves
multiple steps. Write
your equation under
the tab for Solving
Multi-Step Equations.

(6)

Multiply each side by

.

Check the solution.

3m  12  27
3m  12  27
3m  12  

27 

Subtract

from

each side.

4-1 Multi
Rational plying
Numbers

3m  15
3m 

Divide each side by

.

Check the solution.

Your Turn Solve each equation. Check your solution.
h
a.   6  13
5

82

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

b. 9  4a  45

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

m

15

4–5

3n
Solve 6.2  .
15

3n 
6.2  
15 

3n
15(6.2)  15 
15 

Multiply each side by 15. 

93  
93  

3 

n

Subtract. 

n 
x  3
Your Turn Solve  
 3. Check your solution.
7

REMEMBER IT
When solving word
problems, always check
to make sure your
answer is reasonable.
Ask yourself: Does this
answer make sense?

In a city, the tallest building is 1268 feet tall. This is
35 feet greater than 3 times the height of the fifth
tallest building. How tall is the fifth tallest building?
Let x represent the height of the fifth tallest building.
Translate the information into an equation and solve.
Height of
tallest building

equals

35 feet

plus

1268 

35 

3 times the height of
the fifth tallest building.

3x

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

1268  35  3x
1268  

35  3x 

Subtract
each side.

from

1233  3x
1233 

3x
Divide each side by

. 

x
The fifth tallest building is

feet tall.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

83

4–5
Your Turn The Parker family recently purchased a new car.
Their old car had 105,000 miles on its odometer. This is 50,000
more than four times the number of miles on the new car. How
many miles does the new car have on its odometer?

BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY

(page 70)

Consecutive integers are integers in counting order such as
3, 4, and 5.

Find four consecutive odd integers whose sum is 8.
Let n represent the first odd integer. Then n  2 represents
the second odd integer, n  4 represents the third, and n  6
represents the fourth.    

8

4n  12  8
4n  12  

8 
4n  20 
20
4n 

n

and n  6 or

HOMEWORK
ASSIGNMENT

,

.

Your Turn Find four consecutive even integers whose sum
is 28.

Page(s):
Exercises:

84

, n  4 or

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

, n  2 or

The numbers are

4–6

Variables on Both Sides
GLE 9. Model real-life situations using linear expressions, equations, and
inequalities (A-1-H, D-2-H, P-5-H)

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

Solve each equation.

• Solve equations with

y  8  9y

variables on both sides.

y  8  9y
y8 

9y 

Subtract

from each side.

8  8y

ORGANIZE IT

8

Multiplication and
Division Equations

Write and solve an
equation that involves
variables on both sides
of the equation. Write
your equation under the
tab for Variables on
Both Sides.
4-1 Multi
Rational plying
Numbers 

8y

Divide each side by

. 

y
Your Turn Solve each equation.
1
2
b. t  4  t

a. 4x  10x  3

3

BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY
An

that is

3

(page 70)

for every value of the

variable is called an identity.
© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Solve each equation.
3  4y  6  4y
3  4y  6  4y
3 

4y  6  4y 

Add

to each side.

36
The equation has

. 3  6 is never true.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

85

4–6
8m  2  2  3m  11m
8m  2  2  3m  11m
8m  2  2  

3m  11m 

8m  2  8m  2
The equation is an

Property
.

8m  2  8m  2 is true
for all values of m.

Your Turn Solve each equation.
a. 9  5h  4  5h  13

b. 3y  11  8y  4  5y  6

Page(s):
Exercises:

86

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

HOMEWORK
ASSIGNMENT

4–7

Grouping Symbols
GLE 9. Model real-life situations using linear expressions, equations, and
inequalities (A-1-H, D-2-H, P-5-H)

BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN
• Solve equations with
grouping symbols.

(page 70)

Symbols that group terms together in an expression or
equation are called grouping symbols. Parentheses and
brackets are examples of grouping symbols.

Solve each equation. Check your solution.

ORGANIZE IT
Write and solve an
equation that involves
grouping symbols. Write
your equation under the
tab for Grouping
Symbols.

5(2x  1)  25
5(2x  1)  25
10x  5  25
10x  5 

Distributive Property 

25 

Add

to each side.

Multiplication and
Division Equations

10x  20
4-1 Multi
Rational plying
Numbers

10x  20

Divide.

x  2
5(h  6)  6  3(5h 2)
5(h  6)  6  3(5h  2) 
6

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

5h 
5h  24 

Distributive Property 

15h  6

Add like terms. 

15h  6 

Subtract.

24  10h  6
24  

10h  6  6

Add

to each side.

30  10h
30 

3h

10h

Divide.

Check the solution.
Algebra: Concepts and Applications

87

88 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT The value of x is Page(s): Exercises: Your Turn The area of a trapezoid is 52 square inches. 4(3x  7)  8 b.4–7 REMEMBER IT When you add integers with the same sign. Find the value of x. Divide. Check your solution. and the altitude is 4 inches. a. Find the lengths of the bases if one base is 2 inches more than the other base. The sign will be the same as the sign of the integer with the greater absolute value. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill x . The sign is the same as the sign of the integers. (Lesson 2-3) Your Turn Solve each equation. add their absolute values. (x + 2) mm 8 mm (2x – 1) mm 1 A  (b1 b2)h Area of a trapezoid 2 1   [  2 1 64  (3x  1)8 Add 2x  1 and x  2. first find the difference of their absolute values. 7(3  p)  7  4(p  5) The area of the trapezoid is 64 square millimeters. When you add integers with different signs. 1 64    8  (3x  1) Commutative Property 2 2 64  (3x  1) 64  12x  4 64  ] Distributive Property  12x  4  60  12x 60 12x  Subtract.

(6) 3 5 4. Three different outcomes result in a win-loss record of 2-1.glencoe. 5. www.    3 8 7 4-2 Counting Outcomes Kynda is playing in a chess tournament. The tree diagram for her possible outcomes is shown below.2  (0.2) 4 3. What are they? lose win lose lose 7.3) 2. Name two different outcomes. 6. and 3 different types of sauce? Algebra: Concepts and Applications 89 . word search. Game 1 Game 2 Game 3 Outcomes win win-win-win lose win win-win-lose win-lose-win lose win-lose-lose win lose-win-win lose win lose-win-lose lose-lose-win lose lose-lose-lose win © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill win 6. 1. To make a crossword puzzle. go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (page 70) to help you solve the puzzle. How many outcomes are possible in choosing a sundae with 7 different types of ice cream.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index.php 4-1 Multiplying Rational Numbers Multiply. 4 different types of toppings. 4(8.CH APTER 4 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 4 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 4.

4  2     3 4 10. or multiply each side by 1 1 13 17 15.Chapter 4 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 4-3 Dividing Rational Numbers Write negative or positive to describe each quotient. 5x  125 .  16. or multiply each side by 13. 13. 48.   16 7 each side by .    7 5 5 8 11.    6 9 4-4 Solving Multiplication and Division Equations Complete the sentence after each equation to tell how you would solve the equation.2 9. x 12. Then find the quotient.6 8. Explain how rewriting 4x  2 as x   helps you solve 3 8 3 8 the equation. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Divide each side by . 90 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . 14. each side by . 8k  96 .

22. a. The sum of two consecutive odd integers is 36. 2(x  1)  3(x  2)  7 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 91 . 3x  6  10x  10 19. 8(x  5)  4(2  x) 23. Suppose you want to solve   6.2z  3  2.6  4.Chapter 4 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 4-5 Solving Multi-Step Equations x3 16. Check your solution. 18. What is the first step in solving the equation? b. 5 a. Write an equation for this situation. What is the next step in solving the equation? 17. What are the two consecutive odd integers? 4-6 Variables on Both Sides State the first step in solving each equation. Suppose you want to help a friend solve 6k  7  3k  8. 3. What would you advise her to do first? Why? 4-7 Grouping Symbols Solve each equation.  y  3   y 9 9 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 21.1z 1 5 20. b.

CH APTER 4 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. refer back to the specific lesson(s). I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. • You may also want to take the Chapter 4 Practice Test on page 183.com to access your textbook. • You may want take the Chapter 4 Practice Test on page 183 of your textbook as a final check. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. refer back to the specific lesson(s). and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 4. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 4 Foldable. • You may also want to take the Chapter 4 Practice Test on page 183. Visit algconcepts. • Then complete the Chapter 4 Study Guide and Review on pages 180–182 of your textbook. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 92 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . self-check quizzes. more examples. • You should complete the Chapter 4 Study Guide and Review on pages 180–182 of your textbook.

Fold Fold lengthwise to the holes. Begin with a sheet of notebook paper. For example. mutually simple eve events. Cut Cut four tabs. Label Label the tabs using lesson concepts as shown. percents are used when calculating the tax on an item purchased. Algebra: Applications and Concepts 93 . You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. Solve pr oportions oblems Solve pr scale involvingd models an drawings oblems Solve pre percent g th d the by usintio n an propor t equation percen y of probabilit Find theents. and exclusiv e events inclusiv © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you take notes.APTER 5 Chapter 5 CH Proportional Reasoning and Probability Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. it helps to write about when you would use the concept in your daily life.

CH APTER 5 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 5. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example base box-and-whisker plot circle graph complement [kahm-PLU-ment] compound event dimensional analysis [duh-MEN-shun-ul] empirical probability [im-PEER-i-kul] experimental probability [ek-speer-uh-MEN-tul] extremes independent events lower quartile [KWAR-tile] mutually exclusive [MYOO-chew-a-lee] odds 94 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill inclusive [in-KLOO-siv] . As you complete the study notes for the chapter. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages.

Chapter Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition 5 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Description or Example percent equation percent of decrease percent of increase percent proportion percentage percentile probability [PRA-buh-BIL-i-tee] proportion [pro-POR-shun] random rate ratio © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill scale scale drawing scale model theoretical probability [thee-uh-RET-i-kul] unit rate upper quartile Algebra: Concepts and Applications 95 .

45  z 45 96 Find the cross products. z Divide each side by Simplify. and siv clu ts ex even inclusive 5z  5z  45   4z Distributive Property  4z  Subtract  z Algebra: Concepts and Applications from each side. • Solve proportions. Solve each proportion.5–1 Solving Proportions GLE 21. . 9 63    m 35 9 63    m 35  63 9 Find the cross products. Determine appropriate units and scales to use when solving measurement problems (M-2-H. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill (z  9)  4 Solve pr . Solve problems using indirect measurement (M-4-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN A ratio is the (page 95) of two numbers. 315  63m 315 ORGANIZE IT Write a proportion and find its cross products under the tab for Solve Proportions. KEY CONCEPT Property of Proportions The cross products of a proportion are equal. z z9    5 4 oportions oblems Solve pr scale involvingd models an gs drawin oblems Solve pre percent g th d the by usintio an n or prop t equation percen y of probabilit Find theents. mutually simple eve events. An equation stating that two ratios are is a proportion. M-3-H. M-1-H) GLE 22. . 63m  Divide each side by m z z9    5 4 Simplify.

   26 n a.    4 b5 6 2 c. Your Turn Solve each proportion. Convert 3 pounds to ounces. The process of carrying units throughout a is dimensional analysis.  2x REMEMBER IT 15  The denominator in a proportion cannot be equal to zero. x So. Division by zero is undefined. Write a proportion. 15 pints  quarts. Recall that 2 pints  1 quart. b2 9 b.5–1 Convert 15 pints to quarts. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 97 . 15 pints 2 pints    x quarts 1 quart 15 2    x 1 (1)  2 Find the cross products. Let x represent the number of quarts. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY The (pages 94–95) of two measurements having different units of measure is called a rate. A simplified with a denominator of is a unit rate. 2x Divide each side by 2.

42 miles 8 42 miles 8 hours       1 hour  HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 98 1 1 Note that the units cancel. Suppose you have a piece of copper whose volume is 25 cubic centimeters.96 grams 8. how far will she travel in 8 hours? Write the rate 210 miles in 5 hours as a unit rate. How many grams of copper do you have? 8. how far will he travel in 6 hours? Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 210 miles 42 miles    5 hours 1 hour . Your Turn The density of wood is 0. grams 1  1  1 So. At this rate. miles Your Turn Damien drove 220 miles in 4 hours. the piece of copper contains or grams grams of copper.96 grams per cubic centimeter   1 cubic centimeter Multiply the unit rate by the number of cubic centimeters of copper. The unit rate is 42 miles per hour. Suppose you have a piece of wood whose volume is 60 cubic centimeters. How many grams of wood does it contain? A trucker drove 210 miles in 5 hours.71 gram per cubic centimeter. Then multiply by 8.5–1 The density of copper is 8. At this rate.96 grams per cubic centimeter.

ORGANIZE IT Give examples of scale drawings or models under the tab for Solve Problems involving Scale Drawings and Models.  15x 90  15x Divide each side by . Solve pr Use the and the distance between the cities to write a . 1 inch x inches  map distance actual distance oportions © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill oblems Solve pr scale involvingd models an drawings oblems Solve pre percent g th d the by usintio an n propor t equation percen y of probabilitually e th nd Fi ents. x The distance between Chicago and Milwaukee on the map is about . Algebra: Concepts and Applications 99 . object that is too or too to be drawn or built at actual size. The scale on a map of the upper Midwest is 1 inch  15 miles. mut simple eve events.5–2 Scale Drawing and Models GLE 22. Find the distance between Chicago and Milwaukee on the map if the distance between the two cities is 90 miles. A scale is the of the length of a model to the corresponding length of the object. and siv exclu e events inclusiv  15 1 Find the cross products. Solve problems using indirect measurement (M-4-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN (page 95) A scale drawing or scale model is used to represent an • Solve problems involving scale drawings and models.

x HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT .5x  (1) Find the products.5 feet model length actual length 1 foot   x feet 1. 8 Find the actual distance between Fairbanks and Barrow if the 1 8 distance between them on the map is 3 inches. from the heels to the top of the head. What is the scale for the model? Write the ratio of the length of the model to the length of the railroad car.5 feet from the heel to the top of the head. find the scale of the model. Then solve a proportion in which the length of the model is 1 foot and the length of the railroad car is x feet. 1.5 feet long. If a model of the statue is 5.5–2 Your Turn The scale on a map of Alaska is 7 inch  150 miles. A railroad car is 36 feet long and a scale model of the railroad car is 1. Page(s): Exercises: 100 feet or Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The scale is 1 foot  . Your Turn The height of the Statue of Liberty. is about 111 feet.5x  1. 1.5x  36 Divide each side by .

The number that is divided by the is the percentage.  of the circle is shaded. The number that is divided into the is the base. 5 8 r So. 4 a. 12 out of 60 students brought a sack lunch to school.5–3 The Percent Proportion BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN A percent is a (page 95) that compares a number to . 5  of the square is shaded. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Express each fraction or ratio as a percent. On Friday. Express the fraction as a percent.   . 8 5 Find the cross products. 8 r 5    100 8 r is the percent. • Solve problems by using the percent proportion. 5 b.  8r 500 8r    8 8 Divide each side by 8. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 101 .

Find the cross products. Your Turn a. of 50. What percent of 80 is 60? 102 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. 20 is . 3500  175r 3500 175r    175 175 Divide each side by 175.5–3 What percent of 175 is 35? P r     B 100 Use the percent proportion. r   Replace P with 100 B with KEY CONCEPT Percent Proportion If P is the percentage. 40 20     100 B (100)  Replace P with 20 and r with 40. the percent (100)  . 100 20 is 40% of what number? P r     B 100 Use the percent proportion. B Find the products. of 175 is 35.  40B 2000 40r Divide each side by r So.5? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  . and r is the percent. B is the base. 25% of what number is 67. B r and So. r P r proportion is   .

What percent of the time did the family spend on each activity? Time (days) Activity packing 7 cleaning 5 unpacking 8 The family worked for 7  5  8 or 20 days. write and solve the percent proportion for each activity. and HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 7  100  20 = 5  100  20 = 8  100  20 = of the time packing. This is the base. and unpacking boxes. cleaning the two homes.5–3 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 94) A circle graph shows the relationship between parts and the whole. A family recently moved to a new home. Packing: r   Cleaning: Unpacking: 100 r   100 r   100 The family spent © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill the time cleaning. of of the time unpacking. Your Turn The table shows the number of hours Timothy spent on three activities. The table shows how much time the family spent packing boxes. What percent of the time did Timothy spend on each activity? Activity Time (h) reading 1 sports 4 homework 3 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 103 . To find each percent.

104 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. Divide each side by 105  0. B Replace P with R with 105  0. ENTER is 105. Use the percent equation. 250 ENTER . Write the formulas for percent proportion and the percent equation under the tab for Solve Problems by Using the Percent Proportion and the Percent Equation. P-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find 17% of $250. D-2-H.5–4 The Percent Equation GLE 9. a. • Solve problems by using P  RB the percent equation.17 So. Find 12% of 360. 35% of and . 17% of $250 is  and . and inequalities (A-1-H. (  ) B with KEY CONCEPT Percent Equation The percentage is equal to the rate times the base. Replace R with  0. equations. 19 is 25% of what number? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn .35B . 35% of what number is 105? P  RB  Use the percent equation. Model real-life situations using linear expressions.35 B So.

18B Divide each side by 126  0. What was the total of the diners’ bills? P  RB  Use the percent equation. Your Turn A restaurant collects 7% sales tax on all items sold. If $35 is collected in one day. B Replace P with R with 126  B and . The parts that are combined usually have a different price or a different percent of something. She earned $126 last weekend. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 105 . 0.5–4 Riona serves food at a restaurant where she is paid 18% of the diners’ bills. what are the total sales for that day? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 94–95) Mixture problems involve combining parts into a or more . ENTER .18 The total of the diners’ bills was .

buses that each hold 64 students and vans that each hold 8 students were used. How many buses and vans were used? REVIEW IT Explain why 40 is subtracted from each side before each side is divided by 56 in Example 4. how many of each type were sold? . b There were buses and  or vans. For transportation. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 106 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn A T-shirt shop sells adult shirts for $15 each and children’s shirts for $8 each.5–4 All 208 freshmen at a school went on a field trip. (Lesson 4-5) Number of Vehicles Capacity Total Capacity Buses b 64 64b Vans 5b 8 8(5  b) students on buses  students on vans  total students  64b     208 Distributive Property  40  208 64b  8b  56b  56b  168 Divide. If $324 was collected for 30 shirts. and there were 5 vehicles used. Every bus and van was completely filled.

r The percent of increase is about . Round to the nearest percent. original: 110 new: 140 This is an increase. Use the percent proportion. (page 95) When an increase or decrease is expressed as a . the percent is called the percent of increase or percent of decrease. original: 180. P r     B 100 r   100 (100)  r Cross products  110r © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3000 11 0r     100 1 10 REMEMBER IT Replace the equal sign with  to indicate that your answer is approximate.5–5 Percent of Change BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve problems involving percent of increase and decrease. Round to the nearest percent. Find the percent of increase or decrease.  Divide each side by 110. The amount of increase is – or . Your Turn Find the percent of increase or decrease. new: 153 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 107 .

Refer to page 213 in your textbook for another way to solve Examples 2 and 3.5% on the purchase was then added. All hamsters are on sale for 20% off. Suppose the family also bought a printer. Use the percent equation to find the sale price. A sales tax of 5. Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 108 a.5–5 REMEMBER IT There may be more than one way to solve a problem. but they received a 15% discount.95 Then add to $890. The original price of the printer was $140. What was the total price? First. P  RB  (140)  . P  RB   48.95? Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The sale price of the printer is . A family bought a home computer for $890. use the percent equation to find the sales tax. What is the total cost of a dress that sells for $60 if the sales tax rate is 5%? b. What is the sale price of a hamster that normally sells for $9. 890   The total price was . What was the sale price of the printer (before the sales tax was added)? A discount of 15% means that the family will pay  15% or of the price of the printer.

have an equally likely odds of a simple event. outcomes. what is the probability that the person is age 5–17? KEY CONCEPT Population of California Probability The probability of an event is a ratio that compares the number of favorable outcomes to the number of possible outcomes. the outcomes are said to be random.5–6 Probability and Odds GLE 31. and events (D-4-H) GLE 33. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 109 . Explain the relationship between the probability of an event occurring.S. number of people age 5–17 P (age 5–17)   total population  The probability is or 3 or . Use the graph shown. If a person is chosen at random. What actually occurs when conducting an is called the experimental probability. The total population is million. Census Bureau © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill There are million people who are between the ages of 5 and 17. and the odds of an event occurring and compute one given the other (D-4-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 94–95) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN When all possible • Find the probability and chance of happening. Define probability in terms of sample spaces. Under 5 3 5–17 6 3 18 – 24 25 – 34 Age 5 5 35 – 44 45 – 54 4 2 55 – 64 65 and over 4 Number (millions) Source: U. Theoretical probability is what should occur.

5–6 Your Turn A bag contains 1 yellow crayon. . 3 red crayons. 4 blue crayons. What are the odds that the coin is a nickel? There are 8 nickels. and 5 quarters. A coin is randomly removed from a change purse that contains 7 pennies. 4 blue crayons. 8 nickels. Page(s): Exercises: 110 or Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT coins that are not nickels. Find the odds of choosing a green crayon. odds of choosing a nickel  Your Turn A bag contains 1 yellow crayon. and 7 green crayons. 3 red crayons. What is the probability that it is yellow? BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY A (page 94) that compares the number of ways an event can occur to the number of it cannot occur is odds. there are 8 favorable outcomes. and 7 green crayons. So. There are So there are  or unfavorable outcomes. Suppose a crayon is chosen at random.

The outcome of one event does not affect the outcome of the other event when they are independent events. Probability of Mutually Exclusive Events The probability of two mutally exclusive events is found by adding the probability of the first event and the probability of the second event. Two events that cannot occur at the same time are mutually exclusive. Two events that can occur at the time are inclusive. The two spinners are spun. P (green)   2 6 3 5 4 or 6 3 blue green (P  2)  3 P (green and  2)  1 red 3 or 3 9 Your Turn Two dice are rolled.5–7 Compound Events BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN (page 94) Two or more simple events connected by the words • Find the probability of or mutually exclusive and inclusive events. Find the probability that the left spinner lands on green and the right spinner lands on a number greater than 2. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 111 . KEY CONCEPTS © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Probability of Independent Events The probability of two independent events is found by multiplying the probability of the first event by the probability of the second event. are called compound events. Find the probability that an even number is rolled on the first die and a number less than 3 is rolled on the second.

Find the sum of the individual probabilities. If there is a 50% chance of rain on Monday and a 20% chance of rain on Tuesday. What is the probability that the marble is either red or yellow? A marble cannot be both red and yellow. find the probability that it will snow sometime in January or February. and 2 yellow marbles. Since it is possible to snow in both months. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 112 b. P (January or February)  P (January)  P (February)  P(January and February)  0. P (red or yellow)  P (red)  P (yellow)  KEY CONCEPT Probability of Inclusive Events The probability of two inclusive events is found by adding the probabilities of the events.9  0.  10 or 10 10 If there is a 90% chance of snow in January and a 95% chance of snow in February. P (January)  P (February)  These events are independent since the weather in January does not affect the weather in February. Find the probability that the left spinner lands on red or the right spinner lands on 3. independent events and inclusive events.85   or a. under the tab for probability. find the probability that it will rain sometime on Monday or Tuesday. Explain compound events. Refer to the spinners in Example 1.95   1. then subtracting the probability of both events. so the events are mutually exclusive. Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn . 3 blue marbles. these events are inclusive.5–7 A marble is selected at random from a bag that contains 5 red marbles.

   35 15 6 12 2. word search.CH APTER 5 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 5 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. write the cross products. To make a crossword puzzle. What is the height of the actual object? 6. A jet flying at a steady speed traveled 825 miles in 2 hours. go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 94–95) to help you solve the puzzle. 6 14 1. What is the height of the flower in the drawing? Algebra: Concepts and Applications 113 . The real car is 12 feet long. www.5 hours? 5-2 Scale Drawings and Models 4. How far did the jet travel in 1.php 5-1 Solving Proportions For each proportion.glencoe. 5. A 24-inch tall model was made in a scale of 1:3. What is the scale of the model? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Write a proportion and solve for each of the following.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. A flower that is 18 inches long is drawn to a scale of 1 centimeter to 1 inch. A model car is 12 centimeters long.    8 16 3. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 5.

114 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Use the percent equation to find each number. 16 is 20% of what number? 9.Chapter 5 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 5-3 The Percent Proportion Use the percent proportion to find each number. 12 is what percent of 36? 8. Explain how to check that the percentages are correct. What percent of the time does she spend on each activity? Round each answer to the nearest percent. The table shows how Lavonne spends her day. 11. Activity Time (hr) sleep 8 school 6 work 3 homework 2 other 5 5-4 The Percent Equation 12. . 7. 75% of 28 is what number? 10. What is 15% of 200? 14. 25 is 30% of what number? 13. Find 25% of 15.

If false. Round to the nearest percent. original: 50 new: 58 17. or a percent. Two dice are rolled. 19. do you add to or subtract from the original price? 5-6 Probability and Odds Write whether each statement is true or false. a decimal. Probability can be written as a fraction. 18. 2 yellow marbles. Find the probability that an even number is rolled on the first die and the number 5 is rolled on the second die. 20. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 5-7 Compound Events 22. When you find a discount price. The outcomes happen at random when all outcomes are equally likely to happen. replace the underlined word or number to make a true statement. and 6 blue marbles. The probability of an impossible event is 1 . A sock contains 2 red marbles.Chapter 5 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 5-5 Percent of Change Find the percent of increase or decrease. 23. original: 50 new: 42 16. What is the probability that the marble is either red or yellow? Algebra: Concepts and Applications 115 . 15. The odds against an event occurring are the odds that the event will occur. 21. One marble is chosen at random.

• If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You may also want to take the Chapter 5 Practice Test on page 233. more examples. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test.com to access your textbook. self-check quizzes. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 116 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You may also want to take the Chapter 5 Practice Test on page 233. Visit algconcepts. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You should complete the Chapter 5 Study Guide and Review on pages 230–232 of your textbook.CH APTER 5 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You may want take the Chapter 5 Practice Test on page 233 of your textbook as a final check. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 5 Foldable. refer back to the specific lesson(s). I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. • Then complete the Chapter 5 Study Guide and Review on pages 230–232 of your textbook. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 5.

Begin with a sheet of notebook paper. Chapter 6 Fold Fold lengthwise to the holes. Pair Ordered n Relatio ge and Ran Domain Range Set Solution n Equatio Linear n Functio lue Va d tation an Functional No riation Direct Va n Variatio Inverse © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you take notes.CH APTER 6 Functions and Graphs Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Cut Cut along the top line and then cut 10 tabs. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 117 . Label Label the tabs using the vocabulary words as shown. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. it is helpful to write definitions and examples for each of the vocabulary terms.

Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example constant of variation [VARE-ee-AY-shun] dependent variable direct variation domain equation in two variables function functional value functional variable 118 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill functional notation .CH APTER 6 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 6. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study. As you complete the study notes for the chapter. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages.

Chapter Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition 6 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Description or Example independent variable inverse variation linear equation [LIN-ee-ur] range rate problem relation solution set vertical line test © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill x-coordinate y-coordinate Algebra: Concepts and Applications 119 .

The domain is x 4 y 5 and the range is 0 y (4. (2. 2)} as a table and as a graph. 1) x (3. 1). 2) 1 O (0. 2) Write the definition for a relation and give an example under the tab for Relation. (0. as tables.g. Use coordinate methods to solve and interpret problems (e. (0. Then determine the domain and range. intercept as initial value. Express the relation {(4. Then determine the domain and range. 5) (3.. (3. 5). 3 2 Your Turn 120 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Express the relation {(5. 2). 2). The number in an ordered pair is the y-coordinate. intersection as common solution. and as graphs. 2). (1. (3. 2)} as a table and as a graph. slope as rate of change. A set of pairs is a relation. . • Show relations as sets of ordered pairs.1). 1). (3. 1) (1. G-3-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN (page 119) The first number in an ordered pair is the x-coordinate.6–1 Relations GLE 23. KEY CONCEPTS Domain and Range of a Relation The domain of a relation is the set of all first coordinates from the ordered pairs of the relation. 1). The range of the relation is the set of all second coordinates from the ordered pairs of the relation. midpoint as equidistant) (G-2-H. (2.

1) (1. name the domain and range of the set of ordered pairs you chose. The domain is . Under the tab labeled Domain and Range.6–1 ORGANIZE IT Express the relation shown on the graph as a set of ordered pairs and in a table. Pair Ordered n Relatio ge and Ran Domain Range Set Solution n Equatio Linear n Functio lue tation and Va Functional No riation Direct Va n Variatio Inverse y (2. 4) (4. 2) x O © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Algebra: Concepts and Applications 121 . Find the domain and the range. 3)}. 3) The set of ordered pairs for the relation is {(5. ( ( ). 1) x O (2. . 2) (0. Write a set of ordered pairs under the tab for Ordered Pair. and y 5 1 2 2 0 3 2 3 the range is Your Turn Express the relation shown on the graph as a set of ordered pairs and in a table. y (0. ( x ). 1). 3) (3. Then find the domain and range. 3) (5.

The table shows the population of New York City since 1920. b. Graph the relation.2 1760 1.9 1750 1.8 1970 7. Population 10 8 Population 6 (millions) 4 2 0 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 Year Your Turn The table shows Colonial Population estimates from 1730 to 1780.6 1770 2. Population ( in millions) 1730 0. Graph the relation.9 1980 7. Determine the domain and range of the relation. The y-coordinates include values from from to .6 1740 0. a.6–1 WRITE IT Explain how you can tell which decade had the greatest increase in population.infoplease. a. The x-coordinate goes from to .1 1990 7.com HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 122 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Year . Determine the domain and range of the relation.3 b.8 Source: www.1 1780 2. You can include 0 and use units of 2.6 1930 6. The domain is The range is Year Population (millions) 1920 5.5 1950 7.9 1940 7.9 1960 7.

graphical. and algebraic representations of functions and real-life situations (A-3-H. 2) are solutions of y  x  3? Make a table. Translate among tabular. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 123 . Which of the ordered pairs (0. 1). then the ordered pair is a solution of the equation. So. P-2-H) GLE 36. Identify the domain and range of functions (P-1-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 118–119) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve linear equations A set of to a problem is a solution set. (1. KEY CONCEPT Solution of an Equation in Two Variables If a true statement results when the numbers in an ordered pair are substituted into an equation in two variables.6–2 Equations as Relations GLE 15. the ordered pair is a solution of the equation y  x  3. Substitute the x. 1 4 4  (1)  3  2 1 1  (2)  3  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1 2 2  (1)  3  A statement results when the ordered pair is substituted into the equation. tell what a solution set is under the tab for Solution Set. x y 0 0 y  x  3 True or False? 0  (0)  3  In your own words. 4). or (1. (2. 0).and y-values of each ordered pair into the equation. P-1-H. An equation that contains two values is an equation in two variables. for a given domain.

y (2. 2) are solutions of y  2x – 1? Solve y  2x  1 if the domain is {2. 5). 1) (1. y) 2 2(2)  1 1 2(1) 1 0 2(0)  1 1 2(1)  1 2 2(2)  1 y . (2. 5) (1. 3). 1. 0. (1. or (1. x 2x  1 (x. 1. 2). 2}. Make a table.6–2 Your Turn Which of the ordered pairs (0. Graph the solution set. 1) O (2. Substitute each value of into the equation to determine the corresponding values of . 3) 124 Algebra: Concepts and Applications x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The solution set is . 3) (0.

Substitute each value of into the equation. Graph the solution set. Find the domain of y  10  4x if the range is {6. 2. 10}.6–2 REMEMBER IT Sometimes you can solve an equation for y before substituting each domain value into the equation. 2. Then solve each equation to determine the corresponding values of y y  10  4x 6 6  10  4x 2 2  10  4x x 2 2  10  4x 6 6  10  4x 10 10  10  4x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The domain is HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . Your Turn Solve y  3x  2 if the domain is {2. 1. (x. 0. 1. Make a table. Your Turn Find the domain of y  8  3x if the range is {4. 2. 5. y) . 2}. This makes creating a table of values easier. 6. Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 125 . 8}. 1.

6–3 Graphing Linear Relations GLE 15. P-2-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 119) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Graph linear relations. If an equation is linear. Ax  By  C is called the standard form if A. and C when written in standard form. KEY CONCEPT Linear Equation in Standard Form A linear equation is an equation that can be written in the form Ax  By  C. Be sure to include examples. B. . An equation with a graph that is a is a linear equation. This equation can be written as Therefore. Write the standard form of a linear equation under the tab for Linear Equation. Your Turn Determine whether each equation is a linear equation. and algebraic representations of functions and real-life situations (A-3-H. rewrite the equation so that both variables are on the same side of the equation. and C are any numbers. and C are integers. Explain. and C when written in standard form. A . If an equation is linear. Explain. B. where . identify A. identify A.B . 2x  3  y 126 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. the equation cannot be written in the form So. B. graphical. 2x  3xy © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill it is a linear equation in the form Ax  By  C. and A and B are not both zero. B. P-1-H. where A. 4xy  4 Since the term has two variables. this is not a . Determine whether each equation is a linear equation. yx 0xy Subtract from each side. and C  . a. yx First. Translate among tabular.

x  y  5 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 127 . Now make a table and draw the graph. y) y x O 3x  y  2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn a. 3x  y  2 y  2  Subtract y  2  from each side. b. Multiply each side by .6–3 Graph 3x  y  2. solve the equation for . x 2  3x 2 –2  3(2) 1 –2  3(1) y 0 –2  3(0) 1 –2  3(1) 2 –2  3(2) (x. y  2x  2 Graph each equation. In order to find values for y more easily.

. the graph passes through the origin. y  4x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill a. this equation is  y  2. for written as any value of x. In any equation where C  0. So. Make a table and draw the graph. y  y  2 . if x  0. y) y  3x 2 3(2) x O 1 3(1) 0 3(0) 1 3(1) 2 3(2) In standard form. Graph y  3x. if x  1.6–3 Graph y  2. In standard form. . Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 128 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. y  4 Graph each equation. y  3x is written as 3x  y  0. The graph of y  2 is a horizontal line. For x O . y  y y . y  example. if x  3. x 3x y y (x.

is paired with two members of the range. The graph represents a relation that is not a because there are many members of the (the x-values) that are paired with members of the (the y-values). 1).0 Students understand the concepts of a relation and a function. there is only Write three examples of relations that are functions under the tab for Function. Write each function in a different form. (4. (4. KEY CONCEPT Function A function is a relation in which each member of the domain is paired with exactly one member of the range. Standard 18. (2. or a symbolic expression is a function and justify the conclusion. 3). 5). determine whether a given relation defines a function. (4. (3. • Determine whether a given relation is a function. The table represents a function since. and give pertinent information about given relations and functions. {(1. the corresponding member of . Explain your answer. 4). Your Turn Determine whether each relation is a function. for each member of the . x y 2 1 0 1 0 1 2 2 3 4 . Explain your answer. a set of ordered pairs. 5)} Algebra: Concepts and Applications 129 . and .6–4 Functions GLE 35. Determine if a relation is a function and use appropriate function notation (P-1-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Determine whether each relation is a function.0 Students determine whether a relation defined by a graph. 5). {(1. a. y x O © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Standard 16. 6)} This is not a function because one member of the domain. 2). (3.

Use the vertical line test to determine whether each relation is a function. a. 1 1 2 y x O KEY CONCEPT Use the vertical line test to determine whether each relation is a function. then the relation is a function. This relation is y vertical line passes through no more than x O since each point of the of the relation. x 3 1 y 1 2 3 4 5 c. y y O x 130 Algebra: Concepts and Applications O x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn . b. Vertical Line Test for a Function If each vertical line passes through no more than one point of the graph of a relation. This relation is y a x O since line passes through point of the graph.6–4 b.

” is called functional notation. f(1) 4 Replace x with . ƒ(2) f(2)  x  4 f(2)  4  Replace x with . ƒ 1 2 f(x)  x  4 f   1 2 4  Replace x with .6–4 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY ORGANIZE IT Give an example of an equation in functional notation under the tab for Functional Notation and Value. Pair Ordered n Relatio ge and Ran Domain Range Set Solution n Equatio Linear n Functio lue tation and Va Functional No riation Direct Va n Variatio Inverse (page 118) Writing equations of the form “y  . b. Add. . f(a) Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 131 . . . Add. If ƒ(x)  x  4. f(1.5) c. A functional value is a that corresponds to a specific . . find each value. If ƒ(x)  x  4. find each value. Then choose a number and find the functional value of your function for the chosen number.” as “f(x)  . ƒ(c) f(x)  x  4 f(c)  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT a.

yx2 does not pass through the y yx2 . the equation is Write the standard form of an equation that is a direct variation under the tab for Direct Variation. The graph . x So. where k  0. y  2x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Graph the equation.6–5 Direct Variation GLE 7. The constant of variation is . Your Turn Determine whether each equation is a direct variation. The constant of variation is the number in an equation of the form y  kx. KEY CONCEPT Direct Variation A direct variation is a linear function that can be written in the form y  kx. 2 a. The independent variable is the whose value is chosen. Use proportional reasoning to model and solve real-life problems involving direct and inverse variation (N-6-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 118–119) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN The variable whose value depends on the value of the • Solve problems independent variable is the dependent variable. Determine whether the equation is a direct variation. Also draw the graph of a linear equation that varies directly. involving direct variations. the equation is O . x So. y  x  1 3 132 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. O . The graph passes through the y y  1x 2 . 1 y  x 2 Graph the equation.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications 133 . k WRITE IT © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill In Example 3. Divide each side by . How many gallons of gasoline would be needed for a 550-mile trip if a 66-mile trip used 3 gallons of gasoline? Let  represent the length of the trip and let g represent the amount of gasoline used. find the amount of gasoline needed for a 550-mile trip. Next. g A 550-mile trip would use gallons of gasoline. explain the meaning of k within the context of the problem. The length of a trip varies directly as the amount of gasoline used. Find the value of k. The statement the length varies directly as the amount of gasoline translates into an equation   kg in the same way as y varies directly as x translates into y  kx.6–5 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 119)  A problem involving the formula  or d  rt is a rate problem.   kg Direct variation k Replace  with with  and g .   kg 550  g Replace  with 550 and k with 550  22  g . Divide each side by .

Find x when y  15. In addition to the proportion used in y Suppose y varies directly as x and y  27 when x  18. 27x2  27x2  270 Divide each side by . Page(s): Exercises: 134 when y  15.6–5 Your Turn How many gallons of gasoline would be needed for a 630-mile trip if a 126-mile trip used 7 gallons of gasoline? REMEMBER IT There are several combinations for proportions that can be used in direct variation. y y 1 2 Use x  x to solve the problem. and . x  . 1 2  x 1 1 Example 4. x2  Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Suppose y varies directly as x and y  35 when x  14. y2  . Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill So. Find the cross products. y1 y2 x2  (15) . Find x when y  15.    and y x 2 Let y1  x2 2 x1  x x 1 2    can also be used.

 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A crew of 5 bricklayers can build the wall in hours. If 4 bricklayers can build a brick wall in 30 hours. If 3 painters can paint a bedroom in 8 hours. xy  k KEY CONCEPT  k Definition of inverse variation Replace x with y with Inverse Variation An inverse variation is described by an equation of the form xy  k. Let y  the number of hours. First find the value of k. Next. k and . Your Turn The number of painters needed to paint a bedroom varies inversely as the number of hours needed. and . The number of bricklayers needed to build a brick wall varies inversely as the number of hours needed. k y   x  Divide each side of xy  k by Replace k with x with . Use proportional reasoning to model and solve real-life problems involving direct and inverse variation (N-6-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve problems involving inverse variations. how long would it take 4 painters to do it? Algebra: Concepts and Applications 135 . how long would it take 5 bricklayers to do it? Let x  the number of bricklayers. find the number of hours for 5 bricklayers to build a brick wall. where k  0.6–6 Inverse Variation GLE 7. The constant of variation is .

y  .6–6 Suppose y varies as x and y  2 when x  12.  8y2  y2 Therefore. . Your Turn Suppose y varies inversely as x and y  5 when x  9. y x1   2 x2 y1  Inverse variation proportion y2 Let x1  and x2  (2)  REVIEW IT Why does the product of 12 and 2 result in a positive answer? (Lesson 2-5) y2 . Find the cross products. Page(s): Exercises: 136 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . y1  . Find y when x  8. Find y when x  6. when x  8.

3).CH APTER 6 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 6 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. 1. (2. 5. 3). 2) (3. 3) (2.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. Domain  Range  6-2 Equations as Relations Solve each equation if the domain is {1. www. 1) y 3 2 4 1 d. Name the domain and range of the relation in Exercise 1. 0). 1). 1.php 6-1 Relations Match the relation on the left to its other form on the right. y (1. 1) b. 2)} (1. (1. (1. (1. {(1. go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 118–119) to help you solve the puzzle. y  3x 6. (4.glencoe. 4)} c. To make a crossword puzzle. {(3. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 6. y (1. 3) 2. 1). 5). (1. 5) (1. 0) x O 3. 4) (4. 3). x 4 1 3 1 x O (1. 3}. (1. y  2  x 7. 2. word search. x 1 1 0 2 y 3 2 1 4 a. 4). {(1. 1)} © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 4. 0. (2. (0. 2). x  y  1 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 137 .

ƒ(3) 17. ƒ(b) . Explain your answer. 2x  4y  3 11. 12. 2x  3y  1 9. x 4y     2 5 3 Reason 2 6-4 Functions Determine whether each relation is a function. 4xy  2y  7 10. ƒ(0) 138 15. Linear or Nonlinear? Equation 8. x y 2 1 1 2 0 4 3 7 13. ƒ(2) Algebra: Concepts and Applications 16. find the following: 14.Chapter 6 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 6-3 Graphing Linear Relations Complete the table. y x O © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill If ƒ(x)  2x  3.

Problem 24. y varies inversely as x. 25. y  28x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill For each problem. 21. Pedro’s car used 4 gallons of gasoline in the first 112 miles of his trip. y  3x 22. Then write a proportion you could use to solve the problem. If x  50 when y  6. inverse variation. 18. The wages W earned by an employee vary directly with the number of hours h that are worked. write an equation with the proper constant of variation. or neither to describe the relationship between x and y described by each equation. 19. xy  5 23.Chapter 6 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 6-5 Direct Variation For each situation. Equation Proportion Algebra: Concepts and Applications 139 . find y when x  4. Write an equation you can use to solve for k. The length of a trip varies directly as the amount of gasoline used. find x when y  30. 20. The distance d varies directly as time t. If y  8 when x  12. How much gasoline should he expect to use in the remaining 84 miles of the trip? 6-6 Inverse Variation Write direct variation.

Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. more examples.com to access your textbook.CH APTER 6 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 6. Visit algconcepts. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You should complete the Chapter 6 Study Guide and Review on pages 276–278 of your textbook. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. • Then complete the Chapter 6 Study Guide and Review on pages 276–278 of your textbook. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 6 Foldable. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You may also want to take the Chapter 6 Practice Test on page 279. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You may want take the Chapter 6 Practice Test on page 279 of your textbook as a final check. • You may also want to take the Chapter 6 Practice Test on page 279. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 140 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . self-check quizzes. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help.

Begin with four sheets of grid paper. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Label Label each page with a lesson number and title. The top tab is 4 lines wide. If you do. Chapter 7 Cut Cut tabs into margin. the next tab is 8 lines wide. Cut Cut along fold. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 141 . you will become lost in your note-taking. and so on. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. The last tab is for the vocabulary. Fold Fold each sheet in half from top to bottom. Linear Equations 7–1 7–2 NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you take notes. Staple the eight half-sheets together to form a booklet.CH APTER 7 Linear Equations Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Write important equations and/or sketch graphs using the methods presented in each lesson. don’t lose focus as to what your teacher is saying.

As you complete the study notes for the chapter. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example best-fit line correlation coefficient [CORE-uh-LAY-shun] extrapolation [ek-STRA-puh-LAY-shun] family of graphs interpolation [in-TER-puh-LAY-shun] linear regression parallel lines [PARE-uh-lel] parent graph 142 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill median-median line . Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study.CH APTER 7 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 7. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages.

Chapter Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition 7 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Description or Example perpendicular lines [PER-pun-DI-kyoo-lur] point-slope form rate of change residual rise run scatter plot slope © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill slope-intercept form [IN-ter-SEPT] x-intercept y-intercept Algebra: Concepts and Applications 143 .

(2. 1  2  1 The slope is . negative. Determine the slope of each line. y y (1. 1) O 144 Algebra: Concepts and Applications x (2. . 1) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn 2 . 1) x O Name two points and find the slope between them under the tab for Lesson 7-1. 3) Slope The slope of a line is the ratio of the change in y to the corresponding change in x. or the vertical change. zero and undefined slopes. b. A-1-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 143) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Find the slope of a line given the coordinates of two points on the line. Slope is the ratio of the to the . 1) O (1. 4)  (3. The slope is . 4) 3 x O  a. KEY CONCEPT change in y change in x slope   y (1. Then give examples of positive. or the horizontal change.7–1 Slope GLE 25. Explain slope as a representation of “rate of change” (G-3-H. change in y change in x slope   y 4 (1. 2) x (2. Determine the slope of each line.

8) and (3. Determine the slope of the line. 1). Your Turn Determine the slope of the line that passes through (5. 2 4 0 6 8 Find the slope of a line that passes through (3. m y y © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 1 Slope    x2  x1 3 2 1  y2  y1 x2  x1 4 3 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises:  0 The slope is . 4). 1 1 1 x y 2 1 7 4 3 Each time x increases slope  3 0 1 1 2 3 unit. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 145 . y1) and (x2.7–1 A line contains the points whose coordinates are listed in the table. y2) is given by the following formula. change in y  change in x The slope of the line containing these points is . Determine the slope of the line. y decreases units. Your Turn A line contains the points whose coordinates are listed in the table. 2) and (3. x y KEY CONCEPT Determining Slope Given Two Points The slope m of a line containing any two points (x1.

O Write an equation in Point-Slope form and graph the equation under the tab for Lesson 7-2. (1. y1. m    y  y1  m(x  x1) Point-Slope Form 1 3 y  (x  y   (x  ) 1 3 Replace x1. and m. 0). 1 3 a. 3). y1. m   146 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. KEY CONCEPT Point-Slope Form For a nonvertical line through the point at (x1. m  4 y  y1  m(x  x1) y  4(x  Point-Slope Form ) Replace x1. 1 3 (2. y ).  4(x  4) y An equation of the . Your Turn x Write the point-slope form of an equation for each line passing through the given point and having the given slope. (2. 7). the point-slope form of a linear equation is y  y1  m(x  x1) Write the point-slope form of an equation for each line passing through the given point and having the given slope. Graph a line when the slope and a point or when two points are known (G-3-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Write a linear equation in point-slope form given the coordinates of a point on the line and the slope of the line. 0) O . y1) with slope m. (0. 4). and m. x (4. 7) An equation of the line is . m  3 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill line is (4.7–2 Writing Equations in Point-Slope Form GLE 24.

m y2   x1 The slope is  (2)  or 1 2 . y y y  m(x  ) 1   [x  ] 4 1  (x  4 Point-Slope Form (x1. –1) First. Use the slope and either point to write an equation. Method 1 Use (2. 2) and (2. 1). 1) x 147 . –2) x O (2. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Your Turn Write the point-slope form of an equation of the line shown. y1)  ) Method 2 Use (2. determine the slope of the line. y1)  and © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill are point-slope forms of an equation for the line passing through (2. 5) Page(s): Exercises: O Algebra: Concepts and Applications (1. y (2. (–2. 1). 2).7–2 y WRITE IT How can you tell that the two methods used in the example provide the same equation? Write the point-slope form of an equation of the line shown. y y y Both  m(x  ) 1   (x  ) 1  (x  ) 4 4 Point-Slope Form (x1.

intercepts. (page 143) is the y-intercept. m  . a. b  0 y  mx  b  Slope-Intercept Form x Replace m with . Graph a line when the slope and a point or when two points are known (G-3-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN The y-coordinate of the point at which a graph crosses the • Write a linear equation in slope-intercept form given the slope and y-intercept.7–3 Writing Equations in Slope-Intercept Form GLE 13. KEY CONCEPT Slope-Intercept Form Given the slope m and y-intercept b of a line. slope. Write an equation in slope-intercept form of each line with the given slope and y-intercept. An equation of the line is . Write an equation in slopeintercept form and graph the equation under the tab for Lesson 7-3. 2 3 m  . Translate between the characteristics defining a line (i. b with An equation of the line is . b  3 2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill b with and . Your Turn Write an equation in slope-intercept form of each line with the given slope and y-intercept. the slope-intercept form of an equation of the line is y  mx  b. G-3-H) GLE 24. b  1 y  mx  b  Slope-Intercept Form x Replace m with and .. b  5 148 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 1 b. m  3.e. points) and both its equation and graph (A-2-H. The x-coordinate of the point at which a graph crosses the is the x-intercept. m  0.

y  y1  m(x  x1) y  Point-Slope Form (x  6) Replace (x1. 2) y (6. replace (x1. 3 4 y  x  Slope-Intercept Form 3 An equation of the line is . 2) REMEMBER IT The formula for y2  y1 slope is m   . 2) 4 or . y y  m(x  )  3(x  ) O x (1.7–3 Write an equation of a line in slope-intercept form for each situation. 3 Now substitute the known values into the point-slope form. 4) y Using the point-slope form. x2  x1 First. Then simplify. y1) with 4 (6. slope 3 and passes through (1. You can see from the graph that the y-intercept is . Algebra: Concepts and Applications 149 . y1). determine the slope of the line. O m 2   3 3 x (3. 4) y  4  3x  3 y4  3x  3  y  3x  1 An equation of the line is . 4 y  2  2   x  8  2 Add 2 to each side. 2) and (3. passing through (6. 2) and m with . © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3 4 y  2  x  3 Distributive Property Then write in slope-intercept form.

Write an equation of the line in slope-intercept form. Slope-Intercept Form Replace m with and b with An equation of the line is y 35 30 Charge (dollars) Page(s): Exercises: © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A taxi driver charges $5 for each ride plus $2 per mile. Write an equation of the line in slope intercept form. The graph represents the plumber’s charges. 0) Plumber’s Charges A plumber charges $25 for a service call plus $50 per hour of service. 25) 5 6 7 x . 5) 5 1 2 3 4 Miles 150 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . . Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT 1 2 3 x Hours of Service or Now substitute these values into the y  mx  b y-intercept (0.7–3 Your Turn Write an equation in slope-intercept form of each line. The graph represents the taxi driver’s charges. 6) b. 25 20 15 10 y-intercept (0. O m y2    x1 75   x 1 -intercept form. 1 a. passing through (1. 4) and (3. a line whose slope is  2 and passes through (2. 50 25 Determine the slope. y 175 150 125 Charge 100 (dollars) 75 The y-intercept of the line is 25.

000 Salary (dollars) 40.000 60. Experience vs. 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2 4 6 8 10 Number of Absences Algebra: Concepts and Applications 151 . Grades 90 80 70 Test Grade © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Use the scatter plot shown. negative relationship. y increases. Identify independent and dependent variables in real-life relationships (A-1-H) GLE 29.7–4 Scatter Plots GLE 10. or no relationship. Negative relationship: As x increases. D-6-H. Create a scatter plot from a set of data and determine if the relationship is linear or nonlinear (D-1-H. The scatter plot shows the number of years of experience and the salary for each employee in a small company. negative relationship. y decreases. Determine whether the scatter plot shows a positive relationship. the salary does not seem to increase or . . Thus. Determine whether the scatter plot shows a positive relationship. No relationship: No obvious pattern. there is between experience and Your Turn Absences vs. KEY CONCEPTS Scatter Plots Positive relationship: As x increases. describe it. points on scatter plots. or no relationship.000 O 4 x 8 12 16 Years of Experience As the number of years of experience increase. If there is a relationship. describe it.000 20. If there is a relationship. D-7-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Graph and interpret (page 143) A graph in which data is displayed as ordered pairs is a scatter plot. Salary y 80.

so the number of cavities is the variable. . Does the scatter plot show a relationship between instruction time and cavities? Explain. and the number of cavities for each patient. 7–1 7–2 Instruction Time (min) Number of Cavities 6 1 4 3 7 2 10 1 1 5 1 6 5 3 2 4 2 3 A. Describe the independent and dependent variables. Plot the data as shown. Also give an example of one that has a negative relationship and one that has no relationship. .7–4 ORGANIZE IT Give an example of a scatter plot that has a positive relationship under the tab for Lesson 7-4. There is a number of cavities amount of instruction relationship. it appears that a is directly related to a time. Linear Equations The table shows the average number of minutes a pediatric dentist spends during each appointment instructing the patient in proper dental care. The number of depends on the . Make a scatter plot of the data. The is the set of all instruction times and the set of all numbers of cavities. Dental Care y Let the horizontal axis represent the instruction time and let the vertical axis represent the number of cavities. Then state the domain and the range. 152 Algebra: Concepts and Applications is the © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill C. 6 5 Number 4 of Cavities 3 2 1 O x 4 8 12 Instruction Time (min) B.

Gestation (days) Longevity (years) kangaroo 36 7 leopard 98 12 tiger 105 16 baboon 187 20 hippopotamus 238 41 gorilla 258 20 Animal A.7–4 Your Turn The table shows the gestation period and average longevity for various animals. Then state the domain and the range. Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 153 . REMEMBER IT The domain is the set of all of the first coordinates in a set of ordered pairs and the range is the set of all of the second coordinates in the set of ordered pairs. Let the horizontal axis represent gestation time and let the vertical axis represent the longevity of the animal. Make a scatter plot of the data. Describe the independent and dependent variables. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT C. Does the scatter plot show a relationship between gestation period and longevity? Explain. B.

This means (0. slope. 0) O .. 3y  2x  6 154 Algebra: Concepts and Applications x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill at . Graph the equation. Linear Equations 7–1 7–2 2y  x  8 2y  0  8 Replace x with 0. Your Turn Determine the x-intercept and y-intercept of the graph. Translate between the characteristics defining a line (i. 8 ORGANIZE IT x 8    1 1 Draw the graph of a line and label the x and y intercepts under the tab for Lesson 7-5. let y  0. 2y  x  8 2(0)  x  8 Replace y with 0. y The x-intercept is y-intercept is . Determine the x-intercept and y-intercept of the graph of 2y  x  8. Divide each side by 1.intercepts or the slope and y-intercept. points) and both its equation and graph (A-2-H. x To find the y-intercept. and the y . To find the x-intercept. intercepts.7–5 Graphing Linear Equations GLE 13. 4) that the graph intersects the x-axis and the y-axis at (–8. G-3-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Graph linear equations by using the x. Graph the equation. let x  0.e. 8 2y 8    2 2 Divide each side by 2.and y. Then graph the equation.

This will be . 5 units. Then go and the point at 3 units (1. Then draw the line through points and Algebra: Concepts and Applications . A positive slope means that the graph of the line increases when tracing the line from left to right. REMEMBER IT A negative slope means that the graph of the line decreases when tracing the line from left to right. –4) 1 unit. This will be . 1) (0.7–5 Graph each equation by using the slope and y-intercept. write the equation in slope-intercept form. 1 5 y   x  2 y y mx  b 1 5 (5. 155 . 2) y   x  2 x O The slope is . 4 y The slope is © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill is . and the y-intercept is . 3x  y  4 3x  y  3x  4  3x Subtract 3x from each side. Graph the point at Then go 1 unit and the point at . y  y  4 3x  4 y Divide each side by . Graph the point at . –1) x (0. 3x  y  4 First. The y-intercept O . Then draw the line through points and .

7–5
Your Turn

Graph each equation by using the slope
and y-intercept.
1
a. y   x  1

b. 2x  4y  8

3

Graph y  3.
y  mx  b

Slope-Intercept Form

y  0x  3

slope 

, y-intercept 

No matter what the value of x,
y

. So, all ordered pairs

are of the form (x,
examples are (0,
(2,

Page(s):
Exercises:

156

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

x

O

) and

(–3, –3)

(2, –3)

Graph each equation.
b. y  2

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

HOMEWORK
ASSIGNMENT

). Some

).

Your Turn
a. x  4

y

7–6

Families of Linear Graphs
GLE 38. Identify and describe the characteristics of families of linear functions, with and without
technology (P-3-H) GLE 40. Explain how the graph of a linear function changes as the
coefficients or constants are changed in the function’s symbolic representation (P-4-H)

BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN
• Explore the effects of

(page 142)

Graphs and equations of graphs that have at least
one characteristic in common are a family of graphs.

changing the slopes
and y-intercepts of
linear functions.

Graph each pair of equations. Describe any similarities
or differences. Explain why they are a family of graphs.
1
2
1
y    x  1
2

y    x  2

ORGANIZE IT
Summarize the two
categories of families of
graphs under the tab
for Lesson 7-6. What is
the effect of a change in
the slope and y-intercept
on the graph of a line?

Linear
Equations

7–1

7–2

y

The graphs have y-intercepts of 2,
and 1. They are a family of graphs
because each slope is

y = – 1–2x + 2

x
y=

.

– 1–2x

–1

O

y  5x  1
y  x  1
Each graph has a

y
y = 5x – 1

slope.

Each graph has a y-intercept of 1.
Thus, they are a family of graphs.

O

x
y = –x – 1

Your Turn

Graph each pair of equations. Describe any
similarities or differences. Explain why they are a family
of graphs.
© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

a. y  x  3
yx2

b. y  3x  2
2
y  x  2
3

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

157

7–6

300

y  20x  150

250

Balance

Gretchen and Max each have
a savings account and plan
to save $20 per month. The
current balance in Gretchen’s
account is $150 and the
balance in Max’s account is
$100. Then y  20x  150 and
y  20x  100 represent how
much money each has in their
account, respectively, after
x months. Compare and
contrast the graphs of
the equations.

200

y  20x  100

150
100
50
0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Months

The equations have the same

, but the

of Gretchen’s graph is

than the

y-intercept of Max’s graph. Gretchen’s account will always
have more money than Max’s.
Your Turn

8
7
6

Cost ($)

Tyler and Ying
both babysit for Mrs. Hernandez.
Tyler charges $4 per hour and
Ying charges $5 per hour.
Suppose x represents the
number of hours. Then
y  4x and y  5x represent
how much money each person
will make, respectively, after
x hours. Compare and contrast
the graphs of the equations.

5

y  5x

4

y  4x

3
2
1
0.5

1

1.5

2

Time (hours)

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

158

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

7–6

BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY

(page 142)

The simplest of graphs in a
parent graph.

KEY CONCEPT
Parent Graphs
y  x: As the value of m
increases, the line gets
steeper.
y  x: As the value of
m decreases, the line
gets steeper.
y  2x: As the value of
b increases, the graph
shifts up on the y-axis.
As the value of b
decreases, the graph
shifts down on the y-axis.

of graphs is a

Change y  3x  1 so that the graph of the new
equation fits each description.
same y-intercept, less steep positive
slope
The y-intercept is
slope is

y
yx1

O

, and the slope

x

y  3x  1

. The new equation will
of 1. In

also have a

order for the slope to be less steep and positive, its value
must be
is

than 3, such as 1. The new equation
.

same slope, y-intercept is shifted down 2 units
The slope of the new equation will be
y-intercept is

. Since the current

, the new y-intercept will be 1  2, or

. The new equation is

. Check by

graphing.
© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Your Turn

Change y  x  3 so that the graph of the
new equation fits each description.

HOMEWORK
ASSIGNMENT
Page(s):
Exercises:

a. same slope, y-intercept is shifted up 4 units

b. same y-intercept, steeper negative slope

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

159

7–7

Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
GLE 23. Use coordinate methods to solve and interpret problems (e.g., slope as rate
of change, intercept as initial value, intersection as common solution, midpoint as
equidistant) (G-2-H, G-3-H)

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN
• Write an equation of
a line that is parallel
or perpendicular to
the graph of a given
equation and that
passes through a
given point.

Determine whether the graphs of the equations are
parallel.
y  3x  4
9x  3y  12
First, determine the slope of each line. Write each equation
in slope-intercept form.
y  3x  4

KEY CONCEPT
Parallel Lines If two
lines have the same
slope, then they
are parallel.

The slope is

Slope-Intercept Form

.

9x  3y  12
9x  3y 

Give two
examples of equations
whose graphs are parallel
and two examples of
equations whose graphs
are perpendicular under
the tab for Lesson 7-7. 

12 
3y 

y
The slope is 

9x  12

Divide each side by

x

.

The slopes are not the same so the lines are not

Your Turn

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

2y  6x  8

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

160

.

Determine whether the graphs of the equations

are parallel.
3x  y  2

.

7–7

Write an equation in slope-intercept form of the line
2
that is parallel to the graph of y  x  3 and passes
3
through the point at (3, 1).
The slope of the given line is
line will also be

. So, the slope of the new

. Find the new equation by using the

point-slope form.
y  y1  m(x  x1)
2
3 

(x 

y

Point-Slope Form
)

x1 

, y1 

and m 
2
y  1   x 

,

.

Distributive Property

3

2
y  1  1   x  2  1

Add 1 to each side.

3

2
y   x 
3

2
3

An equation whose graph is parallel to the graph of y  x  3
and passes through (3, 1) is

.

Your Turn

Write an equation in slope-intercept form of the
1
line that is parallel to the graph of y  x  4 and passes
2

through the point at (6, 2).
© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

KEY CONCEPT
Perpendicular Lines
If the product of the
slopes of two lines is 1,
then the lines are
perpendicular.

Determine whether the graphs of the equations are
perpendicular.
y  2x  4
1
y  x  3
2

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

161

. 1 y  2x  4 y  x  3 2 y  2x  4 y 4 y The graphs are perpendicular because 1 the product of their slopes is 2   2 or 1 y  2x  3 y  2x  4 . O x Your Turn Determine whether the graphs of x  y  1 and x  y  4 are perpendicular. A line perpendicular to the graph of 1 y  2x  5 has slope . y1  and m  1  x  2 1 y  3  3  x  1  3 2 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Distributive Property Subtract 3 from each side.7–7 First. Write each equation in slope-intercept form. Write an equation in slope-intercept form of the line that is perpendicular to the graph of y  2x  5 and passes through the point at (2. 3). 162 . 1 y  x  2 Your Turn Write an equation in slope-intercept form of the 1 line that is perpendicular to the graph of y  x  2 and passes through the point at (1. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 4 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill y . Find the new equation by using 2 the point-slope form. 2). The slope is 2. determine the slopes of the lines. y  y1  m(x  x1) y 1  (x  2 Point-Slope Form ) x1  .

To make a crossword puzzle. 3).glencoe. (2. (2. 4) 3. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 7. (5. y  1  x c. 5). go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 142–143) to help you solve the puzzle. www. 1. y  3  (x  2) 6. (0. word search. (1. y  2x a.php 7-1 Slope Find the slope between each set of points. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1 5. (2. 1) 2. 2 y O x 2 3 7. what do x1 and y1 represent? Match each equation with the correct graph. b.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. In the formula y  y1  m(x  x1). 1) 7-2 Writing Equations in Point-Slope Form 4.CH APTER 7 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 7 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. y O x y O x Algebra: Concepts and Applications 163 . 0).

Explain how to find the x. Form of Equation 8. What conclusion can you draw from the scatter plot? 30 20 10 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 x Distance from Workplace (mi) 12.Chapter 7 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 7-3 Writing Equations in Slope-Intercept Form Complete the chart below by writing the formula for each form of equation. slope-intercept form Formula Example 7-4 Scatter Plots Refer to the scatter plot shown at the right. Then write an example of each equation. 164 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 7-5 Graphing Linear Equations .or y-intercept of an equation. standard form 9. 10. Which quantity is the independent quantity? the dependent quantity? Length (minutes) y 11.

15. y © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill O x y O x Algebra: Concepts and Applications 165 . 16. 18. Parallel lines (always/never) intersect.7 Chapter BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER Refer to the graph shown at the right. y 13. Tell whether the graphs are parallel. Explain. What is the y-intercept of the graph? 14. 19. What is the x-intercept of the graph? O x 7-6 Families of Linear Graphs Tell whether each set of graphs is a family of graphs. or neither. y O y O x x 7-7 Parallel and Perpendicular Lines 17. perpendicular.

I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You should complete the Chapter 7 Study Guide and Review on pages 328–330 of your textbook. Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. • Then complete the Chapter 7 Study Guide and Review on pages 328–330 of your textbook. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 7. more examples. • You may also want to take the Chapter 7 Practice Test on page 331. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 166 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills.com to access your textbook. • You may also want to take the Chapter 7 Practice Test on page 331. self-check quizzes. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. • You may want take the Chapter 7 Practice Test on page 331 of your textbook as a final check. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 7 Foldable.CH APTER 7 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. Visit algconcepts. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. refer back to the specific lesson(s).

Staple Staple the eight half-sheets together to form a booklet. Powers and roots Use powers in expressions Multiply and divide Powers Simplify expressions containing negative exponents Scientific Notation Simplify Radicals Estimate square roots Pythagorean Theorem NOTE-TAKING TIP: When taking notes in math class. Begin with four sheets of grid paper. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. and so on. 167 . Algebra: Concepts and Applications Chapter 8 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Label Label the tabs with lesson topics as shown. Then cut along the crease.CH APTER 8 Powers and Roots Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Fold Fold each sheet of grid paper in half along the width. six lines from the second sheet. Cut Cut even lines from the bottom of the top sheet. be sure to write down important rules and properties. It is also a good idea to record examples of any rules and properties.

As you complete the study notes for the chapter. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example base composite number [kahm-PA-zit] converse exponent [ek-SPO-nent] hypotenuse [hi-PA-tin-oos] leg negative exponent 168 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill irrational numbers [i-RA-shun-ul] .CH APTER 8 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 8. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages.

Chapter Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition 8 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Description or Example perfect square power prime factorization [FAK-tor-i-ZAY-shun] prime number Pythagorean Theorem [puh-THA-guh-REE-un] radical [RAD-ik-ul] radical expression © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill radical sign scientific notation square root Algebra: Concepts and Applications 169 .

An exponent tells how many times a number is used as a . 5  5  5  dddddd The base is . Write each expression using exponents. Evaluate and write numerical expressions involving integer exponents (N-2-H) GLE 12. The number that is raised to a is called a base. dddddd Use the Associative Property to group factors with like bases.8–1 Powers and Exponents GLE 2. It is a factor times. Evaluate polynomial expressions for given values of the variable (A-2-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 168–169) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Use powers in A perfect square is the of an integer and itself. c 170 Algebra: Concepts and Applications Write each expression using exponents. A power is a number that is expressed when using an . . It is a factor times. (6)(6)(7)(7)(7)(7)(7)  [(6)(6)][(7)(7)(7)(7)(7)]  Your Turn a. (3)(3)(3)(3) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Write (6)(6)(7)(7)(7)(7)(7) using exponents. expressions. 555 The base is . b.

write them again in expanded form. 2 Evaluate 5a if a  4. 2x if x  4   2 Replace a with 4. b KEY CONCEPT Order of Operations 1. c. 4 6 4 6  The exponent 4 means that 6 is a factor 4 times. Evaluate all powers in order from left to right. 2 3 b.8–1 ORGANIZE IT Write three examples of expressions with exponents under the appropriate tab. Do all multiplications and divisions from left to right. a. Evaluate the power 4  4  16. Do all operations within grouping symbols first. 3 2 7a b 3 2 7a b  7 is used as a factor once.   2 5a  5 5  HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Your Turn 3 a. and b is used twice. 3yz 4 2. start with the innermost grouping symbols. 5 h 5 h  The exponent 5 means that h is a factor 5 times. Evaluate each expression. Your Turn Write each power as a multiplication expression. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 4. a is used 3 times. Powers and roots Use powers in expressions Multiply and divide Powers Simplify expressions containing negative exponents Scientific Notation Simplify Radicals Estimate square roots Pythagorean Theorem Write each power as a multiplication expression. Then. 8 3 5 b. 3. Do all additions and subtractions from left to right. 4b  c if b  2 and c  2 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 171 . Multiply.

Quotient of Powers You can divide powers with the same base by subtracting the exponents. write the common base.8–2 Multiplying and Dividing Powers WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Simplify each expression. 5  5 b. n © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  Your Turn 3 6 4 a.  4 (10a)(5a ) 4 (10a)(5a )     4 5 a Use the Commutative and Associative Properties. write the common base. (6x)(3x ) 172 Algebra: Concepts and Applications Simplify each expression. a  a1  50a  5 4 3 7 (m n )(m n ) 5 4 3 7 5 3 4 7 (m n )(m n )  (m  m )(n  n ) m Use the Commutative and Associative Properties. 10 s 10 s s s s 5 5 To multiply powers that have the same base. 2 3 8 5 d.  KEY CONCEPTS Product of Powers You can multiply powers with the same base by adding the exponents. • Multiply and divide 5 5 powers. 2 7 2 7 5 5 5 To multiply powers that have the same base. then add the exponents. (a b )(a b ) . a  a 2 c. then add the exponents.

ORGANIZE IT Write three examples of multiplying terms with powers and three examples of dividing terms with powers under the tab for Lesson 8-2.  15a6b4 4 3 3a b 6 4 15a b  4 3 3a b    aa 6 3  5a 4 4 b  Group the powers that have the same base. b  5a b  Your Turn c c 10 10 b.8–2 Simplify each expression. Powers and roots Use powers in expressions Multiply and divide Powers Simplify expressions containing negative exponents Scientific Notation Simplify Radicals Estimate square roots Pythagorean Theorem 76  2 7 76  7  2 7 2 To divide powers that have the same base.  2 5x y 8 9 21y z d. Then subtract the exponents  p10  p p10   p p 1 Write the common base. 5 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Simplify each expression. write the common base. 7 8 5 6 20x y c.  2 8 3y z Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 173 . Then subtract the exponents.  a.

Simplify each expression.  3 c d © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill m Quotient of powers. a b c2d5 c. 2 6 1  Definition of negative exponent.  an   n a n a The value of a cannot be 0. Then. 2 Write 6 using positive exponents. Powers and roots Use powers in expressions Multiply and divide Powers Simplify expressions containing negative exponents Scientific Notation Simplify Radicals Estimate square roots Pythagorean Theorem 174  n 1 8 n Definition of negative exponent. 3 4 q r 3 4 q r 4 3 q r 1 3 q  Definition of negative exponent. write those examples using positive exponents.  2 10 m n 5 2 m n    2 10 2 10 m n m n  5   5 2 2 m n m n m n ORGANIZE IT Write three examples of variables with negative exponents under the tab for Lesson 8-3. 6  66 KEY CONCEPT Negative Exponents 1 a 1 n .8–3 Negative Exponents WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Simplify expressions containing negative exponents. x 3 Algebra: Concepts and Applications Simplify each expression.  Your Turn a. 3 b. . Then evaluate the expression.

divide 1 by 10 0 1 10    2 2 10 10 1  100 0  10  or © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn 2 5 8a k . 5  A large archery target has a diameter of 1 meter. Quotient of powers. If a pencil’s eraser had a diameter of 1 centimeter.8–3 6 4 10h k 25h k Simplify  . how many pencil’s sharpened lead tips could fit across the diameter of 3 the eraser if each tip was 10 centimeters? Algebra: Concepts and Applications 175 . Simplify   4 8 18a k HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: b. 3 7 6 4 10 10h k    3 7 25 25h k   6     4 h  3 h   2 k  7 k 6 4 3 7 hh kk  2h k 10 25 Write  in simplest form. 2 An arrow tip has a diameter of 10 meter. How many arrows could fit across the diameter of the target? 2 . a. To find the number of arrows. 5  2h k Simplify the powers.

Since 325. a. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Express each number in scientific notation. . • Express numbers in 8 kilobytes scientific notation. 8 kilobytes 8 KEY CONCEPTS  The prefix kilo.5 microseconds  2. solve problems.5 milliseconds 325. • If the exponent is negative.000 is greater than one. Your Turn Move the decimal to the left. 5 gigabytes b. move the decimal point to the left. Multiplying by Powers of 10 • If the exponent is positive.5 microseconds 2.000 325.8–4 Scientific Notation GLE 3.000   176 Algebra: Concepts and Applications  10 ? The decimal point moves 5 places. the exponent is positive. . 2.5   The prefix micro. Apply scientific notation to perform computations.means second Scientific Notation A number is expressed in scientific notation when it is the form a  10n. and write representations of numbers (N-2-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Express each measurement in standard form. . 4. move the decimal point to the right.means bytes Move the decimal point places right. places Express each measurement in standard form. 1  a  10 and n is an integer.

78. Then use the Associative and Commutative Properties to regroup factors.  9  10 Powers and roots Use powers in expressions Multiply and divide Powers Simplify expressions containing negative exponents Scientific Notation Simplify Radicals Estimate square roots Pythagorean Theorem  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT  a. First express each number in scientific notation.   5 4  10 Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 177 . a.000.000 b. write each number using scientific notation.000.00028 is between zero and one. 9 9. ORGANIZE IT Write three large numbers and three very small numbers under the tab for Lesson 8-4. 20  40. Then. 30  30.00028 ? 0. 0.0032 Evaluate 30  30.6  10 b.000.8–4 0.00028   10 The decimal point moves places. the exponent is negative.  Your Turn Since 0. Express each number in scientific notation.000.000  (3  10 )(3  10 )   (3  3)  Associative and Commutative Properties.000 Evaluate each expression.

Simplify the radical. . The symbol. 81  . 81  2 Since 9  . KEY CONCEPTS Square Root A square root of a number is one of its two equal factors. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 16    Use the Product Property of Square Roots. A whole number that has only two . An that contains a square root is a radical expression.  256 22222  16   178 . A that has more than two factors is a composite number. one and itself. is a prime number. 100  2 Since 10  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Product Property of Square Roots The square root of a product of positive numbers is equal to the product of each square root. is used to indicate a . Simplify each expression.  100 . called a radical sign. .  256 Find the prime factorization of 256.8–5 Square Roots BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 168–169) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Simplify radicals by using the Product and Quotient Properties of Square Roots. The prime factorization of a number is an expression of the of the prime factors. Quotient Property of Square Roots The square root of a quotient of positive numbers is equal to the quotient of each square root.

Then.  324 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 179 . explain why. Powers and roots Use powers in expressions Multiply and divide Powers Simplify expressions containing negative exponents Scientific Notation Simplify Radicals Estimate square roots Pythagorean Theorem 2  2  2  2   16   25    Your Turn or Simplify each expression. simplify the expressions. 121  c. 225  d. 289  100  9 Simplify  . a. If one cannot be simplified. 100      9 Use the Quotient Property of Square Roots.8–5 ORGANIZE IT  400  400 Write three radical expressions under the tab for Lesson 8-5.  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Simplify 100 . 4  b.

36.  200  200  144.  48    48   49  36  48  Since 48 is closer to than to . Estimate each square root. 2 For example. 289. 250  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill   200   225  196 ... 25. 256. 225.  48 List some perfect squares to find the two perfect squares closest to 48. b. Powers and roots Use powers in expressions Multiply and divide Powers Simplify expressions containing negative exponents Scientific Notation Simplify Radicals Estimate square roots Pythagorean Theorem 1. 9. 49. Estimate each square root. 4. . 16.. ORGANIZE IT Write the square of each integer from 1–20 and write the squares under the tab for Lesson 8-6..  200  HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Pages(s): Exercises: Since 200 is closer to whole number estimate for 200  is Your Turn a. the best whole number estimate for 48  is .8–6 Estimating Square Roots BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 168) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Irrational numbers are not rational or integers because • Estimate square roots. 1 = 1. etc. 48 is between and . the best . 196. their decimal values do not terminate or repeat. 15  180 than to Algebra: Concepts and Applications . 2 2 = 4.

 81 2 c  Find the square root of each side. and the legs under the tab for Lesson 8-7. is equal to the sum of the squares of the lengths of the legs. The two sides that form the right angle of a triangle are called the legs. KEY CONCEPT Pythagorean Theorem In a right triangle. hypotenuse. Your Turn Find the length of the hypotenuse of the right triangle.8–7 The Pythagorean Theorem BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 168) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Use the Pythagorean Theorem to solve problems. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill c  225  c  The length is inches. 10 ft c ft 24 ft Algebra: Concepts and Applications 181 . c. a and b. 12 in. Find the length of the hypotenuse of the right triangle. 9 in. x in. 2 2 2 c a b 2 Draw a right triangle and label the right angle. write the Pythagorean Theorem. Under the triangle. the square of the length of the hypotenuse. c  2 2 c  Pythagorean Theorem  2 Replace a and b. The side opposite the right of a right triangle is called the hypotenuse.

8–7 Find the length of one leg of a right triangle if the length of the hypotenuse is 22 centimeters and the length of the other leg is 15 centimeters. Determine whether this triangle is a right triangle. b Use a calculator. then the triangle is a right triangle. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 182 a. 18. Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn . Round to the nearest tenth. 2 2 2 c a b 15 cm y cm Pythagorean Theorem 2 2 22  22 cm 2 b Replace c with 22 and a with 15. b. 2 centimeters. Find the length of one leg of a right triangle if the length of the hypotenuse is 28 inches and the length of the other leg is 20 inches. Determine whether this triangle is a right triangle. 2 2 2 2 c  a b 2 2 Pythagorean Theorem 2 13  6  11 and c  a  b . and 13. 2  b 2 484  225  225  225  b Subtract. 11. Replace the variables. and 21. Round to the nearest tenth. The measures of the three sides of a triangle are 15. The length of the leg is about KEY CONCEPT Converse of the Pythagorean Theorem If c is the measure of the longest side of a triangle The measures of the three sides of a triangle are 6. the triangle is a right triangle. 2  169  ≠ 157 2 2 2 Since c ≠ a  b . 2 b b 259 Find the square root of each side.

b  b 6 5. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 6 3 5 a. 22 32 42 52 62 72 82 92 102 8-2 Multiplying and Dividing Powers Write the letter of the correct answer at the right that best matches each expression. b 3 3 b. go to You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 168–169) to help you solve the puzzle. word search. 2. www. b 8 e. fill in the boxes with the correct terms.php 8-1 Powers and Exponents x 1. VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY To make a crossword puzzle. Using 5 .glencoe.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. b  b  b 4 b b 6. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 8.CH APTER 8 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE Use your Chapter 8 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. 3 9 c. b 4 5 3. b  b 4. b Algebra: Concepts and Applications 183 . b 15 d. Complete the table. Five is the and x is the .

Complete the table. 11. 121   100 36 16. To express 0.000. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill decimal point . move the places to the . 13. To express 7. move the decimal point places to the 3 10. 5 1 5 is equal to 4 .   . To express 3. 12.0007865 in scientific notation.000 in scientific notation. move the decimal point places to the right and write . 6 9. 184 25   81 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 14.64  10 in standard notation. Complete each sentence to change from standard notation to scientific notation.825  10 decimal point . in standard notation.000. move the places to the left and write 8-5 Square Roots Simplify each expression. 49  15. 8-4 Scientific Notation Complete each sentence to change from scientific notation to standard notation.Chapter 8 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 8-3 Negative Exponents 7. To express 54. 103 102 101 1 100 2 10 10 3 10 True or False? 4 8.

24. 21. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 10 ft 9 ft 10 ft 10 ft 6 ft 9 ft Algebra: Concepts and Applications 185 . The side opposite the right angle of a right triangle is called the .  125 8-7 The Pythagorean Theorem Complete the sentence.  112 20. 25. In a right triangle.Chapter 8 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 8-6 Estimating Square Roots Complete the chart of the following square roots.  18 18. Write an equation that you could solve to find the missing side length of each right triangle. 23. 22.  88 19. each of the two sides that form the right angle is a of the right triangle. Square Root ?  x  ? Estimate  45   45   49  36 7 17.

self-check quizzes. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills.com to access your textbook. • Then complete the Chapter 8 Study Guide and Review on pages 374–376 of your textbook. Visit algconcepts. • You should complete the Chapter 8 Study Guide and Review on pages 374–376 of your textbook. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 8. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 186 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . • You may also want to take the Chapter 8 Practice Test on page 377.CH APTER 8 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You may also want to take the Chapter 8 Practice Test on page 377. more examples. • You may want to take the Chapter 8 Practice Test on page 377 of your textbook as a final check. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 8 Foldable. refer back to the specific lesson(s).

be sure to write clear and concise notes so that you can study them more easily.APTER 9 Chapter 9 CH Polynomials Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. and Identify classify ls ia m no poly d Add an subtract ials polynom Multiply ials polynom © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you take notes. Label Label the tabs using the lesson concepts as shown. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. Begin with a sheet of notebook paper. Fold Fold lengthwise to the holes. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 187 . Cut Cut along the top line and then cut three tabs.

Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example binomial [by-NO-mee-ul] degree FOIL method like terms polynomial [PA-lee-NO-mee-ul] trinomial [try-NO-mee-ul] 188 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill monomial [ma-NO-mee-ul] . As you complete the study notes for the chapter. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study.CH APTER 9 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 9. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages.

5 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 189 . 2 3 a. Explain why or why not. A monomial or the of one or more monomials is called a polynomial. Determine whether each expression is a monomial. . A monomial is a number. or a of numbers and variables that have only positive . 10x y z x b. a . A polynomial with A polynomial with terms is a binomial. 2 3 a b c WRITE IT Write three examples of expressions that are not monomials. 2 3 a b c is a monomial because it is a 1  x 1  is not a monomial because it includes x of variables.9–1 Polynomials BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 188) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Identify and classify polynomials and find their degree. terms is a trinomial. Explain why or why not. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Determine whether each expression is a monomial.

it is a . 4x  2 Yes. Since the expression can be written as the sum of 2 3x monomials.9–1 ORGANIZE IT Write an example of a monomial. 2 3 2 a. binomial. and trinomial under the tab for Identify and Classify Polynomials. a  3b The degree of a monomial is the of the variables. or trinomial. 3x  2x c. 9x  2x  4 b. and Identify classify ls ia polynom d Add an subtract ials m no ly po State whether each expression is a polynomial. identify it as a monomial. 2 5  3x  x  2 2 Yes. exponent. Your Turn State whether each expression is a polynomial. If it is a polynomial. Since the expression is the sum of it is a monomials. 190 Algebra: Concepts and Applications (page 188) of the © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY . Then write a polynomial with more than 3 terms. Since the expression contains a it is not a polynomial. or trinomial. identify it as a monomial. . The expression 5  3x  x  2 can be written as Multiply ials polynom . binomial. 3  4x No. binomial. If it is a polynomial.

9–1 Find the degree of each polynomial. 2 4 b. 3a b  2ab Find the degree of each polynomial. Term 2 2 The degree of 8b  9 is 8b . 2x  x  xy © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 191 . WRITE IT 4 8b  9 Degree 4 4 Describe how a monomial can have degree zero. Write an example of a monomial with degree zero. Degree 1  1 or 2ab 3a b 2 2  1 or 4 2 4  2 or 5a b Your Turn 3 5 a. 2 9 2 4 2 2ab  3a b  5a b Term 2 4 2 The degree of 2ab  3a b  5a b is .

Method 1 Group the like terms together. use either method. 3s  Align the like terms.  2t () 2 2 (b  4b  6)  (3b  3b  1) To add. REMEMBER IT Terms that have the same variable(s) and power(s) are like terms.9–2 Adding and Subtracting Polynomials WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each sum. (3s  4t)  (6s  2t)   (4t  2t)  s Group the like terms. Let’s use Method 1. group the like terms together. t Distributive Property  Method 2 Add in column form. • Add and subtract (3s  4t)  (6s  2t) polynomials. 2 2 (b  4b  6)  (3b  3b  1)  (4b  3b)  2 b  (4  3)    192 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 2 b 1   © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  . That is.

The additive inverse of g  2 is (g  2) or g  2.  Distributive Property g  (7  2)  Method 2 Arrange like terms in column form. name their additive inverses. (2g  7)  (g  2) Method 1 Find the additive inverse of g  2. let’s use Method 2. binomial.9–2 2 2 2 2 (2d  7de  8e )  (d  8e ) To add. Find each difference. 2 a. and trinomial under the tab for Add and Subtract Polynomials. and Identify classify ls ia m polyno d Add an subtract ials m no ly po Multiply ials polynom Add the additive inverse. ()  Algebra: Concepts and Applications 193 . (3y  4yz  2z )  (2y  4yz  8z ) REMEMBER IT Subtracting an integer is the same as adding its inverse. (3x  y)  (5x  2y) 2 2 b.  (2g  g)  (7  2) Group the like terms. 2 2d  7de  2 d () Your Turn 2 2  8e Find each sum. add in column form. Then. That is. Then group the like terms together and add. (2g  7)  ( g  2)  (2g  7)  ORGANIZE IT © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill List an example of a monomial. (x  5x  2)  (5x  4x  5) 2 2 2 2 c. 2g  7 2g  7 () g  2 2g  7 Add the additive inverse.

(4a2  3a  4)  (a2  6a  1)  (4a2  3a  4)   (4a2  1a2)    (4  1)a2  (3  6)  (4  1)  or 3a2  9a  3 Your Turn 2 REMEMBER IT Before adding or subtracting polynomials. Find each difference. 2 a. 2 or a   . (6a  2)  (a  4) 2 2 b. (6x  x)  (10  5x  x ) Pages(s): Exercises: 194 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . be sure that the powers of the variable are in descending order. (6x  2x  2)  (x  5x  3) 2 2 c.9–2 2 2 (4a  3a  4)  (a  6a  1) 2 2 The additive inverse of (a  6a  1) is (a  6a  1).

9–3 Multiplying a Polynomial by a Monomial WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each product. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 a. a(3a  4) d. • Multiply a polynomial x(x  1) by a monomial. 3x(x  4) b. x   2 g(3g  4) 2 g(3g  4)  g g   y(2y  6) y(2y  6)  y  (y)  2  2 b (2b  4b  9) 2 2 2 2 b (2b  4b  9)  b  Your Turn 2 b b   Find each product. use the distributive property. x(x  1)  x KEY CONCEPT Multiplying a Polynomial By a Monomial To multiply a polynomial by a monomial. x (3x  2x  6) 3 3 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 195 . y(5y  2) c.

3(d  4)  8  5(5d  1)  3 3(d  4)  8  5(5d  1)  3  12  8   20  3d  20  53 Distributive Property 2 Combine like terms.  20  2 22d  20  2 Add to each side. 26 4a  2  6 Add each side. .  2  a  6 3a  2  a  a  6  a Add a to each side. a(3  a)  2  a(a  1)  6 a(3  a)  2  a(a  1)  6 3a  2 2 3a  a  2  REVIEW IT a6 2 a a6 Distributive Property Subtract.  25d  2  Subtract. (Lesson 8-2) . to © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Explain the procedure for combining exponents when multiplying like bases. Divide. 4a  8  The solution is 196 Algebra: Concepts and Applications .9–3 Solve each equation. 22d   The solution is Divide.

9–3 Your Turn Solve each equation. Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Distributive Property 3x + 5 Find the area of the shaded region in simplest form. 2x + 1 4x x 5x + 5 (5x  5) area of larger rectangle: A  w (2x  1) area of smaller rectangle: 4x(5x  5)  area of shaded region: A  4x(5x  5)   4x    4x(5)  x   20x    x(1) x  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The area is Combine like terms. square units. Subtract the area of the smaller rectangle from the area of the larger rectangle. x(4  x)  x(x  10)  6 Find the area of the shaded region in simplest form. a. 3x 2x x+1 Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 197 . 6(a  3)  2  5(a  1)  4 b.

a. (d  2)(d  8) F (d  2)(d  8)  (d) Write what the letters in FOIL stand for under the tab for Multiply Polynomials. Your Turn Find each product. (x  4)(x  1) b. find the sum of the products of . © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill FOIL Method for Multiplying Two Binomials To multiply two binomials. (x  1)(x  5) (x  1)(x  5)  x(x  5)  (1)  x(x)  x Distributive Property  (1)(x)  (1) 2 x  Distributive Property x5 Simplify. 198 Algebra: Concepts and Applications   O I  (d)(8)  (2)  8d  L  (2)(8)  16 Combine like terms. • Multiply two binomials. (p  3)(2p  4) KEY CONCEPT F the First terms O the Outer terms I the Inner terms L the Last terms Find each product.  Combine like terms.9–4 Multiplying Binomials WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find the product.

(k  3)(3k  5) c.  Your Turn © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Find each product. ( y  9)( y  5) b. 2 2 2 (a  2)(a  4)  (a)(a )  (a) 3 a   (2)(a )  (2) 2  2a  There are no like terms. (2x  y)(x  3y) d. (5x  y)(4x  2y) F O (5x  y)(4x  2y)  (5x) I L  (5x)(2y)  (y)   (y)(2y) 2  10xy   2y  Combine like terms. (y  2)(y  5) 2 Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 199 . 2 Find the product of a  2 and a  4.9–4 (e  4)(2e  4) F O (e  4)(2e  4)  (e) I L  (e)(4)  (4)   4e   (4)(4)  16  Combine like terms. a.

9–5 Special Products WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Develop and use the patterns for (a  b)2.  (2d  1) 2 2 (a  b)  2 (2d  1)   2ab   2(2d)(1)  Square of a Sum Replace a with 2d and b with 1. Find each product. (b  5) 2 2  2ab  Square of a Sum 2  2(b)(5)  Replace a with (a  b)  (b  5)  and b with . and (a  b)(a  b). (a  b)2.  2 (a  b)  2 (3e  3f)   2ab  Square of a Difference  2(3e)(3f)  Replace a with 3e and b with 3f.  (c  3) 2 KEY CONCEPTS (a  b)  Square of a Sum and Square of a Difference (c  3)  2 2  2ab  Square of a Difference  2(c)(3)  Replace a with (a  b)2  a2  2ab  b2 (a  b)2  a2  2ab  b2 and b with .  200 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 (3e  3f) .

(y  3) Find each product. write an example of each and include a model. 2 2 b.  d Add an subtract ls ia m polyno Multiply ials polynom and (5b  2)(5b  2) (a  b)(a  b)  (5b  2)(5b  2)  2 b Product of a Sum and a Difference 2  (2) Replace with 5b KEY CONCEPT and b with Product of a Sum and a Difference  (a  b)(a  b)  a2  b2 Your Turn a. (3x  2y) e. (x  6)(x  6) f. 2 c. (2x  5) d. Then. ORGANIZE IT (3  a)(3  a) Write the three special product models under the tab for Multiply Polynomials. (k  4) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT .9–5 Find each product. (a  b)(a  b)  2 b Product of a Sum and a Difference 2 (3  a)(3  a)  a Replace a with b with and Identify classify ials polynom . (4x  3y)(4x  3y) Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 201 .

3 2 3 2 9. www. 2 2 2 3 5. binomial y 2 3 4 3. To make a crossword puzzle. word search. 6xy z  xy 7. (3x  4x  5x  1)  (5x  2x  2x  7) 10. monomial 3x 2. 5ab  2a b  4a b 6. 2 3 1.php 9-1 Polynomials Match the expression on the left with the correct term at the right.glencoe.  b. 5x y z  2x a. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 9. (5k  4)  (k  1) 202 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 9-2 Adding and Subtracting Polynomials 2 .CH APTER 9 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 9 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. trinomial 4. 12a b c c. not a polynomial Find the degree of each polynomial. go to You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (page 188) to help you solve the puzzle. 3a b  2a 2 Find each sum or difference.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. 12 8. 2k  3m  4mn d.

2 2 3 12. Complete. square of a sum 2 2 2 b. Find each product. (a  b)(a  b)  a  b c.Chapter BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 9 9-3 Multiplying a Polynomial by a Monomial 11. 2y (3y  2y  7) 3 2 13. product of a sum and a difference d. 3x (x  2x  3) 9-4 Multiplying Binomials 14. I  . To multiply two binomials. The property is used to multiply a polynomial by a monomial. square of a difference 15. sum of a difference Algebra: Concepts and Applications 203 . and L  . 9-5 Special Products Match each model to its special product name. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 2 2 a. (a  b)  a  2ab  b 16. find the sum of the products of F  . O  . (a  b)  a  2ab  b 2 2 17.

Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You should complete the Chapter 9 Study Guide and Review on pages 412–414 of your textbook.CH APTER 9 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. self-check quizzes. • Then complete the Chapter 9 Study Guide and Review on pages 412–414 of your textbook. more examples. Visit algconcepts. • You may also want to take the Chapter 9 Practice Test on page 415. • You may want to take the Chapter 9 Practice Test on page 415 of your textbook as a final check. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 9. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 204 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You may also want to take the Chapter 9 Practice Test on page 415.com to access your textbook. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 9 Foldable.

1 2 Chapter 10 Begin with a sheet of plain 8  " by 11" paper. Then look for sample problems and solutions that illustrate the objectives. Fold Fold again in thirds. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 205 . Open Cut along the second fold to make three tabs.CH APTER 10 Factoring Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Label Label each tab as shown. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. Factoring Greatest The Common Distributive Trinomials Factor Property NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you start a new lesson. write down the objectives. Fold Fold in half lengthwise.

As you complete the study notes for the chapter. Vocabulary Term Found on page Definition Description or Example difference of squares factoring greatest common factor (GCF) prime polynomial 206 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill perfect square trinomial .CH APTER 10 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 10. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages.

51 b.10–1 Factors WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Find the greatest common factor of a set of numbers or monomials. and . list all pairs of whole numbers whose product is 35. 47 is a number. REVIEW IT a. 1 5 The factors of 35 are 1. 18 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill How can you tell that the expression listed in Example 3 is a monomial? (Lesson 9-1) Factor each monomial. 5. Find the factors of each number. 1 The factors of 47 are and . Since 35 has more factors. than . 35 To find the factors of 35. Then classify each number as prime or composite. Then classify each number as prime or composite. 47 There is only one pair of whole numbers whose product is 47. it is a number. Your Turn Find the factors of each number. 2 2 16b c 2 2 16b c  2  2  2  b cc Algebra: Concepts and Applications 207 . Therefore.

The GCF of 12. 12. 20  2  2  2  3  5 Line up as many factors as possible.10–1 2 15xy To factor a negative integer. first express it as the product of a whole number and 1. 9a b and 12a b © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 The GCF of 21ab and 9a b is . 20. and 50 208 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Your Turn Find the GCF of each set of numbers or monomials. and 24 is 2  or . 6a b Find the GCF of each set of numbers or monomials. 2 2 15xy   15xy 2 15xy  1  3  Your Turn xy Factor each monomial. 24  2  2  2  3 Circle the common factors. Then find the prime factorization. 2 21ab and 9a b 2 21ab  3  3  7  a  a  b  b 2 9a b  3  3  7  a  a  b 2   or . 10 and 11 2 3 2 c. a. 36xy KEY CONCEPT Greatest Common Factor The greatest common factor of two or more integers is the product of the prime factors common to the integers. and 24 12  2  2  2  3 Find the prime factorization of each number. Find the greatest common factor for a set of three numbers and write it under the tab for Greatest Common Factor. 20. 10. 2 3 2 a. b. 20.

(page 206) The process of finding the factors of a product is factoring. find the GCF of 24y and 18y . Write each term as a product of the GCF and its remaining factors. 2 24y  18y  (4)  (3y)  6y 18ƒg  21gh Distributive Property 2 2 First. A polynomial that cannot be factored is called a prime polynomial. 2 24y  18y 2 First. 12mn  15n Algebra: Concepts and Applications 209 . REVIEW IT How can you use the Distributive Property to check your work? (Lesson 9-3) 24y  2  2  2  3  3  y 2 18y  2  2  2  3  3  y  y 2 The GCF of 24y and 18y is . 2 b.10–2 Factoring Using the Distributive Property BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Use the GCF and the Distributive Property to factor polynomials. 18ƒg  2  3  3  3  ƒ  g 2 21gh  2  3  3  7ghh © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The GCF is . 10a  5a 2 (6ƒ)  (7h )  Distributive Property Factor each polynomial. find the GCF of 18ƒg and 21gh . Factor each polynomial. 2 18ƒg  21gh    3g Your Turn 2 a.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  210 1 2 5a  2  2 223 aa            a 2 2 1 1 2 1 2a 1 1 1 Greatest The Common Distributive Trinomials Factor Property HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Divide each . 2 . 2 2 2 a. 2 5a  20ab  10a  (1)  (4b)   5a Your Turn (2a) Distributive Property Factor each polynomial. 1 Therefore. 5a  2  2  5  a 20ab  2  2  5  a  a  b 2 10a  2  2  5  a  a The GCF is . (24a  20a)  4a  Your Turn . 6ab  15ab  3a b b.10–2 2 Factor 5a  20ab  10a . the remaining factor is . 2 24a 2 (24a  20a)  4a   20a term by 1 1 1 1 Factoring 1 1  2 Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications Simplify. 15c  11ab 2 2 Divide (24a  20a) by 4a. 2 Divide (36ab  9a b) by 9ab. ORGANIZE IT Multiply a monomial and a trinomial together under the tab for Distributive Property. When 5a is factored from 5a.

2 x  9x  8 2 x  9x  8  (x   )(x  ) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Find integers whose product is is and whose sum . Product Integers Sum 12 2. 2 2 x  x  12  (x   )(x  ) REMEMBER IT The product of a positive integer and a negative integer is negative. The product of two negative integers is positive. 6 2  (6)  12 3. x  9x  8  x  Sum 1  (8)   x  . 2  Therefore. 6 2  6  12 2. 8 2  Therefore.Factoring Trinomials: x 2  bx  c 10–3 WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Factor each trinomial. • Factor trinomials of the x  x  12 2 form x  bx  c. x  x  12  x    x . Algebra: Concepts and Applications 211 . 4 3  4  You can stop listing factors when you find a pair that works. Product Integers 8 1. Find integers whose product is is and whose sum .

10–3
2

x x1

REMEMBER IT
Square models can
be used to help find the
correct combination
when factoring
trinomials.

2

x  x  1  (x   )(x   )
Find integers whose product is
Product

Integers

1

1, 1

1 

1, 1

There are no factors of

and whose sum is
Sum

11 
1  (1) 

whose sum is

2

Therefore, x  x  1 is a

Your Turn

.

.

polynomial.

Factor each trinomial.

2

2

a. x  14x  24

b. x  7x  18

2

c. x  2x  1

2

Factor 4x  8x  60.
First, check for a GCF.
2

2

(x  2x  15)

The GCF is

2

Now, factor x  2x  15.
2 

x  2x  15  x 

HOMEWORK
ASSIGNMENT
Page(s):
Exercises:

212 

x

2

4x  8x  60 

Your Turn Factor 5x2  10x  15.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications 

.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

4x  8x  60 

10–4

Factoring Trinomials: ax 2  bx  c

2

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

Factor 3y  7y  6.

• Factor trinomials of the

3y is the product of the first terms, and 6 is the product of
the last terms.

2

form ax  bx  c.

2

2

3y  7y  6  (3y  )(y  )

ORGANIZE IT
Choose two binomials
and use FOIL to multiply
them together under
the tab for Trinomials.
Then use the factoring
techniques you’ve
learned to factor the
result back into two
binomials.
Factoring
Greatest
The
Common Distributive Trinomials
Factor Property

The last term,

, is negative. The sum of the inside and

outside terms,

, is positive. So, one factor must be
and one must be

pairs of

. Try factor

until the sum of the products of the Outer

and Inner terms is

.

Try 2 and 3. 

3y  

y 

2 

3y  9y  2y  6
2 

3y 

6

is
not the correct
middle term. 

3y 

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 

y 

2 

3y  6y  3y  6
2 

3y 

6

is not
the correct
middle term.

Try 2 and 3. 

3y  

y 

2 

3y  9y  2y  6
2 

3y 
2

Therefore, 3y  7y  6  

6
.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

213

10–4
Your Turn

Factor each trinomial.

2

2

a. 2x  x  3

b. 5z  22z  8

2

Factor 4x  4x  15.
Number

Factor Pairs

4 
15

4 and 1, 2 and 2
3 and 5, 3 and 5, 15 and 1, 15 and 1

Try 4 and 1.
2 

2 

15

(4x  3)(x  5)  4x  
4x  

15
is not the
correct middle term.

2

(4x  15)(x  1)  4x  

2 

4x  

15 

15

is not the
correct middle term.

2 

2 

15

Try 2 and 2. (2x  3)(2x  5)  4x 

2

Therefore, 4x  4x  15 

HOMEWORK
ASSIGNMENT

Your Turn

Page(s):
Exercises:

214

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

2

Factor 4c  16c  7.

.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 

4x  

15

10–5

Special Factors

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN
• Recognize and factor
the differences of
squares and perfect
square trinomials.

Determine whether each trinomial is a perfect square
trinomial. If so, factor it.
2

x  14x  49
2

To determine whether x  14x  49 is a perfect square
trinomial, answer each question.
• Is the first term a perfect square?

KEY CONCEPT
Factoring Perfect Square
Trinomials A perfect
square trinomial is a
trinomial that has two
equal binomial factors.
For example, x2  6x  9 
(x  3)(x  3) and
x2  6x  9 
(x  3)(x  3).

2

x is the square of

.

• Is the last term a perfect square?
49 is the square of

.

• Is the middle term twice the product of x and
14x 

?

(7x).

2

Therefore, x  14x  49 is a perfect square trinomial.
2

x  14x  49 

.

2

9a  16a  4
• Is the first term a perfect square?
2

9a is the square of

.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

• Is the last term a perfect square?
4 is the square of

REMEMBER IT
In a perfect square
trinomial, the last term
is always positive.

.

• Is the middle term twice the product of 3a and 

2 

? 

16a

2

Therefore, 9a  16a  4 is not a perfect square trinomial.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

215

10–5
Your Turn

Determine whether each trinomial is a
perfect square trinomial. If so, factor it.
2

2

a. x  10x  25

b. 4c  20c  100

2

c. 9m  12m  4

KEY CONCEPT
Factoring a Difference of
Squares A binomial that
can be factored into two
binomials is a difference
of squares. For example,
x2  9  (x  3)(x  3).

Determine whether each binomial is the difference of
squares. If so, factor it.
2

d  81
2

2

and d  81 is a

d and 81 are both perfect
.
2

d  81   

   

2

2  

(d  9) 

d 2, 

81

Difference of Squares

2

ƒ  64
2

2

ƒ and 64 are both perfect squares. But ƒ  64 is a

,

2

not a difference. Therefore ƒ  64 is not a difference of
squares. It is a

polynomial.

2

HOMEWORK
ASSIGNMENT
Page(s):
Exercises:

216

a. r  100

2

c. 9x  121

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

2

b. n  4

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Your Turn Determine whether each binomial is the
difference of squares. If so, factor it.

CH

APTER

10

BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER
STUDY GUIDE
BUILD YOUR
VOCABULARY

VOCABULARY
PUZZLEMAKER
Use your Chapter 10 Foldable to
help you study for your chapter
test.

You can use your completed
Vocabulary Builder (page 206)
to help you solve the puzzle.

To make a crossword puzzle,
word search, or jumble
puzzle of the vocabulary words
in Chapter 10, go to
www.glencoe.com/sec/math/
t_resources/free/index.php

10-1
Factors
Find the prime factorization of each number or monomial.
3

1. 36

2. 14

3. 25a b

4. 27x

5. 81

6. 42mn

2

10-2
Factoring Using the Distributive Property
2

Refer to the polynomial 5ab  25b  5b.
7. What is the GCF of this polynomial?
© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

8. Write this polynomial in factored form.

9. Explain how to check your answer.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

217

x  6x  16 Match each trinomial with the correct factored form. 20. x  8x  15 d. x  7x  6 16. (x  3)(x  5) 2 e. x  2x  5 10-4 Factoring Trinomials: ax 2  bx  c 2 Refer to the trinomial 4x  11x  6.Chapter 10 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 10-3 Factoring Trinomials: x 2  bx  c Tell what sum and product you want m and n to have to use the pattern (x  m)(x  n) to factor the given trinomial. x  7x  30 15. x  10x  24 11. (x  2)(x  4) 2 f. 2 sum: product: 2 sum: product: 2 sum: product: 2 sum: product: 10. (x  10)(x  3) 14. 2 a. prime polynomial 17. choose answer F. If the trinomial will not factor. x  4x  21 13. (x  1)(x  6) 2 c. (x  2)(x  8) 2 b. x  12x  20 12. x  6x  16 18. What are the possibilities for the first term in each binomial? . What are the possibilities for the last term in each binomial? 218 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 19.

x  5x  6 c. prime polynomial Algebra: Concepts and Applications 219 . If none of the techniques can be used to factor the polynomial. 9x  12x  4 2 b. 49a  64b Match each polynomial from the first column with a factoring technique in the second column.Chapter 10 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 10-5 Special Factors Explain why each binomial is a difference of squares. 4x  25 2 2 22. Some of the techniques may be used more than once. difference of squares 2 26. 2 21. factor as ax  bx  c 2 25. choose prime polynomial. x  25 2 28. perfect square trinomial e. x  4x  4 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 29. factor as x  bx  c 2 24. 2 23. 4x  13x  9 2 27. 2x  16 d. factor out the GCF f. 9x  64 2 a.

I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 10. • You may also want to take the Chapter 10 Practice Test on page 453. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. refer back to the specific lesson(s). Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 220 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . Visit algconcepts. • You may also want to take the Chapter 10 Practice Test on page 453.com to access your textbook. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You may want to take the Chapter 10 Practice Test on page 453 of your textbook as a final check. • You should complete the Chapter 10 Study Guide and Review on pages 450–452 of your textbook.CH APTER 10 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. more examples. self-check quizzes. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 10 Foldable. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • Then complete the Chapter 10 Study Guide and Review on pages 450–452 of your textbook.

117 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Refold Refold to form a booklet.” NOTE-TAKING TIP: When taking notes. Begin with four sheets of plain paper. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 221 .CH APTER 11 Quadratic and Exponential Functions Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Unfold Unfold each sheet and tape to form one long piece. atic adr Qu nd a tial n one s Exp ction Fun 111 2 11- 113 4 11- 115 6 11- Chapter 11 Label Label each page with the lesson number as shown. listen for key words your teacher may use to emphasize important concepts. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking note. Label the front cover “Quadratic and Exponential Functions. Fold Fold each sheet in half along the width.

As you complete the study notes for the chapter.CH APTER 11 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 11. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example axis of symmetry [SIH-muh-tree] completing the square discriminant [dis-KRIMH-uh-nunt] exponential function [EKS-po-NEN-chul] geometric sequence [JEE-uh-MET-rik] maximum 222 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill initial value .

Chapter 11 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example minimum parabola [puh-RA-buh-la] quadratic equation [kwad-RAT-ik] Quadratic Formula quadratic function roots © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill vertex [VER-teks] zeros Algebra: Concepts and Applications 223 .

y) 2 2 2 2 2 Graph the points and connect them with a curve. functions. First choose values for x. O 224 Algebra: Concepts and Applications x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill y . KEY CONCEPT Quadratic Function A quadratic function is a function that can be described by an equation of the form y  ax2  bx  c. Evaluate the function for each x-value.11–1 Graphing Quadratic Functions BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 223) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Graph quadratic The shape of a function is called a parabola. 2 x x 2 2 (2)  2 1 (1)  2 0 0 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 y (x. 2 Graph y  x  2 by making a table of values. where a  0.

2 y  ax  bx  c 2 y  x  2x  1 So. a. Find the equation of the axis of symmetry. y  x  3 b. 2 2 a. is x  . a  .b 2 x  1x 2 . x Equation of axis symmetry x x 2  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill x  a . where b a  0. . Find the coordinates of the vertex of the parabola. KEY CONCEPT Equation of the Axis of Symmetry The equation of the axis of symmetry for the graph of y  ax2  bx  c. Substitute 2 for x in the equation y  x  2x  1 to solve for y. 2a Draw a parabola under the tab for Lesson 11-1. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 225 . b. and c  .b Simplify. Since the equation of the axis of symmetry is the x-coordinate of the vertex must be . Now.11–1 Your Turn Graph each quadratic equation by making a table of values. Label the axis of symmetry and the vertex. y  x  2 Use characteristics of quadratic functions to graph 2 y  x  2x  1. find the equation of the axis of symmetry.

If you know the axis of symmetry. Find the coordinates of the vertex of the parabola. a. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 226 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill b. c. Choose some values for x that are less than 1 and some that are greater than 1. c. Graph the function. 2 x x  2x  1 1 (1)  2(1)  1 0 (0)  2(0)  1 1 (1)  2(1)  1 2 (2)  2(2)  1 3 (3)  2(3)  1 y y O x (x. . Find the equation of the axis of symmetry. This ensures that points on each side of the axis of symmetry are graphed. Construct a table. Graph the function.11–1 2 y  x  2x  1 2   2   1 or The point at REMEMBER IT The axis of symmetry can help you graph quadratic functions. y) 2 2 2 2 2 Your Turn Use characteristics of quadratic functions 2 to graph y  x  4x  3. 1 is the vertex. additional points can be found by reflecting across the axis of symmetry.

a family can consist of parabolas of the same shape. What conclusions can be drawn? 2 2 2 y  x .5x .11–2 Families of Quadratic Functions WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Learn the characteristics of families of parabolas. . graphs either share a vertex or an axis of symmetry. Also. 2 The shape of the parabola narrows as the coefficient of x becomes greater. Compare and contrast the graphs. A constant greater than 0 shifts the graph the axis of along . Draw an example of a family of parabolas that share the same axis of symmetry under the tab for Lesson 11-2. y  x  4 Each graph opens and has the same shape as y  x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill so they form a 2 . y  x  1. 2 The graph of y  2x is than the graph 2 of y  x . Algebra: Concepts and Applications 227 . or both. 2 2 2 y  x . 2 The graph of y  0. Each parabola has a different located along the y-axis. The shape widens as the coefficient of x2 becomes smaller. y  2x Each graph opens and has its vertex at the KEY CONCEPT Families of Parabolas In families of parabolas. Graph each group of equations on the same screen. y  0.5 x is than the graph of 2 y  x .

Your Turn Each group of equations is graphed on the same coordinate plane. each parabola has a different along the located . 2 y  x . y  x . Find the number for x that results in inside the parentheses. However. Compare and contrast the graphs.5x . y  0. The graph shifts this number of or 2 to the . y  3x y O 228 Algebra: Concepts and Applications x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Draw a graph of the linear equations y  x and y  x  1. y  (x  1) Each graph opens and 2 has the same shape as y  x . y  (x  2)  1 2 The graph of y  (x  2)  1 has the same shape as the graph of . What conclusions can be drawn? 2 2 2 a.11–2 2 2 2 y  x . However. How do the shifting techniques learned in this lesson relate to your observations of these two linear graphs? inside the parentheses. it shifts to the negative two units because a will result in It also shifts WRITE IT 1 unit because of the constant outside the parentheses. y  (x  3) . .

y  2x . y  2x  3. y  (x  3) 4 2 y 8642 O 2 4 6 8 x 2 4 5 8 10 12 2 2 d. y  x . y  2x  2. y  (x  1)  2 y © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill O x HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 229 . y x O 2 2 2 c. y  (x  2) . y  x .11–2 2 2 2 b.

The of a quadratic function are called zeros. of a quadratic equation are called the roots of the equation.0 Students graph quadratic functions and know that their roots are the x–intercepts. (Key) for your table easier. function ƒ(x)  Graph the . 230 Algebra: Concepts and Applications .11–3 Solving Quadratic Equations by Graphing BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN (page 223) A quadratic equation is an equation of the form • Locate the roots of quadratic equations by graphing the related functions.b .0 Students apply quadratic equations to physical problems. where a ≠ The . such as the motion of an object under the force of gravity. Now. This will make selecting Standard 21. find the equation of the of symmetry. tic adra Qu nd a tial n one s Exp ction n Fu 111 2 11- 113 4 11- 115 6 11- 117 2 Find the roots of x  2x  15  0 by graphing the related function. . . (Key) b 2a x   x x 2  Equation of the axis of symmetry  or a The equation of the axis of symmetry is make a table using x-values around on a coordinate plane. . ORGANIZE IT Draw a parabola and label the zeros under the tab for Lesson 11-3. Graph each point © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Standard 23. Before making a table of values.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications 231 . make . Graph each point on a coordinate plane.11–3 2 x x  2x  15 5 (5)  2(5)  15 3 (3)  2(3)  15 1 (1)  2(1)  15 f(x) 2 2 2 2 1 (1)  2(1)  15 3 (3)  2(3)  15 2 The zeros of the function appear to be and . 2 f(x) 5 4321 O 1 2 3 x 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Your Turn Find the roots of x2  4x  12  0 by graphing the related function.b The equation of the axis of symmetry is a table using x-values around . Now. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill b 2a x   x x 2  Equation of the axis of symmetry  or a . Find the equation of the axis of symmetry. 2 Estimate the roots of x  4x  1  0. So. the roots are and .

one root of the equation is between other root is between y and the O x . Page(s): Exercises: 232 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . So.11–3 2 x x  4x  1 0 0  4(0)  1 1 1  4(1)  1 2 2  4(2)  1 3 3  4(3)  1 4 4  4(4)  1 f(x) 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 The x-intercepts of the graph are between 0 and 1 and between 3 and 4. Your Turn Estimate the roots of x2  3x  2  0.

b  0. Summarize the Zero Product Property in your own words under the tab for Lesson 11-4. 0 2t  t Algebra: Concepts and Applications 233 . Check your solution. x or Check: Substitute each value for x in the original equation. then equations by factoring and by using the Zero Product Property. if ab  0. The height h of the ball t seconds after it has been thrown is given by the 2 2 equation h  16t  8t  4. If 8t(2t  1)  0. 0 KEY CONCEPT Zero Product Property For all numbers a and b. Check your solution.  0 or 0 or x  0. Solve 4  16t  8t  4 or 8t(2t  1)  0 to find how long it would take the ball to reach the height from which it was thrown.11–4 Solving Quadratic Equations by Factoring WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Solve 2x(x  5)  0. then a  0. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A child throws a ball up in the air. 2x(x  5)  0 2    0 5 0  0 2x(x  5)  0   2  5 0 (0)  0 0 0 Your Turn Solve 3x(x  4)  0. • Solve quadratic If 2x(x  5)  0. then 0 t or  0 or  0. or both a and b equal 0.

Page(s): Exercises: 234 2 x  4x  21  0 4 Zero Product Property Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  2 Factor . 2 x  4x  21  0 x  x  0 0 or x Check:  0 x or 2    21  0   21  0 0 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT x  4x  21  0 2    21  0   21  0 4 0 Your Turn Solve x2  11x  30  0. So. Check your solution. Your Turn A child throws a ball up in the air. The solution 0 represents the beginning of the throw.11–4 The solutions are and . Check your solution. Solve 3  16t  4t  3 or 4t(4t  1)  0 to find how long it would take the ball to reach the height from which it was thrown. 2 Solve x  4x  21  0. the ball would reach the height from which it was thrown after of a second. The height h of the ball t seconds after it has been thrown is given by the 2 2 equation h  16t  4t  3.

When the square root is taken on both sides of an equation. tic adra Qu nd a tial n one s Exp ction Fun 111 2 11- 113 4 11- 115 6 11- 2 Find the value of c that makes x  8x  c a perfect square. it is necessary to add a  sign. 2 (4)  2 Step 3 Add the result of Step 2 to x  8x. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 235 . Step 1 Find half of 8. ORGANIZE IT Create your own quadratic equation (choose any integers for a.11–5 Solving Quadratic Equations by Completing the Square BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 222) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN A method to make any • Solve quadratic equations by completing the square expression a square is called completing the square. c  . 2 x  8x  Thus. and c) and write it under the tab for Lesson 11-5. b. 2 Notice that x  8x  16  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill REMEMBER IT  2 . 117  4 2 Step 2 Square the result of Step 1. Solve the equation by completing the square. Your Turn Find the value of c that makes x2  12x  c a perfect square.

x   2  x   2  222 x Factor x 2  4x  4. The solutions are and .  x2  3  Subtract side.   2 2 x  4x  5 Since 2  . Your Turn Solve x2  4x  21  0 by completing the square. Page(s): Exercises: 236 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . x or x  Check the solution. add to each side. 2 x  4x  Add to each side. Take the square root of each side.11–5 2 Solve x  4x  5  0 by completing the square. 2 2 x  4x  5  0 x  4x  5 is not a perfect square. from each x or x  Simplify each equation.

0 Students know the quadratic formula and are familiar with its proof by completing the square.0 Students use the quadratic formula to find the roots of a second-degree polynomial and to solve quadratic equations. .  Write the Quadratic Formula under the tab for Lesson 11-6. Use the formula to solve the quadratic equation that you created under the tab for Lesson 11-5. a  2 2a KEY CONCEPT The Quadratic Formula For ax2 x     2 bb  4ac  x   . (Key)   x or 4 5 4 x x or 4  5 5 x Standard 19.11–6 The Quadratic Formula WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Use the Quadratic Formula to solve each equation.b or 4 5 4 or 4 2 x  6x  9  0 2 b b  4ac .a x   . • Solve quadratic 2x  5x  3  0 equations by using the Quadratic Formula. (Key)   4    x . 2 b  b  4ac  x   . © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Standard 20. and c  2   bx  c  0. 2a 2 a  0.b 2a  x      2      2 x  4 . and c    x  6  2  2 or Algebra: Concepts and Applications 237 .

2 The equation y  16t  50t  3 gives the height y of the ball after t seconds. The football has a hang time of .a 2a 2 t  t  t    . This means that there is no real solution for x. the only approximate about HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 238 . and c  (1) 4 2(16) 58   58  t 32 or t  or 58  32  Since time cannot be negative. 2x  3x  2  0 REMEMBER IT The square root of a negative number is not a real number. Your Turn A baseball player hits a baseball with an upward velocity of 50 feet per second from a height of 3 feet.b  2  . 2 2 a. where h(t) is the ball’s height for any time t after the ball was kicked. How long will it take the ball to be 5 feet above the ground on the way down? Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill solution is . b. His formula is h(t)  16t  58t  1. What is the hang time? b  b  4ac  t   . A punter kicks the football with an upward velocity of 58 ft/s and his foot meets the ball 1 foot off 2 the ground. 6n  7n  3  0 “Hang time” is the total amount of time a ball stays in the air.11–6 Your Turn Use the Quadratic Formula to solve each equation.

5 2 1.5 3 1.5 y y 1 0 O x 1 2 3 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Graph y  3x. The initial value of an exponential function is the value of the function when ORGANIZE IT Sketch an exponential function under the tab for Lesson 11-7. x Graph y  1.5 0 1. is a variable is an exponential function.5 1 1.11–7 Exponential Functions BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 222) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN A function in which the • Graph exponential functions. tic adra Qu nd a tial n one s Exp ction Fun 111 2 11- 113 4 11- 115 6 11- 117 . Label the initial value.5 1 1.5 . x x 1. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 239 .

let x  and solve for y. Then state the y-intercept.11–7 Graph the exponential function. the y-intercept is . 0 y  3  1 or So. x y3 1 x 3 1 x y y 1 1 3 1 0 0 3 1 1 3 1 2 3 1 3 3 1 O x 1 2 3 To find the y-intercept. y  2  1 Page(s): Exercises: 240 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT x b. Your Turn Graph each exponential function. Then state the y-intercept. y  3  2 . x a.

The highest point of the graph is located . If you fold a parabola along a line to get two halves that match exactly. the line where you fold the parabola is the © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill of the parabola. To make a crossword puzzle.CH APTER 11 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 11 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. y  (x  3)2 y  (x  4)2 yx 2 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 241 .php 11-1 Graphing Quadratic Functions Complete each statement about the graph at the right. 5. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 11. www. The graph is a curve called a y . go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 222–223) to help you solve the puzzle.glencoe. Do the parabolas graphed form a family of parabolas? Explain why or why not. 1. at x O 2. This point is the (maximum/minimum) point of the graph.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. word search. 4. 11-2 Families of Quadratic Functions Refer to these parabolas that were graphed on a calculator. 3. This line goes through the of the parabola.

7. 2x  8x  42  0 2 13. the related quadratic equation is . 2 12. x  3  0 or x  7  0 16. 11-4 Solving Quadratic Equations by Factoring Provide a reason for each step in the solution of the equation. Use the graphs to provide the requested information about the related quadratic equations. For Graph a. How many solutions are there? 11. x  3 or x  7 242 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 2x  8x  42 . the related quadratic equation is . How many solutions are there? 8. 9. 10. ƒ(x)  x  x  2 y y O O x x 6. Name any solutions. 2(x  4x  21)  0 14. ƒ(x)  x  2x  3 b.Chapter 11 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 11-3 Solving Quadratic Equations by Graphing The graphs of two functions are shown. For Graph b. Name any solutions. 2(x  3)(x  7)  0 15. 2 2 a.

Solve x  6x  72  0 by completing the square. 2 11-7 Exponential Functions © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Match the correct equation with each graph shown. 22. y x O x a. x  2x  c 18. y  4 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 243 . Round to the nearest hundredth. y y x x c. y  3  3 x x d.Chapter 11 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 11-5 Solving Quadratic Equations by Completing the Square Find the value of c that makes each trinomial a square. Find the length and width of the rectangle shown. w  3 in. 23. y  3 O x b. 21. 11-6 The Quadratic Formula 2 20. w  2 in. y  4 24. Area  84 in. 2 2 17. x  9x  c 2 19. Solve 12x  7x  15 using the Quadratic Formula.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 244 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . Visit algconcepts. • You may also want to take the Chapter 11 Practice Test on page 499. • You should complete the Chapter 11 Study Guide and Review on pages 496–498 of your textbook.com to access your textbook. self-check quizzes. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 11. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. more examples. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • Then complete the Chapter 11 Study Guide and Review on pages 496–498 of your textbook. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 11 Foldable. • You may want take the Chapter 11 Practice Test on page 499 of your textbook as a final check.CH APTER 11 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. refer back to the specific lesson(s). Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. • You may also want to take the Chapter 11 Practice Test on page 499.

245 . Label Label each page with a lesson number and title. Write your own examples that use the new terms and concepts. Staple the eight half-sheets together to form a booklet. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. 12–1 Inequalitie s Algebra: Concepts and Applications Chapter 12 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill NOTE-TAKING TIP: When you take notes. Cut Cut along fold. define new terms and write about the new concepts in your own words.CH APTER 12 Inequalities Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Begin with four sheets of grid paper. Fold Fold each sheet in half from top to bottom.

As you complete the study notes for the chapter. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example boundary compound inequality half-plane intersection quadratic inequalities union 246 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill set-builder notation . you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study.CH APTER 12 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 12.

Many movie theaters give a senior-citizen discount to people who are 65 or over. 0 1– 4 1– 2 3– 4 1 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 247 . is used when the inequality includes the endpoint. An open circle is used when the inequality does not include the endpoint. Then a is 65. x ∞ 1 Since x can equal shade to the . Write an inequality that describes the speed cars are allowed to travel. Graph and interpret linear inequalities in one or two variables and systems of linear inequalities (A-2-H. REMEMBER IT © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A bullet.12–1 Inequalities and Their Graphs GLE 14. A-4-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Graph inequalities on a number line. the speed limit on an interstate highway is 75 miles per hour. Write an inequality that describes those who are eligible to receive the discount. Let a represent the ages of people who are eligible to receive the discount. Your Turn In Colorado. or closed circle. The ages of all those eligible are greater than or equal to 65 years. graph a at and . is the same as 65  a. Graph each inequality on a number line. graph a at and . –3 –2 –1 0 1 3 k   4 Since x cannot equal shade to the .

Write an inequality for the graph. . b  1. b. . –9 –8 –7 –6 –5 248 Algebra: Concepts and Applications – 3–4 – 1–2 – 1–4 0 1– 4 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Write an inequality for each graph. – 4–3 –1 – 2–3 – 1–3 0 Locate where the graph begins. This graph begins at 2 3 . So. w  5 Write an inequality for the graph. a.8 b. and  under the tab for Lesson 12–1. . So.12–1 Your Turn Graph each inequality on a number line. The graph describes values that are 2. and  is not included. . This graph begins at . ORGANIZE IT Summarize the meaning of the following signs: . The graph describes . 12–1 Inequalitie s 0 1 2 3 4 Locate where the graph begins. a. Also note that the arrow points to the . Note that the arrow points to the values that are . . and 2 is included.

first graph a at . Then graph the inequality on a number line. To graph the inequality. Let s represent the who can fit in a large school van. Then write an inequality using the symbol since the number 12 students. Write an inequality to express this information. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 249 . 10 11 12 13 14 Your Turn A classroom can seat no more than 30 people. Then include the numbers by drawing and shading an than to the . Then graph the inequality on a number line. Write an inequality to represent this situation.12–1 No more than 12 students can fit in a large school van.

BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 246) Set-builder notation is a method of writing the solution set for an 250 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . D-2-H. Check your solution. and inequalities (A-1-H. the . y  5  2 y  5  2 y  5  2  5 / 2  5 / 2  5 / 2 / 2 / 2 / 2 The solution is {all numbers }. . if the same quantity is added or subtracted to each side.12–2 Solving Addition and Subtraction Inequalities GLE 9. Let x  3. and a number greater than into the inequality. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Solve r  12  2. Solve y  5  2. P-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve inequalities involving addition and subtraction. {x  x  3}. y  5  2 y5  2  Add to each side. the resulting inequality is true. Check your solution. Let x  5. equations. y KEY CONCEPT Addition and Subtraction Properties for Inequalities For any inequality. Model real-life situations using linear expressions. Check: Substitute a number less than number . Let x  0.

During one week. }. you run 2 miles on Sunday and 2. .5  Subtract from each side. Your Turn Suppose that your teacher recommends that you read 3 hours each week. During one week. you read 35 minutes on Monday and 25 minutes on Tuesday. Inequalitie 12–1 Suppose that you plan to run at least 7.5 s  m  7. at least more miles need to be run before the week is over. used in set builder notation can be read “such that”.5  m   7. m The solution can be written as {m  REMEMBER IT The vertical line.5 to find out how many more miles need to be run before the week is over. Solve 2  2. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 251 .5  m § 7. So.5 4. Solve 35  25  m  180 to find how many more minutes m you must read this week for your weekly total to be at least 3 hours.5 miles on Wednesday.5 miles per week during the summer to train for the cross-country season in the fall.12–2 ORGANIZE IT Write the solution set for Example 3 using words under the tab for Lesson 12-2. 2  2.5  m  7.

KEY CONCEPT Division Property for Inequalities If you divide each side of an inequality by a positive number. the inequality remains true.5x  10. how long do they walk every day? © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Solve 2. the inequality symbol must by reversed for the inequality to remain true. You should travel no more than hours or 2 hours and minutes away from the charger. x 252 Algebra: Concepts and Applications and . If you divide each side of an inequality by a negative number. what are the lengths of time t you can drive away from the charger and then still make it back without running out of energy? Recall that rt  d. The inequality symbol is facing the same direction. 2.12–3 Solving Multiplication and Division Inequalities GLE 9. If they walk 2 miles per hour. Check your solution. and inequalities (A-1-H.5x  10 2. t 50t  130 t Divide each side by . If you drive at an average speed of 50 miles per hour. An electric car that needs to be recharged every 260 miles should travel no more than 130 miles from the charger.5x  10 Divide each side by reverse the inequality symbol. equations. Model real-life situations using linear expressions. P-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve inequalities involving multiplication and division. D-2-H. Your Turn Two friends walk at least 3 miles every day.

5x  10 0 10 2. into the original inequality. y  12 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 253 . Let x  8.5x  10 2. 3r  21 3 4 b.5 ( ) 2. 2.5 ( )  10  10 The solution set is {x  KEY CONCEPT Multiplication Property for Inequalities If you multiply each side of an inequality by a positive number. }. Let x  5. 1 2 Solve x  5. Write the Multiplication and Division Properties for Inequalities under the tab for Lesson 12–3.12–3 Check: Substitute and a number less than . the inequality symbol must be reversed for the inequality to remain true. 1 x  5 2 1 2  ( ) 1 2 x  5 1 2 2 5 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The solution is {x  Page(s): Exercises: . such as 5. Check your solution. x Check: Substitute and a number less than Let x  10. 1 2 x  5 ( x)  1  2 (5) Multiply each side by 2 and reverse the inequality symbol. into the original inequality. Let x  4.  ( )  5 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT 0 10 2 5  5 }. a. the inequality remains true. Check your solution. If you multiply each side of an inequality by a negative number. such as 8. Your Turn Solve each inequality.

P-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Solve 5x  9  21. name the operations used. Check your solution. D-2-H. equations. 5x  5x 30     5 5 Divide each side by 5. Check your solution.12–4 Solving Multi-Step Inequalities GLE 9. Solve 16  2x  3x  1. 5x  9  21 5x  9  21 5(6)  9 0 21 5(7)  9 0 21 30  9 0 21 35  9 0 21  21 false The solution is {x   21 true }. 5x  9   21  Add to each side. Then. . and inequalities (A-1-H. x Check: Substitute 6 and 7 into the original inequality. Model real-life situations using linear expressions. 16  2x   3x  1  16  5x  1 16  5x  12–1 Inequalitie s 1 5x  15 5x 15    5 5 x 254 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill ORGANIZE IT Algebra: Concepts and Applications Divide and reverse the inequality symbol. 16  2x  3x  1 Write and solve an inequality requiring more than one step to solve under the tab for Lesson 12–4. 5x  9  21 • Solve inequalities involving more than one operation.

Check your solution. Check your solution.12–4 Check: Substitute 3 and 4 into the original inequality. Let x  4. x The solution is {x  Your Turn }. 16  2x  3x  1 16  2x  3x  1 16  2(3) 1 3(3)  1 16  2(4) 1 3(4)  1 10  8 true The solution is {x  true }. 3(x  2)  75 3x  3x  6   75 Distributive Property  75  Subtract from each side. 3t  2  4 b. Let x  3. 15  5(x  6) Algebra: Concepts and Applications 255 . 10  3x  5x  4 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill c. 3x  3x  81 Divide each side by . Check your solution. Solve each inequality. Solve 3(x  2)  75. a.

will give the mean score. The mean must be more than 15  12  19  18  t ( 15  12  19  18  t ) . 19. How many points t must he score in the fifth game to have a mean point total of more than 16? The sum of Karl’s points.   Multiply each (16) side by . HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 256 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Lien’s score on the first four of five 100-point tests were 82. What score s on the fifth test will give her a mean score of at least 90 for all five tests? .  80  t Karl must score more than points in the fifth game to have a mean point total of more than .12–4 Karl’s point totals in the first four of five basketball games were 15. 12. divided by . 85. 15  12  19  18  t   t  80 64  t  Subtract. 95. and 18. and 91.

Then. 12–1 Inequalitie s © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A veterinarian has a scale for weighing dogs and cats that weigh more than 10 pounds but no more than 65 pounds. The weights w that can be measured on this scale can be written as 10  w  65. Graph the solution of this inequality. give examples of when to use each one. Write x  0 and x  3 as a compound inequality without using and. A-4-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve compound inequalities. An intersection is the set of elements common to inequalities. x  0 and x  3 can be written as x x or .12–5 Solving Compound Inequalities GLE 14. . Your Turn Write x  2 and x  5 as a compound inequality without using and. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 257 . BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 246) Two or more inequalities that are connected by the words or form a compound inequality. 10  w  65 Rewrite the compound inequality using is the same as w  10 and . A union is the set of elements in each of inequalities. Graph and interpret linear inequalities in one or two variables and systems of linear inequalities (A-2-H. ORGANIZE IT Summarize the difference between “intersection” and “union” under the tab for Lesson 12–5.

–4 –3 –2 –1 0 1 2 3 4 Your Turn Solve 4  2x  12. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 STEP 3 Find their . Graph the solution.12–5 STEP 1 Graph w  . The age a of people charged $15 for admission can be written as 5  a  13. STEP 1 Rewrite the compound inequality using and. Your Turn An amusement park charges $15 admission for children between the ages of 5 and 13. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 STEP 2 Graph w  . Solve 6  x  3  1. 258 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . Graph the solution of this inequality. 6  x  3  1  6  1 and STEP 2 Solve each inequality. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The solution is {x   1  . x  3  6 x3 x  3  1 and  6  x3 x x  x STEP 3 Rewrite the inequality as }. The solution is {w  w 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 }. Graph the solution.

STEP 3 Find the union of the graphs. 4 Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 259 . STEP 2 Graph x  4. 3 2 x  4 3 5x  20 or ( ) 2 x  3 (4) 5x x  20 x Now graph the solution.12–5 Graph the solution of x  7 or x  3. STEP 1 Graph x  . STEP 3 Find the union of the graphs. 2 Solve x  4 or 5x  20. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The last graph shows the solution {x  HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT –4 –2 0 2 4 6 –4 –2 0 2 4 6 –4 –2 0 2 4 6 }. Your Turn Solve 1x  3 or 3x  48. Graph the solution. Graph the solution. STEP 2 Graph x  . 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Your Turn Graph the solution of x  3 or x  2. STEP 1 Graph x  .

Inequalitie 12–1 s 4x is positive. x3 x3 (x  3)  4  x3 x x3  4  x The solution is {x  x }. Graph and interpret linear inequalities in one or two variables and systems of linear inequalities (A-2-H. x  3 is negative. –4 –3 –2 –1 0 1 2 3 4 . Solve  x  3  4. CASE 1 CASE 2 x  3 is positive.12–6 Solving Inequalities Involving Absolute Value GLE 14. Graph the solution. CASE 1 CASE 2 4x is negative. 4x  4x 16     4 4 x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill ORGANIZE IT Solve 4x  16. Summarize the difference between the solution of  x   4 and  x   4 under the tab for Lesson 12–6. A-4-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve inequalities involving absolute value. 4x  4x  4x 16     4 4 x The solution is {x x  260 Algebra: Concepts and Applications or x  }. The solution makes sense since units from –7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 0 1 and are at most . Your Turn Solve  t  3  10. Graph the solution. Graph the solution.

025  p CASE 2 p  3.25)  p  3.12–6 REMEMBER IT Your Turn Solve 5x  15.025 feet.25 is negative. What is the range of acceptable post lengths? Let p  the actual measure of the posts. (p  3. The tolerance for the posts is 0.25   0. p  3.25 is positive. The word “and” refers to an intersection of solutions and the word “or” refers to a union of solutions. The 2 tolerance for the washers is 0. p  3  .05 inch. 1 Write  as 0.25  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill p  3.  p  3. Your Turn A company makes 11-inch washers. What is the range of acceptable washer sizes? Algebra: Concepts and Applications 261 . 1 A lumber company makes 3-foot railing posts to use in 4 making decks.  1 4  Then.25  0.25.25  p  3.025 4 CASE 1 p  3.025  p HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: The solution is {p  p }. Graph the solution.25   0.

Describe the term “halfplane” using the words “half” and “plane”. STEP 1 Determine the boundary by graphing the WRITE IT related equation. x x2 2 2  2 1 1  2 0 02 1 12 2 22 line since y the boundary is included. Graph and interpret linear inequalities in one or two variables and systems of linear inequalities (A-2-H. The region of the graph of an inequality on side of a boundary is a half-plane. Graph y  x  2. y  x  2. O 262 Algebra: Concepts and Applications x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill STEP 2 Draw a y .12–7 Graphing Inequalities in Two Variables GLE 14. BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY A line that (page 246) the coordinate plane into half-planes is a boundary. A-4-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Graph inequalities on the coordinate plane.

12–7
STEP 3 Test any point to find which half-plane is the
solution. Use (0, 0) since it is the easiest point to use
in calculations.
yx2
1 

2

0

ORGANIZE IT
Explain when to use a
dashed line and when to
use a solid line when
graphing inequalities in
two variables under the
tab for Lesson 12–7.
Then explain how to
determine which halfplane should be shaded.

x

,y

false

y

Since (0, 0) does not result in a
inequality, the half-plane
containing (0, 0) is not the solution.

x

O

Your Turn Graph y  x  2.

12–1

Inequalitie

s

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Graph 3x  y  1.
To make a table or graph for the
inequality for y in terms of

line, solve the
. 

3x  y  1 
3x  y  

1
y

Add 
1

to each side.

Rewrite

as

3x  1.
Algebra: Concepts and Applications

263

12–7
STEP 1 Determine the boundry by graphing the related
equation, y  3x  1
x

3x  1 

2

3(2)  1 

1

3(1)  1

0

3(0)  1

1

3(1)  1

2

3(2)  1

STEP 2 Draw a

y

line

y

since the boundary is
not included.
x

O

STEP 3 Test (0, 0) to find which
half-plane contains
the solution.
y  3x  1 
3(

)1

x

,y

0  1 false
Since (0, 0) does not result
in a true inequality, the
half-plane containing (0, 0)
is not the solution. Thus, shade
the other half-plane.

HOMEWORK
ASSIGNMENT
Page(s):
Exercises:

264

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

O

x

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

Your Turn Graph y  2x  1.

y

CH

APTER

12

BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER
STUDY GUIDE
BUILD YOUR
VOCABULARY

VOCABULARY
PUZZLEMAKER
Use your Chapter 12 Foldable to
help you study for your chapter
test.

You can use your completed
Vocabulary Builder
(page 246) to help you solve
the puzzle.

To make a crossword puzzle,
word search, or jumble
puzzle of the vocabulary words
in Chapter 12, go to:
www.glencoe.com/sec/math/
t_resources/free/index.php

12-1
Inequalities and Their Graphs
Write the letter of the graph that matches each inequality.
1. x  1

a.

2. x  1

b.

3. x  1

c.

4. x  1

d. 

3 2 1

0

1

2

3 

3 2 1

0

1

2

3 

3 2 1

0

1

2

3 

3 2 1

0

1

2

3

12-2
Solving Addition and Subtraction Inequalities
Write an inequality for each statement. Then solve.
© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

5. A number subtracted from
21 is no less than 2.

16. A number added to 12 is a
minimum of 1.

7. 5 more than a number is
at least 15.

18. 18 less than a number is
at most 45.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

265

Chapter 12 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER

12-3
Solving Multiplication and Division Inequalities
Solve each inequality. Check your solution.
19. 12  6n

t
10.   14 
3

11. 12x  32

12-4
Solving Multi-Step Inequalities
Solve each inequality. Check your solution.
12. 2x  8  16
13. 3y  5  16
14. n  3(n  1)  1
12-5
Solving Compound Inequalities
Write the letter of the graph that matches each
compound inequality.
a. 

3 2 1

0

1

2

3

16. 3  x  3

b. 

3 2 1

0

1

2

3

17. x  3 or x  3

c. 

3 2 1

0

1

2

Solve each compound inequality. Graph the solution.
18. 13  2x  1  5

19. 3a  21 or 2a  24

266

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

3

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

15. x  3 or x  3

Chapter 12 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER

12-6
Solving Inequalities Involving Absolute Value
Solve each inequality. Graph the solution.
20. 2x  2  8
2x  2  8
2x  2  8

21. x  5  4
x5 4
x  5  4

22. 2x  3  5
2x  3  5
2x  3  5

23. 2x  2  6
2x  2  6
2x  2  6

12-7
Graphing Inequalities in Two Variables

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

24. BUSINESS A small business is charged 5 cents per minute for
in-state calls and 10 cents per minute for out of state calls.
The inequality 5x  10y  2500 represents how many minutes
of each type of call can be made for under $25 per month.
Graph the inequality. List three solutions of the inequality.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

267

CH

APTER

12

ARE YOU READY FOR
THE CHAPTER TEST?

Checklist
Check the one that applies. Suggestions to help you study are
given with each item.
I completed the review of all or most lessons without using
my notes or asking for help.
• You are probably ready for the Chapter Test.
Visit algconcepts.com to
access your textbook, more
examples, self-check
quizzes, and practice tests
to help you study the
concepts in Chapter 12.

• You may want take the Chapter 12 Practice Test on page 545
of your textbook as a final check.
I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review
of all or most lessons.
• You should complete the Chapter 12 Study Guide and Review
on pages 542–544 of your textbook.
• If you are unsure of any concepts or skills, refer back to the
specific lesson(s).
• You may also want to take the Chapter 12 Practice Test on
page 545.
I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of
all or most lessons.
• You should review the examples and concepts in your Study
Notebook and Chapter 12 Foldable.
• Then complete the Chapter 12 Study Guide and Review on
pages 542–544 of your textbook.
• If you are unsure of any concepts or skills, refer back to the
specific lesson(s).
• You may also want to take the Chapter 12 Practice Test on
page 545.

© Glencoe/McGraw-Hill

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268

Algebra: Concepts and Applications

Systems of Equations and Inequalities 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 13-3 Substitution 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 13-7 Graphing systems of inequations NOTE-TAKING TIP: When taking notes. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 269 . Fold Fold up bottom edges. Stack Stack sheets of paper with edges four grids apart to create tabs. Begin with four sheets of grid paper. Write why you think the concepts were presented in this sequence. Staple Staple along the fold.APTER 13 Chapter 13 CH Systems of Equations and Inequalities Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Label Label the tabs using lesson numbers and titles. All tabs should be the same size. think about the order in which concepts are being presented.

As you complete the study notes for the chapter.CH APTER 13 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 13. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages. Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example augmented matrix consistent [kun-SIS-tunt] dependent digit problems identity matrix 270 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill elimination [ee-LIM-in-AY-shun] . Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study.

Chapter 13 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example inconsistent [in-kun-SIS-tunt] independent matrices [MAY-tra-seez] quadratic-linear system of equations row operations © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill substitution [SUB-sti-TOO-shun] system of equations system of inequalities Algebra: Concepts and Applications 271 .

intersect at y =x+6 . Interpret and solve systems of linear equations using graphing. with and without technology. elimination. O x (2.13–1 Graphing Systems of Equations GLE 16. –1) x+y=1 Solve each system of equations by a. • Solve systems of yx6 y  3x equations by graphing. x–y=3 Check this estimate. y  x  4 yx6 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill graphing. y (3. The solution of the system of equations is Your Turn . The solution of the system of equations is O x . 9) The graphs appear to KEY CONCEPT System of Equations A system of equations is a set of two or more equations with the same variables. y = 3x You can check this estimate by substituting the coordinates into each equation. substitution. . xy3 xy1 The graphs appear to intersect at y . and matrices using technology (A-4-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Solve each system of equations by graphing. y  x xy6 272 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. The solution is the ordered pair that satisfies all of the equations.

50 40 (10. xy the number of items 4x  5y  the total profit Graph x  y  and 4x  5y  appear to intersect at ( . The club wants to sell 100 items and make a profit of $230. 40) 30 4x + 5y = 240 20 10 x + y = 50 10 20 30 40 50 x  y  50   50  50 ✓ 4x  5y  240 4( )  5(  )  240  240  240 ✓ They should try to sell T-shirts and caps. You can write two equations to represent this situation.13–1 ORGANIZE IT Tell what a system of equations is under the tab for Lesson 13-1. Check this estimate. The graphs . 40). How many of each item should the club try to sell? Let x  the number of T-shirts and y  the number of caps. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT A service organization is selling flowers for a profit of $2 each and vegetable plants for a profit of $3 each. How many of each item should the organization try to sell? Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 273 . Systems of Equations and Inequalities 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 13-3 Substitution 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 13-7 Graphing systems of inequations The Math Club is selling T-shirts for a profit of $4 each and caps for a profit of $5 each. The club wants to sell 50 items and make a profit of $240. Then describe the solution to a system of equations.

without graphing. Because there solution. or inconsistent. y O x–2=y x there are y=x–2 solutions. A system of equations with solutions solutions is dependent. A system of equations with is inconsistent. with and without technology. Both equations have the same graph. elimination. WRITE IT How do you know if two lines are parallel without drawing their graphs? How do you know. Because any ordered pair on the graph will satisfy both equations. when two equations represent the same line? State whether each system is consistent and independent. . A system of equations with solution is independent. or infinitely many solutions by graphing. 274 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill . The system is and The graphs appear to intersect at y the point at y=3 is O . consistent and dependent. this system of x y = 1–2x – 1 equations is and . and matrices using technology (A-4-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (pages 270–271) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Determine whether a system of equations has one solution. A system of equations with solution is consistent. substitution. no solution. Interpret and solve systems of linear equations using graphing.13–2 Solutions of Systems of Equations GLE 16.

3x  y  1 6x  2y  2 Write each equation in slope-intercept form. Algebra: Concepts and Applications x y = –x 275 . this system of y=x–2 equations has one solution . a. y  x yx2 The graphs appear to intersect at y . b. O (1. Then name the type of system that each graph represents. The system y = 3x – 1 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill ORGANIZE IT Describe the possible graphs of a system of linear equations under the tab for Lesson 13-2. or infinitely many solutions by graphing. consistent and dependent. If the system has one solution. or inconsistent. name it.13–2 Your Turn State whether each system is consistent and independent. y y y  x  3 O y  2x  4 x y  2x yx1 x O Determine whether the system of equations has one solution. –1) Remember to check by substituting the values for x and y into each of the original equations. 3x  y  1 y 6x  2y  2 y The graphs have the same the same and y . Therefore. Systems of Equations and Inequalities 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 13-3 Substitution 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 13-7 Graphing systems of inequations x O of equations has 6x – 2y = 2 solutions. no solution.

y  3x  1 y2 b. Do the tracks intersect. or infinitely many solutions by graphing. 2x  3y  1 4x  6y  5 The system of equations 4x  2y  6 and 8x  4y  20 represents the tracks of two trains. so the lines are O not intersect. a. Your Turn HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 276 The system of equations 3x  y  2 and 9x  3y  6 represents the tracks of two trains. no solution. run parallel. Write each equation in slope-intercept form. name it. 4x  2y  6 y 8x  4y  20 y The graphs have the same y and y-intercepts. or are the trains running on the same track? Explain. run parallel. Do the tracks intersect. If the system has one solution.13–2 Your Turn Determine whether the system of equations has one solution. Algebra: Concepts and Applications x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill and the tracks do . or are the trains on the same track? Explain.

with and without technology. Use substitution to solve y  3x  1 and Algebra: Concepts and Applications 277 . Interpret and solve systems of linear equations using graphing. The first equation tells you that x is equal to 2y. elimination. y © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8 6 4 2 8642 O 2 4 6 8x 4 6 8 Your Turn x  y  3. substitution. So. substitute 2y for x in the second equation. Then solve for y. 2x  3y  5 2( )  3y  5 Replace x with . Substitution is an algebraic method to solve a of equations. ORGANIZE IT Summarize the substitution method and explain when it is preferred over the graphing method under the tab for Lesson 13-3. The solution of this system of equations is .13–3 Substitution GLE 16. x  2y x  2( ) or Replace y with . and matrices using technology (A-4-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 271) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve systems of equations by the substitution method. Choose the equation that is easier to solve.  3y  5 Systems of Equations and Inequalities 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 13-3 Substitution 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 13-7 Graphing systems of inequations 5 Now substitute 5 for y in either equation and solve for x. Use substitution to solve x  2y and 2x  3y  5.

278 Algebra: Concepts and Applications b. x in either equation and solve for y. Use substitution to solve each system of equations. x  2y  0 3x  2y  12 . Solve the first equation for y since the coefficient of y is 2x  y  7 . 2x  y  3 x  2y  6 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill a. find the value of x by Now substitute substituting 2x 7 for y in the second equation. y  2x 7 Next. 3x  2y  12 3x  2( 3x  2( )  y  7 )  12   y  7  12 4  y   14  12 x  14  for  7  y  12  x  x  2 x The solution is Your Turn .13–3 Use substitution to solve 2x  y  7 and 3x  2y  12.

Use substitution to solve each system of equations. x  2y  2 3x  6y  12 b. REMEMBER IT When using an algebraic method to solve a system of equations. 3x  1  y 9x  3y  3 Find the value of x by substituting for y in the second equation. 9  3y  3 9x  3( 9x  )  3  Replace y with  3 . y  2x  2 2x  y  2 Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 279 . The system has solutions.13–3 Use substitution to solve each system of equations. Thus. Distributive Property 4 The statement 10  4 is . This means that an ordered pair for any point on either line is a solution to both equations. y  3x  5 6x  2y  4 6x  2( 6x  )4  4 Replace y with . This means that there are no ordered pairs that are solutions to both equations. and the system has . A false statement with no variables represents no solution. the lines are © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn . HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT a. Distributive Property  3 The statement 3  3 is . a true statement with no variables represents an infinite number of solutions.

Choose the equation that is easier for you to solve. substitution. REVIEW IT How can you tell when a linear equation is in standard form? (Lesson 6-3) 3x  2y  21 ()3x  4y  3  Write the equations in column form. Interpret and solve systems of linear equations using graphing. and matrices using technology (A-4-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve systems of (page 270) Elimination is an algebraic method to solve a system of equations by adding or subtracting the equations. . Subtract to eliminate the x terms.  18  18 6y 18    6 6 y The value of y is . with and without technology. elimination.13–4 Elimination Using Addition and Subtraction GLE 16. Use elimination to solve 3x  2y  21 and 3x  4y  3. Use elimination to solve x  2y  4 and x  y  1. 3x  4( )3 3x  3 3x  12  3 x The value of x is The solution of the system of equations is Your Turn 280 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . equations by the elimination method using addition and subtraction. Now substitute in either equation to find the value of x. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3x  15 3x 15    3 3 .

13–4 For a special event at the Kartchner Caverns. 4a  3s  84 total cost for the 2a  3s  54 total cost for the () group group 4a  3s  84 Write the equations in column form. . 4a  3s  84 4( )  3s  84  3s  84 60  3s   84  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3s  24 3s 24    3 3 s The value of s is The solution of the system of equations is means that the cost for adults was students was . Now substitute in either equation to find the value of s. This and the cost for . the cost of tickets for 4 adults and 3 students was $84 and the cost of tickets for 2 adults and 3 students was $54. 2a  3s  54 Subtract the equations to eliminate the s terms.   30  30 2a 30     2 2 a The value of a is . Let a  the cost for an and s  the cost for a . Find the admission price for an adult and for a student at the special event. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 281 .

3x  4y  6 ()5x  4y  22 ORGANIZE IT   16 Describe the types of systems where the elimination method is the preferred method used to solve under the tab for Lesson 13-4. The value of x is . Use elimination to solve 2x  3y  6 and © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 4y 12     4 4 . 3x  4y  6 3( )  4y  6  4y  6 6  4y  6 4y  12 y The solution of the system is Your Turn 3x  3y  21. .  16 8x 16     8 8x x Systems of Equations and Inequalities 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 13-3 Substitution 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 13-7 Graphing systems of inequations 4y and 4y are additive inverses.13–4 Your Turn The group admission cost for 2 adults and 6 children to enter a museum is $60. Find the group admission price for an adult and a child. Use elimination to solve 3x  4y  6 and 5x  4y  22. Add to eliminate the y terms. 282 Algebra: Concepts and Applications The value of y is . The group admission cost for 2 adults and 10 children to enter the same museum is $84. Now substitute in either equation to find the value of y.

t  u  14 the sum of the digits ut2 the relationship between the digits Rewrite the second equation so that the t and u are on the same side of the equation. . what is the number? Let t represent the tens digit and let u represent the units digit. Add the equations to eliminate the t terms. If the units digit is 7 less than the tens digit. ut2 t  u  2 Then use elimination to solve. Your Turn The sum of the digits of a two-digit number is 7.13–4 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 270) Digit problems explore the relationship between digits of a number.  16  16 2u 16     2 2 u The units digit is . what is the number? Algebra: Concepts and Applications 283 . Now substitute to find the tens digit. t  u  14 t  14 t  8  8  14  8 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill t Since t is HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: The tens digit is and u is . If the units digit is 2 more than the tens digit. The sum of the digits of a two-digit number is 14. the number is . t  u  14 ()t  u  2  Write the equations in column form.

elimination. Interpret and solve systems of linear equations using graphing. 5x  2y  2 x y  6 3x  6y  30 () 3x  6y  30 0  36 18x 36 x ORGANIZE IT Summarize the difference between the elimination method taught in Lesson 13-4 and the elimination method taught in Lesson 13-5 under the tab for Lesson 13-5. Use elimination to solve 5x  2y  2 and 3x  6y  30.13–5 Elimination Using Multiplication GLE 16. 284 Algebra: Concepts and Applications .  Now find the value of y by replacing x in either equation. with and without technology. 5x  2y  2 )  2y  2 5( 10  2y  2 10  2y   2  2y  Systems of Equations and Inequalities 2y 8    2 2 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 13-3 Substitution 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 13-7 Graphing systems of inequations The solution of this system of equations is Your Turn Use elimination to solve 3x  4y  1 and 2x  8y  0. Multiply the first equation by 3 so that the y terms are additive inverses. and matrices using technology (A-4-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve systems of equations by the elimination method using multiplication and addition. Multiply by 3. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill y . substitution. Then give examples of when to use each method.

Algebra: Concepts and Applications 285 . For example. REMEMBER IT Another method can be used to check your answers. Multiply the first equation by 3 so that the x terms are additive inverses. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Use elimination to solve x  2y  3 and 4x  y  12. Multiply by 3. 3x  2y  4 9x  4y  7 () x y 9x  4y  7 0   5 10y  5 y Now find the value of x by replacing y in either equation. 3x  2y  4 3x  2   3x  4 4 3x  1  4 3x  3x  3 x The solution of the system of equations is . the system can then be graphed or substitution can be used to check the answer.13–5 Use elimination to solve 3x  2y  4 and 9x  4y  7. if elimination is used to solve the system.

50. Another customer bought 4 regular CDs and 5 sale CDs and paid $62. . This means that the regular and the sale CDs sell for .75 () 2s  79.50 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8r  8r  68 r The solution is CDs sell for 286 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . 4r  5s  62. 8r  2s  79. What are the costs of regular and sale CDs? Let r represent the cost of the regular CDs and let s represent the cost of the sale CDs. 8r  2s  79.50 4r  5s  62.50 0   46 8s  46 s Now find the value of r by replacing s with either equation. in 8r  2s  79.75 first customer’s expense second customer’s expense Multiply the second equation by 2 to eliminate the r terms.75. One customer bought 8 regular CDs and 2 sale CDs and paid $79.50 r s  125.50 8r  2   79.50 8r   79.13–5 A music store has one price for all CDs except for the CDs in the Sale section.50 8r  Multiply by 2.

not including tax. Find the cost of each pair of shorts and the cost of each shirt. not including tax. The solution is . Use elimination to solve 4x  3y  8 and 7x  5y  27. 4x  3y  8 Multiply by 3. 7x  5y  27 REMEMBER IT © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill There may be more than one way to solve a problem. 7( )  5y  27  5y  27 7  5y  7  27  7 5y  20 5y 20     5 5 y HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Your Turn 3x  4y  6. In Example 4. 7x  5y  27 () x y x y 41x  41x 41    41 41 x Now find the value of y by replacing x in either equation. you can also solve this system of equations by multiplying the first equation by 7 and the second equation by 4. Use elimination to solve 2x  3y  13 and Algebra: Concepts and Applications 287 . Morgan bought 5 pairs of shorts and 5 shirts for $125. Multiply by 5. Amy bought 3 pairs of shorts and 6 shirts for $105. Multiply the first equation by 5 and the second equation by 3 so that the y terms are additive inverses.13–5 Your Turn Morgan and Amy found a special on shorts and shirts.

y)  1✓ © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill x O x 0✓ y  x2 O y = –x y  x 2  no solution graphs do not intersect (0. 0) . 2) O x Check: y  x2  1   1 288 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 2  1 ✓ y1 (x. If the system has one solution or two solutions. KEY CONCEPT Check: y  x2 Quadratic-Linear Systems (x. y)  y  x  x  (x. y)   0✓ y 2 (x. y (0. 32) at . two solutions. 1) substituting the coordinates into each equation.13–6 Solving Quadratic-Linear Systems of Equations WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve systems of quadratic and linear equations. Determine whether each system of equations has one solution. 1) y=1 x O y = –x 2 + 1 two solutions graphs intersect at two points y (1. y)  1✓ y  x2  1 y1 y The graphs appear to intersect (1. or no solution by graphing. name them. y  x2 y  x y The graphs appear to intersect at y = x2 and . Check this estimate by (–1. 1) (2. y)    1✓ one solution graphs intersect at one point (x.

y  2x2  3 1   2x2  3 Replace y with  2x2  3  Add . The solutions of the system of equations are and . Substitute 1 for y in the first equation. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 289 . y  x2  1 y5 b. to each side. a. If the system has one solution or two solutions. or no solution by graphing. name them.  2x2 2  2x2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1  x2 x Take the square root of each side.13–6 Your Turn Determine whether each system of equations has one solution. Then solve for x. two solutions. y  x2  3 2x  y  6 Use substitution to solve y  2x2  3 and y  1.

y  2x2  3 1 ORGANIZE IT List the different methods of solving quadratic-linear systems under the tab for Lesson 13-6. y  x2  3 y7 Page(s): Exercises: 290 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT c.  2x2 2  2x2 1  x2 x Take the square root of each side. Then describe the situations in which each method is preferred.13–6 Use substitution to solve y  2x2  3 and y  1. Your Turn Use substitution to solve the system of equations. y  x2  6 yx . from each side. a. y  3x2  4 y  1 b.  2x2  3 Replace y with  2x 2  3  Subtract . Systems of Equations and Inequalities 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 13-3 Substitution 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 13-7 Graphing systems of inequations There is no real solution because the square root of a negative number is not a real number. Substitute 1 for y in the first equation.

Then give an example of each. x=3 x O The graph of y  x  4 is a line and is in the solution of the system. The graphs of x  3 and y  x  4 are the y=x+4 of this region. Graph and interpret linear inequalities in one or two variables and systems of linear inequalities (A-2-H.13–7 Graphing Systems of Inequalities GLE 14. If the system does not have a solution. Because the regions in the solution of x  y  2 and 2y  2x  2 have in common. Solve each system of inequalities by graphing. Systems of Equations and Inequalities 13-1 Graphing systems of equations 13-2 Solutions systems of equations 13-3 Substitution 13-4 Elimination using addition and subtraction 13-5 Elimination using multiplication 13-6 Solving quadratic-linear systems of equations 13-7 Graphing systems of inequations y The solution is the ordered pairs in the of the graphs of x  3 and y  x  4. the system of inequalities has solution. A-4-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Solve systems of (page 271) A set of two or more inequalities is a system of inequalities. x3 yx4 ORGANIZE IT Compare the solution of a linear system of equations with a linear system of inequalities under the tab for Lesson 13-7. Choose a point and check the solution. Check this by graphing or by comparing the O x 2y = –2x – 2 . Shade the region darkest on the graph. inequalities by graphing. write no solution. xy2 2y  2x  2 y © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The graphs of x  y  2 and 2y  2x  2 are x+y=2 lines. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 291 .

If the system does not have a solution. a.13–7 Your Turn Solve each system of inequalities by graphing. y  5 yx2 Page(s): Exercises: 292 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT . y  2x  1 3x  2y  6 b. write no solution.

word search.glencoe. y  2x  1 y  3x  6 13-2 Solutions of Systems of Equations Describe the solution of each system of equations. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 13. You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (pages 270–271) to help you solve the puzzle. Solve the system of equations by graphing. To make a crossword puzzle.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index.php 13-1 Graphing Systems of Equations 1. 3. go to: www. y O x y O x Algebra: Concepts and Applications 293 . © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2.CH APTER 13 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 13 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test.

13-4 Elimination Using Addition and Subtraction 7. Describe the graph of the system. 10. The sum of the digits of a two-digit number is 8. x  4y  4 4x  4y  6 11. Explain. Describe the graph of the system.Chapter 13 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 13-3 Substitution 4. 3x  5y  15 3x  2y  6 . y  2x x  3y  15 5. If the tens digit is 6 more than the units digit. 6. All of her work was correct. All of his work was correct. Describe how you would use substitution to solve the system of equations. 5x  7y  17 8x  7y  9 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8. 3x  5y  7 3x  2y  14 294 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 9. Amy solved a system of equations and her result was 8  8. what is the number? Use elimination to solve each system of equations. Explain. Luis solved a system of equations and his result was 5  2.

0) 13-6 Solving Quadratic-Linear Systems of Equations Match each graph with the correct system of equations. y  2x  3 2 y  3x2  5 y  x2 13-7 Graphing Systems of Inequalities © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Write the inequality symbols that you need to get a system whose graph looks like the one shown. x  y  4 a. 12. y  x2  6 a. (0. 2) b. 1 e. 4) 13. 17. y   x  4 y3 d. 2x  y  4 15. 2) c. (1. 20. 19.Chapter 13 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 13-5 Elimination Using Multiplication Match each system with its solution. (4. or . y  x2 y  2x  3 1 c. y yx2 y y  2x  1 x O O x y  2x  1 yx2 y x2 y x2 y 2x  1 y 2x  1 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 295 . . 5x  3y  5 4x  y  2 2x  7y  2 (2 ) 1 d. (1. y 18. Use . 4x  3y  1 3x  2y  8 2x  y  2 14. 16. . y y x O x O x O b. .

refer back to the specific lesson(s). © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 296 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . more examples. • You should complete the Chapter 13 Study Guide and Review on pages 592–594 of your textbook. • You may also want to take the Chapter 13 Practice Test on page 595. • You may also want to take the Chapter 13 Practice Test on page 595. self-check quizzes. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 13. Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. Visit algconcepts. • You may want to take the Chapter 13 Practice Test on page 595 of your textbook as a final check. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons.CH APTER 13 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • Then complete the Chapter 13 Study Guide and Review on pages 592–594 of your textbook. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 13 Foldable.com to access your textbook. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills.

Describe the Find the distance relationships between two among sets points in the of numbers coordinate plane Simplify. Open Cut along the second fold to make four tabs. write down questions you have.CH APTER 14 Radical Expressions Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Label Label each tab as shown. comments. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 297 . and/or short summaries of the main ideas of the lesson that are highlighted or underlined. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. and simple subtract radical radical equations expressions NOTE-TAKING TIP: As you study a lesson. Solve add. reactions. Fold Fold the top to the bottom. Fold Fold the short sides to meet in the middle. Chapter 14 Begin with a sheet of 11"  17" paper.

Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example conjugates [CON-ja-guts] Distance Formula radical equations rationalizing the denominator [RA-shun-ul-eyes-ing] 298 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill radicand [RA-di-KAND] . As you complete the study notes for the chapter.CH APTER 14 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 14. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study. you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages.

N-3-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Name the set or sets of numbers to which each real number belongs. and a rational number. 36  18 3 b. and irrational numbers (N-1-H. and real numbers under the tab for “Describe the relationships among sets of numbers. 2 5 2 Since 5  . 0. irrational numbers. integers. an . this number is a natural number.  17 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill   4. rational numbers. number. Solve add. this number is an and a rational number. N-2-H. whole numbers.14–1 The Real Numbers GLE 1. and a number. and simple subtract radical radical equations expressions Since  100  . Your Turn Name the set or sets of numbers to which each real number belongs. a an . rational numbers.” Describe the Find the distance relationships between two among sets points in the of numbers coordinate plane Simplify. 10 This number is a natural number. integers. • Describe the relationships among sets of numbers. it is an number.123105626 . whole numbers. Identify and describe differences among natural numbers. So.666 . . . This repeating decimal is a number since it is 2 3 equivalent to . It is not the square root of a perfect 17 square.  Algebra: Concepts and Applications 299 . a number. . a. 100  ORGANIZE IT Explain the similarities and differences between the sets of natural numbers. .

0. for each square root.16227766 An approximate value for 10  is . Find an approximation. Then graph the square root on a number line. 2 e. 2  3 d. 19  300 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn Find an approximation. for each square root.5  KEY CONCEPT Completeness Property for Points on the Number Line Each real number corresponds to exactly one point on the number line. to the nearest tenth. Then graph the square root on a number line. to the nearest tenth.  10 Enter: 2nd [] ENTER 3.  10 –1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 8  Enter: (–) 2nd [] 8 ENTER –2. 7  b.828427125 An approximate value for 8  is  .14–1 c. . Each point on the number line corresponds to exactly one real number.  8 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 0 1 2 a.

59   59   59  59 is not a . If it is irrational. The graph of 59  lies between and . 16. find two consecutive integers between which its graph lies on the number line. 64. 64  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill b. . Determine whether each number is rational or irrational. 81. . . Your Turn Determine whether each number is rational or irrational. If it is irrational. it is a . 4.  121 Since 121  .14–1 REMEMBER IT To find the two consecutive integers between which an irrational square root lies. a. 36. 25. 49. make a list of perfect square numbers: 1. Then find the two numbers between which the number under the square root symbol lies. its square root is . So. 23  HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 301 . 9. find two consecutive integers between which its graph lies on the number line.

y1)  (3. 302 y Sales St. 8) and F(5. Two taxis leave the intersection of 15th Street and G Street. 1) is or about units. two KEY CONCEPT The Distance Formula The distance d between any two points with coordinates (x1. New F St. How far apart are the taxis when they stop? . One taxi travels 7 blocks north. Metro Center O White House x 8th St. d 2 2 (x2   x1)  (y2  y1)  d  Distance Formula   2   2  (x1. 9th St. y2) is given by d  (page 298) on the coordinate plane. Algebra: Concepts and Applications Farragut Square Mount Vernon Square Green Ct.  1)  d d 2    2  d The distance between points E(3.C. 15th St. 8) and F(5. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill McPherson Square 10th St. Ave York G St. D. Find the distance between points E(3. 11th St. A coordinate system is superimposed over a map of Washington.14–2 The Distance Formula BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN The Distance Formula is a formula derived from the • Find the distance Theorem to find the distance between between two points in the coordinate plane. and the other taxi travels 11 blocks east. 1). 1) 2 (x2  x (y2  y1)2. D St. . 8). and (x2. y2)  (5. y1) and (x2. L St. E St.

x2  . 7). 7) and the other taxi’s location by (11. Solve add. So. 7) and D(6. 0). x1  y1  d d . How far is Jake’s school from his house? School Home Algebra: Concepts and Applications 303 . and (x2. Jake leaves his school and travels 3 blocks west to a friend’s house.14–2 Let the first taxi’s location be represented by (0. 2 2 (x2   x1)  (y2  y1)   . A coordinate system is superimposed over a map of Jake’s neighborhood. and y2  . Find the distance between points C(2. ORGANIZE IT Write the distance formula and two examples to help you remember how to use it under the tab for “Find the distance between two points in the coordinate plane.” © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Describe the Find the distance relationships between two among sets points in the of numbers coordinate plane Simplify. 0) d d d 2    2  or about The taxis are about units blocks apart when they stop. y2)  (11. and simple subtract radical radical expressions equations b. Then he turns and travels 5 blocks south to his home. 4). Distance Formula    2 2 (x1. y1)  (0. Your Turn a.

b  0. . d REVIEW IT 2 2 (x2   x1)  (y2  y1)    The Zero Product Property says that for all numbers a and b. 5) and Q(2. 6). y1)  (a. then b  0. a) are  units apart. if ab  0. 0  (a  1)(a  5) Factor. 194 Page(s): Exercises: 304 a Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill The value of a is Zero Product Property . y2)  (2. and (x2. 3)     2 4  4a  a  9  18 2 (2  a)2  4  4a  a2 and (3)2  9 2  4a   13    a 18  4a   13    a 18 2 2 2 Square each side. Your Turn Find the value of a if P(3. 3) are 18  units apart. 6) and N(2.  0 or 0 a HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT or . 2  a  4a  13 0 Subtract. (Lesson 11-4) Distance Formula    2 2 (x1. or both a and b equal 0.14–2 Find the value of a if M(a.

b if a  0   a   ab and b  0.. Simplify 15   75 .g. Rationalizing the denominator is a method used to remove from the of a fraction. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3  5   3  5  5   75    15 Prime factorization  3   5  3  5  5 Product Property of Square Roots  5   5  5    32   52  Commutative Property 3  3   32 and 5  5   52 35  Simplify. Simplify and perform basic operations on numerical expressions involving radicals (e. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 305 . (Lesson 8-5) Simplify 48 . REVIEW IT The Product Property of Square Roots says that the square root of a product is equal to the product of each square root. The radicand is the number under the sign. Conjugates are two expressions of the form ab   cd  and ab   cd .14–3 Simplifying Radical Expressions GLE 6. In symbols. 2 3 + 53  = 73) (N-5-H) BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 298) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Simplify radical expressions.  48 Prime factorization 3  16  2  2  2  2  16  16  Product Property of Square Roots  Simplify 16 .

72  b.  2  2  5  Prime factorization 2 5  b  0. a if a  0 and ba    b 300    15  300   15 Quotient Property of Square Roots  20  Divide 300 by 15. 6 . a. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Simplified Form for Radicals A radical expression is in simplest form when:  30  1  30  6 6 30      30 30    30 .  9  4  5    30    30 Product Property of Square Roots 3  2  5    30  306 900  Algebra: Concepts and Applications Simplify. 6   12  . • No radicands contain fractions. Simplify  30  KEY CONCEPT • No radicands have perfect square factors other than 1. (Lesson 8-5)  22  2  2  22 Product Property of Square Roots  Simplify.  30 6 30    30   Simplify. • No radicals appear in the denominator of a fraction.14–3 Your Turn Simplify each expression. 300 Simplify  15  REVIEW IT The Quotient Property of Square Roots says that the square root of a quotient is equal to the quotient of each square root. In symbols.

multiply both the numerator and denominator by the conjugate of 4  3 . 16  3 20  53   13 Simplify 3 6 48y z. 4 3 108a  b  Algebra: Concepts and Applications 307 . 12  b.  16  a.  72  48  5 Simplify  . 7 2  5  b. 4 3 To rationalize the denominator.  4yz 3y  3 The absolute value of y ensures a nonnegative result.14–3 Your Turn Simplify each expression.  3 6 48y z  3 6  2  2  22  3  y z   16  3  2 Prime factorization 6 y z 2  2  2  2  16  3 y   z   y   2  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  4  3   y  6 3 z Simplify. (a  b)(a  b)  a 2  b 2  Simplify. a. 4   3  4   3 1  4  3 5 5      4  3 4  3   4  3 5(4)  53   2  Distributive Property. HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: Product Property of Square Roots Your Turn Simplify each expression.

Find the exact perimeter of the triangle. 1210   1510     10 Distributive Property  32   92 32   92   2 Distributive Property  REMEMBER IT To add or subtract radicals. 23  + 53 = 73) (N-5-H) WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Simplify each expression. 55 centimeters.g. 85   125 Algebra: Concepts and Applications  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  308  Like terms: 103 . The lengths of the three sides of a triangle are 103  centimeters. Simplify and perform basic operations on numerical expressions involving radicals (e..14–4 Adding and Subtracting Radical Expressions GLE 6. and 9 3 centimeters. Your Turn Simplify each expression. P   and 93   103   93  55 Commutative Property  (10  9)3  Distributive Property  The exact perimeter of the triangle is centimeters. a. the radicands must be the same. • Add and subtract 1210   1510  radical expressions.

ORGANIZE IT Write a note to explain the process for simplifying. Describe the Find the distance relationships between two among sets points in the of numbers coordinate plane Simplify.14–4 b.” Then show one example of each. add and subtract radical expressions. adding.  2  4  3   153   153  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  (8  15)3  Distributive Property  HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Your Turn Simplify 3 72 . The lengths of the sides of a quadrilateral are 82  inches. Solve add. and simple subtract radical radical expressions equations Simplify 248   375 . and 62 inches. 248   375  4 2 2  2 33    3  3 3 Prime factorization   3  Simplify. and subtracting radical expressions under the tab for “Simplify. 57  inches. 3 7 inches. 211   411   911  c. Find the exact perimeter of the quadrilateral.   518 Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 309 .

3  x   12 3  x  12 3  x   12  Subtract from each side. y2  2 ( y  2)  2 Square each side. Algebra: Concepts and Applications Add 2 to each side. x  9 (x)2  2 Square each side.14–5 Solving Radical Equations BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN (page 298) A radical equation is an equation that contains a • Solve simple radical expression. and simple subtract radical radical expressions equations 3 . Check your solution. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Describe the Find the distance relationships between two among sets points in the of numbers coordinate plane Simplify. Check this result. equations in which only one radical contains a variable.  12 3 Replace x with  12 12  12 ✓ y21 6   y21 6   6   y2 1 Add to each side. Solve add. Solve each equation.” Then show two examples. x 3  x  12 Check: ORGANIZE IT Explain how to eliminate the radical from an equation under the tab for “Solve simple radical equations. y  2  49 y  2  2  49  2 y 310 .

Zero Product Property  4m  3m Check: Since  3m  4m   3   4  1 44  4  1 4  1 44 1 1 does not satisfy the original equation.  z518 Solve each equation. Check your solution. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 311 . a. 3m  4m  3m  4m  2 2 ( 3m  4)  m WRITE IT Square each side. 2  x  9 b. 0  m  0 m m  0 or m  0 m © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill  m 44 3 Factor. is the only solution. 2 m 2 3m  3m  4  4  m  3m  4 Why is it important to check your solutions when solving radical equations? Subtract 3m and 4 from each side. always isolate the radical before squaring each side. Check your solution. Your Turn Solve each equation.14–5 REMEMBER IT When solving a radical equation.

Your Turn Solve each equation. Check your solution.  x3x3 Page(s): Exercises: 312 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT .14–5 n5n5  n5n5  2 2 ( n  5 )  (n  5) Square each side. they are both solutions. y  3y   b. 2 n  5  n  10n  25 2 n  n  5  5  n  10n  25  n  5 Subtract. 2 0n   20  n  0 n n  0 or n  n Check:  0 Zero Product Property n n5n5   Factor.  10 a. 5 0  0 0  0✓ Since both and n5n5   5  5 5 1  1 1  1✓ satisfy the original equation.

3. choose the letter of each set of numbers to which each real number belongs. www. 2).glencoe. d     2   2 7. 1) are 10 units apart? Algebra: Concepts and Applications 313 . y1)  (3. What is the value of b if S(7. word search. 7) and (x2. 2). Natural numbers b.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. Use (x1. go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (page 298) to help you solve the puzzle. 5 c. y2)  (9. 0 5.php 14-1 The Real Numbers For each of the following. Each real number may belong to more than one set of numbers.CH APTER 14 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 14 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test. 120 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 14-2 The Distance Formula 6.6 a. 7) and N(9. 41  d. Rational numbers e. b) and T(13. Integers 3. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 14. Suppose you want to use the Distance Formula to find the distance between M(3. Irrational numbers 4. To make a crossword puzzle. Whole numbers 2. 1. Complete the equation by writing the correct numbers in the boxes.

Leave in radical form. 4  7  x  y is equal to the product . and 33. 6   18  2 11. Simplify again to get a final answer of 2 x y 7 . How can you tell that the radical expression simplest form? b. 32  10. To simplify 2 4 28x y is not in  2 4 28x y. What method would you use to simplify  ? 15  314 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 4 of 28x y .  1 7 12. 56. you first find the  2 Property of Square Roots. 2 12t  13. Of 53 . 9. which two radical expressions have the same radicand? Simplify each expression.Chapter 14 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 14-3 Simplifying Radical Expressions 8. a. Then apply the . 4 In this case.

63   12  b. Provide the reason for each step in the solution of the given radical equation. Radical expressions can be added or subtracted if they have the same . 415   360  d.Chapter 14 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 14-4 Adding and Subtracting Radical Expressions 14. Indicate whether the following expressions are in simplest form. 15. 5x  1  4  x  3  Original equation 5x  1  x  1  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 2 ( 5x  1 )  (x  1) 2 5x  1  x  2x  1 2 0  x  3x  2 0  (x  1)(x  2) x  1  0 or x  2  0 x  1 or x2 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 315 . 126   710  c. 320   530  14-5 Solving Radical Equations 16. a. Explain your answer.

and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 14.com to access your textbook. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 14 Foldable. • You may also want to take the Chapter 14 Practice Test on page 633. more examples. • You may also want to take the Chapter 14 Practice Test on page 633. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. Visit algconcepts. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. refer back to the specific lesson(s). refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You may want take the Chapter 14 Practice Test on page 633 of your textbook as a final check. self-check quizzes.CH APTER 14 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 316 Algebra: Concepts and Applications . Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. • You should complete the Chapter 14 Study Guide and Review on pages 630–632 of your textbook. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. • Then complete the Chapter 14 Study Guide and Review on pages 630–632 of your textbook.

CH APTER 15 Rational Expressions and Equations Use the instructions below to make a Foldable to help you organize your notes as you study the chapter. Fold Fold lengthwise to the holes. always write definitions and examples of each of the terms learned. Begin with a sheet of notebook paper. You will see Foldable reminders in the margin of this Interactive Study Notebook to help you in taking notes. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill sion l Expres Rationa Values Excluded n l Functio Rationa ssion tional Expre Multiplying Ra ion ss tional Expre Dividing Ra ls lynomia po g in id Div iple mmon Mult Co t as Le tor on Denomina Least Comm n l Equatio Rationa lems otion Porb Uniform M NOTE-TAKING TIP: When taking notes. Algebra: Concepts and Applications 317 . Chapter 15 Cut Cut along the top line and then cut ten tabs. Label Lable the tabs using the vocabulary words in the chapter.

Vocabulary Term Found on Page Definition Description or Example excluded value least common denominator (LCD) least common multiple (LCM) rational equation [RA-shun-ul] rational expression uniform motion problem work problems 318 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill rational function . you will see Build Your Vocabulary reminders to complete each term’s definition or description on these pages. As you complete the study notes for the chapter.CH APTER 15 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY This is an alphabetical list of new vocabulary terms you will learn in Chapter 15. Remember to add the textbook page number in the second column for reference when you study.

3 a. 2 y 4 0 y Factor or y  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill So.  m(7  m) y b. Find the excluded value(s) for each rational expression. 10y  2  y 4 2 Exclude the values for which y  4  . KEY CONCEPT Rational Expression A rational expression is an algebraic fraction whose numerator and denominator are polynomials. y cannot equal . Zero Product Property or . 20  (x  3)x Exclude the values for which (x  3)x  . x cannot equal Product Property or .  2  y  16 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 319 .15–1 Simplify Rational Expressions BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN (page 318) An excluded value is any value assigned to a • Simplify rational that results in a denominator of expressions. Your Turn Find the excluded value(s) for each rational expression. . (x  3)x   0 or 0 So.

15–1 REMEMBER IT Division by zero is undefined. 1  1 1 1 225xxxxxy 3 or 4x 2 The GCF is 5x y. Then find all the excluded values for the expression and write those under the tab for Excluded Values. Simplify each rational expression.   5x  20 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Write an example of a rational expression under the tab for Rational Expression. (x  3) 1  (x  3) or The GCF is (x  3) .   5 4 21a b 3x  12 b. 1 ORGANIZE IT sion l Expres Rationa Values Excluded n l Functio Rationa ssion tional Expre Multiplying Ra ssion tional Expre Dividing Ra ials polynom Dividing e on Multipl m m Co t Leas Denominator on mm Co Least n l Equatio Rationa lems otion Porb M rm ifo Un 320 18a2b a. 4x  12  7x  21 4x  12   7x  21 (x  3) Factor 4x  12 and 7x  21. 20x5y  2 3 25x y 225xxxxxy 20x5y   2 3 25x y Note that x  0 and y  0. Write the rational expression as a function and draw its graph on the tab for Rational Function. Your Turn Simplify each rational expression. .

The GCF is 6  2x   2 x  x  12 2(3  x) 6  2x   2 x  x  12 (x  )(x  ) 2( 1)(x  3)    (x  4) Factor 6  2x 2 and x  x  12. 1 2(1)  (x  4) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Your Turn 15  5x a. b2  12b  27 b. REVIEW IT Explain how to factor a trinomial. Factor 1 from . Simplify each rational expression. 1 (a  5)  (a  3)   1  or   a3  .   2 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT x  2x  15   1  or   x4 The GCF is x  3. How do you find the correct combination of inner and outer terms? (Lesson 10-3) a2  25   2 a  2a  15 a2  25   2 a  2a  15 (a  )(a  ) (a  )(a  ) 2 Factor a  25 2 and a  2a  15.  2  b 9 Page(s): Exercises: Algebra: Concepts and Applications 321 .15–1 Simplify each rational expression.

15–2 Multiplying and Dividing Rational Expressions WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each product. z  3 3z2  15z    z5 4z  12 (z  5) z  3 3z2  15z z3       z5 4z  12 z5 2 Factor 3z  15z and 4z  12. 4 m4 m2  1    2 2 m  3m  4 m m4 m2  1 m4       2 2 2 m  3m  4 m m sion l Expres Rationa Values Excluded n l Functio Rationa ssion tional Expre Multiplying Ra ion ss tional Expre Dividing Ra ls lynomia po g in id Div iple mmon Mult Co t as Le tor on Denomina Least Comm n l Equatio Rationa lems otion Porb Uniform M (m  )(m  ) (m  )(m  ) 1 1 m4    2 m (m  1) (m  4) 1 322 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 1 or m  1 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill ORGANIZE IT . Then. (z  3) 1 1  z5 1 3z(z  5)  (z  3) and (z  5) are common factors. • Multiply and divide 4ab 10a2    5 10a 8ab rational expressions. 1 a3 2  Multiply. 4 1  Summarize the steps in multiplying two rational expressions under the tab for Multiplying Rational Expressions. 1 1 1 4ab 4ab 10a2 10a2        5 5 10a 10a 8ab 8ab Simplify. give an example.

a and b are common factors. y2  64 y2  2y 15n2 4mn2 2d  10 3d  21 b.        5 2   2 3 12m 8n d  7d d5 y  10y  16 2y Summarize the steps in dividing two rational expressions under the tab for Dividing Rational Expressions. Then. sion l Expres Rationa Values ed ud Excl n l Functio Rationa on nal Expressi tio Ra ing y ipl t Mul ssion tional Expre Ra ing vid Di ials polynom Dividing iple mmon Mult Least Co tor on Denomina Least Comm n l Equatio Rationa lems otion Porb Uniform M Find each quotient. 1  x3 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 323 .   c. 1 1  6a 6x  6   (x  1) x3 6x  6   (x  1) x3 6x  6    The reciprocal of x3 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill (x  1) is  x3  1  1 . 1  x3 is a common factor. 15a3 5a2    3 b 2b 15a3 5a2     3 b 2b 15a3    3 5a2 The reciprocal of   is b . give an example.  a. Factor 6x  6. 2b 1 2b 15a3     3 2 5a b 5.15–2 Your Turn ORGANIZE IT Find each product.

4t3 12t4 a. and factors. 1 1 1 2 5  2 (4x y) 4x y  Factor from 6  x .15–2 x2  36 6x   2 2 5 4x y 4x y x2  36 6x   2 2 5 4x y 4x y x2  36    2 6x The reciprocal of  is 2 5   4x y .    (x  5) x5 Algebra: Concepts and Applications © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill p2  4 2p b. 1 are common  Your Turn Find each quotient.     2 3 2 .     3 s 2s 10q p HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 324 5q p 2x  10 c. 111 1   (x  6) 2 x  6. y. x . 4x y 2 5 2 4x y 4x y 2 Factor x  36.

Therefore. Subtract: x  3x   4x. divisor. Find each quotient. Multiply 5 and . (x  8x 9)  (x  1) sion l Expres Rationa Values Excluded n l Functio Rationa ssion tional Expre Multiplying Ra ssion tional Expre Dividing Ra ials polynom Dividing iple mmon Mult Least Co minator no De on Least Comm n l Equatio Rationa s on Porblem oti M rm Unifo Algebra: Concepts and Applications 325 . Then identify the dividend.15–3 Dividing Polynomials WHAT YOU’LL LEARN • Divide polynomials by binomials. 2 (x  x  12)  (x  3) x x  3 x  x  12 2 x xx 2 Multiply x and () x  4x 2 . Subtract. Find each quotient. (14x  7)  (2x  1) 2 b. 2 Therefore. (x  x  12)  (x  3)  Your Turn . (15x  10)  (3x  2) 5 3x  21 5 x 0 1 15x  3x  () 15x  . bring down () 4x Multiply 4 and . quotient and remainder. ORGANIZE IT © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Give an example of a division problem using two polynomials under the tab for Dividing Polynomials. . (15x  10)  (3x  2)  . a.

The quotient is 4a  1 with remainder 6. 2 So. Multiply 5 and . Then bring down . 326 2 Therefore. (8a  14a  9)  (2a  3)  4a  1  . the result is subtracted.15–3 2 (8a  14a  9)  (2a  3) 4a  1 2 2a  3 8a  14a  9 2 () 8a  2 8a  2a  Multiply 4a and  2a Subtract. . Then bring down ()  2a . Subtract. If you prefer. Subtract. The remainder is . 2a  3 2 (x  20)  (x  5) x x5 ) 2 x  5  20 2 Rename x  20 as 2 x  2 () x   20 Multiply x and 5x Subtract. (x  20)  (x  5)  Algebra: Concepts and Applications  x5 . 3 . The remainder is . © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill () 5x . Multiply 1 and . you may add the opposite of the entire expression. REMEMBER IT After the divisor is multiplied by the last term in the quotient.

Subtract. (9y  9y  4)  (3y  1) b. the length of the rectangle is . units. 2 2 a. Then bring down 3 Multiply 3 and The remainder is Therefore. 5a  2 5a2  8a  4 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 327 . (x  32)  (x  6) Find the length of a rectangle if its 2 area is 12x  13x  3 square units and its width is 3x  1 units. . 4x  3 12x  13x  3 3x  1 2 2 () 12x  Multiply 4x and 9x  9x  () . 3x  1 12x2  13x  3 To find the length. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill You can check your answer by multiplying and HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: .15–3 Your Turn Find each quotient. Your Turn Find the length of a rectangle if its area is 2 5a  8a  4 square units and its width is 5a  2 units. . divide the area the length by .

17 17 Find each sum or difference. 7 7 10     y y Standard 13.0 Students add. . (Key) The common denominator is y. • Add and subtract 7 10    y y rational expressions with like denominators. Students solve both computationally and conceptually challenging problems by using these techniques. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 8 4    15n 15n . multiply. and divide rational expressions and functions.    11 n 11 Find each sum or difference. Write in simplest form. 8 4     15n 15n  8 15n 12   or 15n 328 Algebra: Concepts and Applications The common denominator is 15n. 15n 5n Divide by the GCF. 3 12 a. Subtract the numerators. Add the numerators. y  3 y or  y 13a 2a     17 17 13a 2a      17 17 13a   Your Turn The common denominator is 17.15–4 Combining Rational Expressions with Like Denominators WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find each sum or difference. subtract. Add the numerators.    n 5x 2x b.

2p . Subtract the numerators.15–4 REMEMBER IT When adding or subtracting rational expressions. Add the numerators. always check to see if your final answer can be simplified. 3x  1 4 a3    a3 a3 4 a3     a3 a3  a3 a3 The common denominator is a  3. 5 13    2p 2p 5 13     2p 2p 5 The common denominator is 2p. 2p  2p 4  Divide by the GCF. a a3 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2x  5 x4    x3 x3 2x  5 x4     x3 x3   2x  5  x  4 The common denominator is x  3. 1  or  p p 10 3    3x  1 3x  1 3 10 3     3x  1 3x  1 3x  1  The common denominator is 3x  1. Subtract the numerators. 3x  Algebra: Concepts and Applications 329 . Add the numerators.

1 (x  3)  Divide by the GCF.    14y .    x5 3b 3x x4 e.15–4 (x  3)  Factor the numerator. 11 1 a.    m  10 Page(s): Exercises: 330 3b Algebra: Concepts and Applications m  10 7 6 c.  2a  1 5 Distributive Property 2a  1 Your Turn Find each sum or difference.     14 y m2 5 d. Write in simplest form. Subtract the numerators.    x1 x1 x5 y1 y f. . 1  12a 2a  5    2a  1 2a  1 12a 2a  5    2a  1 2a  1  (2a  5)   2a  1 12a   The common denominator is 2a  1.    4y  3 4y  3 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT 20 2 b.

subtract. 3x  7x  2 Factor each expression. a.0 Students add. LCM  mmmmnnnnn  2 2 x  3x  10. and divide rational expressions and functions.15–5 Combining Rational Expressions with Unlike Denominators WHAT YOU’LL LEARN Find the LCM for each pair of expressions. 4 5 2 Factor each expression. • Add and subtract 12m n . LCM  Your Turn 3 5 Find the LCM for each pair of expressions. 18x 2 2 2 b. 15x y . multiply. x  2x  15. x  11x  30 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 331 . 2 x  3x  10  (x  5) 2 3x  7x  2  © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Standard 13. 4 5 12m n  2  2  3  m  m  m  m  n  n  n  n  n 2 14m n  ORGANIZE IT Write two expressions and explain the steps you would take to find the LCM for the expressions under the tab for Least Common Multiple. (Key) (x  2) Use each factor the greatest number of times it appears in either factorization. sion l Expres Rationa Values Excluded n l Functio Rationa ssion tional Expre Multiplying Ra ssion tional Expre Dividing Ra ials polynom Dividing e on Multipl m m Co t Leas Denominator on mm Co Least n l Equatio Rationa lems otion Porb M rm ifo Un Use each factor the greatest number of times it appears in either factorization. 14m n rational expressions with unlike denominators. Students solve both computationally and conceptually challenging problems by using these techniques.

1   x3  2(x  3) 5x   2x  6 2(x  3) Your Turn Write each pair of rational expressions with the same LCD. 3 6m 2m      2 5m 2m 10m 4   2 2m  2 10m 1 5x .15–5 BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY (page 318) The least number that is a of two or more numbers is the least common multiple (LCM). 5m  5  m 2 2m  LCD  2  5  or . . sion l Expres Rationa Values Excluded n l Functio Rationa ssion tional Expre Multiplying Ra ion ss tional Expre Dividing Ra ls lynomia po g in id Div iple mmon Mult Co t as Le tor on Denomina Least Comm n l Equatio Rationa lems otion Porb Uniform M The least common multiple of the denominators is called the least common denominator (LCD).  n  8 4n  32 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill A common denominator can always be found by multiplying the two denominators together. a. Then write each fraction with the same LCD. 3 4 . ORGANIZE IT Write two rational expressions and explain the steps you would take to find the LCD for the expressions under the tab for Least Common Denominator.  x  3 2x  6 First find the LCD.  2 5m 2m First find the LCD. WRITE IT 2x  6  2 LCD  Then write each fraction with same LCD. 23 . Write each pair of rational expressions with the same LCD. What are the reasons this method is not always used? x3x3 . 42 3a 332 5a Algebra: Concepts and Applications n 3 b.

32  53 Your Turn 10b 5b 2x b. 3  52  3 4m 8m Find the LCD. 7    2 x3 x  3x  18 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 333 . Write in simplest form. 3   3 4m  5  m   2 8m m 3 8m 3 8m Add.15–5 Find each sum or difference. 3 2 4m  2  2  m  m  m LCD  8m  2  2  2  m  m  m  m  m or Rename each expression with the LCD as the denominator. Page(s): Exercises: a. 3  53    3 3 4m 8m 8m 3 or 5m  3 8m 8m 3 4x    2  x6 x  36 x6x6 2 x  36  LCD  3 4x 4x (x  6)  3         2  x6 x  36 x  6 (x  6) (x  6)(x  6)  3x  (x  6)(x  6) x  4 (x  6)(x  6) © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 3x  18  4x    18 (x  6)(x  6) or  (x  6)(x  6) HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Find each sum or difference. Write in simplest form.

8 8  x So.  The LCD is 12.15–6 Solving Rational Equations BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY WHAT YOU’LL LEARN (page 318) An equation that contains at least one rational • Solve rational equations. is a rational equation.       7x  12 5x 2     4 3   5x   4 7x  12 2   3    1 Distributive Property   7x 5x 2 12   12   12  4 12 3 1 1  1  7x 15x  8   7x  Subtract from each side. Solve each equation. Algebra: Concepts and Applications . Then compare the method of solving rational equations with the method of adding rational expressions with unlike denominators. 8x © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill sion l Expres Rationa Values Excluded n l Functio Rationa ssion tional Expre Multiplying Ra ion ss tional Expre Dividing Ra ls lynomia po g in id Div iple mmon Mult Co t as Le tor on Denomina Least Comm n l Equatio Rationa lems otion Porb Uniform M 7x 5x 2      12 4 3 . the solution is 334 Multiply each side by 12. 5x 2 7x      4 3 12 ORGANIZE IT Tell the difference between a rational expression and a rational equation under the tab for Rational Equations.

Distributive Property 5 4 26 15x   15x   15x  3x 5x 1 15 1  1  26x Simplify.       7 2x      x1 x1 5 2x   x1 5 7 2x (x  1)  (x  1)   5     7   x1 1 1 x1 x1 1 1 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 7 7  2x  7 7  5x   5x  5   5  7  5  3x  12 x Algebra: Concepts and Applications 335 .15–6 5 4 26      3x 5x 15 5 4 26        3x 5x 15       5   3x 4   5x 5 3       26  15 5 4     3x 5x     The LCD is 15x. 26  15 1 Multiply each side by the LCD.  26x x Divide. 7 2x     5 x1 x1 7 2x     5 x1 x1 The LCD is x  1.

6n n a.15–6 Your Turn Solve each equation.     5 7 2 3 4 11 b. Check your solution.      x1 x1 8 a1 HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Page(s): Exercises: 336 Algebra: Concepts and Applications a a1 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 6 12 5 d.      .       y 2y 6 2 x x1 c.

x2  9 x2  10x  21    2 8 z © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill c 8y Algebra: Concepts and Applications 337 . 3n  15  n  2 6n  30 n 9ab3 7.glencoe. go to: You can use your completed Vocabulary Builder (page 318) to help you solve the puzzle.     2 6.php 15-1 Simplifying Rational Expressions Simplify each rational expression. www. (  6) 2. 10x3y xz2 5.   27ab  2 8.   2 9m  18m 4. or jumble puzzle of the vocabulary words in Chapter 15.CH APTER 15 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER STUDY GUIDE BUILD YOUR VOCABULARY VOCABULARY PUZZLEMAKER Use your Chapter 15 Foldable to help you study for your chapter test.   2 2 x  5x  4 m  6m  16 15-2 Multiplying and Dividing Rational Expressions Find each product or quotient.   3 yy 4y  24 28ab x4 3.com/sec/math/ t_resources/free/index. To make a crossword puzzle.   7a2b 1. word search.

(12d  30)  (2d  5) 2 11.Chapter 15 BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER 15-3 Dividing Polynomials Find each quotient.     5 13 14. (a  4a  4)  (a  1) 15-4 Combining Rational Expressions with Like Denominators Find each sum or difference. (x  6x  7)  (x  7) 3 12.     x2 x2 © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 1 15. 9. Write in simplest form. n 7n 13. (6y  7y  5)  (3y  2) 2 10.     10 10 9x y y2 338 y y2 Algebra: Concepts and Applications 3x2 2x  8 16. 6   9x .

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Suggestions to help you study are given with each item. I asked for help from someone else to complete the review of all or most lessons. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You may want take the Chapter 15 Practice Test on page 679 of your textbook as a final check. Visit algconcepts. • You should review the examples and concepts in your Study Notebook and Chapter 15 Foldable. I completed the review of all or most lessons without using my notes or asking for help. • You should complete the Chapter 15 Study Guide and Review on pages 676–678 of your textbook. refer back to the specific lesson(s). • You may also want to take the Chapter 15 Practice Test on page 679. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills.CH APTER 15 ARE YOU READY FOR THE CHAPTER TEST? Checklist Check the one that applies. self-check quizzes. © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Student Signature Parent/Guardian Signature Teacher Signature 340 Algebra: Concepts and Applications .com to access your textbook. • You are probably ready for the Chapter Test. and practice tests to help you study the concepts in Chapter 15. • If you are unsure of any concepts or skills. • Then complete the Chapter 15 Study Guide and Review on pages 676–678 of your textbook. more examples. I used my Foldable or Study Notebook to complete the review of all or most lessons. • You may also want to take the Chapter 15 Practice Test on page 679.