You are on page 1of 110

University of Iowa

Iowa Research Online
Theses and Dissertations

2013

Developing proficiency in the tenor arias of
Vincenzo Bellini through the study and
performance of the composer's art song repertoire
James Loving Thompson
University of Iowa

Copyright 2013 James Thompson
This dissertation is available at Iowa Research Online: http://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/2644
Recommended Citation
Thompson, James Loving. "Developing proficiency in the tenor arias of Vincenzo Bellini through the study and performance of the
composer's art song repertoire." DMA (Doctor of Musical Arts) thesis, University of Iowa, 2013.
http://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/2644.

Follow this and additional works at: http://ir.uiowa.edu/etd
Part of the Music Commons

DEVELOPING  PROFICIENCY  IN  THE  TENOR  ARIAS  OF  VINCENZO  BELLINI  THROUGH  THE  
STUDY  AND  PERFORMANCE  OF  THE  COMPOSER’S  ART  SONG  REPERTOIRE  
 
 

by  
James  Loving  Thompson  
 
 
 

An  essay  submitted  in  partial  fulfillment  of  the  requirements  for  the  Doctor  of  Musical  Arts  
degree  in  the  Graduate  College  of  The  University  of  Iowa  
 
 
May  2013  
 
 
Essay  Supervisor:    Professor  John  Muriello

Copyright  by  
 
JAMES  LOVING  THOMPSON  
 
2013  
 
All  Rights  Reserved  
 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

Graduate  College  
The  University  of  Iowa  
Iowa  City,  Iowa  
 
 
CERTIFICATE  OF  APPROVAL  
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 
D.M.A.  ESSAY  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This  is  to  certify  that  the  D.M.A.  essay  of    
 
James  Loving  Thompson  
 
has  been  approved  by  the  Examining  Committee  for  the  essay  requirement  for  the  Doctor  
of  Musical  Arts  degree  at  the  May  2013  graduation.  
 
 
Essay  Committee:        
 
 
 
 
 
John  Muriello,  Essay  Supervisor  
 
 
 
 
                     
 
 
 
 
 
       Susan  Sondrol-­‐Jones  
 
 
 
 
                     
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                       Rachel  Joselson  
 
 
 
               
 
 
                     
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                         Maurita  Mead  
 
 
 
 
                       
 
 
 
 
 
                   Robert  Bork  

For  Maria  
 
 

 

ii  

 
 

 
 

 
 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  
 
I  would  like  to  offer  my  most  sincere  gratitude  to  my  committee:  Dr.  John  Muriello,  

Dr.  Rachel  Joselson,  Dr.  Maurita  Murphy  Mead,  Professor  Susan  Sondrol-­‐Jones,  and  Dr.  
Robert  Bork.    Your  commitment  to  this  project  is  very  much  appreciated.  
 

 A  special  thank  you  goes  out  to  Shari  Rhoads,  who  shares  my  affection  for  Bellini’s  

music  and  with  whom  I  shared  valuable  experiences  both  related  and  unrelated  to  this  
topic.    Additionally,  I  would  like  to  thank  Professor  Arne  Seim,  who  was  integral  in  helping  
me  to  translate  the  aria  from  Zaira.  
 

To  Dr.  Jonathan  Thull:  All  I  can  say  is  thank  you  for  everything.    Over  a  decade  ago,  I  

started  this  journey  as  your  voice  student,  now  I  am  glad  to  call  you  friend.      
I  would  not  be  writing  these  words  without  Dr.  Simon  Estes.    I  simply  cannot  
express  my  gratitude  for  all  you  have  done  for  Maria  and  me.      
 

To  all  my  family,  especially  my  mom  and  dad,  thank  you  for  all  your  support.    I  

would  also  like  to  thank  Grandma  Thompson,  who  was  instrumental  in  fostering  my  love  of  
music.    
 

The  one  who  deserves  the  most  thanks  is  my  beautiful  wife,  Maria.    You  amaze  me  in  

every  way.    You  have  been  by  my  side  for  the  entire  journey,  and  this  is  something  for  
which  I  am  truly  grateful.    I  love  you  so  much.      
 

 

iii  

........................................................59     CHAPTER  8     “SOGNO  D’INFANZIA”  AND  “MECO  ALL’ALTAR  DI  VENERE”  FROM   NORMA………............................................................................................33   “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste”............................11       Bel  canto..........................................................  O  ROSA  FORTUNATA”  AND  “È  SERBATO..............................................................................................32   Coloratura  and  its  use  in  Bellini’s  music.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................vi   LIST  OF  MUSICAL  EXAMPLES......................1       CHAPTER  1     A  BRIEF  OUTLINE  OF  A  BRIEF  LIFE............  defined..................................................................................15     CHAPTER  3     ADELSON  E  SALVINI  “OH!    QUANTE  AMARE  LAGRIME”  EVIDENCE  OF     SELF-­‐BORROWING:  MAKING  THE  CONNECTION  BETWEEN  “OH!    QUANTE  AMARE   LAGRIME”  AND  “PER  TE  DI  VANE  LAGRIME”  FROM  IL  PIRATA.............................................................26     CHAPTER  5     “QUANDO  VERRÀ  QUEL  DÌ”  TO  “TU  VEDRAI  LA  SVENTURATA”  AND     “VAGA  LUNA...…………………………………………………64       iv   .........................................  RENDI  PUR  CONTENTO”     AND  “ALL’UDIR  DEL  PADRE  AFFLITTO”  FROM  BIANCA  E  FERNANDO….................................……………………..............................................................................................................................  PER  CHI  PUGNASTI”  FROM   ZAIRA............19     CHAPTER  4    “MA............…...............vii   INTRODUCTION  ..............................11   Tenore  di  grazia...................................37   CHAPTER  6     “VANNE...............................................................................................  A  QUESTO  ACCIARO”   FROM  I  CAPULETTI  E  I  MONTECCHI  AND  “PER  CHI  MAI.....  CHE  INARGENTI”  TO  “NEL  FUROR  DELLE  TEMPESTE”  FROM     IL  PIRATA...............  CHE  D’AMORE”  AND  “AH!    PERCHÉ  NON  POSSO  ODIARTI”   FROM  LA  SONNAMBULA…….......................................................................................12   Compositional  Elements  of  Style...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................……………...................................................................................................52     CHAPTER  7     “BELLA  NICE................................................................…………………........................................42     Zaira............................................................................................4     CHAPTER  2     INFORMATION  ON  USING  BELLINI’S  SONGS  AS  STEPPING-­‐STONES  TO     HIS  ARIAS  FOR  TENOR………………………………………...................................................................................................................32     Career  Firsts...............................................................................................................         TABLE  OF  CONTENTS     LIST  OF  TABLES...

………………………....…………………………91     BIBLIOGRAPHY…………………………………………………………………………………………………………....94   v   .   CHAPTER  9     “LA  RICORDANZA”  AND  “PER  PIETÀ  BELL’IDOL  MIO”   TO  “A  TE..  SUPPORTED  BY  ANALYSES  OF  AVAILABLE  RECORDINGS……………………………….79     CONCLUSION……………………………………………………………………………………..71     CHAPTER  10    THE  FREQUENCY  AND  THE  FREEDOM  OF  THE  IMPLEMENTATION  OF   RUBATO.  O  CARA”  FROM  I  PURITANI………………………………………………….

.....................  bel  idol  mio”................69   Table  2...............................................................    Recording  analysis  of  “Malinconia.......................    Recording  analysis  of  “Bella  Nice.................................................    Recording  analysis  of  “Vanne..................................91       Table  8...........................96     Table  13.    Recording  analysis  of  “Per  pieta..............92   Table  9....................88   Table  4................    Recording  analysis  of  “Ma.................................................................    Recording  analysis  of  “Torna....  ninfa  gentile”........................         LIST  OF  TABLES       Table  1.............................  rendi  pur  contento”.......................95   Table  12.........................89     Table  5...........    Tessitura  Matrix  for  “Ah!  Perche  non  posso  ordiarti”................................92   Table  10...........96                                       vi   ................90       Table  6............................    Recording  analysis  of  “Dolente  immagine  di  Fille  mia”.91   Table  7...................  che  d’amore”...........................................71       Table  3........................................................    Tessitura  matrix  for  mm..................  34-­‐43  of  “Bella  Nice.....................................................  o  rosa  fortunata”.  vezzosa  Fillide”......    Recording  analysis  of  “Vaga  luna................................................................    Recording  analysis  of  “Sogno  d’infanzia”..............  che  d’amore”............93   Table  11.......................    Recording  analysis  of  “La  ricordanza”............  che  inargenti”............    Recording  analysis  of  “Quando  verra  quel  di”...

............  40-­‐41...……........................    Bellini:  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto”    (Bianca  e  Fernando)  mm......................    Bellini:  “All’udir  del  padre  afllitto”  (Bianca  e  Fernando)  m.....……...    Bellini:  “Ma........42     Example  12.........  1-­‐12…………………………….........51     Example  20..  14.……....35   Example  6..........  15……………...    Bellini:  “Vanne.......  7-­‐11………............48   Example  18.....................  78-­‐79...............    Bellini:  “Ma.    Bellini  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto”  (Bianca  e  Fernando)  m......................    Bellini:  “Quando  verrà  quel  dì”  m.......52         vii   ........    Bellini:    “Oh!    Quante  amare  lagrime”  (Adelson  e  Salvini)  mm...............................    Bellini:  “All’udir  del  padre  afllitto”  (Bianca  e  Fernando)  m...............................35   Example  5......46   Example  17....    Bellini:    “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste  (Il  Pirata)  mm.…...........    Bellini:  “Ma..  5-­‐7……………………………………………..............  1-­‐4...   LIST  OF  MUSICAL  EXAMPLES       Example  1........    Bellini:    “Tu  vedrai  la  sventurata”  (Il  Pirata)  mm..  22...  rendi  pur  contento”  mm..45     Example  15....................  43-­‐50...    Bellini:    “Per  te  di  vane  lagrime”  (Il  Pirata)  mm.................    Bellini:  “La  ricordanza”  mm...............30   Example  3.........  19...........…........  24………………………………………...  che  inargenti”  mm.............……36   Example  7........................................................……37   Example  9.31   Example  4...49   Example  19..............  19-­‐21.45   Example  14........    Bellini:  “Quando  verrà  quel  dì”m......  o  rosa  fortunata”  mm............................  30………….…........  67-­‐69…………………………………………………………...    Bellini:  “Quando  verrà  quel  dì”  m........……..........………37     Example  8..    Bellini:  “È  serbato.  1-­‐10......  rendi  pur  contento”  m........  a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi)  mm.    Bellini:  “Vaga  luna.......42   Example  13....  21………………………………………………….....  7....46     Example  16...............  rendi  pur  contento”  m..39     Example  11.......  1-­‐12………….29   Example  2...................  25......    Bellini:  “Nel  furor  delle  tempese”  (Il  Pirata)  mm................    Bellini:  “Tu  vedrai  la  sventurata”  (Il  Pirata)  m.......…………39   Example  10.......

.    Bellini:  “A  te...........  13-­‐14...  18-­‐20..............................  25-­‐26..........58   Example  24..  delle  tempeste”  (Il  Pirata)  mm...  4-­‐9...74   Example  31..    Bellini:  “È  serbato  a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi)  mm........................  22-­‐23.......  47-­‐48.........................82   Example  38...............................    Bellini:  “Vanne..  20-­‐21...............  31-­‐32....  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm..  o  rosa  fortunata”  mm.............    Bellini:  “È  serbato  a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi)  mm..........................         Example  21.  7..............  68-­‐69.    Bellini:  “È  serbato  a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi)  m................  per  chi  pugnasti”  (Zaira)  mm......    “Ah!  Perché  non  posso  odiarti”  (La  sonnambla)  mm.........  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm........    Bellini:  “Vanne....................................81     Example  37...............................................................85     Example  41................................    “A  te...................    5-­‐6.........    Bellini:  “A  te.......................................  “È  serbato.  126-­‐130..............................................    Bellini:  “A  te..86     Example  42....86   viii   .55   Example  22.........................74   Example  30........    Bellini:  “Per  chi  mai..............................  12-­‐15..    “Meco  all'altar  di  Venere”  (Norma)  m.......................    Bellini:  “La  ricordanza”  mm....................83     Example  39.....................59   Example  25.....    Bellini:  “Per  pietà......81   Example  36..  bell'idol  mio”  mm.........................................1-­‐2......    Bellini:  “La  ricordanza”  mm...84     Example  40...........................1-­‐2...................................................................76     Example  34.......  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  m................1-­‐2................    Bellini:  “A  te.  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm................  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm.............................................    “Sogno  d’infanzia”  mm.................................................................................73   Example  28..............56   Example  23.............63-­‐66   Example  27.    “Per  chi  mai.........................75     Example  33...................  1-­‐26......74   Example  29...................................................  8-­‐9....    “Oh!    Quante  amare  lagrime”  (Adelson  e  Salvini)  mm..................................  a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuletti  e  i  Montecchi)  mm...  27..........................................................................  8-­‐9.....................    “Nel  furor..77   Example  35.....  o  rosa  fortunata”  mm.....  9.59   Example  26........  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm.....................75     Example  32...........  7-­‐8...........  per  chi  pugnasti”  (Zaira)  mm...........    Bellini:  “A  te....

.............................95             ix   ..................94   Example  46........    Bellini:  “La  ricordanza”  m........  33.......    Bellini:  “Vanne..89     Example  44........93   Example  45.....  di  Fille  mia”  m........................    Bellini:    “Dolente  immagine........................    Bellini:  “Vaga  luna...................           Example  43...................  o  rosa  fortunata”  mm..........  15.  36............  1-­‐5...............................................................................  che  inargenti”  m........................................

 but  are  not  limited  to.    Milano:  Ricordi.  in  her  1992  doctoral  dissertation.  2004).  2004.  in  which  he  endorses  Battaglia’s   statement.  Soo  Yeon.   Bellini.  editor  of  the  Bellini  song  collection  Canzoni  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte   (Ricordi.”2   There  is  clearly  agreement  that  Bellini’s  songs  provide  the  singer  an  introduction  to   his  operatic  arias.  Soo  Yeon.      Outlining  the  elements  that  support  these  assertions   is  the  task  of  this  doctoral  essay.  “Singing  and  learning  these  songs  can  also  be  excellent   preparation  for  the  study  and  performance  of  Bellini  operatic  roles.    (DMA  thesis.  Bellini.    There  are.    This  essay  will  use  Battaglia’s                                                                                                                   1  Bellini.  p.  65.    (DMA  thesis.     These  include.    Canzoni  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte.  Vincenzo.  technically  challenging  melodic  material.1    Soo  Yeon  Kim.  1992).  they  [the  songs]  provide  the  student  with  a  valid   preliminary  background  for  understanding  Bellini’s  operas…”  This  song  collection  also   features  a  forward  from  Dietrich  Fischer-­‐Dieskau.  however.  vocal  ornamentation.  and  Donizetti.  in  which  he  outlines  aspects  of  each  piece  that  warrant  particular  attention.       Prefacing  each  song  in  the  Canzone  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte  is  commentary  from   Battaglia.  writes.  and  text  declamation.   University  of  Illinois  at  Urbana-­‐Champaign.  The  Chamber  Songs  of  Rossini.  states  in  the  preface  “When  studied  and  thoroughly  explored  in  close   collaboration  with  one’s  teacher.          2  Kim.  and  Donizetti.  no  extensive  comparisons  of  Bellini’s  songs  and   arias  that  substantiate  these  claims.    The  Chamber  Songs  of  Rossini.  difficult   intervallic  leaps.  and  Donizetti.   1   INTRODUCTION       Elio  Battaglia.           .  Bellini.    The  Chamber  Songs  of  Rossini.   2  Kim.

 only  the  songs  that  feature  “male”  text  were  selected  for  further   comparison  to  the  arias.       While  relatively  few  in  number.    Further  still.  Bellini’s  “Romaze  da  camera”  provide  an  insightful   glimpse  to  his  arias  for  tenor.  p.    Of  these.    By  means  of  thoughtful  score  study  and   analyses.             .   2   art  song  commentary  as  a  starting  point  for  the  study  of  Bellini’s  operatic  arias  for  the   tenor  voice.  there  is  no  literature  that  specifically  addresses  the  art  songs  in  detail.    Sometimes.   these  songs  should  be  regarded  as  serious  pedagogical  resources.         As  such.   pedagogical  connections  are  made  through  exploration  of  vocal  technique.   explore  the  reasons  why  these  songs  cultivate  proficiency  in  a  particular  aria.       There  are  24  Bellinian  art  songs  that  are  readily  available  for  study  and   performance.  and  so  compositional  elements  of  style   between  the  genres  are  shared.    Canzoni  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte.  10.3    An  added  benefit  of  this   essay  is  that  to  date.    A  significant  reason  for  this  is  that  Bellini  composed  many  of   the  art  songs  simultaneously  with  his  operas.  the  reader  will  note  that  throughout  this  essay.  Bellini  was  intentional  in  his  song   composition  in  that  the  songs  were  often  composed  as  sketches  for  his  arias.    Therefore.    The  rationale  for  this  is  centered  in  the  attempt  to  show  the                                                                                                                   3    Bellini.       The  methodology  for  this  essay  is  to  pair  selected  Bellinian  operatic  tenor  arias  with   at  least  one  of  the  composer’s  art  songs.  sometimes  the  best  possible   pedagogical  connection  between  song  and  aria  is  made  by  textual  comparison.    (Milano:  Ricordi.  using  Battaglia’s  commentary  as  a  guide.  pedagogical  recommendations.  Vincenzo.  2004).  and  occasionally.  both  of  these.  and.  I  made  these  decisions  based  on  the  most  direct  and  applicable  similarities   between  song  and  aria.    Additionally.    Battaglia’s   commentary  addresses  text.   both  text  and  vocal  technique  are  referenced.

      Moreover.  and  these  subsequent  pages  highlight  a  finite  number  of   possible  methods.   3   closest  possible  connections  between  art  song  and  tenor  aria.  the  performance  concepts  that  are  outlined  in  this  document  occur  in   situations  in  addition  to  the  specific  cited  examples.    The  final   song  selections  and  their  corresponding  arias  were  made  at  my  discretion.       The  reader  should  note  that  there  are  numerous  methods  by  which  the  songs  and   the  arias  can  be  compared.   thereby  encouraging  the  reader  to  likewise  draw  additional  pedagogical  connections  that   can  assist  in  the  teaching  and  performance  of  these  pieces.    It  is  my  hope  that  this  essay  facilitates  additional  interest  in  this  subject.    As  a  result.    These  remaining  “male”   songs  underwent  supplemental  analyses.                                                 .  the  reader  is  encouraged   to  apply  the  ideas  and  concepts  of  the  featured  material  to  all  of  Bellini’s  art  songs  and   arias.  and  the  songs  that  displayed  the  closest   similarities  to  the  operatic  arias  were  ultimately  selected  for  use  in  this  essay.

 Bellini’s  compositions.  and  that  by  five  years  old  he  was  a  masterful  pianist.  were  often  performed  locally.  Vincenzo.  It  was  reported.  Vincenzo  Tobia.   During  his  youth.oxfordmusiconline.  mostly  sacred.         .  He  was  the  first   of  seven  children  born  to  Rosario  Bellini  (1776–1840)  and  Agata  Ferlito  (1779–1842).   however.   The  manuscript  also  claims  that  a  three-­‐year-­‐old  Bellini  was  able  to  conduct  his   grandfather’s  church  service.  2011.  www.   accessed  28  July.  Bellini  sang  an  aria  without  having  formal  vocal  or  musical  training.5         Under  the  tutelage  of  his  grandfather  Vincenzo  Tobia.  Bellini  wrote  his  first   composition  at  six  years  old.  “Bellini.  that  his  career  did  not  reach  the  level  of  success  and  popularity  as  that  of  his   father.  as  his  grandfather.com.  A  manuscript  written  by  an  unknown  source  reveals  that  at   eighteen  months  old.    The   Bellini  family  had  strong  musical  roots.”    Grove  Music  Online.  Vincenzo  Tobia  Bellini  (1744– 1829)  was  a  student  at  the  Conservatorio  di  S  Onofrio  a  Capuana  in  Naples  and  later   maintained  a  successful  career  as  an  accomplished  organist.  it  is                                                                                                                   4  Mary  Ann  Smart.  and  became  a  formal  student  of  composition  at  age  seven.  composer.     5  Ibid.4     Much  of  the  information  available  about  Vincenzo  Bellini’s  youth  is  found  at  the   Museo  Belliniano  in  Catania.    Rosario  Bellini  was  a  maestro  di  cappella  and  music  educator.   4   CHAPTER  1:   A  BRIEF  OUTLINE  OF  A  BRIEF  LIFE       Vincenzo  Bellini  was  born  in  Catania  on  the  island  of  Sicily  in  1801.   Although  Bellini  was  not  regarded  as  a  literary  scholar  or  an  accomplished  academic.  and  teacher  of   music.

8     Upon  graduation  in  1825.  all  male  cast  also  presented  the  three  female   roles.    The  original.  and  may  have   had  an  impact  on  his  mature  melodic  compositional  style.  6     In  1819.  with  whom  he  studied  the  theoretical  aspects  of  singing.  counterpoint.  and  impressed  the  faculty  at  the  conservatory.     He  studied  traditional  curriculum  for  several  years  with  Giovanni  Furno  and  Giacomo  Tritt.  which  include  a  soprano  and  two  mezzo-­‐sopranos.    The  work  gained  enough                                                                                                                   6  Ibid.  which  uses   straightforward  texts  and  simple  melodies.  The  conservatory  rejected  the  modern   compositions  of  local  contemporaries  like  Rossini.   In  1822.         7  Ibid.  which  included  classic  and   modern  languages.  but  sadly  none  of  them  survive   today.  whose  works  were  being  performed  in   Neapolitan  theaters  at  the  time.  however.    The  work  that  emerged  was  Adelson  e  Salvini.  and  regularly  attended  Neapolitan  performances  of  Rossini’s   works.    Hundreds  of  these  wordless  exercises  were  completed.  Niccolò  Zingarelli  began  teaching  Bellini  harmony.  Bellini  accepted  and  practiced  the  conservative  Neapolitan   style.  Bellini  was  awarded  the  opportunity  to  present  an  opera   for  the  school’s  teatrino.         8  Ibid.  Bellini  earned  a  scholarship  to  attend  the  Real  Collegio  di  Musica  in  Naples.  and  philosophy.7     The  Real  Collegio  di  Musica  emphasized  Neapolitan-­‐style  composition.  presented  by   students  of  the  conservatory.  Italian  literature.         .   5   reported  that  he  received  an  intense  and  liberal  education.  Bellini  remained  interested  in   Rossini’s  work.  and  methods  of   composing  solfeggi.    Bellini’s  keen  ability  for  crafting  melodic  material  was  cultivated  by  Girolamo   Crescentini.

    11  Ibid.  Simon  and  Forbes.     The  opera  had  to  be  given  under  the  name  of  Bianca  e  Gernando  due  to  the  death  of  King   Ferdinand  I  of  Naples.    Bellini  was  not  the   theater’s  first  choice  of  composer.    The  operas  that  featured  both  Romani  and   Rubini  were  unquestionably  Bellini’s  most  popular  and  so  they  remain  today.  and  so  his  attention  was  fixed   upon  securing  commissions  from  more  prominent  organizations.”    Grove  Music  Online.  and  Giovanni  Rubini.    “Zaira.  La  straniera.     Bellini  himself  was  pleased  enough  with  the  opera  that  he  gave  it  several  revisions  in   subsequent  years.    He  followed  this  success  with  the  May  1829  failure  of  Zaira  at  the  Teatro  Ducale   in  Parma.9     May  1826  saw  the  success  of  Bianca  e  Fernando  at  the  Teatro  San  Carlos  in  Naples.  the  resident  librettist  at  La  Scala.oxfordmusiconline.    Like  Adelson  e  Salvini.  2012.   www.  2009).   2.  although  it  never  received  a  professional  performance  until  1992.   one  of  the  most  acclaimed  tenors  of  the  day.  Vincenzo  Bellini:  A  Guide  to  Research(Florence.         The  success  of  Bellini’s  first  two  operas  led  to  a  commission  from  La  Scala  in  Milan.  Bianca  e  Fernando  underwent  revisions  in   subsequent  years.  accessed  3  September.   6   popularity  that  it  was  performed  on  successive  Sundays.    Zaira  was  the  inaugural  performance  at  the  Teatro  Ducale.  KY:  Routledge.com.11      1829  also  witnessed                                                                                                                   9  Willier.   the  result  of  which  was  Il  Pirata.  Bellini’s  next  opera.  though  it  is  not  clear  how  many.  was  a  success  at   La  Scala.     .    This  opera  marked  the  first  opera  that  included   collaboration  with  Felice  Romani.         10  Maguire.10    Also  contributing  to  his  lack  of  interest  was  the  fact  that  Bellini   had  recently  triumphed  at  the  more  prestigious  La  Scala.  and  knowledge  of  this  may  have  contributed  to  his  lack   of  interest  in  the  project.  Elizabeth.  Stephen  Ace.         Following  on  the  heels  of  Il  Pirata.

 3.     .         March  1833  was  the  debut  and  failure  of  Beatrice  di  Tenda.com.     Bellini  rebounded  from  the  failure  of  Zaira  with  the  success  of  I  Capuleti  e  i   Montecchi  at  La  Fenice  in  Venice.  proving  that  the  unpopular  debut  of  the  opera  was  not  a  true  indication  of  the   worth  of  the  opera  as  a  whole.   accessed  12  March.”    Grove  Music  Online.  this  is  a  testament  to  Bellini’s  innovative  aesthetics.    Late  December  of  1831  was  the   premier  of  Norma.         14  Maguire.  accessed  3  September.    “Norma.  2012.  Nicolai.  reinforcing  Bellini’s   reputation  of  being  a  slow  worker.   www.    The  piece  was  behind  schedule  in  its  premier.  which  by  Bellini’s  own  admission  was  a  “Fiasco.     13  Ibid.”    Grove  Music  Online.    Romani  must  shoulder  some  blame  for  the  seemingly                                                                                                                   12  Julian  Budden.    The  act  ends  with  a  trio  instead  of  a  larger  and  more  complex  ensemble.  Elizabeth.        In  March  1831.com.oxfordmusiconline.  solenne  fiasco!”13     The  inauspicious  debut  of  the  opera  was  due  in  part  to  the  progressive  formal  structure  of   the  Act  I  finale.  fiasco.      Rather.oxfordmusiconline.  2012.  La  sonnambula  saw  the  return  of  Giovanni  Rubini.14    Norma  has  since  become  one  of  Bellini’s  most  beloved   operas.  www.  performed  at  Venice’s  La   Fenice  opera  house.    The  opera   achieved  positive  reception  at  the  Teatro  Carcano  in  Milan.  the  three  operas  of   1829-­‐1830  were  well-­‐received.   7   the  publication  of  Sei  ariette  by  the  Milanese  publisher  Ricordi.   which  were  recognized  after  his  death.  and  established  Bellini  as  one  of  the  premier  Italian   composers  of  the  time.   which  was  conventional  of  the  era.  Sei  ariette  is  the  largest   collected  set  of  art  songs  that  the  composer  ever  produced.  the  libretto  of  which  had  already  been  set  to  Nicolai   Vaccai’s  1825  opera  Giulietta  e  Romeo.  Simon  and  Forbes.12    With  the  exception  of  Zaira.    “Vaccai.

 but  had  the  faithful  services  of   Rubini.  which  was  not  unusual  because  the  librettist  worked  through  numerous  drafts  and   revisions  of  his  libretti.    Work  on  I  Puritani  commenced  in  1834  and  the  opera  was  heard  for  the  first  time   in  January  1835.    Romani  was  late  in  getting  the  libretto  to   Bellini.    The  ensuing  meeting  between   Bellini  and  representatives  from  the  Opéra  was  the  first  in  a  series  of  unsuccessful   negotiations  that  occurred  between  1833  and  Bellini’s  death  in  1835.  “Le  souvenir                                                                                                                   15  Smart.  as  a  settlement  was  never  reached.  6.    Among  other  factors.    New  beginnings  in  Paris  and   the  new  commission  prompted  Bellini  to  begin  work  on  I  Puritani.  Stephen  Ace.  which  ultimately  ended  in  the  splitting  of  their  partnership.           16  Willier.   Bellini  demanded  a  fee  equal  to  Rossini’s  current  earnings.  Bellini  received  a  commission  from  the  Théâtre-­‐Italien.  KY:  Routledge.           .  first  stopping  in  Paris.  Norma.    “In  Praise  of  Convention:  Formula  and  Experiment  in  Bellini’s  Self-­‐ Borrowings.         17  Ibid.  Bellini  left  London  and  returned  to  Paris  after  having  conducted  Il   Pirata.    It  seems  that  Bellini’s  demands   were  cost  prohibitive.16      In   Paris.  Mary  Ann.  Vincenzo  Bellini:  A  Guide  to  Research(Florence.  and  was  a  sensation.    No  doubt  suffering.17         In  August  of  1835  Bellini  relapsed  with  a  bout  of  amoebic  dysentery  that  had   plagued  him  in  1830.   8   lethargic  pace  of  Bellini’s  compositional  output.  5.  in   hopes  of  securing  a  commission  from  the  Paris  Opéra.     In  April  1833.”    Journal  of  the  American  Musicological  Society  100/1  (Spring  2000):  25-­‐68.  Bellini  had  a   new  librettist  in  Italian  expatriate  Count  Carlo  Pepoli.15    Composer  and  librettist  blamed  one  another  for  the  tardy  debut   and  failure  of  Beatrice  di  Tenda.  Bellini  left  Italy  and  headed  to  London.   2009).  and  I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi  to  moderate  success  at  the  King’s  Theater.         In  August  1833.    This  time.  Bellini  composed  his  final  art  song.

  He  succumbed  to  dysentery.  KY:  Routledge.  1835.    Upon  examination  of  the  text  setting.    (Milan:  Ricordi.  the  effects  of  which  were  aggravated  by  an  abscess  liver.  one  realizes   Bellini’s  deficiencies  of  the  French  language.  which  reads  après  tous  ceux  qu'on  a  perdu  (after  all  those  we  have  lost).  in  an  attempt  to  embrace  the  French  culture  and  learn  the  language.  2004).   2009).    In  the   final  line  of  text.    Moreover.    Bellini’s  remains  were  interred  at  the  Père-­‐Lachaise  cemetery  in                                                                                                                   18  Bellini.  the  brevity   of  his  life  matched  by  the  brevity  of  the  final  piece.   9   présent  celeste.  when  they  are  arguably  best  suited  for  “weak”  beat  pick-­‐up  notes.  Vincenzo.     The  final  vocal  composition  is  only  25  measures  of  music  and  four  lines  of  text.  who  also  negotiated  the  return  of  Bellini’s  personal  items  to   his  family  in  Catania.  Stephen  Ace.  France.       .  Vincenzo  Bellini:  A  Guide  to  Research  (Florence.  and   quintessentially  Bellini.  112.19    He   was  given  a  Requiem  Mass  on  October  2.    For  example.  1835  in  Puteaux.         Bellini  died  on  September  23.     Alas.  as   this  word  combined  with  the  climactic  moment  would  offer  an  abundance  of  dramatic   opportunities  to  enhance  performance.  a  city  just  outside  of  Paris.”  on  August  16.  however.    Among   the  pallbearers  was  Rossini.     The  melodic  and  harmonic  content  is  characteristically  Italianate.18    Bellini  used  an  anonymous  French  text  for  his  final   vocal  composition.  in  singing  a  word  with  the  significance   of  perdu.  words  such  as  “et”  (and)  occur   on  strong  beats.   Bellini  chooses  to  set  the  top  note  (A4)  on  a  relatively  less  significant  word  a  (have).  6.     19  Willier.    Canzoni  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte.  his  skills  with  French  reportedly  left  much  to  be  desired.  the  tenor  would  have  the  opportunity  to  experiment  with  varying  vocal  colors.  with  Rubini  serving  among  the  cantors.     Perhaps  it  would  have  been  more  suitable  to  set  the  word  perdu  (lost)  on  the  top  note.

   Also  in  Catania  is  the  Teatro   Massimo  Bellini.  Bellini’s  childhood  home  is  the  site  of  a  museum  that  is  devoted  to  upholding   the  composer’s  legacy.  where  they  remained  for  41  years.  20       Today.   10   Paris.    Many  important  relics  from  Bellini’s  life  are  now  housed  there.     .  until  French  and  Italian  officials  negotiated   Bellini’s  return  to  the  Cathedral  in  Catania.   including  keyboards  and  original  manuscripts  of  his  works.  which  stages  Bellinian  operas  as  well  as  operas  from  other  composers  and   genres.                                                                                                                                                                                   20  Ibid.  6.

          22  Ibid.  portamento.  these  interactions  allow  the  singer  to  develop  versatility  with   various  techniques  and  styles.     Bellini  epitomizes  bel  canto.  and  glottal  articulation.  and   pleasing  vibrato.   vocal  ornamentation.  including  legato.  defined   Bellini  is  regarded  as  a  master  of  the  Italian  bel  canto  style.   the  vocal  tract.    When  translated  to  English.  James.  the  term  bel  canto  will  be  used  to  explain  a   vocal  technique.   smooth  melodic  material  in  his  arias.  dynamic  variance.”    Throughout  this  document.    Moreover.    In  addition.  crafting  long.21    These  elements  combine  in  such  a  way  that   the  singer  is  able  to  produce  evenness  of  register.    As  bel  canto  relates  specifically  to  the  delivery  of  Bellini’s  vocal  music.  floridity.  which  requires  the  singer  to  produce  perfect  legato   throughout  the  whole  of  the  range.  section  7.   11   CHAPTER  2   INFORMATION  ON  USING  BELLINI’S  SONGS  AS  STEPPING-­‐STONES  TO  HIS  ARIAS  FOR   TENOR         Bel  canto.  author  of  Bel  Canto:  A  History  of  Vocal   Pedagogy.  bel  canto  singers  must  produce  a  top                                                                                                                   21  Stark.    Bel  Canto:  A  History  of  Vocal  Pedagogy  (Toronto:  University  of  Toronto   Press.  and  a  genre  of  music  that  was  born  out  of  early  nineteenth-­‐ century  Italy.    Stark  explains  that  bel  canto  vocal  production  is  the  interaction  of  the  glottis.  florid.  a  musical  style.  and  the  respiratory  system.  2003).22       These  attributes  of  vocal  composition  are  prevalent  in  both  the  art  songs  and  arias.  the  term  bel  canto  means   “beautiful  singing.       .  flexibility  of  pitch  and  intensity.  section  7.  the   term  is  perhaps  best  defined  by  James  Stark.

 1969).    (New  York:  Schirmer.   12   register  that  is  focused  and  resonant.  styles.  they  must  have  a  flexible  and  agile  voice.   www.24     Tenore  di  grazia   The  components  of  Bellini’s  art  songs  and  arias  require  the  tenor  to  fuse  vocal   lyricism  and  agility  into  a  “hybrid”  tenor.  accessed  12  March.  87.  when  vocal  compositions  of  the  day  demanded  increasingly  dramatic  voices.  Richard.    The  term  was  coined  retrospectively  circa   1860.  and  yet  is  simultaneously  virile  and  resonant.23         Mastering  the  bel  canto  aspects  of  vocal  performance  ensures  versatility  in  the  voice  and   will  ensure  that  the  singer  is  prepared  to  study  vocal  repertoire  from  not  only  the  bel  canto   period.  1993).”  in  Grove  Music  Online.         24  Franzone.  and  languages.  9.     27  Ibid.26   The  repertoire  of  the  tenore  di  grazia  consists  of  melodic  material  rich  in  coloratura   passages  and  vocal  ornamentations.  Columbia  University.  vocal  grace  and  flexibility  are  required  of   him  more  than  any  other  type  of  tenor.  elegant.  Margaret  Smith.  2012.25     The  term  tenore  di  grazia  (synonymous  with  tenore  leggiero)  is  a  specific  fach  most   closely  associated  with  the  bel  canto  genre.  2.oxfordmusiconline.27      These  vocal  traits  are  a  necessity  for  the  ideal                                                                                                                   23  Owen  Jander  and  Ellen  T.       .  “Bel  Canto.  9.  Harris.       25  Miller.  106.  and   warm..D  diss.  “The  Revival  of  Bel  Canto  and  its  Relevance  to  Contemporary   Teaching  and  Performance.com.    The   term  tenore  di  grazia  is  used  to  describe  a  tenor  whose  voice  is  graceful.    As  a  result.      Finally.  agile.  but  also  repertoire  from  other  genres.  typically  classified  as  the  tenore  di  grazia.”  (Ph.     26  Ibid.    Training  Tenor  Voices.

 and  vital.com.                                                                                                                       28  J.  while  the  lyric  tenor’s  repertoire  has  comparatively   little.     32  Ibid.  Steane.  10-­‐11.28    There  are.”  in  Grove  Music  Online.  “Lyric  Tenor.  and  Bellini  roles.    The  timbre  of  the  tenore  di  grazia  is  distinguished  by  morbidezza  (sweetness).  accessed   15  July.  several   key  differences  between  the  two  fachs:     l.  however.  11.    Training  Tenor  Voices.  the  tenore  di  grazia   has  repertoire  that  is  rich  in  coloratura.    Because  of  his  increased  vocal  weight  and  dramatic  qualities.  including  Tamino.  while  the  tenore  di  grazia  typically  sings  lighter   Mozart.    The  passaggi  points  for  the  tenore  di  grazia  are  between  E♭4  and  A♭4  and  the   passaggi  points  for  the  lyric  tenor  are  D4  and  G4.         30  Miller.       3.  www.  10-­‐11.  Richard.30    This  supports  the  assertion  that  the  lyric   tenor  possesses  a  heavier  voice  than  does  the  tenore  di  grazia.  and  Rodolfo  (La  Bohème).  Rossini.  Alfredo  (La   Traviata).32    As  previously  mentioned.29       2.    (New  York:  Schirmer.     .B.   13   Bellinian  tenor.  2011.  the  lyric  tenor   performs  “standard”  operatic  literature.  1993).       31  Ibid.oxfordmusiconline.  as  much  of  the  repertoire  consists  of  material  that  requires  agility  and   flexibility  of  onsets.31   4.   The  lyric  tenor  and  the  tenore  di  grazia  are  related  voice  classifications  in  that  both   of  the  fachs  must  produce  evenness  of  tone  and  melodic  line.  exciting.    The  tenore  di  grazia  possesses  a  lighter  instrument  than  the  lyric  tenor.  (Die  Zauberflöte).  Donizetti.   while  the  timbre  of  the  lyric  tenor  is  warm.         29  Ibid.

 and  a  voice  of   substantial  size.    Still.  www.”  (Ph.  the   evidence  of  which  is  ascertained  by  the  top  F5  from  I  Puritani.  or  comic  characters  (Basilio.33    Bellini’s  tenors  are  the  romantic  leading  characters.  (1979)..”  in  Grove  Music  Online.  31.    In  addition.D  diss.     Rubini  also  possessed  an  upper  range  extension  unsurpassed  by  any  tenor  of  the  day.  “The  Operas  of  Vincenzo  Bellini.   accessed  9  September.  operatic   orchestration  became  denser  during  the  bel  canto  era.    His  voice  was  no   doubt  agile  and  flexible  –  we  know  this  to  be  true  due  to  the  nature  of  each  composition.    His  voice  was  described  as   beautiful  and  romantic.  the  tenor  could  not  sacrifice  agility  and  flexibility.  David.    “Tenor.    For  this  reason.  the  King  of  Tenors’.  As  a  result.  326–9     35  Greenspan.  Opera.  we  understand   Rubini’s  voice  to  embody  Bellini’s  desired  qualities  of  a  bel  canto  tenor.34     Bellini’s  operatic  tenors  are  described  as  the  impulsive.  the  typical  operatic                                                                                                                   33  Fallows.  and  the  tenor  needed  to  be  able  to   contend  with  it.  Charlotte  Joyce.       Bellini’s  favorite  and  most  loyal  tenor  was  Giovanni  Battista  Rubini.  1977).    Mozart’s   domination  of  late  eighteenth-­‐century  Italian  opera  saw  his  tenors  as  either  distinctly   secondary.  et  al.  University  of   California  at  Berkeley.oxfordmusiconline.  and  warmth  is  needed  for  these  roles.  the   tenore  di  grazia  became  a  necessary  voice  quality  for  Bellini’s  tenors.  Brewer:  ‘Rubini.  Le   nozze  di  Figaro).           .com.   14   The  emergence  of  the  tenore  di  grazia  happened  out  of  necessity.  but  the  true  testament  to  his  artistry  is  his  reported  expressivity  in   phrasing.35  Apart  from  Bellini’s  tenors.    Rubini  created   the  tenor  role  in  four  of  Bellini’s  ten  mature  operas.  as  in  the  case  of  Don  Ottavio  (Don  Giovanni).  resonance.  2012.  strong-­‐willed  characters   that  we  now  associate  with  Verdi  tenors.         34  B.

 the  Bellinian  tenor  must  possess  the  ability  to  heighten  the   vocal  intensity  in  order  to  convey  the  drama.       Compositional  Elements  of  Style     One  of  the  most  distinguishing  features  of  Bellinian  vocal  music  is  the  quality  of  his   melodic  material.   a  well-­‐trained  mechanism  translates  to  the  tenor’s  ability  to  access  at  least  C5.    In  addition.         37  Ibid.  the  tenor  must  be  in   command  of  a  well-­‐trained  and  advanced  vocal  mechanism.  This  lyric  quality  of  the  tenore  di  grazia   allows  the  singer  to  convey  the  dramatic  intensities.  the  characteristic  of   vocal  flexibility  allows  for  the  singer  to  negotiate  the  coloratura  and  ornamentations  that   are  found  in  both  the  art  songs  and  arias.  the  use  of  rubato.           In  order  to  achieve  an  optimal  performance  of  a  Bellini  opera.  the   singer  is  at  an  immediate  disadvantage  when  attempting  to  prepare  a  role.    Richard  Wagner  noted  this                                                                                                                   36  Ibid.    Additionally.           .    From  a  technical  perspective.   15   tenor  character  of  the  era  was  gentle  and  sensitive.  31.  and  he  must  have  the  ability  to  sustain  a   high  tessitura.   he  must  deliver  articulate  yet  smooth  coloratura.  and  text   declamation  must  be  addressed  in  preparation  for  undertaking  any  of  Bellini’s  tenor  roles.36    Because  of  the  dramatic  dispositions   of  Bellini’s  operatic  tenors.    Bellini  was  a  master  at  composing  melodies.  31.37.     Without  adequate  exposure  to  these  definitively  Bellinian  performance  elements.  elements  of  style  such  as  phrasing.    Additionally.

 which  aligns   structurally  to  numerous  art  songs.  Bellini  uses  the  standard  ternary  form.   27.  including  “Ma.38     Bellini  did  not  transfer  his  art  song  melodies  directly  to  his  tenor  arias.    Vol.        Understanding  the  relationship  between  formal   structure  and  the  manner  of  vocal  delivery  is  an  integral  component  of  a  proficient   performance.    Bellini  employs  strophic  structure  in  both   his  art  songs  and  his  arias.    Among  his  most  basic  is  the  strophic  form.  Richard.  rendi  pur  contento.  a  questo   acciaro”  from  I  Capuleti  e  I  Montecchi.         It  is  reasonable  to  conclude  that  Bellini  used  specific  formal  structures  to  satisfy  the   dramatic  intentions  of  a  piece  or  an  aria.”    Moreover.    The   structures  of  the  two  vocal  genres  also  share  common  bonds.  vezzosa  Fillide”  and  the  aria  “Meco  all'altar  di  Venere”  from   Norma.  and  published  periodical  articles  that  commented  on  Bellini’s   knack  for  crafting  universally  pleasing  melodies.  Bellini   composed  both  art  songs  and  arias  that  included  multiple  developmental  sections.  1886).  as  is   used  in  “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste”  from  Il  Pirata.  No.”    The  Musical  Times  and  Singing  Class  Circular.  66-­‐68     .”      In  the  case  of  other  arias  such  as  “È  serbato.    Perhaps  the  most  famous  example  of  a  Bellinian  strophic  art   song  is  “Vaga  luna.  which   range  from  varying  vocal  timbre  to  convey  the  text  of  each  strophe.    Each  form  poses  challenges  for  the  singer.    There  are   other  similarities  between  the  arias  and  art  songs  in  addition  to  the  melodic  content.  516  (Feb.    “Wagner  on  Bellini.  pp.  to  possessing  the   ability  to  negotiate  several  layers  of  dramatic  intent.                                                                                                                       38  Wagner.  as  is  the  case  with  pieces  that  contain   multiple  sections  of  development.    Bellini  composed  his  tenor   arias  using  a  variety  of  formal  structures.  as  is  the   case  with  the  art  song  “Torna.  che  inargenti.   16   feature  of  Bellini’s  music.  1.

        As  in  the  case  of  “La  ricordanza.    “Credeasi.    As  such.  Training  Tenor  Voices  (New  York:  Schirmer.  each  climb  to  D5.  misera”  from  I  Puritani.  and  so  there  is  extreme  value  in  its  study.  It   is  still  possible.         While  still  vocally  demanding.  the  method  used  to  access  B♭4.    Many  of  the  arias  reach  C5.  found  in  the  art  song  “La  ricordanza.”  is  largely  the  same  method  of  production  used  to  access  all  of  the  notes                                                                                                                   39  Miller.  the  A4  is  the  pitch  that  is   responsible  for  the  transition  out  of  the  passaggio.  to  develop  the  technical  strategy  needed  to  reach  upper   range  notes  of  the  arias.  “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste”  and  “Per  te  di  Vane   lagrime.  “A   te.  or  the  midway  region  between  the  chest  (voce  di  petto)  and  the  head   voice  (voce  di  testa).  lies  between  E♭4  and  A♭4.     .   17     A  tenor  who  uses  Bellini’s  art  songs  as  a  means  of  training  his  voice  to  undertake  the   operatic  repertoire  will  develop  all  of  the  stylistic  and  dramatic  tools  necessary  for  optimal   performance.”  the  B♭4  is  an  indicator  of  how  a  tenor  is  able  to   access  the  upper  range.  which  puts  the  B♭4  as  fully  within  the   spectrum  of  upper  range  vocal  production.”  both  from  Il  Pirata.  Richard.  9.  found   in  “La  ricordanza.    Bellini’s  arias  for  tenor  require  the  singer  to  sustain  a  high  tessitura  and  to   ascend  to  the  extreme  upper  range  of  the  voice  classification.  which  is  not  an   extractable  aria  and  therefore  lies  outside  of  the  spectrum  of  this  document.  using  the  art  songs.  1993).   the  zona  di  passaggio.  the  art  song  repertory  reaches  a  maximum  upper   pitch  of  B♭4.  o  cara”  from  I  Puritani  reaches  C♯5.  is  nonetheless   notable  as  it  demands  the  note  F5.  and  “Oh!    Quante  amare  lagrime”  from   Adelson  e  Salvini  ascends  to  E5.”    Several  other  art  songs  ascend  to  A4.  as  the  technique  required  to  achieve  A4  and  beyond  is  largely  the   same.    For  the  tenore  di  grazia.39    Therefore.  but  one  major  difference  between  the  two  vocal  genres  lies  in  the  aspect  of   vocal  range.

   Several  of  the  art   songs  include  coloratura.    This.                                                   .  but  do  not  require  the  tenor  to  sustain  this  technique  for  the   duration  that  the  arias  require.  but  equally   necessary  for  the  Bellinian  tenor  is  the  ability  to  negotiate  the  coloratura.  and  all  previously  mentioned  criteria  make  the  art   songs  perfect  pedagogical  tools  for  the  preparation  of  the  arias.    Agility  and  flexibility  of  vocal  production  are  some  of  the   necessary  elements  associated  with  Bellinian  and  other  bel  canto  repertoire.    These  are  pitches  that  the  Bellinian  operatic  tenor  will  encounter  with   frequency.     Security  of  the  top  register  is  of  course  a  vital  necessity  for  any  tenor.   18   beyond  this  pitch.    Perfecting  the   shorter  coloratura  passages  from  the  art  songs  will  allow  the  tenor  to  translate  the   technique  directly  to  the  arias.

  however.    As  a  result.  setting  it  in  C  major  for  Adelson  e  Salvini  and  in  B♭  major   for  Il  Pirata.    Bellini  retains  the  contour  of  the  melodic  line  in  each  aria.  and  will  insert  the  art  songs  that  correspond  to  the  arias.”  a  student  work  from  Adelson  e  Salvini.    To  begin.40    It  is   not  certain  exactly  why  Bellini  decided  to  recycle  the  aria.  and  a  “new”   version  of  the  aria  was  composed.  notating  the   beginning  (measures  1-­‐5)  of  each  aria  as  scalar  passages  that  ascend  to  scale  degree  five  ( 5ˆ                                                                                                                 40  Smart.  was   relocated  to  the  cabaletta  found  in  the  form  of  “Per  te  di  Vane  lagrime”  from  Il  Pirata.  38.         .   the  two  arias  must  be  grouped  together  in  order  to  show  the  pedagogical  connections   between  the  art  songs  and  what  can  be  considered  essentially  the  same  aria.  however  it  can  be  presumed  that   Bellini  approached  Romani  and  insisted  that  the  melodic  material  and  supporting   orchestration  be  used  in  Il  Pirata.  as  the  tenor  aria  from  the  first  opera  that  Bellini   composed  shares  striking  similarities  to  one  of  the  arias  from  his  third  opera.  the  libretto  needed  to  be  altered.41     Bellini  transposed  the  aria.  this  format  must  be  altered.   19           CHAPTER  3   ADELSON  E  SALVINI     “OH!    QUANTE  AMARE  LAGRIME”   EVIDENCE  OF  SELF-­‐BORROWING:  MAKING  THE  CONNECTION  BETWEEN   “OH!    QUANTE  AMARE  LAGRIME”  AND  “PER  TE  DI  VANE  LAGRIME”  FROM  IL  PIRATA         The  majority  of  this  document  will  work  chronologically  from  the  earliest  operatic   composition  to  the  last.    “In  Praise  of  Convention:  Formula  and  Experiment  in  Bellini’s  Self-­‐ Borrowings.    As  a  result.  Mary  Ann.         The  aria  “Oh!    Quante  amare  lagrime.”    Journal  of  the  American  Musicological  Society  100/1  (Spring  2000):  38.           41  Ibid.

   At  this   moment.  the  melody  moves  from  ♯ 2ˆ  to   3ˆ .   20   ).    Bellini  slightly  altered  the   orchestration  in  that  Adelson  e  Salvini  uses  stacked  chords  while  Il  Pirata  uses  a  rocking   motion.    Once  the  tonic  chord  is  sounded.                                       .  oscillating  through  the  chord  tones.    He  then  adds  non-­‐diatonic  passing  tones  that  anticipate  the  movement  to 6ˆ .  solidifying  the   progression  to  the  tonic  chord.  found  integrated  within  the  tonic   chord.  thereby  completing  the  phrase.  the  same  I—V/ii—ii—V7—I   harmonic  progression  is  employed  in  order  to  complete  the  opening  phrase.    In  spite  of  this.    He  does  delay  the  arrival  to  tonic   by  way  of  a  half-­‐step  ascent  from  the  non-­‐chord  tone  ♯ 2ˆ .  the  progression  moves  back  to  the  tonic  chord.

   Bellini:    “Oh!    Quante  amare  lagrime”  (Adelson  e  Salvini)  mm.   21   Example  1.  1-­‐12       .

  22   Example  2.    Bellini:    “Per  te  di  vane  lagrime”  (Il  Pirata)  mm.  1-­‐12       .

 which  is  free  of  excess  weight.  “Oh!    Quante  amare  lagrime”  ascends  to  E5  while  “Per  te  di  vane   lagrime”  due  to  its  lower  key.    Battaglia   expands  this  direction.  Elio.    Canzoni  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte.l'or - œ œ Ó 3 3 3 3                                                                                                                   42  Bellini.  95.  as  previously  mentioned.  as  carrying  excess  weight  to  that  part  of  the  range  will  result  in  not   achieving  the  note.  a  tenor  with  professional  aptitude  should  study  the  art  song  “La  ricordanza.    For  the  tenore  di  grazia.  Vincenzo.  67-­‐68  (example  3).  67-­‐69   4œ & b4 { œ œ < t'e rain œ ˙ ˙ quel .  as  his  edition  and  commentary  calls  for  the  preceding  A4  to  initially   be  produced  using  smortzato.  tops  out  at  D5.  or  with  immediate  decay  of  sound.  and  so  all  notes  found  beyond  B♭4  will  be  produced   using  the  same  technical  strategy.    This  same  method  must  be  used  to   secure  the  D5  or  E5.  p.   6 2004).    (Milano:  Ricordi.”  calling  for  diminuendo  from  mm.  ed  Battaglia.    For  the  reason  of  gaining  access  the  top   register.42    This  strategy  suggests  a  lighter  quality  of   production  for  the  B♭.”   which.   23   In  terms  of  range.             Example  3.           &b ∑ b ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ra 3 3 3 3 3 4 œ œ œ & b 4 ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰bœ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó ? 4œ Œ œ Œ #œ Œ Œ b4 œ œ œ œ #œ 3 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ .    Bellini  gave  specific  instructions  on  how  to  produce  the   B♭4  in  “La  ricordanza.  contains  the  top  note  B♭4.    Bellini:  “La  ricordanza”  mm.  the  B♭4   begins  the  upper  portion  of  the  range.  then  should  bloom  to  a   full  voice  B♭4  on  beat  two  of  measure  69.

   Vocal  conservation   is  also  needed  for  the  arias.   will  be  greatly  aided  by  his  ability  to  exercise  breath  control.  is  “smooth  register  blending..    One  result  of  this   respiratory  coordination.    One’s  ability  to  implement  smortzato.44    From  a  technical  perspective.  as  explained  by  Dr.  95.  Diane  Pulte.M.    “The  Messa  di  Voce  and  its  Effectiveness  as  a  Training  Exercise  for  the   Young  Singer.  equating  messa  di  voce  and  smortzato   translates  to  the  latter  technique  also  aiding  in  respiratory  coordination.  Ingo.    Battaglia  equates  these  two  terms  in  his  “La  ricordanza”   commentary.  diss.  Vol.  13.           .”    (D.43   Vocologist  Dr.   24       Managing  the  demanding  tessitura  is  likewise  a  difficult  task  for  “La  ricordanza”  and   both  of  the  corresponding  arias.  Diane.  2005).  thereby  conserving  the  voice.A.    In                                                                                                                   43  Ibid.”  as  producing  B♭4  requires  solid  technical  breath  control.    Heading  Battaglia’s  advice  in  producing  passaggi  notes   with  smortzato  technique  results  in  conserving  the  voice.         45  Pulte.         44  Titze.  and  allows  the  tenor  to  gradually   bloom  into  the  fully  produced  B♭4  found  in  measure  69  of  the  art  song.  The  Ohio  State  University.  as  the  challenging  tessitura  is  compounded  by  the  prevalence  of   high-­‐pitched  notes.    In  order  to   achieve  smortzato.  March  1996.  52.     Breathing  technique  in  preparation  for  the  arias  can  be  practiced  and  perfected   using  “La  ricordanza.”    The  Journal  of  Singing.”45       The  ability  to  smoothly  blend  the  registers  will  allow  the  tenor  to  move  out  of  the   passaggio  and  achieve  the  top  notes  of  “La  ricoranza”  and  its  corresponding  arias.    “More  on  the  Messa  di  Voce.  one  must  employ  the  same  attention  to  breath  management  as  if   producing  messa  di  voce.  Ingo  Titze  contends  that  messa  di  voce  develops  coordination  of  the   respiratory  system.

 which  will  in  turn  increase  proficiency  in  “La  ricordanza.  smooth  register  transitions  will  aid  in  negotiation  of  the  demanding  tessitura.  control  over  the  respiratory  process  will  increase  the  tenor’s  ability  to  manage  the   range  and  tessitura.”  as  well  as  in   “Oh!    Quante  amare  lagrime”  and  “Per  te  di  vane  lagrime.”                                                                                 .     Overall.   25   addition.

 with  the  art  song  in and  the  aria  in 4 .       ∑ ∑ in  the time     ∑     ∑   ∑     ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑                          ∑                                                                      ∑                 46  Ibid.   4  The  tenor  aria  from  this  opera  is  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto”   ∑ ∑ (“Upon  hearing  of  his  afflicted  father”).  scene  VI.46     ∑ ∑ The  art  song  “Ma.  Bellini’s  second.  which  he  further  elaborated  by  adding  triplets  over  each   ∑ ∑ ∑ 12 8 ∑ ∑ ∑ 98 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 12 8 ∑ ∑ grouping.  rendi  pur  contento”  (“But  please  do  make  glad”)  was  written  in   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 4 eighth-­‐note  arpeggio  figure.  of  Metastasio’s  drama  Impermestra  (1744).  and  uses  the  text  from  Act  I.           ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ 8 98 12 8 .∑   26   CHAPTER  4   “MA  RENDI  PUR  CONTENTO”   TO   “ALL’UDIR  DEL  PADRE  AFFLITO”   FROM  BIANCA  E  FERNANDO         ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 43 The  opera  Bianca  e  Fernando.    This  rhythmic  ∑idea  is  already  implied   6 signature.    The  aria  could  have  just  as   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑ 98 ∑ ∑ easily   b een   c omposed   i n 68 to  be  grouped  using  a  three   12 ∑ ∑ .  72.    Both  the  art  song  and  the  aria   ∑ ∑ ∑ 68 44 3 98∑ ∑ are  set  in  triple  meter.       44 ∑ 44 The   that   3 and  the  aria  share  are  found  in  the   6∑ the  art  song   ∑ m∑ost  noticeable   ∑ similarities   ∑   4 8 accompaniment  and  are  exemplified  in  examples  4  and  5.  debuted  successfully  in  May  1826  at  the   ∑ ∑ 3 ∑ Teatro  San  Carlos   in  Naples.  as  B∑ellini  called   ∑8for  each  beat   ∑ ∑ 4 ∑ ∑ ∑ 1829.

to∑ bb& œ { 3 œ œ ?b b œ   3 b & b bb ? bb bb le 3 ∑ ca .  rendi  pur  contento”  mm.    bBellini:  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto”    (Bianca  e  Fernando)  mm.dre œ 3 œ œ œ Œ∑ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ nœ œ ‰ Œ J ne e la ∑ sven .  5-­‐7   b b9 œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ™ b & b8 J œ™ b & b bb98 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j j j ? bb b98 œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ b œJ œJ œJ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ œœ œœ œœ j j j œ‰‰œ‰ ‰ œ‰‰ ∑ œ œ œ { Ma ren .  7-­‐11   &b b ∑ ∑ ∑ bbb ∑ b b& 3 ∑ ∑ {{ b & b 43 Ó 3 ∑ œ™ Al 3 l'u .   27   Example  4.ten .te 3 ∑ - ∑ ∑ ∑ œ™ œ ∑ - ∑ 3 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ af - ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 3 #œ œ œ œ œ ∑ del 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ∑ ∑ ∑Œ ∑ pa .to œ œ œ œ œœ ∑ del - ∑ la mia bel . ∑ ∑ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ∑ ∑ Œ ∑ ∑ 3 œ 3 Œ ∑   ∑     ∑ ∑ 3 Œ ∑ ∑ 3 œ Œ ∑ ∑ 3 3 Œ ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ .tu ∑ - ra.    Bellini:  “Ma.la ∑ ∑     6 Example  5b.di pur con .dir 3 &b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? b? 3 b ∑Œ ∑ b 4 bœ bb ∑ Œ ∑ b & b nœ ™ { 3 œ œJ ‰ œ œ œ œ™ 16 flit & bb bb.

 2∑1   & 4 { j (example  6).    (Milano:  Ricordi. b b9 & b b 8 ‰ œœ œ ∑ ∑ 3 that  also  use  the  acciaccatura  ornament  3(examples   37  and  8).  rendi  pur   bb 3contento.o   vi 3 bbbb 4 ∑ U                                                                                                                 œ œ œ œ  (New  York:   47  Grout.  the  art  songs  and  arias  were   often  set  using  this  rhythmic  structure.”  Œ  The  Œfirst  is  tŒhe  Œacciaccatura   Œ ∑ found   ∑ in  m.  and  smoothness.  Donald  Jay.   2004).  the  singer  must  first  s12 tudy  “Ma.”  as  it  is  the  only  art  song   featuring  the  compound  triple  meter.           j U { œ™ œœ ‰ œ œ œ va.  Elio.    To  achieve  this  desired  vocal  smoothness  in  Bellinian   9 repertoire.  p.    Bellini:  “Ma.    He  cautions  the  singer  tcor hat  “The  acciaccatura  must  be  rendered   œ œ œ œ found  in  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto”   [rhythmically]  properly…”48  There   œœœœ b are  tœwo  œmœœoments   3 &b 4 ‰ œ œ œœ œ œ œ ? b3 œ œ œ œ œ œ b4 3 3 3 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Example  6.  editor  of  Ricordi’s  Canzone  per  voce  e  pianoforte.W.  ed  Battaglia.       Elio  Battaglia.  fluidity.  A  History  of  Western  Music.  as  the  bel  canto  style  began  to  evolve.47  The  reason  for  this  is  due  to  the  desired  length  of   the  musical  phrases.    Canzoni  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte.    Employing  the  triplet  rhythm  gave  the  desired  effect  of  phrasal   length.  rendi  pur  contento.   28   The  idea  of  triple  or  compound  triple  meter  is  significant  to  the  bel  canto  style  of   composition.         col .   3 Norton  and  Company.             ∑ b j & b 43 œœ ‰ n œœ œ œ   U ? b 3 œj ‰ œj b4 - - ∑ ‰ Œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ‰ Œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .  288.   œnœ œ œ œ œWœ.  rendi  pur  contento”  m.  21   b & b bb 98 œ œ { vi œj - ? b b9 œ ‰ ‰ bb8 J   U œn bbbb 43 ∑ bbbb 98 œ™ ‰ œœ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ‰ ‰ œ‰ ‰ J J bbbb 43 ∑ j bbbb 98 ‰ œœ œ ‰ œœ œ œœ œ 9œ œ bbbb 8 J ‰ ‰ J ‰ ‰ œJ i .  makes  specific  note   œœ of  two  moments  in  “Ma.pa de 48  Bellini.   b œœ ∑ 3 œ b ∑ ∑ & 4 1960).    In  fact.  72.  Vincenzo.

 so  as  to  not  take  away  from  its  metric  value.   29       Example  7. ∑ ∑ ∑   vi   ∑ i .  15     j œ‰ Œ b3 j &b 4 œ œ { 9 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ sto 3 b & b 43 œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œœ ? bb 43 œœœœœœœœ œ 3 12 11 3 3     b ∑ (Bianca   ∑ e  Fernando)   ∑ ∑m.   ∑ b b9 Comparing  the  art  song  and  the   bbb bthe   9∑ notes   œ l∑eading   œ in  ∑ and  out  ∑ of  tbhe  ba3∑cciaccatura   ∑ ∑ ‰ œœ‰ œœ b b 4 ∑ b b 8 ‰ œœ œ ‰ œœ œ have  different  rhythmical  values.o vi ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ œ™ - ∑ ?aria.    Bellini:  “All’udir  del  padre  afllitto”  (Bianca  e  Fernando)  m.    However.  30   Example  8.    The  tenor  must  be  mindful   U œ for   3 short  a  duration   of  the  rhythmic  value  of  the  acciaccatura.  much  can  still  be  gleaned  with  regard  to   ? b b9 œ ‰ ‰ œ‰ ‰ œ‰ ‰ bbb 43 ∑ bbbb 98 œJ ‰ ‰ œJ ‰ b 8 b b J J successfully  negotiating  this  ornament.pa b 3 œj U j b & 4 œ ‰ n œœ œ œ de ‰ Œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ - ∑ ∑ .    Bellini:  “All’udir   & bdel  p∑adre  afllitto”   { { b3 œ œ b & b4 &b ∑ j Œ cor ∑ Œ ∑ ? bb 3 ∑ œœ œœ œœ œœ∑ œœ œœ œ œ∑ œœ &bb 4 ‰ 3 œ 3œ œ 3œ œ œ ? b3 œ œ œ b4 21 3 3   b ∑3 b ∑ ∑ & { { Œ Œ Œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ b œj bbbb 43 ∑ bbbb 98 œ™ & bb bb 98 œ   œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ &b ∑ - va.  ab s  holding  œit  œ œ œtoo   œoœr  œtoo   nœ œlong   œœ ∑ 3 œ œ b ∑ & 4   col .    The  acciaccatura  is  to  be   Jproduced  slightly  before     &b b 8 ‰ œ œ the  ensuing  note.

 the  difference  between  the  A♭  in  the  art  song   and  C  in  the  aria  is  relatively  large.         The  second  moment  that  Battaglia  highlights  is  m.         This  technical  strategy  can  likewise  be  applied  to  the  octave  leap  from  C4—C5  found   in  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto”  (example  10).  and  upon  mastery.  24.  the  singer   must  make  and  maintain  the  downward  connection  into  the  breath  while  simultaneously   ascending  to  the  A♭.    Gaining  confidence  and  control   over  the  technique  through  the  study  of  “Ma.  should  move  to  the  aria.     His  advice  regarding  breath  connection  and  “feeling”  the  C4  as  higher  will  allow  the  singer   to  make  the  ascent  to  the  A♭.    The  tenor  should  perfect  this  rhythmic  idea  in   the  context  of  the  art  song.  yet  the  tenor  will  do  well  to  heed  the  advice  of  Battaglia.  when  the  melodic  line  makes   the  leap  of  a  minor  6th  from  C4àA♭4  (example  9).”                                                                                                                           .   the  singer  will  do  well  to  “feel”  as  though  the  C4  is  higher  in  pitch.”    Admittedly.    The  fact  that  both  leaps  begin  from  C4  is   significant  in  using  “Ma.  in  order  to  feel  as  though  the  leap  is  not  as  large  as  it  is.    Some  singers  may   interpret  this  “feeling”  as  “staying  on  top  of  the  pitch”  or  as  producing  the  pitch  with  the   “feeling”  of  A♭  already  in  place.   30   results  in  altering  the  rhythmic  significance.”49    What  Battaglia  is  stating  is  that  in  order  to  successfully  make  this  leap.  the  same  technique  applies  when  attempting  to   ascend  through  the  seconda  passaggio  to  the  C5  of  the  aria.    In  addition.    He  instructs  the  singer  that  “[the  leap]   should  be  sung  directly  on  the  breath…and  support  the  breath  from  beneath  so  that  the   voice  can  press  the  note  of  arrival  by  imagining  the  note  of  departure  to  be  itself  rather   high.  rendi  pur  contento”  as  a  pedagogical  resource  for  the  preparation   of  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto.    Likewise.  rendi  pur  contento”  will  translate  seamlessly   to  the  aria  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto.

m'e piu ca .o‰ œj ? bb bb98 bœ9 ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ &bb b J8 ‰ œœ œJ ‰ œœœJ ‰‰ œ‰ œ œœ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   31   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ## 12 8 U œ™ œn ## 12 8 bbnbb 43 ∑ n nn ∑ bbbb 98 œ™ ∑ n bnbbnbn 43 ∑∑ # 12 j bbbb 98 ∑‰ œœ œ ‰# œœ8 œ œœ œ   vi - - ?# b b 9 œœ ‰œ ‰ œ  œ ™ œœ ‰ ‰ œ ‰™ ‰œ œ œ œb ™ b 3 ∑ 9œ œ b12bœ8 RJ≈ J J œ œ Jœ b b 4Œ ™ Œ ™ Œb™bbb 8 ∑J ‰ ‰ ∑J ‰ ‰ œJ # & 8 23 { { œ œ œ™ U ## 12 œ œ œ œ‰œ œ œ œœ™ œœœœ3 œ œ ‰ Œ ™ Œ ™ Œ ™ & b8b 3 œœœ œ œ j nœ œ œ œœ ∑ ∑ & 4œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ ?## 12 œ col J ‰ ‰ Œ™ Œ™ pa de ™ 8 J‰‰ Œ b3 j U j b ‰ Œ ∑ ∑ & 4 œœ ‰ n œœ œ œ U ? b 3 œj ‰ œj ‰ Œ ∑ ∑ b4 Example  10.tar   œœœ œ                                       ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .ro.  rœendi   œ ? 3 œ œ œ b ∑ ∑ 2 b4 U 3 œ3™ 3 œ œ œ œ b b 9 œ œ nnnn œ™ &b b 8 { { vi - - - va.to.& 4 { cor œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ b 3 œœ b ‰ ∑ ∑ & 4 3 3 œ 3œpur   œ contento”  m.    Bellini:   “œ Ma. œ œœœ i ‰ .    Bellini  “All’udir  del  padre  afflitto”  (Bianca  e  Fernando)  m. ch'io b &b bb 9bb 98 œœ œ œœ œ j‰ œ œ œ & b b 8 ‰ œvi œ ‰.ro pal -pi .  24   Example  9.  14   ten .œ va. m'e piu ca .

 1827  the  audience  at  Teatro  alla  Scala  in  Milan  was  witness  to  three   firsts  in  the  career  of  Vincenzo  Bellini.com.   Il  Pirata.                                                                                                                               50  Simon  Maguire  and  Elizabeth  Forbes.   with  whom.    However.  CHE  INARGENTI”   TO    “NEL  FUROR  DELLE  TEMPESTE”   FROM  IL  PIRATA     Career  Firsts   On  October  27.  who  went  on  to  debut  several  other  Bellinian  operas.    “Il  Pirata.  Bellini  shared  a  lifelong  devotion  and  partnership.   32   CHAPTER  5:   “QUANDO  VERRÀ QUEL  DÌ TO  “TU  VEDRAI  LA  SVENTURATA”    AND   “VAGA  LUNA.  accessed  13  March.   www.  2012.  including  La   sonnambula  and  I  Puritani  (Note  that  Rubini  debuted  Bianca  e  Gernando  in  1826.”  in  Grove  Music  Online.  it   was  with  the  collaboration  of  Romani  and  Rubini  that  Bellini  began  to  find  his  mature   compositional  style.  practically  stated.  However   he  did  not  debut  the  final  revision  which  was  debuted  in  1828  in  the  form  of  Bianca  e   Fernando).  the  opera  was  the  first  Bellinian  opera  set  to  a  text  by  Felice  Romani.  Giovanni  Rubini.  the  likes  of  which  were  already  seen  from  Rossini.  Il  Pirata  was  the  first  Bellinian  opera  sung  by  the  acclaimed  Italian   tenor.oxfordmusiconline.50   Il  Pirata  shows  the  beginnings  of  Bellini’s  mature  compositional  style.    This  is  evidenced  by  his  more  frequent  use  of  vocal  ornamentation   and  coloratura.    The  date  marked  the  debut  of  Bellini’s  latest  opera.         .    Additionally.    Finally.

 but  are  done  so  within  the  context  of  a   comparatively  easy  melodic  line.  smooth.  the  basic  concepts  of  breath  control  and   vocal  agility  are  tested  in  the  art  song.    A  rapid   melodic  passage  is  found  in  m.  25  of    “Quando  verrà  quel  dì.  185     .    The  advantage  of  using  this  art  song  is  due  in  part  that   in  this  excerpt.    As  such.  run.  the  tenor  is  not  required  to  ascend  into  the  seconda  passaggio.  defined  as  a  rapid  passage.  Wili.    In  addition.  trill  or  similar  virtuoso-­‐like  material.  the  tenor  must  gauge  the  expenditure  of  air   when  holding  the  G4  so  that  he  retains  enough  air  to  negotiate  the  descending  line.   33   Coloratura  and  its  use  in  Bellini’s  music   Coloratura.  which  the  tenor  must  hold  at  his   discretion.51  is   a  hallmark  trait  of  the  bel  canto  style.    In  “Tu  vedrai  la  sventurata”  there  are  several   moments  that  the  tenor  must  deliver  clear.    Still.  vocal  agility  is  manifested  in  a  variety  of  ways.    The  Harvard  Dictionary  of  Music  (Cambridge:  Harvard  Press.  so  that  the  subsequent  sixteenth  note   material  can  be  sung  with  fluidity.  before  descending  through  the  passaggio.          Example  12  from  Il  Pirata  shows  a  leap  up  to  G4.  this  art  song  can  be   used  to  train  the  tenor  for  the  aria.  2000).                                                                                                                             51  Apel.  and  articulate  coloratura  (examples  11   and  13).    This   obviously  requires  solid  breath  management  and  skillful  artistry.”  As  such.  negotiating  these  difficult  passages  is  a   central  priority  for  bel  canto  tenors.    The  challenge  of  this  passage  is  to   ascend  to  the  G4  without  carrying  weight  in  the  voice.  which  would   compound  the  difficulty  of  the  technique.       As  the  examples  indicate.

”52    Battaglia                                                                                                                   52  Bellini.  p.    Canzoni  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte.  Elio.  Vincenzo.  19   { ri - bb œ & b b œJ ‰ ? b b œJ ‰ bb           ve - ‰ ‰ der po j œœ ‰ œ œ ‰ J j œœ œ œ J -         Another  example  of  Bellini’s  use  of  coloratura  is  found  in  measure  seven  of  “Quando   verrà  quel  dì.    Bellini:  “Quando  verrà  quel  dì”m.  25     U U b œ™ & b bb œ nœJ œ œœœœ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ b b bœj & b b œœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ b b œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœœœœœ &b b ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ { di? Ah.  depending  on  the   individual  voice)  the  seconda  passaggio  and  descending  back  through  it.  32.{ b & b bb 68 bœœœ ™™™œœœœœœ œœœ œœ ? b b 6 œ ™œœ œbœ bb8 U ‰ U ‰ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   34  ∑ ∑ ∑ Example  11.    He  instructs  the  singer  to  “Release  the  breath  pressure  on  the  E♭  immediately  after   its  emission  so  that  the  F  that  begins  the  run  can  be  attacked  from  the  glottis.”    This  excerpt  shows  the  tenor  ascending  near  (or  at.  only  to  ascend   again. ? b b œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ bb J   Example  12.   2004).             .    (Milano:  Ricordi.  ed  Battaglia.    Battaglia  specifically  mentions  the  vocal  technique  required  to  deliver  measure   seven.    Bellini:  “Tu  vedrai  la  sventurata”  (Il  Pirata)  m.

 whereas  in  the   aria.    That  is  to  say  they  should  take  a  tempo  that  will  allow  them  to   articulate  each  note  in  a  manner  that  is  in  line  with  the  stylistic  aspects  of  the  piece.  a  singer  should  deliver  coloratura  or  florid  passages  at  a  tempo  that  is   manageable  for  them.    In  this  passage.     .    However.     A  similar  passage  is  found  in  measures  78-­‐79  of  “Tu  vedrai  la  sventurata”  (example   14).  he  must  only  deliver  sixteenth  notes.    It  is  a  general  rule  that  in  the   realm  of  art  song.       These  excerpts  call  to  attention  the  issue  of  tempi.  a  closer  examination  will  note  that  the   tempo  marking  of  the  art  song  is  Andante  sostenuto  (at  a  sustained  “walking”  pace).    For  bel                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         53  Ibid.    In  actuality.  32.  the  tenor  is  required  to  sustain  the  coloratura  for  two  measures.”  meaning  that   each  note  of  the  rapid  scalar  passage  is  produced  with  rhythmic  accuracy.    Increasing  the  speed  of  delivery  can  cause   problems  relating  to  articulation  and  clarity  of  the  vocal  line.    The   melodic  line  takes  the  tenor  in  and  out  of  the  seconda  passaggio  several  times.  therefore  the  art  song  is  a   good  starting  point  for  perfection  of  the  technique.  the  tenor   must  deliver  the  aria  at  a  faster  tempo.   35   elaborates  that  the  adequate  release  of  breath  pressure  which  begins  this  florid  passage   will  allow  the  remaining  vocal  material  to  “glide  along  the  palate  in  tempo.53  Heading   Battaglia’s  advice  by  efficiently  releasing  the  breath  pressure  will  likewise  allow  the  tenor   to  “glide”  through  the  coloratura  passage  of  example  13.   whereas  this  excerpt  from  the  aria  is  marked  at  Allegro  (fast).  then.  adding  to  the   difficulty  of  the  aria  and  mandating  resolute  technical  control.       The  art  song  excerpt  (Example  13)  may  initially  appear  to  be  more  difficult  than  the   Il  Pirata  excerpt  because  the  tenor  is  required  to  sing  thirty-­‐second  notes.

        By  examining  these  excerpts.    The  tenor   should  head  this  advice  when  performing  an  aria  as  well.  one  ascertains  that  the  singer  has  an  adequate  amount  of  liberty  in   dictating  the  tempo.       This  is  not  to  say  that  he  is  free  to  be  careless  with  his  vocalism.  the  orchestra  (or   piano).       Because  of  this.   36   canto  repertoire.    Battaglia  states  that  “Quando  verrà  quel  dì”  should  be  delivered   with  attention  to  the  recitation  of  the  text.    In  summary.  one  sees  very  little  supportive  accompaniment.  so  that  he  is  able  to  adequately   negotiate  these  passages.  thereby  ensuring  that  they  are  able  to  deliver  the  vocal  line  in  a   manner  that  is  stylistically  appropriate.  as  text  recitation  should  also  be   paramount  for  performances  of  arias.  for  with  increased   rubato  comes  greater  potential  for  disconnection  among  the  singer.  Lack  of  accompaniment  translates  to  allowing  the   tenor  to  take  a  tempo  with  which  he  is  comfortable.  and  the  conductor.  in  either  art  song  or  aria.    Battaglia  warns  the  singer  not  to   compound  the  challenges  of  the  art  song  with  preoccupation  to  sentimentalism.    That  is  to  say  that  clearly  delivering  and   conveying  the  text  is  the  top  priority  in  performance.                             .  the  technique  put  forth  should  be   applied  to  any  text.  this  means  that  the  singer  has  the  task  of  striking  a  balance  between   lyricism  and  clarity.

a j & 44 œ ‰ Œ œ ? 44 œœ ‰ Œ J     6 & 12 8 { œ™ - Ó œ ‰ ‰™ œ J R œ ∑ ∑ 12 8 ∑ ∑ ∑ 12 8 ∑ ∑ del U Ó j œœ ‰ Œ œœ ‰ Œ J Ó œ mor.    This   œ œ œ œ œ œ 12 œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ nœ J ‰ ‰ Œ ™ Œ™ Œ™ ∑ &8 aria  features  several  of  the  characteristics  as  “Tu  vedrai  la  sventurata.    There  are  of  course   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ & the  passages  of  the  art  song  and  the  aria.”  including  the   œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœ œœœœœœ œœœ ? 12 œ Œ™ Œ™ ∑ incorporation  of  “fast”   to  articulation   œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™of  coloratura.    Bellini:  “Quando  verrà  quel  dì”  m.  7     { ri - ve bb œ & b b œJ ‰ ? bb b œJ ‰ b - ‰ ‰ der po j œœ ‰ œ œ ‰ J j œœ œ œ J -       Example  14.”   comes  from  Act  I.  78-­‐79     U œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œnœ œ nœ#œ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ #œ œ#œ œ#œ œ œ#œ œbœnœ &4 { mor.{ bbb bœœj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ b & œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ b b œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœœœœœœ &b b ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ? b b œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ bb J   37   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Example  13. ∑ U Ó   œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ™ Œ ™ “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste”   ∑ ∑ ta il dol .  rhythm   differences  between   & ?   .   8 œpassages.cei .stan te.    They  include  range.    Bellini:    “Tu  vedrai  la  sventurata”  (Il  Pirata)  mm.    For  œreasons  relating   œ J fret - ∑ 12 8 ∑ ∑ perfecting  measure  22  of  “Quando  verrà  quel  dì”  (example  16)  will  translate  well  to  the   perfection  of  m 10m. < œœœœœœœœœ œ œ n œdnelle   The  other  aria  found  in  Il  Pirata.  40-­‐41  of  “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste”  (example  15).  “Nel  furor   tempeste.

 which  is  an  area  of  the  voice   that  is  also  exploited  in  example  15.  resting  on  A♭3.  he  may  take  more  liberty   with  the  tempo.  and  tempo.   38   of  vocal  line.   Still..ma ∑ ∑ ‰ ∑ U bœ œœœœœœœœœ œœ œ ∑ J ? bbb b∑6 bœ ™œ∑œ œ ∑ &b b 8 œœ ™™œœœœ œœ œ b &b ∑ ∑ - ∑ U U ‰ U   U œ™ bb & &b b bb∑ œ nœJ∑ œ œ∑œœœ ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑∑ ∑∑ ∑∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ . ∑ œœ œ‰Œ J   Example   9 16.a.  which  is  also  the  art  song’s  final  note  in  example  16.    In  the  art  song.    In  the  aria.  as  the  accompaniment  is  at  rest  through  the  duration  of  the  coloratura. a b b6 œ &b b 8 { b &b ∑ ∑ œ ? bb b 68 œ ™œœ œbœ b 20 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ni .     Not  only  does  the  art  song  prepare  the  tenor  for  negotiating  coloratura.    Bellini:  “Quando  verrà  quel  dì”  m.    Bellini:    “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste  (Il  Pirata)  mm.  the  contours  of  each  vocal  line  are  comparable.    The  aria  ascends  up  to  the  A♭4   and  then  back  down.  40-­‐41     j b 3 bœ œ œb œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ ™ œœœ ‰ Œ &b 4 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ b & b 43 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ { nul 20 ? - la io spe - ∑ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ bœœ bœœœ 10 bbœ 3 b b4 bœ bœ ro.  the  tenor  must  maintain  a  more  consistent  tempo  due   to  the  increased  involvement  of  the  orchestra.                 Example  15.  22   b &b { ∑ ∑ ∑ mi ∑ .  but  it  also  prepares   him  for  maintaining  resonance  while  singing  in  the  mid-­‐range..

 ed.    (Milano:  Ricordi.  75.  Bellini  had  this  same  intention  in  mind.                                                                                                                                 54  Bellini.”  he  notated  a  fermata  over  the  first  syllable  [pal].”       The  art  song  is  the  last  of  the  Tre  Ariette.    With  this   fermata.55    For  example.    The   answers  to  these  decisions  can  be  summarized  by  considering  that  the  singer  must  be   connected  to  the  text  in  such  a  way  that  natural  musical  variations  will  be  made.  75.  che  inargenti.  Battaglia.    Battaglia  urges  the  singer  to  vary  the   vocal  color  of  “palpiti.  as  during  the   second  recitation  of  “palpiti.    Canzoni  per  voce  e  pianoforte.         Perhaps  the  best  example  of  a  strophic  Bellini  art  song  is  “Vaga  luna.”  Presumably.  written  in  London  in  1833  and  dedicated  to   Giulietta  Pezzi  of  Milan.         55  Ibid.   featuring  two  sections  of  music  with  little  variation  between  them.         .  Vincenzo.    Each  strophe  features   musical  phrases  that  feature  frequent  repetition  of  text.54    Battaglia  instructs  the  singer  to  “Use  different  expressive   nuances”  when  repeating  text.   2004).  measure  20  uses  the  word  “palpiti”   (“heartbeats”)  twice  in  succession  (example  17).  the  singer  is  free  to  linger  on  the  pitch  and  syllable  in  such  a  way  that  he  is  able  to   convey  the  dramatic  intention  of  the  entire  line  of  poetry.  as  text   repetition  will  warrant  variance  of  vocal  colors  and  timbres.   39       It  is  worth  mentioning  that  “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste”  is  set  in  strophic  form.  Elio.    This  calls  to  light  the  musical   decisions  that  must  be  made  when  a  singer  is  operating  within  these  parameters.  not  solely  the  word  or  syllable  to   which  the  fermata  is  attached.

                .    Bellini:  “Vaga  luna.  is  repeated  several  times.pi .  in  which  the  text.  che  inargenti”  m.    Using  “Vaga  luna.pi .ti i pal .spir ed a lei che m'in. anguish  that  he  must  feel. te_ihe  text  so .    This  slowing  of  tempo  will  help  the  tenor   spir.  “Io   amo  e  peno”  (“I  love  and  I  suffer”).  delle  tempeste.in  “Nel   Battaglia’s   e  -espir xtended   text   found   furor.ta_i pal .    Using  Battaglia’s  advice.ti_e_i so .   40   Example  17.  19-­‐21   19 mo - ra con .spir.ti_e_i so . e_i the  a somorous   .na -     22   moi-nstruction   ra con .  and  strive  to  find  a  new  dramatic   nuance  with  each  word.nathe   .    Bellini  helps  the  tenor  in  this  endeavor.ta_i pal .mor-epeated   ra con -ta_i pal .spir.  as  he  calls  for  a   25 rallentando  in  both  the  voice  and  orchestration.”    Example  18  shows  measures  43-­‐50  of  the  aria.clian   .       to  properly  declaim   and   convey   This  is  one  of  any  number  of  examples  of  text  repetition  that  are  found  in  “Nel  furor   dolce delle  tempeste”  and  other  arias.  the   tenor  must  vary  the  delivery  of  each  repetition  of  text.pi .ti_e_ibso ed ato   leiinclude   che m'in.  che  inargenti”  to  learn  to  emote  the   nuances  of  text  declamation  and  strophic  variance  will  prepare  the  singer  to  do  so  within   the  context  of  the  arias.

œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ ™ œ bœ nœ ˙ œ œ œ ˙™   .mo bœ œ œ bœ rall.  43-­‐50   b3 &b 4 œ œ Œ { a . col canto bœ œ œ œ b˙ ™ ? b3 ‰ J J ‰ ˙™ ˙™ b4 b˙ ™ ˙™ b &b œ { œ nœbœ œ œ ˙™ ˙™ n œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ b œ & b ‰ bnœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ ? b n˙ ™ œ œ bœ nœ œ b ™ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœœ n˙                   a - mo e pe - - - 5                                   - - œ Œ Œ no. io j j b3 ‰ bœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ bœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ & b 4 ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ ˙˙˙ ™™™ œœœ œ œ œ bœœœ œ œ œ rall. un poco a piacere ‰ œj ˙ io a - mo e pe œ ‰ ‰ œ bœ J J - no io œ a - bœ œ œ mo.   41   Example  18.    Bellini:  “Nel  furor  delle  tempese”  (Il  Pirata)  mm.

     ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ &∑ ∑ ∑ 13 17 www.  The  rhythmic  figure  of  the  accompaniment  features   4 a   ∑ ∑∑ 68 ∑ ∑ ∑ 4 6 ∑ ∑ “rocking”  eighth-­‐note  pattern  set  in 8  time.       3 two-­‐beat-­‐per-­‐measure   pulse   rather  than  the  indicated ∑ ∑ ∑ & ∑ however.   12 8 &∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ to  each  beat  and  measure.    The  opera  debuted  in   ∑ & 9 The  opera  I  Capuleti  e  I  Montecchi  is  defined  as  a  tragedia  lirica  (“lyric  tragedy”).   42   CHAPTER  6:   “VANNE.”  occurs  in     ∑ ∑ ∑∑ 43 ∑ 4 43 ∑ ∑ 44 ∑ 44 68 ∑ 68 the  first  a4ct  and  is  sung  by  the  character  Tebaldo  (Tybalt).    The  division  of  the  rhythmic  structure.    3  The  tenor  aria.    “I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi.  a  questo  acciaro”  is  “Vanne.   ∑∑ 6 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 98∑implies  a  slow   8 .   ∑∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑ and  was  without  question   intended  by  the  b∑el  canto  composers.  2012.  o   4 rosa  fortunata”  (example  19).  a  questo  acciaro.   ∑∑ ∑ & 21 25 ∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ .  A  QUESTO  ACCIARO”   FROM  I  CAPULETTI  E  I  MONTECCHI   AND   “PER  CHI  MAI.  PER  CHI  PUGNASTI”   FROM  ZAIRA           The  libretto  was  penned  by  Felice  Romani.  rather  than  directly  from  the  Shakespeare  play.  accessed  14  March.     ∑ ∑ 3 ∑ ∑ ∑ 4 4 The  art  song  that   ∑ most  closely   4resembles  “È  serbato.   4 9 ∑ ∑ 8 ∑   ∑ Similarly.   ∑ ∑ & 13 4 ∑∑ 5 & Renaissance   3 sources.com.  Bellini  is  able  to  add   ∑ the  perception   rather   8 of  length   ∑ 68 ∑ 98 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑                                        ∑                                                                         ∑ ∑ ∑ &∑ ∑56 ∑  Anonymous  author.    The  division   time  (example   of  the  rhythmic  structure  implies  a  slow   4 8 5 9 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 12 ∑ 12 12 ∑ than  the  indicated∑8 .    This  trait  is  common  in  Bellinian  and  other  bel  canto  repertoire.  who  took  his  inspiration  from  various  Italian   & 17 & 21 & 25 & 29 & 56 1830   at  Venice’s  Teatro   ∑ ∑ la  Fenice.  O  ROSA  FORTUNATA”   AND   “È  SERBATO.  but  in  choosing 8 ∑.oxfordmusiconline.  “È  serbato.”  in  Grove  Music  Online.   motion  that  is  a  stylistic  trademark  of   9 ∑ t∑he  aria  b9egins  w∑ith  the  “rocking”   8 8 9 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 8 4 12 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ & Bellini’s 8 12 ∑ ∑ 20).

 the  pulse  of  each  piece  should   ∑ ∑ be  felt  as  if  a  grouping  of  three  eighth-­‐notes  creates  one  large  beat  rather  than  three   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 9 8 ∑ smaller  beats.    Proceeding  with  this  rhythmic  pulse  in  mind  will  also  facilitate  the   ∑ 12 ∑ 8 ∑ ∑ ∑ singer’s  ability  to  sing  with  legato  phrasing.tu - ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œ œ j œ‰ ‰ œ‰ ‰ œJ œ œœœœ œœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ j ‰ œ & œ œ J J J J na .         ∑ to  enhance  communication   ∑     Example  19.cein pet .sar di Ni .to La tua < # ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ œœ & œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j j j ? # œ ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ œ œ œJ œJ œ œ œ J œ J œ œ 6 { #œ     . A po .  1-­‐10   #6 & 8 { ∑ ∑ Œ™ ∑ # & 68 Œ ™ œœ œ j œœ œœ J œœ œœ œœ œj ‰ œ œj ‰ œœ œ # Jœ œ n œ œ œ œ œœ œ ? #6 Œ ™ ‰ J n œ J ‰ J œj ‰ 8 J ‰ œ œ œ Vanne.sa for .to Ed o .  from  a  rhythmic  perspective.ra co .ta. o j œ œ j œ j œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ ™ œ ‰ Œ œœ J œ J ro .  the  pieces.  function   almost  identically.  o  rosa  fortunata”  mm.stret .∑∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 4 4 98 6 12   43   Regardless  if  operating  within  the  realm  of   8  or   8 .    Bellini:  “Vanne.  meaning  ∑that  the  singer  should  perform  the  piece  with  extreme   ∑ ∑ ∑ smoothness  in  the  vocalism  while  simultaneously  employing  appropriate  colors  and   ∑ nuances  that  serve   of  the  text.    He  states  that  the  art  song  must  be  sung  in  a   ∑ “legato-­‐declamatory”   style.  as  the  fluidity  that  this  technique  creates   ∑ adheres  to  the  inherent  fluidity  of  the  Italian  language.    Battaglia  references  this  in  his   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ “Vanne.gnun sa .  o  rosa  fortunata”  commentary.    When  felt  in  this  manner.

 consider   & ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ the  vocal  differences   occur   w∑ithin  the   ∑ naturally   ∑ ∑ if  a  s∑inger  operated   ∑ ∑ realm  o∑f  an   & ∑ that  would   ? ∑ feeling   ∑ the  ∑eighth  ∑notes  in   ∑ groups   ∑ that  c∑ombine   ∑ to  form  larger   eighth  note  pulse  r∑ather  than   ? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ beats.  1-­‐4     12 &8 {{ 12 &8 œ & 12 8 œ ∑ ≈ œœR œœ œ œœ & 128 œ œœ≈ œR œ œ ? 12 8 œ œœ œ ? 128 œ œ ∑ ≈ œœR œœ œœ œœ œ ≈œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ R œ œœ œ œœœ œœ œ œ œ œ Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ œ œ™ ™ œ œ™ & œ™ œ™œ™ ‰ ‰‰ ‰ œœœ™ œœ ™œ œ™ œœ œ ™ œ ™ & œœ ba .  a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi)  mm.ta e ser -ba .cia< .taa que-stoac .ro <             œ œœ œ œœ E ser j j j j œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ™ 3         Œ™ Œ™ E ser œœ œœ œœ œ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ ‰ œœ œ j œœ j œœ jœœ j œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰œ œ ‰ œ‰ œ ‰œ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ 3 { Œ™ - Œ™ ro Œ ™ j œ œj ∑ ∑ œ œ ∑ del tuo   del tuo ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ & ‰ œ ‰‰ œœœ ‰ ‰œ œœ ‰ œ‰ œœ ‰∑ œœ ∑ ∑ & ‰ œœœ ‰ œ œœ ‰ œ œœ ‰ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j j j j ? ? œœj ‰‰‰ ‰œjœ‰ ‰‰ œ‰j ‰œ‰‰ ‰ œj ‰ œ ‰‰ ‰ j ‰ ‰ jj ‰‰‰‰ j ‰j ‰‰ ‰j ‰ j‰‰ ‰ ∑j ‰ ‰ ∑ ∑ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ   77 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ & the   ∑ style.   ∑ impeding  the  pursuit  and  execution  of  delivering  a  legato  melodic  line.   44   Example  20.    Bellini:  “È  serbato.  diction  would  suffer.         .    With  respect  to  examples  19  and  20.      In  addition.    Feeling  each  eighth  note  as  a  separate  beat   equalizes  the  rhythmic  importance  of  each  note.cia ba .  the  nuances  of  the  Italian   language.  would  be  lost.    Likely.  specifically  the  frequent  stress  put  on  the  penultimate  syllable.    As  a  result.ta e ser -ba .   {{ determining  the  mood  of  a  particular  piece.  r∑hythm.  the  vocal  lines  would  have  a  sense  of  disconnection  from  note  to  note.taa que-stoac .  a∑nd  texture   ∑ of  accompaniment   ∑ ∑ are  ∑ significant   ∑ factors   ∑ in   & Generally.

com.  Vincenzo.  45.  Bellini  composed  and  dedicated  the  Sei  Ariette  to  Marianna  (Bellini  dedicated  the   opera  La  sonnambula  to  Francesco  in  1831).         60  Mary  Ann  Smart.  59   It  is  with  “Vanne.   accessed  28  July.  “Bellini.       .  Elio.  52.    (Milano:  Ricordi.  Battaglia.    Canzoni  per  voce  e  pianoforte.  www.  “Bellini.oxfordmusiconline.  2011.60    The  objective  of  this  compositional  style   was  to  merge  syllabification  and  floridity  in  such  a  way  that  every  word  was  set  using  the   ideal  pitch  and  note  value.  Vincenzo.  Vincenzo.    When  Bellini  arrived  in   Milan  in  1827.    Sections  also  appear  in  the  trio  that  concludes  the  first  act.  at  the  time.”    Grove  Music  Online.  he  befriended  the  composer  Francesco  Pollini  and  his  wife  Marianna.    Composing   in  a  style  motivated  by  canto  declamato  permitted.   45   “Vanne.   accessed  28  July.oxfordmusiconline.    Simply  stated.         58  Mary  Ann  Smart.  ed.  2011.  Vincenzo.     59  Bellini.  Elio.  o  rosa  fortunata”  is  the  second  of  the  Sei  Ariette.  a  complete                                                                                                                   57  Bellini.”    Grove  Music  Online.       It  is  plausible  that  Bellini  was  using  this  arietta  as  a  sketch  for  a  later  work.  Battaglia.  o  rosa  fortunata”  that  the  topic  of  canto  declamato  must  be   addressed.  so  that  through  the  music.  ed.  58  Prompted  by  the  affection  he  felt   for  her.       The  implementation  of  canto  declamato  was.com.    Sections   of  this  piece  resurfaced  years  later  in  the  final  duet  between  Norma  and  Pollione  in  Bellini’s   masterpiece  Norma.  controversial.  the  text  could  be  adequately   conveyed.  this  “declamatory  style”  of  writing  for  which  Bellini  is  revered   merges  syllabic  and  florid  vocal  composition.57  The   Pollini’s  became  surrogate  parents  to  the  young  Bellini.  www.    Canzoni  per  voce  e  pianoforte.   2004).    (Milano:  Ricordi.   2004).  if  not  facilitated.

 “An  emphatic  enunciation  of  the  consonants  will  also   facilitate  the  diaphragm’s  support  of  the  voice  and  will  bring  out  the  sound  of  the  word.  52.  if  not  more  emphasis  for  text   declamation  as  for  melodic  content  is  interesting.    In  short.    As  Battaglia  writes.    Canzoni  per  voce  e  pianoforte.63    Indeed.       With  regard  to  “Vanne.   46   restructuring  of  previously  held  operatic  forms.  moments  that  had  been   structurally  reserved  for  recitative  now  became  open  to  the  inclusion  of  arioso.  and  sets  the  singer  in  line  with  Bellini’s  intentions  of  canto  declamato   (example  21).  Vincenzo.     .    He  calls  particular  attention  to   the  word  “costretto”  (“forced”).    This  term  is  interpreted  not  simply  as   speaking  the  text.61       It  is  with  “Vanne.”  Battaglia’s  performance  instructions  are   specific  and  relate  almost  exclusively  to  text  declamation.  giving  due  articulation  to  this  consonant  cluster  adds  to  the  dramatic   intention  of  the  word.  o  rosa  fortunata.  considering  that  the  perception  is  that   with  bel  canto  music.  directing  the  singer  to  give  adequate  articulation  to  the   [str].  but  as  a  form  of  vocal  technique  that  emphasizes  simplicity  of  vocal   production.   2004).62    The  notion  that  Bellini  supported  equal.  o  rosa  fortunata”  that  Bellini  uses  the  Italian  word  “dire”  (“to  say”)   to  describe  the  method  of  delivering  the  text.  Battaglia.         64  Ibid.  the  text  is  predominately  subservient  to  the  melodic  line  and  to  the   voice.”64                                                                                                                         61  Ibid.         63  Ibid.  ed.  Elio.         62  Bellini.    (Milano:  Ricordi.

   This  chord  is  non-­‐diatonic  to  G  major  and   therefore  unanticipated.  so  as  to  feature  the  poignant  line  of  text  with  which  it  is  associated:           .     fourth/tri-­‐tone)  is  primarily  responsible   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ?# ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ & Representative  compositional  practices  of  the  era  would  incorporate  smoother  voice   leading  to  non-­‐diatonic  harmonies.  o  rosa  fortunata”  mm.    The  bass  note  leap  from  G3  to  C♯4  (augmented   # for  this  abrupt  harmonic  transition.ra co .    I∑n  the  m∑icro-­‐division   ∑ ∑ ∑of  six  b∑eats  per   ∑ & measure.    Bellini:  “Vanne.stret .   47   Example  21.  8-­‐9   œœ œ œ œœ J J J #6 œ & 8 { ognun sa .  This   ?# ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ weak  beat  accent  occurs  unexpectedly.  t#he  v∑oicing  ∑of  the  c∑♯o7  indicates   ∑ ∑that  it  ∑has  not  ∑ been  ∑ 20 & { ∑ ∑ prepared  by  the  previous  harmony.  with  the  w#ord  ∑“tu”  (“you”).  Bellini’s  intention  must  have  been  to  call  attention  to  this   moment.  the  word  appears  on  beat  two  and  has  an  accent  mark  associated  with  it.    Moreover.  The  tension  of  the  weak  beat  accent  is  compounded   due  to  Bellini’s  notation  of  a  c♯o7  chord.  typically  setup  by  a  secondary  dominant  that  aimed  to   harmonize  the  subsequent  chord.to la #6 œ & 8 ‰ œœ œ ‰ œœ œ ‰ œ j ?# 6 œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ 8œ œJ œJ 10 & { œ J ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ tua œ ‰œœ ∑ œ j ‰œ‰ ‰ ∑ œ     # ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ‰‰‰ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑    Another  moment  that  Battaglia  highlights  as  critical  in  declaiming  the  text  is  in   measure  47  (example  22).

    .  47-­‐48   Tœ™ # j œ œ œ j œ œ œ & œ J œ { mor.ra co .    Bellini:  “Vanne.  è  destinata     ad  entrambi  un'ugual  sorte:     là  trovar  dobbiam  la  morte.  a  questo   ∑ # ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ & acciaro.to la tua #6 œ ‰ œœ œ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ & 8 œœ œœ œœ œ j ? # 6 œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œj ‰ ‰ 8œ œJ œJ œ Example  22.”    Further.stret .  o  rosa  fortunata”  mm. tu # j ˙ & œ b˙˙ œ #˙ ?# œ J     Õ d'in .     tu  d'invidia  ed  io  d'amor.  then.vi -diaed ‰ ‰ i-o ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ d'a j ‰ ‰ œœ œ œ œ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ‰ ‰ J J     ∑   # ‰ ‰ ‰ Œ™ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ & The  mission.  52.                     Beautiful  rose.    In  measure   the  singer  to  depict   œ instructs   œ # 48  (example  22).  Battaglia   6œ & 8 { œ œ J œœ J œ J J ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ sorrow  with  the  vocal  turn.  by  way  of  a  subtle  forte-­‐piano  on  the  vowel  [i]  found  in  the   word  “io”  (“I”).  the  ultimate  mission  is  to  recognize  moments  of  canto  declamato  in  all  of   ∑ ∑ ∑ ? # on  the  w∑ords  and  phrases   the  tenor  arias  and  place  emphasis   ∑ where  v∑ocal  emphases   ∑ are   warranted.                                                                                                                       65  Ibid.   48   Bella  rosa.   10   In  delivering  the  final  line  of  text.  o  rosa  fortunata”  and  translate  them  to  similar  moments  in  “È  serbato.  is  to  practice  these  moments  of  canto  declamato  with  the  context   19 { of  “Vanne.  Battaglia  directs  the  singer  to  stress  the  word  “tu”  as  the   accent  mark  suggests.65       ognun sa .   you  from  envy  and  I  from  love.  for  both  of  us   is  destined  a  similar  lot:   there  must  we  find  death.

        Key  words.  love.  or  he  may  choose  to  sing  them  more  lyrically.  ‘vendetta’  (‘vengeance’).    The  first  of  these  moments  occurs  between  measures  five  and   six  (example  23).  he  must  use  the   repeated  consonant  [t:t]  [vϵndϵt:ta]  to  depict  the  connotation  of  the  word.  due  to  the  fact  that  the  line  progresses  toward  an  even  more  powerful   word  in  “vendetta.  there  is  repetition  of  text  with  the  word  ‘sangue.  with  the  text  ‘del  tuo  sangue  la  vendetta’  (‘your  blood  vengeance’).   49     “È  serbato  a  questo  acciaro”  is  an  aria  that  is  about  passion.  and   hatred.    In  either  case.  Tebaldo  has  learned  that  Giulietta  will  marry  him   as  a  vendetta  to  punish  Romeo  for  the  murder  of  Capulet’s  son.  making  the  task  of  detecting  moments  of   canto  declamato  accessible.  ‘ciel’  (‘heaven’).  with  which  the  tenor  can  experiment  colors  and  timbres  that  enhance   the  text.     Immediately.’    The  tenor  must  vary   the  delivery  of  this  text  in  such  a  way  that  the  word  becomes  more  impassioned  upon  the   second  declamation.  include  ‘sangue’  (‘blood’).”  the  tenor  must  decide  how  to  vocalize  the   thirty-­‐second  notes.  vengeance.”    Upon  arrival  at  “vendetta.                         .    He  may  choose  to  sing  them  in  a  manner  that  adds  slight  pulses  to   each  pitch.    These  adjectives  permeate  the  score.  and  ‘dolce   istante’  (‘sweet  moment’).    In  this  aria.

 the  tenor  Tebaldo  is   declaring  vengeance  on  Romeo.det ‰ œ œœ j ‰‰ œ   ∑ œœ œ ∑ œ œœœ - Œ™ ∑ ta: ‰ œ œœ j‰ ‰ œ ∑ ‰ Œ™ ‰ ‰ ‰ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ j‰ ‰ j‰ ‰ j‰ ‰ œ œ œ ∑ ∑ ∑ (example  24)  with  the  word  “ciel”  (“heaven”).   ∑  He  may  ∑start  and  ∑ end  this  ∑pitch  all  ∑at  one  soft   ∑ dynamic.  Training  Tenor  Voices  (New  York:  Schirmer.    It   makes  sense  to  deliver  this  line  with  dramatic  intention  relative  to  the  text.  he  may   choose  to  start  softly  ∑and  crescendo.    For  the  tenore  di   ? ∑   The  next  opportunity  to  sufficiently  declaim  the  text  occurs  at  measure  nine   & ∑ grazia.    5-­‐6   & 12 8 { œ™ san - œ‰ œ œ œ J gue.  the   ∑ & ? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ best  decision  is  to  produce  this  with  one  voluminous  dynamic.    The  rationale  for  this   decision  lies  in  the  dramatic  intention  of  the  text.   ∑  He  may   ∑ & { ∑ choose  to  start  and  end  this  pitch  all  on  one  voluminous  dynamic.    Bellini:  “È  serbato  a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi)  mm.    Further  still.                                                                                                                     66  Miller.    Arguably.  9.   ∑   ∑ Depending  on  his  dramatic  intentions.      In  this  aria.  and  that  “all  heaven  knows”  his  loyalty  to  Giulietta.  1993).    He   messa   ∑ ∑ may  even   ∑ choose  ∑to  implement   ∑ ∑ di  voce.     .   50   Example  23.  all  of  these  options  are  acceptable.   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ which  are  augmented  by  Bellini’s  choice  of  pitch.  Richard.  the  F4  is  a  note  that  occurs  below  the  seconda  passaggio66  and  so  it  is  likely  that  the   tenor  will  be  comfortable  to  experiment  with  different  colors  and  timbres  that   13 communicate  the  text. del tuo san 12 & 8 ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œ œ j‰ ‰ j‰ ‰ ? 12 œ 8 œ 4   & { ∑ ∑ œ - œ œ gue la ‰ œ œœ j ‰ ‰ œ ven .    At  this  point  the  tenor  has  several  options.  and  his  use  of  fermata.

Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ ∑ 12 8 ∑ ∑ 12 8 ∑ 12 ∑8 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .   prolong   but  e∑nhance   ‰ Œ embellishments   Ó Ó ∑ the  ∑ text.    Bellini:  “È  s? erbato  ∑a  questo  acciaro”   (I  C∑apuleti  e  i  M ∑ ∑ ontecchi)  ∑mm.   a Bellini  follows  this  by  adding   tmor.    Bellini  sets  the  word   ∑ where  ∑tenors  who   ∑ possess  e∑ven  the  lightest   ∑ ‘dolce’  (‘sweet’)  in  an  area  o& f  the  voice   vocal  ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ U ∑ œ œ œ œ n œ # œ œ œ b œ n œ œ œmnœoment”   œ [stan]  of  ‘∑istante.   of  the  tenor  and  conductor.  13-­‐14   ∑ 6 & 12 8 { œ™ œ ‰ ‰™ œ J Rœ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ™ Œ ™ < œœœœœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nnœœ nœ œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ 12 &8 nœ J ? 12 œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœ œœœœœœ œœœœ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ 8 œ œ œ J 10 & fret ∑ - ta ∑ il dol . il ciel ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ lo U Œ™ œ œœœ ‰ ‰ j Œ & 12 8 J n œœ œ œ n œ œ œ œ œj ? 12 œ 8 œ œ Œ   œœ U Œ™   7 ∑ has  the   ∑ opportunity   ∑ to  be  c∑reative  with   ∑ One  additional  moment   & in  w∑hich  the  tenor     { ∑ text  declamation  is  during  the  phrase  ‘dolce  istante’  (example  25). he  tempi  of  which  del are  at  the  discretion   15 U ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ j  These   4 & j ‰∑ Œ the  cadence.vocal  embellishments.   51   Example  24.cei .  9   12 œ &8 { U œœ J œœœ ‰ œ œ J J ta - lia.    Bellini:  “È  serbato  a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi)  m.       & 4 œœ ? 44 œœ ‰ Œ J& ∑ { Ó œœ œœ ‰ Œ J ∑ ∑ U Ó ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Example  25.stan   ∑ ∑ ∑ - te.’   œ œ œ œ œbœy  œadding   ∑   tenor  to  further  embellish   œ#œ œ œ#œover   & 44 this  “sweet   œ™ #œ œa#œ  fermata   ∑ mechanisms  will  be  able  to  ? add  warmth  and  sweetness  to  their  timbre.    Bellini  allows  the   { mor. il ciel.

 per  chi  pugnasti”  from  Bellini’s  1829  Zaira.  German.  in  which  the  progressive  music  of  composers  such  as  Rossini  was   excluded  from  the  curriculum.  the  text  is  subservient  to  the  music  and  to   the  voice.    For  this  reason.   genres.    His  melodies  are  highly  accessible  –  one  might  even  say  predictable  –   and  the  supporting  harmonies  and  harmonic  progressions  share  this  same  characteristic.     .   52   Bellini  cared  deeply  about  the  text.    The  primary  reason  for  this  is  that  Bellini’s  music  is  more  accessible  than   the  music  of  his  Italian.    His  manner  of  setting  texts  is  logical  yet  thoughtful  –  no   doubt  crafted  in  this  manner  in  order  to  facilitate  proper  text  declamation.  so  much  so  that  he  pioneered  this  canto   declamato  in  an  effort  to  unite  the  music  and  the  text.     These  traits  are  the  manifestation  of  the  conservative  education  he  received  from  the  Real   Collegio  di  Musica.    However  within  the  realm  of  bel  canto  it  seemed  to  be  revolutionary.  and  composers.         Using  Bellini  to  learn  and  perfect  the  art  of  text  declamation  is  a  necessary  endeavor   for  all  singers.         Zaira   One  must  perfect  the  principles  of  canto  declamato  by  studying  any  aria  from   Bellini’s  repertory.  there  is  great  value  in  the  study  of  Bellini  and   canto  declamato.   namely  Franz  Schubert.    Among  Bellini’s  contemporaries.    This  is  particularly  true  of   Bellini’s  art  songs.  the  belief  that  the  text  and  music  should  work  congruently  was  not   new.  and  French  contemporaries.    This  is  due  to   the  perception  that  in  Italian  bel  canto  literature.  periods.     The  accessible  nature  of  Bellini’s  music  means  that  the  principles  learned  from  the   study  of  his  art  songs  can  be  applied  to  art  songs  and  arias  from  a  variety  of  styles.  With  the  aria  “Per  chi  mai.

 as  this  is  mandated  by   the  accent  marks.  the  tenor  must  use  the  double  consonant  [ff]  in  the  word   soffrir  to  convey  the  meaning  of  this  word.”       Musically.”     In  short.   53   however.    Finally.  soffrir  (tolerate).   Bellini  undoubtedly  believed  that  much  of  this  work  had  potential.     Just  as  certain  text  warrants  attention  in  the  aria  from  I  Capuletti  e  i  Montecchi.  the  double  consonant  should  be  sounded  in  such  a  way  that  it  conveys  the  sense  of   enduring  intolerance.  including  the  tenor  aria.    Typically  the   word  soffrir  is  translated  as  “suffer.         .  “Per  chi  mai.  many  of  the  same   concepts  detailed  with  “È  serbato  a  questo  acciaro”  can  be  translated  directly  to  “Per  chi   mai.  there  are  several  words  that  warrant   emphasis.  per  chi  pugnasti.  a  few  of  which  include  insulterà  (insult).  the  latter  shares  striking  similarities  with  the  former.  for  I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi.  and  at  the  time  this  was  an  unpopular  topic).    Therefore.  it  should  be  translated  as  “tolerate.    He  reworked  much  of   Zaira.”       Specifically  relating  to  text  declamation.  the  tenor  must  find  a  different  vocal  color  or  nuance  with  each  repeated   recitation  of  the  text.  and  viltà  (cowardice).  as  Zaira  was   actually  composed  before  I  Capuletti  e  i  Montecchi.      Despite  the  failure  of  Zaira  (the  opera’s   storyline  concerns  interreligious  marriage.  relative  to  the  context  of  this  aria.    The  tenor   must  be  sure  to  put  stress  on  the  final  syllables  of  insulterà  and  viltà.”  but  in  this  context.  and  not  suffering.  as  these  and  other  bits  of  text  are   repeated.  per  chi  pugnasti”  is  strikingly  similar  to  “È  serbato  a  questo   acciaro”  –  rather.    In  addition.  the  tenor  can  make  direct  translations  to  the  principles  previously  discussed  with     “È  serbato  a  questo  acciaro.  these  words   must  be  delivered  in  such  a  way  that  their  meanings  are  adequately  highlighted.

    This  is  the  first  time  that  the  aria  has  been  made  accessible.         While  set  with  librettist  Felice  Romani’s  somewhat  antiquated  Italian.org)  website.         .imslp.  it   has  never  been  available  in  a  piano/vocal  reduction.       The  following  pages  contain  the  Zaira  aria.  sings  the  aria.  Napoli.       A  major  reason  to  include  the  aria  in  this  document  is  due  to  the  fact  that  to  date.   O  my  leader.  each  tenor  aria   from  a  completed  Bellinian  opera  is  available  for  study  and  performance.    He  emphatically  opposes  the   marriage  of  the  Christian  slave  girl  Zaira  and  the  Sultan  Orosmane.  only  the  duet  “Io  troverò  nell’Asia”  and  the  trio  “Cari  oggetti  in  seno   a  voi”  have  ever  been  available  for  study.  transcribed  in  a  piano/vocal  reduction.  via   the  Biblioteca  del  Conservatorio  di  musica  S.    A  manuscript  copy  of  the  entire  opera   is  available  on  the  International  Music  Score  Library  Project  (www.  and  in  so  doing.   54   In  Act  I.  Pietro  a  Majella.  for  whom  did  you  fight.  Corasmino   is  voicing  his  displeasure  over  the  sacrilegious  union.  Corasmino.    Previously.  and  it  was  used  to   transcribe  this  aria.  O  Saladin!   Of  the  Empire  that  you  founded   Be  this  the  evil  fate?   That  a  degenerate  and  blind  child   insult  your  throne?   Oh!  Inspire  him  with  your  example   and  do  not  tolerate  his  cowardice!     The  opera  was  never  published  in  its  entirety  and  so  has  fallen  into  relative   obscurity.  the   translation  is  as  follows:   For  whom.    In  this  aria.  the  Grand  Vizier.

sti 3 { & œ ? ˙™ 5 & œ ‹ .com   - ˙™ œ   pu - œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > œ J ≈œ œ R œ   .pe œ™ - Œ la - ro.ro che fon œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ Copyright 2012 Classical Vocal Reprints www.  per  chi  pugnasti”  (Zaira)  mm.pe .  1-­‐26   Per chi mai. œ œ œ™ œ œ œ dell' im .classicalvocalrep. per chi pugnasti Corasmino's aria from the opera Zaira (1829) q. œ o œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ J œ mio du . per chi 12 &8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? 12 8 ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ Œ™ œ™ œ œ œ œ™ & ‹ gna .   55   Example  26.ce Sa ˙™ œ œ™ J Dell' im . = 47 chi œ ma - Œ™ i.    Bellini:  “Per  chi  mai. = 47 12 & 8 Ó™ ‹ { Vincenzo Bellini Transcribed and edited by James Loving Thompson Œ™ œ œ™ J œ Per q.di { & ?   œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ no! œ œ ˙™ œ mio œ œ ‰ Œ™ œ œ ‰ œ œ J o œ 3œ œ œ - œ œ du .ce.

sto.noin .   56   Example  26  continued   2 7 & ‹ { Œ™ œ™ œ œ œ œ™ da - & œ ? ˙™ 9 & œ ‹ sti { sti œ T - œ œ #œ J no? œ & ‹ { ˙™ rà œ œ J fia œ Œ™ œ œ ˙™ œ œ≈œ R pur que .sul œ™ - fia œ œ J œ œ ˙™ œ œ™ nœ œ œ™ œ œ Tra .toe — cie-co fi & œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ ? œ™ œ™ ˙™ 11 œ Œ te .na .sul .rà? œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ — Tu is .te- œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙™ œ™ œ œ œ œ 3œ œ œ #œ œ™ in .raa lui con œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ™ œ™ œ™     .gli . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? ™ b˙ ˙™ - œ œ J — de - œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙™ Œ glio œ™ œ J pur que .pi .stoil rio œ œ œ™ œ œ œ — al tuo tro .

frir la sua vil . œœ œœ œœ.da .a vil . œœ œœ œœ.tà. œœ œœ œœ. œ œœ ‰ U Ó - Œ™ su . œœ œœ œœ. œ œœ œ. la œœ œ œœ œ ˙™ w Per œ ™ Jœ œ™ chi ma œ™ œ™ U ‰ œ™ Ó™ œ™ œ™ œ™ œ™ w i.   57   Example  26  continued 13 & ‹ { & ? 15 & ‹ { & ? œ™ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ U œ ™ œ aœpiacere œ œ ™ œ œ™ si .glio non sof . œœ œœ œœ.pe 18 { œ U œœ. œœ œœ œœ. œœ œœ œ. Dell' im . œ œœ œ. œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ™ œ™ œ™ ™ U œ œ ˙™ J & œ œ™ Œ ™ ‹ gna .sti œ œ™ œ™ œ™ œ™ ‰œ œ œ œ œ dell' im . œœ œœ œœ. œ œœ œ.sti. œœ œœ œœ.pe . œ J œ œJ per chi pu œœ. œœ œœ œœ. œœ œœ œœ.tà! U Ó j œœœœ j œ Ó™ 3 U œ ™ ™ & œœ ™ Ó™ U ? œ™ Ó™ Œ™ Œ™ - œ™ œ™ œ œ œ œ3œœœ œ™ #œ œ Œ™ J œ™ ro œ™ che œ œœœœœœœœ œ ˙™ œ™ œ™ fon .ro che fon œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ ˙™ ˙™ œœ œ     .

stin.sti fia pur que .a vil . œ œ œ œ 3œ œ œ #œ o non œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙™ œ™ œ™ ˙™ œ œœ U œ œ œ œ™ su - a.stoil rio de. U & œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ ? ˙™ ˙™ j œ™ œ œ u ∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏∏                                                                                         sof- œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w™ a piacere la U Œ™ U Œ™ su .   58   Example  26  continued       4 œ™ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ j œ™ œ & œ ‹ da . la. O! — œ œ œ J Œ 21 { & œ œ œ ? ˙™ 23 œ & JŒ ‹ frir { œ™ la œ œ œ œœœœœ so - œ™ frir.tà! U Œ™ U Œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙˙ ™™™ ˙™ ˙™ .

   This  feature  is  highlighted  in  the  aria  “Ah!  perchè  non  posso  odiarti.”     Specifically.”    Grove  Music  Online.   59   CHAPTER  7:   “BELLA  NICE.    The  opera  was  a  success.  the  juxtaposition  of  chorus  within  an  aria  underlines  Bellini’s   desire  to  constantly  progress  the  standard  principles  of  operatic  form  and  structure.com.  Bellini  reached  his  mature  style  of  composition.  as  was  witnessed  with  I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi.  Bellini  composed  sections  of  chorus  to  interject  within  the  aria.  was  to  experiment  with   traditional  aria  forms.    Rather.  which  again   included  the  acclaimed  tenor  Giovanni  Rubini.     .  and  completed  it  in  mid-­‐February.oxfordmusiconline.  which  allowed  them  to  segue  seamlessly  into  the  true  aria.  CHE  D’AMORE”   AND    “AH!    PERCHÉ NON  POSSO  ODIARTI”   FROM  LA  SONNAMBULA         Bellini’s  sixth  professional  opera  La  sonnambula  (“The  Sleepwalker”)  debuted   March  6.  www.         The  success  of  the  opera  was  due  in  part  to  the  star-­‐studded  cast.  pitching                                                                                                                   67  Julian  Budden  et  al.    This   pursuit  was  not  done  randomly  or  casually.    While  not  an   unprecedented  convention.   accessed  16  March.    The  recitatives  assumed  stylistic  qualities  of   arioso.  Bellini   continued  to  hone  his  canto  declamato  style.  “La  sonnambula.    Bellini  exploited  Rubini’s  abilities.  Bellini  made  these  structural  decisions   with  the  intention  of  creating  realism  and  adding  to  the  dramatic  impact.         With  La  sonnambula.  1831  at  Milan’s  Teatro  Carcano.    An  aspect  of   this  style.  2012.67    Bellini  did  not  begin  work  on  the  opera  until   January  2  of  that  year.    Moreover.  and   solidified  Bellini  as  one  of  the  most  heralded  Italian  composers  of  the  era.

      The  problem  for  contemporary  operatic  tenors  is  that  the  expectation  is  for  them  to   incorporate  chest  voice  production  even  into  the  upper  extremes  of  the  vocal  range.  the  major  challenge  as  it  pertains  to  the  aria   “Ah!  perchè  non  posso  odiarti”  and  the  entirety  of  La  sonnambula  is  sustaining  the  high   tessitura.”    The  tessitura  matrix  ultimately  calculates  the  average  pitch  of  an  art   song  or  aria.    However.  and   so  was  developed  for  this  document.    In  fact.  the  singer  can  then  evaluate  the   difficulty  he  would  have  in  sustaining  that  single  pitch  throughout  the  duration  of  the  art   song  or  aria.    Below  is  a  tessitura  matrix  for  the  tenor  aria  “Ah!  perchè  non  posso  odiarti”   from  La  Sonnambula.  regardless  of  fach.    The   method  of  gaining  access  to  the  upper  register  has  been  outlined  in  this  document.       Tessitura  is  difficult  to  quantify.    In  order  to  compare   the  tessituras  of  an  art  song  and  aria.  even   when  using  chest  voice  production.  but  every  singer.                     .    At  this  point.  a  system  of  quantifying  tessitura  was  necessary.  it  can  then  be  hypothetically  inserted  to   replace  the  actual  pitches  of  the  piece.    Once  the  average  pitch  is  calculated.  and   many  tenors.  are  able  to  gain  entry  to  these  notes.   60   the  music  at  a  high  tessitura.    The  end  result  of  this  endeavor  is  what  I  call  a   “tessitura  matrix.  Bellini’s  autographed  score  shows  the  tenor  sections   pitched  a  full  tone  higher.  understands  it’s   meaning  and  how  it  affects  voice  classification  and  repertoire  choices.  both  professional  and  amateur.

      3.    This  number  is  what  is   referred  to  as  a  pitch’s  Composite  Value. Multiply  the  pitch’s  numeric  value  and  it’s  Frequency.         .        The  system  begins  with  assigning   a  numeric  value  to  each  pitch  throughout  the  breadth  of  the  tenor  range. Calculate  the  sum  of  the  Frequencies  to  find  the  total  number  of  melodic  notes  that   are  used  in  the  art  song  or  aria.  the  matrix  can  extend.    Tessitura  Matrix  for  “Ah!  Perche  non  posso  ordiarti”     Tessitura)Matrix) "Ah!))Perche)non)posso)odiarti" Tenor)Aria)from)La#sonnambula Pitch C3 C#/D♭4 D4 D#/E♭4 E4 F4 F#/G♭4 G4 G#/A♭4 A4 A3/B♭4 B3 C4 C#/D♭3 D3 D#/E♭3 E3 F3 F#/G♭3 G3 G#/A♭3 A3 A3/B♭3 B4 C5 Numeric7Value 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Frequency 8 8 8 8 8 12 8 6 8 21 45 8 76 8 78 45 6 42 8 12 8 2 2 8 8 Composite7Value 8 8 8 8 8 72 8 48 8 210 495 8 988 8 1170 720 102 756 8 240 8 44 46 8 8 Sum)of)composite)values)=)4891 Total)number)of)melodic)notes)=)347   4891/347)≈)14)=)D♭     The  process  of  completing  a  tessitura  matrix  uses  very  basic  mathematics  and   provides  and  empirical  method  of  calculating  tessitura. Tally  the  number  of  times  that  an  individual  pitch  is  used  in  the  art  song  or  aria.    Repeat  this  step  for  each  pitch  that  is  used.    The  remainder  of  the  process  involves  several   other  basic  components:   1.     This  number  is  referred  to  as  a  pitch’s  Frequency.    With  each  passing  half-­‐step.    The  tenor  range   spans  roughly  two  octaves.  each  half-­‐step  should   continue  to  increase  by  an  integer  of  one).   61   Table  1.       4.    In  this  case.       2.  the   pitches  increase  in  numeric  value  by  an  integer  of  one  (note  that  if  a  piece  goes  beyond  C5   as  many  Bellinian  pieces  do.  from  C3  to  C5  (25  half-­‐steps). Calculate  the  sum  of  the  Composite  Values.

 most  would  presumably  agree  that  singing  the  note  D♭4  347  times   in  succession  would  cause  at  least  a  moderate  amount  of  fatigue  for  the  tenor.  then  he  may  simply  isolate  the  most  vocally     .    In  theory.  che  d’amore”  is  the  proper  option.    While   there  may  be  some  discrepancy  among  tenors  and  pedagogues  regarding  the  difficulty  of   sustaining  the  tessitura.  or   wishes  to  begin  to  train  his  stamina  gradually.     This  number  will  correspond  with  a  pitch  in  the  matrix.     In  the  case  of  “Ah!  perchè  non  posso  odiarti.  with  singing  the  aria  after  having  replaced  each  note  with  the  average  pitch.    This  will  adequately   train  him  to  sustain  a  slightly  lower  tessitura  over  a  longer  duration.    In  this  case.         In  order  to  train  a  tenor  to  meet  the  challenging  demands  sustaining  the  tessitura  of   “Ah!  perchè  non  posso  odiarti.    In  short.  the  average  pitch  is  actually  one  half-­‐step  higher   (D4)  than  the  average  pitch  of  “Ah!  perchè  non  posso  odiarti.  with  the   average  pitch  being  D♭4.  but  will  sustain  that  tessitura  for  a  shorter  duration.  the   aria  “Ah!  perchè  non  posso  odiarti”  is  situated  at  a  relatively  high  tessitura.  which  is  a  trait  of  the   aria.”    In  spite  of  this  fact.”    The  logic  in   pairing  this  art  song  with  this  aria  is  that  the  tenor  will  experience  a  higher  overall  tessitura   in  the  art  song.  the  tessitura  matrix  equates  singing  the  actual   aria.   62   5.”  an  art  song  with  a  similar  or  identical  average  pitch  must  be   used. Divide  the  sum  of  the  Composite  Values  by  the  total  number  of  melodic  pitches.  then.”  there  are  347  melodic  notes.  the  art  song  “Bella  Nice.  and  is  the  average  pitch  of   the  art  song  or  aria.  che  d’amore.    As  the   corresponding  tessitura  matrix  indicates.         If  the  tenor  does  not  wish  to  learn  the  entire  art  song  in  training  for  the  aria.  there  are   comparatively  few  (204)  melodic  pitches  involved  in  “Bella  Nice.

 but  will  correspond  to  the  different  pitches   that  are  used  for  the  bass.  the  baritone   matrix  might  range  from  A3-­‐A5.  che  d’amore”       Tessitura)Matrix) "Bella)Nice.  it  can   be  used  to  make  pedagogical  connections  between  art  songs  and  arias  across  the  spectrum   of  the  repertory.7)≈)E♭4     The  tessitura  matrix  can  be  used  for  any  art  song  and  any  aria.  che  d’amore.    Below  is  the  tessitura  matrix  for   measures  34-­‐42  of  “Bella  Nice.  34-­‐43  of  “Bella  Nice.  with  A3  having  a  numeric  value  of  1  and  A5  having  a   numeric  value  of  25.   63   taxing  measures  of  an  art  song.    For  example.  that  of  E♭4.    In  the  case  of  “Bella  Nice.  che  d’amore.   the  numeric  values  1-­‐25  will  remain  the  same.    Using  this  matrix  as  a  tool  for  literature  selection  helps  to  ensure   that  the  literature  being  studied  is  appropriate  for  his  current  ability  level.)34:42 Song)for)voice)and)piano Pitch C3 C#/D♭3 D3 D#/E♭3 E3 F3 F#/G♭3 G3 G#/A♭3 A3 A/B♭3 B3 C4 C#/D♭4 D4 D#/E♭4 E4 F4 F#/G♭4 G4 G#/A♭4 A4 A 3/B♭4 B4 C5 Numeric7Value 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Frequency : : : : : 1 : : : : 4 : 2 : 8 4 : 6 1 5 : : : : Composite7 Value : : : : : 6 : : : : 44 : 26 : 120 64 : 108 19 100 : : : : : Sum)of)composite)values)=)487 Total)number)of)melodic)notes)=)31   487/31)≈)15.    If  calculating  for  low  voice  singers.)che)d'amore"mm.         I  developed  this  matrix  with  the  added  intention  of  aiding  in  literature  selection  for   beginning  voice  students.         .    Tessitura  matrix  for  mm.  baritone.  or  mezzo-­‐soprano  ranges.”         Table  2.  and  can  be   transposed  in  order  to  be  useful  for  low  voices  as  well.    Moreover.”  measures  34-­‐42   contain  an  even  higher  average  pitch.

oxfordmusiconline.  “Norma.  Bellini  mastered  the  canto  declamato  style.  dark.69    It  is  plausible  that  Bellini  created  the   dramatic  vocal  traits  required  of  Pollione  to  pair  with  Norma’s  dramatic  disposition.  289.”  Grove  Music  Online.  Pearl  Yeadon.  2012.             .  the  role  was  created  for  Domenico  Donzelli.    Instead.  UK:  Scarecrow  Press.                                                                                                                       68  Simon  Maguire  and  Elizabeth  Forbes.  whose  voice  was   described  as  “forceful.  Bellini  was  again  without  the  services  of  his   faithful  Rubini.  2010).    This  trait  is  a  departure  from  typical   Bellinian  roles  and  training  a  tenor  to  meet  this  demand  is  a  unique  endeavor.  accessed  7  May.   Bellini  clearly  understood  the  differences  in  composing  for  the  tenore  di  grazia  and  the   dramatic  tenor.    The  Opera  Singer's  Career  Guide:   Understanding  the  European  Fach  System.  whose   role  is  tremendously  demanding  for  the  soprano  both  in  terms  of  the  dramatic  and  vocal   requirements.  and  low.     69  McGinnis.  as  it  rarely  ascends  beyond  G4.    To  be  forthright.   64   CHAPTER  8:   “SOGNO  D’INFANZIA”   AND   “MECO  ALL’ALTAR  DI  VENERE”   FROM  NORMA             Arguably  the  most  famous  and  revered  opera  composed  by  Bellini  is  Norma.  and  Willis.  the  tenor  must  first  possess  a  voice  that  can  be  described  in  a   way  that  is  similar  or  identical  to  what  Donzelli’s  must  have  been.  Pollione.  the  role   of  Pollione  requires  a  dramatic  tenor  voice.”68    The  entirety  of  the  role  reflects  the  quality  of   Donzelli’s  voice.     Admittedly.com.    If  so.       As  for  the  principal  tenor.    With  Norma.       First  and  foremost.  the  opera  receives  such  acclaim  due  in  large  part  to  the  title  character.  Marith  McGinnis.   www.    (Plymouth.

 with  the  exception  of  Norma’s   Pollione. co .    “Oh!    Quante  amare  lagrime”  (Adelson  e  Salvini)  mm. fier.si.jae l'es .   65   Perhaps  the  most  overt  trait  of  a  dramatic  tenor  voice  is  that  he  must  possess  great   power  in  the  upper  range.  are  considered  to  be  ideal  for  the  tenore  di  grazia. œ bœ a œ œ œ œœœœœ œ œœœœ J co .    All  Bellinian  tenor  roles.sul .to tra   ∑ ∑ la gio .           Example  27. tra la gio .    The  melodic  aspect  that  is   consistent  with  all  of  the  tenore  di  grazia  arias  is  how  Bellini  approaches  the  notes  G4  and   beyond  (examples  27-­‐32).  20-­‐21   œ œ 4 &4 J { tan .  Apart  from  the  timbre  and  tone  quality  of  an  individual  voice.ja.  an   art  song  or  aria’s  melodic  material  can  be  used  facilitate  repertoire  selection  that  is  suitable   for  the  dramatic  tenor  voice.si & 44 ‰ œj œ œ ‰ œœj œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ ?4 œ Œ œ Œ 4 œ œ 7 & { & ? ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ ∑ - œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœœ œ œœœ œ œ œ   < œ œ œ ™ œ œ œœ œ œ ## 12 ™œ œ ‰ Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ 8 œ œ   œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ Œ ™ Œ ™ Œ ™ œ œ ## 12 œ ‰ ‰   Œ ™ 8 J ‰ Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ can .tar ∑ ∑   ∑ # &# ∑ ∑ ?## ∑ ## 12 œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ™ œ 8 œ R  ≈ J ∑ { do ∑   # &# 11 fier ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   .to.

 a  questo  acciaro”  (I  Capuletti  e  i  Montecchi)  mm.  7-­‐8   12 œ™ &8 { man 12 & 8 Ó™ 2 21 œ ? 12 œ 8 - œœ b b9 & b b 8 œ™ { & ˙™ - œ ™ œ œ™™ Œ te il Œ™ nœ ™ œ vi ‰ œœ œ œ - œœ œ œ - con .  68-­‐69   { œœ œ b3 &b 4 ˙ mor.  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm.    “A  te.œch'ioœ ‰œ œœ ‰ con œ œ ∑ ∑ nnnn ∑ ∑ nnn   n ∑ ∑ - ## 12 œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ™ œ & 8 œ R≈ J Example  29.    “Nel  furor. dal b 3 œœ ™™ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ &b 4 Ó ? bb 43 œœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ - œ œnœ bœ œ œ œ - œ œœ œœœ œœ - œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ ∑ ∑ ∑ l'a - mor.  “È  serbato.& ∑ & ∑ { ? b bb 98 Œ ™ œ œ n nn ∑ 12 8 ∑ ∑ 12 8 va.jae l'es .sul .ja.to tra la gio . tra la gio .  delle  tempeste”  (Il  Pirata)  mm.pi - œœ œ U œ nœ œ œ nœ nœ nnnn œ œ œ œ - jœ œ b b9 ‰ œ œ œ b ‰ n œ & &b 8 œœ nœ‰ œŒ ™ œ œ œŒ ™n œœœœ ‰ #œ œ œ œ ? bœ œ œ bœ œ œ ? b b 9 œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ nœ ‰ bb8 J J J { œ œ™ œ ra.sor ‰™ œ œ œ™ œ ® œ œ™ œ - tea dem . œ‰ Œ J œ œ œœ j ‰Œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ Œ J   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   8 b &b b ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .tar ∑ ∑ Example  30.  8-­‐9   Œ™ 24 { Œ™ Œ™ ∑ < œ œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ## 12 œ ™ œ œ œ ‰ Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ & 8 œ œ œ œ j‰ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ ? ## 12 œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ J ‰ ‰ Œ™ Œ™ 8 J   can . ch'io j bbbb 98 ‰ œœ œ ‰ œœ œ œœ ‰ ‰ œ 9 œ bbbb 8 ‰ ‰ ‰ J ‰ ‰ œJ ‰ ‰ ∑ ∑ nnnn nnnn ∑   66   12 8 ∑ Example  28. il œ ˙™ œ Œ™ œ va.

œœœœœj ‰œ.sti.to. œ œœ œœ ? b 4 j ‰œ™œ ‰œ™ j ‰œ™œ ‰œ™ j ‰ ? œ œ™ œ ™ œ ™ œ ™ b 4œ ™ œ J œ J & ‰ Œœ Œ™ Œ™ - ro che œ Œ™ J fon . œœ œœ œœ.ce. Dell' im . œœ œœœœœ. per œ ™ œ™ UŒ ™ œ œJ ˙™ & ‹ gna . œœ œœ œœ.    In  order  to  access   the  top  register.  the  tenore  di  grazia  must  deliver  the  passaggio  notes  with  the  same   method  of  production  that  is  required  for  notes  beyond  the  secondo  passaggio.  he  is  already  in  the   midst  of  upper  register  production. œœ œœœœœ. œœ œœ œœ. œœ œœ œœ. œjœ‰œ.o ma - i. œœŒœœ œœ.    “Per  chi  mai.    Another   way  of  stating  this  is  that  when  the  tenor  is  in  the  secondo  passaggio.pe U œ ™ ™ & œœ ™ Ó™ U ? œ™ Ó™     chi œœ œ‰ J œ™ pu J j œ œ‰™ Œ œ ™ ∑   Example  32.  22-­‐23   15 & ‹ { œ™ b œfij œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ ≈ & bœ 4™ œ ™ œ™ ™ w Ó Jœ ∑ nn ∑ ∑ œ œ œœ.ro che fon œ œ œœœœœœœœ œ œ œœœœœœœœœ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ œ™ œ™ œœ œ   The  aspect  that  is  consistent  with  each  of  these  (and  other)  examples  is  the  fact  that  the  top   register  is  approached  from  a  note  that  is  within  the  secondo  passaggio. œœœ œœœ œœ.sti ‰œ œ œ™ œ œ œ dell' im -pe .tri . Œœ œ œ.‰œœ Œœœ œœ.    “Ah!  Perché  non  posso  odiarti”  (La  sonnambla)  mm.  and  so  can  easily  make  the  transition  out  of  the  secondo   passaggio  and  into  the  upper  register.         .  per  chi  pugnasti”  (Zaira)  mm.di . no.{ { 12 & #8 œœ j œUÓ œ œ U‰ œ œœ. œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ & œ œ œ œ œœœœ œ œ œ œ œ Uj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ ? ## 12 œ ‰j ‰ UÓŒ ™ ™ œœ™‰ ‰ Œœ™™ œj ‰ ‰   Œ67   ? ‰ 8 œ™ œ™ œ ™ Jœ J ˙ ∑ ∑ Example  31.  18-­‐20     œ œ œ œ3œœœ œ™ #œ 18 { Jœ œ J tra . œœbœœb 4œœ. œjœ‰œ.da . œœ œœ ∑ & 4 œœœœœœœœœœ nn ∑ ∑ nn ∑ ∑ w Per { chi v .

gi - œ & 43 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ œ œ œ sain 3 8 ∑   œ œ ˙™ œ       Pollione’s  ascent  from  D4  to  G4  reoccurs   car numerous   ratimes  throughout   vo the  -aria  “Meco   - { œ Œ Œ all'altar  di  Venere.    “Meco  all'altar  di  Venere”  (Norma)  m.dal .  the  upper  register  pitches  are  predominately   approached  from  pitches  that  are  below  the  seconda  passaggio  (example  33).ti reason  why  these  two  pieces  translate  so  well   is  the  fact  that  each  frequently  ascend  to  G4.  the  tenor  does  not  begin  the  leap  while  within  the  parameters  of  upper  register   production.do .  the  4approach   Œ œplays  aŒ  significant   Œ œ Œ Œ œ œ Œ to  Œ the  œupper  Œregister   role  in  determining  the  voice  type  best  suited  for  Pollione.raA.   68     In  Pollione’s  aria  from  Norma.  and  do  so  from  notes  that  are  well  below  the   & ∑ œ ? ‰ ˙™   œj œ œ œ œ Œ Œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .  and  therefore  he  requires  more  power  and  weight  in  the  voice  in  order  to  make   the  ascent.    There  can  be  little  doubt  that  due   œ characteristics   œ to  the  melodic   œ and  the   < glioa .         13 The  art  song  that  will  adequately  prepare   a  tenor  for  the  demands  of  “Meco  all'altar   œ & { Œ Œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ di  Venere”  is  “Sogno  d’infanzia.             Example  33.  7   œ œ œ œ œ™ 4 &4 { & 44 ?4 4   < œ J ∑ < œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œœ œœ ∑ J J 3 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j j œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œJ ‰ Œ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ e .”    The  major   .    At  these   moments.”  just  as  the  melodic  leaps   3 associated  with  tenore  di  grazia  arias  are   ∑ &4 ∑ ∑ prevalent  as  well.rar ∑ j œ j œ j œœ ? 3 ‰ ˙™œ œ œ œ ‰ ˙™œj œ œ ‰ ˙™#œ œ œ ‰ ˙™#œ œ œ ‰ ˙™# fach  category  for  the  role  of  Pollione.

 ∑which  a∑llows  t∑he  tenor   ∑ to  practice  this   “Sogno   & dœ’infanzia”   { .raA-odal gi -fact   sainthat  he  is  actually  descending  to  G3.    In  doing  so.  the   leap  from  D4  to  G4  is  a  prevalent  interval.   perfect  fifth  l& eap   pedagogically.  a  similar  melodic  figure   occurs  in  the  art  song  “Sogno  d’infanzia.   J  However.ti technique  numerous   times  with  varying  texts  and  vowels.  the  tenor   “feeling”  of  D4  in  espite   < f  t.  t∑he  tenor  m∑ay  also  ∑negate  ∑the  descent   that  note   ∑ to  ∑ the  G3.    As  example  34  shows.       will  achieve  maximum   4 œœ œœ œœ œœ r‰esonance   œ ‰ œœœ ∑ ∑ ∑     &4 J J 3 3 ? 4 j ‰ œœœœœœœœœœœœ j ‰œœœœ ‰ Œ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ 4œ œ J ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 43 ∑ 43 3 Example  34.  the  ascents  to  the  G4  are  virtually  identical.  ∑and  replace   ∑ & with  a  D4.    This  method   j œ wœill  be  most  beneficial  in  the  early  stages  of  study.    An  initial  analysis  would  indicate   that  the  octave  leap  found  in  the  art  song  seems  to  be  markedly  different  from  that  of  the   œ™ œ 44 œfound   œ œ œin  the  aria.  126-­‐130   œ & 43 œ œ œ Œ Œ 3 &4 ∑ ∑ 8 { ∑ ∑ car - ˙™ ra œ vo - - ∑ œ œ œ < glioa .   ∑ ∑ ∑ the   ∑ tenor   ∑ must   ∑ retain   43 the   { .    As  the  tenor   œ ? ‰ ˙™œ œ œ Œ Œ ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .    In  order  to  make  a  direct   melodic  connection.   69   seconda  passaggio.do .”         The  difference  between  the  two  examples  is  that  in  the  art  song.he   < œ œ œ œ and  clarity  on  the  G4.    “Sogno  d’infanzia”  mm.  the  melodic  line   first  descends  to  G3  before  making  the  octave  leap  to  G4.    In  the  aria.    Moreover.rar ∑ œ œ - ∑ œ œ œ œ œ ? 3 ‰ ˙™œj œ œ œ ‰ ˙™œj œ œ œ ‰ ˙™#œj œ œ œ ‰ ˙™#œj œ œ œ ‰ ˙™#œj œ œ œ 4 œ Œ Œ œ Œ Œ œ Œ Œ œ Œ Œ œ Œ Œ     13 Œ Œ is  a  three-­‐strophe   ∑ ∑ art  ∑ song.

 he  should  sing  the  melodic  material  as  written.   70   becomes  more  technically  stable.”                                                                           .  but  should   be  mindful  of  carrying  excessive  weight  in  the  voice  on  the  ascent  from  G3  to  G4.       Developing  confidence  and  reliability  in  this  technique  will  ultimately  allow  the   tenor  to  make  a  seamless  transition  to  all  the  melodic  material  of  “Meco  all'altar  di  Venere.

 1835.    In  the  years  after  Bellini’s  death.    The  split  between   composer  and  librettist  occurred  during  the  composition  of  Beatrice  di  Tenda.  Bellini  forced  a  new  subject  on  Romani.”  Grove  Music  Online.    Bellini  predicated  a  failure  for  the  March   debut.oxfordmusiconline.    Bellini   received  the  commission  for  Beatrice  di  Tenda  from  Venice’s  La  Fenice  in  May  of  1832.       At  this  time.  but   in  October.  which  resulted  in   Bellini’s  final  opera.  Bellini  acknowledged  that   he  had  yet  to  begin  composing  the  second  act.  and   the  collaboration  ended.    Each  artist  blamed  the  other  for  the  failure..com.  2012.    Romani   finally  delivered  the  libretto  in  January  of  1833.  Romani  was  simultaneously  working  on  five  other  opera  libretti.70   The  opera  features  a  libretto  from  Carlo  Pepoli.  BEL  IDOL  MIO”   TO   “A  TE.  Bellini  moved  to  Paris  in  hopes  of  securing  a  commission  from  the  Paris   Opera.     .   creating  tension  in  the  working  relationship  that  he  had  developed  with  Bellini.    The  opera  debuted  on  January  24.  www.    Two  years  of  negotiations  proved  fruitless.  marking  the  first  time  since  Bianca  e   Fernando  that  Bellini  used  a  librettist  other  than  his  faithful  Romani.  as  he  died  in  1835  having  never  secured   the  commission.  which  is  exactly  what  transpired.  O  CARA”   FROM  I  PURITANI     In  1833.  I  Puritani.   accessed  8  May.   71       CHAPTER  9:   “LA  RICORDANZA”   AND   “PER  PIETÀ.  Beatrice  di  Tenda  was  revived                                                                                                                   70  Simon  Maguire  et  al.  but  by  February.    He  did  receive  a  commission  from  the  Théâtre  Italien.  “I  Puritani.

 who  was  the  librettist  for  I  Puritani.”  in  which  Arturo  soars  to  F5.    “La  ricordanza”  is  set  in   4 .  but  still  features   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ the  three  eighth-­‐note  groupings  (example  35).  it  is  no  longer  considered  a  failure.    At  first  comparison.     4 ∑ ∑ will  most  adequately   ∑ 4 One  B∑ellini  art  song  that   prepare   a  tenor  for  “A  te.    In  order  to  group  the  eighth  notes.  Carlo  Pepoli.  implying  the  triplet  triadic  arpeggios  with  which   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 68 seem  extensive.  but  an  analysis  of  the  rhythmic  impulses  reveals  that  the  aria  and  the  art   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ song  are  structurally  almost  identical.  the  most  obvious  connection  is  found  in  the  meter  and  in  the  rhythmic   ∑ ∑ ∑ 12 patterns  of  the  a∑ccompaniments.  h4 ighlighted  by  the  aria/ensemble   tenor  role.  this  difference  in  orchestration  may   ∑ ∑ ∑ Bellini  is  frequently  connected  (example  36).    Presently.  and  is  occasionally   programmed.   72   and  gained  momentum.  Bellini  had  the  services  of  his  favorite  tenor.  misera.  o  cara”  is  set  in   8∑with  the  accompaniment   43 ∑ featuring  the  three  eighth-­‐note  groupings.         ∑     ∑ ∑ ∑ 98 ∑ 12 8 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑                                                                                                                   71  Ibid.  8 as  studying  “La  ricordanza”   text  for  “La   affords  the  tenor  the  only  opportunity  in  the  Bellinian  repertory  to  study  the  text  setting  of   9 ∑ ∑ ∑ of  art  song  ∑and  opera.    “A  ∑te.  ∑Arturo.  Giovanni  Rubini.  has  several   piece  “A  te.    The   3 ∑ major  musical  ∑moments.71     ∑  For  I  Puritani.  Bellini   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .”    Interestingly.  o  cara”  is  “La   ricordanza.  also  wrote  the   6 ∑ ∑ ricordanza.  o  cara”  and  the  infamous  “Credeasi.  8     a  specific  librettist   in  both  genres     ∑ Musically.       ∑ 4 had  to  notate  them  as  triplets.”    This   ∑ is  a  significant  ∑connection.

 or   4  which  has  a  feel  of  added  length  due  to   ∑ the  application  of  triplets.  Bellini  is   ∑ ## 12 8 ∑ Example  36.    One  example  of  this  is  a  singer’s  ability  to  produce  legato.  which  satisfies  Bellini’s  desire  to  create  a  feeling  of   ∑ ∑ able  to  achieve  the  long  phrasal  length  because  he  notes  the  tempo  as  Largo.    He  employs  the  use  of   8 meter.       ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑∑ ∑ ∑ 12 4 Because  of  the  inherent  cadence  of   8 .  phrase.mor ta ## 12∑ ‰ & 8 œœ œœ œœ œ œ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ ∑ œ œ43 œ œ œ ∑ j ? ## 12 j ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ 8∑ œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™68 Ó™ œ J œ ∑ ∑ 98 44   ∑ ∑ -   ∑ ∑ ∑     8 12 triads. ch'io j bbbb 98 ‰ œœ œ ‰ œœ œ œœ ‰ ‰ œ bbbb 98 ‰ ‰ ‰ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ ‰ ‰ ∑ nnnn nnnn ∑   { 43 Œ™ Œ™ A 44 œ™ j œ œ™ œ te.”  is  Bellini’s  trademark  oscillating   ∑ 21 ∑ ∑ ∑length  to  each  ∑beat.1-­‐2     2 18 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑     bbbb 98 Œ ™ ∑ U œœœœ œ œ nnnn ∑ ∑ ## 12 8 ∑ ∑ ## 12 8 va.    In  addition.  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm.   43 the  entire  piece.  o  cara.   ∑ measure.1-­‐2   ## 12∑ ™ & 8 Œ ∑ ∑ & ∑ { ∑ ∑ ∑ ?   ∑ & œ™ .   ∑ ∑ and  u98ltimately. œ ‰ œ œ œj J J a.    Bellini:  “La  ricordanza”  mm.o ca - ra.  errors  of  technique—become  noticeable.    Bellini:  “A  te.    The  slowness  of  the   ∑∑ ∑ 98 ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 12 8 - ∑ One  of  t∑he  distinct  characteristics   of  6“A  te.   73   Example  35.  technique—rather.     ∑∑ 68 ∑ ∑ The  relatively  slow  rhythmic  pulse  of  these  meters  causes  errors  and  deficiencies  to  be   ∑ ∑ augmented.

 Vincenzo. ch'io ## 12 8 notated  a  rest  to  enhance  the  separation  of  the  first  two  lines  of  text.  95.       21 ## 12 8   ∑ - .72  This  will  allow  the   singer  to  match  the  smoothness  of  the  meter  with  the  smoothness  of  vowel-­‐to-­‐vowel   articulation.o ca - ra.    The  difficulty  in  these  decisions  is  due  to  the  fact  that  he  may  be  forced  to  breathe   during  moments  that  are  not  ideal  for  declamation  of  the  text.    He  must  make  careful  decisions  regarding  when  to  take  a   breath.mor ta -                                                                                                                   72  Bellini.    In  order  to  achieve  this.       can  use  this  rest  to  breathe  and  prepare  for  the  next  line   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ { ## 12 8 va.   74   tempo  mandates  that  the  legato  must  actually  be  produced  with  the  sensation  of  hyper-­‐ legato.  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm.    Notice  that   2 œ œ œ œ nn n ∑ ∑ bbbb 98 Œ ™ n & example  37  shows  punctuation  (a  comma)  after  the  word  “cara.1-­‐2   # 12 & # 8 Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ œ™ œ ‰ œ œ œj J J ∑ # ‰ & # 12 8 œœ œœ œœ œ œ ‰ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ j ? ## 12 œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ Ó™ œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ 8 œ J œ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ { j œ œ™ œ A te.  ed.    In  addition.  Bellini   ∑ b b 9 ‰ œ ‰ œ œj ‰ ‰ b nnnn b 8 œœ œœœ & œ of  material.       Another  important  technical  aspect  to  consider  when  operating  in  a  slow  meter  is   breath  management.   2004). a.  the  tenor  must  be  skilled  in  the   command  of  his  breathing.    (Milano:  Ricordi.    Canzoni  per  voce  e  pianoforte.  the  tenor     ? ∑ ∑ bbbb 98 ‰ ‰ ‰ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ ‰ ‰ nnnn Example  37.  Battaglia  instructs  the  singer  to  give  due  articulation  the   consonants.     18  Examples   37  and  38  show  the  aria  and  tœhe   ™ first  U œphrases   œ of  each  strophe.  but  to  connect  them  closely  to  each  vowel  in  each  word.  Battaglia.”    As  a  result.  Elio.    Bellini:  “A  te.    Due  to  the  long  phrasal  length.

   Example  40  shows  two   musical  phrases  from  “La  ricordanza.”    Notice   in  example  38  that  there  is  no  punctuation  that  separates  the  first  two  lines  of  texts.    The  decision  whether  or  not  to  breathe   becomes  more  complicated  when  a  tenor  considers  that  he  was  able  to  breathe  in  the  first   œ ## 12 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nn ∑ in  b∑reathing  ∑ strophe.  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm.men .  but  the  tenor  should  make  this  and       & 8 œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ j ? ## 12 œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ j ‰ ‰ Œ™ 8 œ œ { ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ nn ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ## 12 8 ∑ nn ∑ ∑ nn ∑ ∑ nn ∑ Example  38.      By  this  rationale.  Bellini  did  not  notate  a  rest  or  a  breath  mark  because  he  wanted  the  text  to  flow   continuously  and  uninterrupted.ra.  25-­‐26     ## 12 & 8 œ™ 6 nn œ™ œ™ œ œ œ œj œ™ J lar di si bel l'or - ra œ ‰ œœœ ™ œœ œ J di si bel # 12 & #8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ ? ## 12 œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ j ™ œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ 8 J œ‰‰Œ J       10 & { ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑   ∑ The  tenor  is  also  faced  with  breath  decisions  in  the  art  song.  and  not  breathing  here  and  at  every   possible  moment  can  lead  to  issues  of  stamina.  h∑e  is  justified   8 eœncountered   ## 12 8 ## 12 ‰based  on  his  individual  needs.  followed   ? ∑   .  when  & he  first   R ≈ Jthis  music.    Each  dl'or ecision   will  have  consequences.to il mio tor in  measure  25.    This  would  indicate  a  moment  where  the  performer  should  take   (night).       all  breathing  decisions   ## 12 8 { .   75   The  first  two  lines  of  the  second  strophe  begin  with  “Al  brillar  di  si  bell’ora.     Therefore.”    Measure  six  features  a  comma  after  the  word  notte   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ & by  a  rest.    The  challenge  with  measure  25  is  that  the  most  difficult   singing  is  in  the  second  strophe  (includes  the  C♯  5). se ram .    Bellini:  “A  te.

3 3 3 3 3 3 œbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœœœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœ œ œ #nœœ œ œ œ j œ3 j‰ Œ j‰ Œ œj ‰ Œ œ œ ‰ Œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œJ J œ œ œ œ   lei che so .la cor 3 3 mi giun .  o  cara.           Example  39.    In  measure  seven  of  the   art  song.  there  is  no  punctuation.  which  ascend  to  challenging  parts  of  the  vocal  range.so di j r œ œ ≈ œ œ™ œ œ œ œœ co œ œœœ 3 œ ‰ Œ œJ 3 j œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ nœ 3 con quel Õ 3 so .    These  factors  call  to  mind   issues  of  stamina.  indicating  that  there  is  no  moment  to  breathe.”    However.see vi sta 3 3   4   .  the  rest  in  measure  seven  of  “La  ricordanza”   gives  the  tenor  the  possibility  of  breathing.  in  spite  of  the  fact  that  this  decision  is  not   supported  by  textual  punctuation  (example  39).  and  so  the  performer  should  weigh  these  and  all  other  performance   factors  in  deciding  the  placement  and  frequency  of  breaths. 3 œœœ œ œj ‰ Œ œ ∑ e pres .   76   a  breath.    Bellini:  “La  ricordanza”  mm.ra 3 3 & b 44 œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ‰ œœ œœ ‰ œœ#nœœ œ œ ? 4 œj ‰ ‰ œ œ b4 œ J &b { &b ?b 3 œ 3 ‰ ™ œR œ ™ œ œ œ j ≈ r œ™ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ™ bœ œ Ó la not - œœ 3 ∑ te.    This  measure  corresponds  with  measure  two  of  the  aria.  as  is  the   case  of  measure  25  of  “A  te.  4-­‐9   & b 44 { ∑ E .         Like  the  aria.  decisions  relating  to  the  respiratory  process  should  be  managed  based   on  the  individual  needs  of  the  singer.la.    This  series  of  breath/no  breath  decisions   are  comparable  to  the  breathing  decisions  the  tenor  faces  in  the  aria.    Both  the  art  song  and  the  aria  are  rather  lengthy   pieces.

m'e piu ca .  bell'idol   mio.”    Specifically.  bell'idol  mn io.ro pal -pi .ro.tar                       .   U negotiating  the  secondo  passaggio  is  a  mœajor   ™ technical   œ challenge  for  the  tenor.”   ? bb b 98 œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ b J J J ‰ va.  o  cara”  is  “Per  pietà.  the  challenge  is  negotiating  the  secondo  passaggio.to.    Example  41  from  the  art  song  shows   a  very  similar  passage.  and  a  scalar  ascent  to  A5.    He  can   2 b b 9 œ™ œ œ œ œ œ nn n b ∑ & b t8hrough  the  study  of  “Per  pietà.  only  the  top  note  is  one-­‐half  step  lower  than  the  example  from  the   aria.    In  both  cases.    Although  this  concept  has  been  previously  outlined.     Example  40  shows  the  aria.  however.  31-­‐32     23 { ## 12 8 Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œœ œ œ # 12 œ™ œ œ ‰ Œ™ Œ™ Œ™ & # 8 œ œ œ œ j‰ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ ?## 12 œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ J ‰ ‰ Œ™ Œ™ 8 J ten .   77   Another  art  song  that  will  prepare  the  tenor  for  “A  te.    Bellini:  “A  te. ch'io ## 12 8 ‰ nnnn ∑ ∑ ‰ nnnn ∑ ∑ ## 128 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ## 12 œ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ ™ œ & 8 œ R≈ J Example  40.  o  cara.  there  is  one  passage  that  is  quite  similar  to  a  passage  found  in  the  aria. m'e piu ca .  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  mm.  The  tenor   must  exit  the  secondo  passaggio  in  such  a  way  that  he  has  simultaneously  shifted  into  his   high  register  method  of  production.”  and  ∑transitioning   directly  apply  this  concept       { vi - - - b b 9 ‰ œ ‰ œ œj ‰ b & b 8 œ œ œ œ œœ to  the  aria  “A  te.

to.11 www.ra.mi - o. Non mi dir ch'io so % &&%&&& %&&&%& && & " !"" % & & & % & & & no in % & & & % (& & &   78   ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) & ..men -     # & # 12 8 œ™ 6 { lar œ™ œ œ œ œj œ™ J di si ∑ ∑ ∑ ## 12 8 nn ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ nn ## 12 8 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ## 12 8 ∑ nn ∑ ∑ nn ∑ ∑ nn ∑ to il mio tor # ‰ & # 12 8 œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ j ?## 12 j ™ 8 œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ‰‰ Œ œ     ∑ bel l'or -   œ™ ra œ ‰ œœœ ™ œœ œ J di si bel # & # 12 8 œ œ œ  œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?## 12 œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ j œ ‰ ‰ Œ ™ œj ‰ ‰ Œ ™ 8 œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ .  followed  by  a  major  sixth   leap  from  E4  to  C♯  5  (Example  42).jk-klassik. "" " &%+ &% + - ce e sve ntu .    Separating   the  strophes  is  a  quartet  and  chorus  that  features  Arturo  and  the  soprano  Elvira  soaring   over  the  orchestra  and  the  other  voices  in  a  major  third  harmonic  relationship. Non mi dir ch'io so .  12-­‐15   & %“Per   &%+ m & io”   Example   41.  27   ## 12 œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nn J & 8 œ R { l'or .stan .to In .  the  aria  is  set  in  two  strophes  with  identical  musical  material.  o  cara”  (I  Puritani)  m.no in gra - .         Example  42.fe .za il Ciel mi & % && %&& & ) & & &%+ &%+ 1 %& &&% &&& & &% 1 JK1107.   % + bell'idol   % + m.    Bellini:   " & 4 & & & & & &   & & & & ( & & & & & & & " &/ & & & & & & 1 1 1 1 " & + /) 0 * & & ! " " (& 12 gra .ba. se ram .to % & & & % & (& & ) & & &%+ & % + 1   Ab .    Bellini:  “A  te..04.    Arturo   begins  the  second  strophe  with  a  repeat  of  the  opening  material.de ) + & % + &     Formally.li " ! " " % & & (& % & (& & ) ) & & . "" & % + & % + 4 & %+ % + + &pietà.ra .

”     What  constitutes  a  beautiful  tone  quality  is  relative  and  contingent  upon  the   personal  preferences  of  the  individual  listener.    Bel   canto.  if  not  more  important  to   Bellini  as  beautiful  singing.  the  choices  that  the  individual  singers  made  during  these   performances  were  made  to  accentuate  their  strengths  while  simultaneously  concealing   their  weaknesses.    Communication  of  the  text  was  equally.    Below  are  tables  that     .     On  the  contrary.  as  doing   so  will  increase  the  probability  of  a  positive  performance  experience.         As  a  result.  each  individual  singer  strives  to   sing  beautifully  in  a  manner  that  is  consistent  with  his  personal  aesthetics.    However.    After  careful   analysis  of  the  available  recordings  of  the  Bellinian  art  songs.    The  amateur  performer  should  be  encouraged  to  do  the  same.  interpretations  of  tempi  and  the  addition  of  vocal  ornamentation  seem  to   be  at  the  discretion  of  the  individual  performer.  text  delivery  is  also  an  important   component  to  bel  canto.    Likewise.  translates  to  “beautiful  singing.    Each  singer   knows  his  voice  and  knows  how  to  highlight  the  positive  attributes  while  diminishing  the   negatives.  after  all.   79   CHAPTER  10:   THE  FREQUENCY  AND  THE  FREEDOM  OF  MODIFICATIONS  TO  THE  PRINTED  SCORE   SUPPORTED  BY  ANALYSES  OF  AVAILABLE  RECORDINGS       The  driving  force  behind  bel  canto  is  the  singers’  ability  to  deliver  the  art  song  or   aria  with  a  universally  pleasing  tone  quality.  singers  make  choices  regarding  technique.  and   tempo  that  help  them  to  achieve  their  highest  level  during  performance.  it  is  apparent  that  some   generalizations  can  be  made  regarding  the  observation  of  the  indicated  rhythms  and  rests.  including  text  delivery.  followed  by  other  performance  factors.       While  often  different.  interpretation.  style.    An  evolving  but  accepted  notion  is  that  bel  canto  emphasizes   the  beauty  of  the  voice.

  80   are  labeled  with  criteria  that  constitute  adjustments  to  the  printed  score.)13.)17.)25.)59.  employing  vocal  ornamentation  that  is  not  indicated  in  the  score.)17.)ninfa)gentile Singer Marcello)Giordani Luciano)Pavarotti José)Carreras Dennis)O'Neil Juan)Diego)Florez Time 1:29 1:29 2:03 1:30 2:04 Added)vocal))ornamentation No No No No No Observation)of)Rests Instances)of)liberty)with)indicated)rhythm NoCm.    As   the  “time”  column  indicates.)23.)21.  the  tempo  that  Bellini  indicates  is  Allegro  agitato.   observation  of  rests.    Differences  in  performance  timing  are  a  byproduct  of   interpretation  and  declamation  of  the  text.  and  each  of  them  took  liberty  with  the   observation  of  the  rests.)33.  the  singers  tended  not  to  observe  the   sixteenth  note  rests.)25.)bt.     Table  3.)15.)21.)17.))3 NoCm.)49.)29 m.    In  the  case  of  the  rests.)55.  several  recordings  of  each  piece  were  analyzed  and  are   performed  by  a  variety  of  famous  professional  tenors.    The  criteria   include  tempi.    The  performance  aspects  that  are  consistent  with  each  singer  are  the  fact   that  none  of  them  added  any  vocal  ornamentation.    As  the   following  tables  indicate.)49 NoCm.13.33 NoCm.    This  is  especially  true  when  the  rest  followed  a  word  that  was  not       .  and  taking  liberties  with  regard  to  rhythmic  precision.)21.13.)25.    Examining  the  data  will  allow  the   tenor  to  understand  the  variety  of  interpretations  of  each  art  song  and  will  especially  assist   the  young  tenor  in  making  these  critical  performance  decisions.      It  is  the  interpretation  of  the  listener  as  to   which  of  these  times  is  most  in  accordance  with  the  indicated  tempo.)26.13.)29.    Recording  analysis  of  “Malinconia.)29.)25.)52.)53   In  the  first  of  the  Sei  Ariette.  and  which  tempo  best   serves  the  text.  there  is  a  35  second  discrepancy  between  the  fastest   performance  and  the  slowest.)50.)25.)17.)62 NoCm.  ninfa  gentile”   Malinconia.

   This  is  a  major  clue  in  how  to  deliver  the   text.ra co .  o  rosa  fortunata. o j œ œ j œ j œ ‰ ‰ Œ™ œ ™ œ ‰Œ ro .  with  Dennis  O’Neil  singing  the  piece  virtually  as  written.  but  one  can  still  glean  much  from  the  analysis.   81   accompanied  by  punctuation.    Each  tenor  chose  not  to  customize  the  score  for  their   individual  needs.    Recording  analysis  of  “Vanne.         Table  4.&3.  the  tempi   of  each  recording  are  the  same.stret .  1-­‐5     #6 &8 { ∑ # & 68 Œ ™ œœ œœJ œœ œ#œ œ ?#6 Œ ™ ‰ 8 6 & ∑ œœ J œ œœ œœ œ œnœ œ J nœ J Œ™ ∑ j œ‰ œœ J‰ j œ œj ‰ œœ œ j‰ Jœ ‰ œ œ œ œJ œ œJ Vanne.ta.&bts&5H6.”    There  are  fewer  available   recordings  of  this  piece.&50 No Observation&of&Rests Yes Yes Yes Instances&of&liberty&with&indicated&rhythm m.  o  rosa  fortunata”     Vanne.gnun sa .    Bellini:  “Vanne. A po .sa for .to La tua <   .  however  the  indicated  rhythm   is  notated  as  straight  eighth  notes  (example  43).         Example  43.&o&rosa&fortunata Singer Nicolai&Gedda Luciano&Pavarotti Dennis&O'Neil Time 2:14 2:06 2:25 Added&vocal&&ornamentation No m.sar di Ni .    Largely.  such  as  a  comma.    Nicolai  Gedda   sang  a  dotted  rhythm  on  beats  five  and  six  of  measure  four.to Ed o .cein pet .    The  singer  seems  to  be  justified  in  negating  a  rest  if  doing  so  enhances  text  delivery   and  produces  a  more  natural  recitation  of  the  text.tu - ‰ œœ ‰ œœ œ œ œj ‰ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œJ œ #œ œœœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œJ œ j ‰ œ œ œ   œ J J J J œ na .&       The  second  of  the  Sei  Ariette  is  “Vanne.  o  rosa  fortunata”  mm.

 and  as  a   result.     Again.   82   In  Pavarotti’s  recording.  che  d’amore.   misaligns  these  components  of  the  art  song.  respectively.  these  moments  seem  to  be  justified  by  the  lack  of  textual  punctuation.    If   the  singer  deviates  from  this  rhythmic  cadence.  the  piano  and  voice  are  no  longer  in  line.  che  d’amore”  is  arguably  the  most  difficult  art  song  in  the  Bellinian   repertory  to  which  to  modify  the  printed  score  for  the  purpose  of  tailor  to  one’s  needs.  allow  the  singers  to  deliver  the  text  in  a  speech-­‐like  manner.  cohesive  unit.  the  melodic  line  is  imbedded  within   the  chords.         Brownlee  and  O’Neil  took  liberty  with  the  rests  in  measures  32  and  44.    Recording  analysis  of  “Bella  Nice.  he  added  a  vocal  turn  to  measure  50.%che%d'amore Singer Nicolai%Gedda Luciano%Pavarotti Lawrence%Brownlee Dennis%O'Neil Time 2:53 2:13 2:37 2:49 Added%vocal%%ornamentation No No No No Observation%of%Rests Yes Yes NoJm.  which  is  found  in  measure  48.   and  the  piece  loses  the  desired  integrity.    Bellini  notated  only   one  such  ornament.               .  deviation  from  the  melody.    As  a  result.  che  d’amore”       Bella%Nice.     This  is  due  to  the  chordal  accompaniment  that  pulses  a  consistent  quarter  note  tempo.”   Bellini  clearly  intended  for  the  voice  and  piano  to  be  a  unified.      Particularly  with  “Bella  Nice.%32 NoJm.      Moreover.  either  harmonically  or  rhythmically.%44 Instances%of%liberty%with%indicated%rhythm       “Bella  Nice.           Table  5.

   Recording  analysis  of  “Per  pieta.$17 Yes Instances$of$liberty$with$indicated$rhythm 68 Each  tenor  who  has  recorded  “Ma.  the  tenors  adhere  to  the  wishes  of  Bellini.   83   Table  6.5.    In  addition.  rendi  pur  contento”  chose  to  perform  the  piece   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 98 with  similar  tempi.         Table  7.    There  is  a  sizeable  difference  in  the  tempi  due  in  large  part  to  Lawrence   Brownlee’s  faster-­‐paced  interpretation.    Recording  analysis  of  “Ma.$32 No Observation$of$Rests Yes Yes Yes Yes Instances$of$liberty$with$indicated$rhythm m.$9.  but  other  than  these  two  relatively  minor  encounters  of   score  modification.    The  slower   meter  does  not  provide  the  opportunity  for  any   flourishing  vocal  ornamentation.    Carlo  Bergonzi  interpolated  an  E♭   rather  than  a  D  in  measure  32.$15       The  tenors  who  recorded  “Per  pietà.  rendi  pur  contento”       Ma.  the  morose  character  of  the  piece  does  not   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 12 8     .  bel  idol  mio”   Per$pieta.$15.    José  Carreras  negated  the  dotted  rhythm  in   measure  15  in  favor  of  holding  a  quarter  note  on  the  B♭.$rendi$pur$contento ∑ ∑ Singer Lawrence$Brownlee Luciano$Pavarotti ∑Dennis$O'Neil Carlo$Bergonzi   ∑ ∑ Time 2:14 2:17 2:31 ∑ 2:31 ∑ 43 Added$vocal$$ornamentation No No 44 No No Observation$of$Rests Yes Yes NoLm.  bell'idol  mio”  adhered  closely  to  the  indications   of  Bellini.$bel$idol$mio Singer José$Carreras Dennis$O'Neil Carlo$Bergonzi Lawrence$Brownlee Time 2:43 2:19 2:48 2:06 Added$vocal$$ornamentation No No m.

   Due  to  the  32nd  note  passages.31'(turn'is'sung'with'rhythmic'liberty)     In  “Dolente  immagine  di  Fille  mia.  15.14 m.  which  is  an  important  consideration  for  the   tenor.         Table  8.31/36'(turn'is'sung'with'rhythmic'liberty) Yes m.  the  tenor  must  choose  his  tempo  wisely  so  as  to   adequately  articulate  these  passages.26 m.  the  text  that  precedes  the  rest  is   not  accompanied  by  textual  punctuation.  and  17.  the       .    In  measures  five.    The  tempi  are  significantly  different.  nine.   84   indicate  a  virtuosic  display  of  such  ornamentation.    None  of  the  tenors  chose  to  adjust  the   score  in  this  manner.    In  both  cases.  which  justifies  O’Neil’s  decision  to  deliver  the   prose  seamlessly  without  pause.”  there  are  two  instances  where  indicated  rests   were  not  observed:    Carreras  in  measure  14  and  Pavarotti  in  measure  26.    Recording  analysis  of  “Dolente  immagine  di  Fille  mia”   Dolente'immagine'di'Fille'mia Singer José'Carreras Dennis'O'Neil Luciano'Pavarotti Time 3:37 3:00 2:47 Added'vocal''ornamentation No No No Observation'of'Rests Instances'of'liberty'with'indicated'rhythm NoDm.'31/36'(no'turn) NoDm.  tenor  Dennis  O’Neil  chose  to   negate  the  eighth  note  rests.    Recording  analysis  of  “Quando  verra  quel  di”   Quando'verra'quel'di Singer José'Carreras Dennis'O'Neil Time 2:49 2:17 Added'vocal''ornamentation No No Observation'of'Rests Yes Yes Instances'of'liberty'with'indicated'rhythm   The  first  of  the  Tre  Ariette  was  performed  in  accordance  with  the  indications  of  the   score.    In  each  of  these  instances.       Table  9.

le l'an.$bt. e_i .$m.gui .$bt.$38.ce E_i .li .ti .$35.$4 m.$42.co ar .  36     36     gui .bi .$49T52 Observation$of$Rests Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Instances$of$liberty$with$indicated$rhythm m.ne .         Measures  31  and  36  (example   44)  feature  vocal  turns.co_ar .sa_in pa .po .$$m.$4.$bt.ne Pavarotti  took  the  turn  out  of  tempo. Om .bi .le l'an . Singer Carlo$Bergonzi Dennis$O'Neil José$Carreras Luciano$Pavarotti Ramon$Vargas Time 3:37 3:49 3:25 3:49 3:35 Added$vocal$$ornamentation No No No No m. e_i .  di  Fille  mia”  m.dor.$bt.$4 m.    Carreras  and   dor.po .$che$inargenti gui .$33.dor.$m.ce ri .sa_in pa .$4.$mm.de ri .bra di Fil .  and  slowly  negotiated  the  ornament  before   continuing  forward.$13.ti .$33.    Bellini:    “Dolente  immagine.stin .ne           Table  10.    Recording  analysis  of  “Vaga  luna.   85   negation  of  the  rests  are  justified  due  to  the  lack  of  textual  punctuation  and  the  artists   desire  to  reflect  this  in  their  delivery.$m.$4   Copyright by Nlendic 2009     .$bt.dor.co_ar .  che  inargenti”   40 Vaga$luna.$46.    In  all  three  recordings.$7.$m.       Example  44.  the   32 turns  were  either  not  done  or  were  done  without  rhythmic  precision.$33.bi .le l'an ti .

ran - za el .tro_u .  and  inverted  triadic  arpeggios.  however.  and  he  was  liberal   in  his  application  of  this  type  of  melodic  modification.    First.nir.na spe .  appoggiaturas. .  taste.  each  tenor  observed  each  of  the  rests  that  Bellini  notated.le pur che lon ta   3 pp   p Example  45.    Next.  negating   3 29 the  dotted  rhythm  found  on  beat  four  in  favor  of  a  straight  eighth  note  rhythm  (pexample   45).   and  stylistic  accuracy.  the  tempi   are  all  very  similar.  the  second  strophe  is   highlighted  by  interpolated  high  notes.la_e sol nell'av .       Dil .    Bellini:  “Vaga  luna.la_e sol si el .  33   33 nan - za il mio duol non puo le .to .    Specifically.tro se nu .    If  performed  with  care.ve - Regarding  vocal  ornamentation.  only  Ramon  Vargas  took  liberty.  60%  of  the  singers  took  liberty  with  the  indicated  rhythm  in  measure  33.     Finally.     Vargas’  decision  to  embellish  the  second  strophe  shows  one  artist’s  interpretation  of  the   39 liberties  one  enjoys  when  performing  bel  canto  repertoire.           ra con . che se     36     nu .  che  inargenti”  m.  implementing   vocal  Dil ornaments   add  -variety   to  an  nir.   86     There  are  several  interesting  realizations  when  analyzing  this  data.le pur chewill  gior no e se otherwise  straightforward  strophic  piece.

#15#(turn) No No Observation#of#Rests NoHm.36# NoHm.         Brownlee  added  a  vocal  turn  in  measure  15  where  one  is  not  indicated  (example   46).  15     & b 44 { ce ‰ ? b 44 8 &b 3 œ & b 44 ˙ ∑ œ œ œ œ œœœ - de a' 3 3 ˙   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ mar .#36.    Bellini:  “La  ricordanza”  m.#10.    Consistent  with  the  theme.”  the  common  trait  among  the  performers  is  that  none  of  them   breathed  in  measure  36.6.  which  occurs  directly  before  a  sixteenth  note  rest.  in  which  he   does  not  rest  in  measure  6.”           Example  46.  which   occurs  in  the  midst  of  the  word  “mercede.#40 NoHm.#36.  all  the   other  instances  where  the  singers  did  not  observe  the  rests  were  in  moments  where.    Brownlee  added  this  ornament  to  bridge  beats  one  and  two  of  measure  15.    In  fact.    The  exception  to  this  is  O’Neil’s  recording.   87   Table  11.  it  is  justified  not  to  breathe.  even  though  a  comma  after  the  word  “notte”  and  a  subsequent   rest  seems  to  indicate  that  a  rest  and  breath  is  warranted.    Recording  analysis  of  “La  ricordanza”   La#ricordanza Singer Lawrence#Brownlee José#Carreras Dennis#O'Neil   Time 4:50 5:51 5:27 Added#vocal##ornamentation m.tir œœ ‰ œ œ œœ œ œ 3 ∑ ∑   ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .#20   In  “La  ricordanza.  due  to   the  text.#12.  there  is  no  punctuation  after  the  word   “tremante”  in  measure  36.#48 Instances#of#liberty#with#indicated#rhythm m.

'm.'190.'191. Instances%of%liberty%with%indicated%rhythm       The  obvious  discrepancy  with  the  art  song  “Sogno  d’infanzia”  is  the  time/tempo.  these  opportunities  are  exploited.'176G177.'221 m.  Un  po’meno  mosso.    Recording  analysis  of  “Torna.  vezzosa  Fillide”  most  closely  resembles  an  aria  in  a  mature  Bellini  style.'193.'190.    The   art  song  is  divided  into  three  sections.'107.'m.  and   Agitato.'196.    What  one  must   consider  when  reading  this  table  is  the  fact  that  “Sogno  d’infanzia”  is  a  four-­‐strophe  piece.'Vezzosa'Fillide Singer Lawrence'Brownlee Marcello'Giordani Dennis'O'Neil Time 7:51 7:34 7:49 Added'vocal''ornamentation m.  there  are  opportunities  for  the  implementation  of  adjustments  to  the  printed   score.'m.'190 Observation'of'Rests NoGm.'221G222 m.'m.'m.       Table  13.     O’Neil’s  recording  is  more  than  double  the  length  of  Carlo  Bergonzi’s.   88     Table  12.  whereas  O’Neil  sings  all  four.           .%155.'216.    Recording  analysis  of  “Sogno  d’infanzia”   Sogno%d'infanzia Singer Carlo%Bergonzi Dennis%O'Neil Time 2:56 6:40 Added%vocal%%ornamentation m.    They  are  labeled  Andantino.'180 NoGm.    Given  the  varieties  of  the  different  sections  and  the  resemblance  of  aria  form  and   structure.'m.    This  brings  to  light  the   question  of  whether  or  not  to  perform  an  art  song  in  its  entirety.'m.    As  the  above  table  indicates.'m.%42 No Observation%of%Rests Yes NoIm.     Bergonzi  only  sings  the  first  strophe.  vezzosa  Fillide”   Torna.    One  answer  is  that  it  is   more  desirable  to  include  all  the  verses  in  order  to  adhere  to  the  score.'91 Yes Instances'of'liberty'with'indicated'rhythm     “Torna.

 in  particular  during  the  third  Agitato  section.     His  embellishments  are  primarily  interpolations  of  high  register  pitches.    If  he  ever  transcribed  the  piece  for  full  orchestra.  it  seems  acceptable  to  tastefully  embellish  certain  vocal  passages.    Often.   exercising  liberties  with  regard  to  rhythm  is  less  frequent  and  can  be  problematic  in   operatic  performance.    Given  the  frequency  of  vocal  ornamentation  as  a  means  of  performance   customization.         Giordani  also  embellishes  the  melody.    Based  on  this  data.  tempi  and  the  addition  of  vocal  ornamentation  are     .  it  is  reasonable  to  conclude  that   certain  rests  can  be  negated  as  longs  as  it  makes  textual  sense  to  do  so.  vezzosa  Fillide”   was  probably  conceived  as  a  sketch  for  an  operatic  aria.    These   embellishments  should  be  planned  and  done  with  stylistic  accuracy.    Like  Giordani’s  ornaments.  often  singing  his   notes  a  major  third  or  perfect  fourth  higher  than  notated  by  Bellini.             The  significance  for  compiling  these  tables  is  to  discern  how  to  add  elaboration  into   the  arias.  as  his  interpretation  features   a  setting  of  the  score  that  is  transcribed  for  full  orchestra.    Finally.  operatic   cadenzas  feature  the  interpolation  of  high  register  pitches  that  show  the  virtuosic  qualities   of  the  leading  tenors.  cadenzas  have  become   commonplace  as  alternatives  to  the  original  score.  he  should  consult  these  recordings  and  his  teacher  before  making  any  final   decisions  regarding  modifications  to  the  printed  score.  Bellini  composed  the  piece  for   voice  and  piano.    In  addition.    While  “Torna.  it  no  longer  exists.         While  not  as  prevalent.  if  the  tenor   is  a  student.  Brownlee  and  O’Neil  take  liberty  with  vocal  embellishments   as  well.    Moreover.   89     Marcello  Giordani’s  recording  is  the  most  progressive.  using  the  art  songs  as  a  guide  for  what  to  embellish  and  how  frequently  these   embellishments  should  be  introduced.    This  is  not  an   uncommon  occurrence  in  standard  operatic  repertoire.

 any   decisions  should  be  made  with  respect  to  communication  of  the  text.    The  greatest  opportunities  to   implement  score  modifications  are  within  strophic  arias.  o  cara”  from  I  Puritani.  it  is  necessary  to  consult  the  conductor  and  communicate  any   thoughts  and  decisions  that  deviate  from  the  printed  score.         Any  decisions  pertaining  to  score  modification  should  be  carefully  planned.    Above  all.   90   performance  aspects  that  should  be  discussed  and  planned  with  a  pianist  and/or   conductor.                                   .    In   operatic  performance.  and  should  not   detract  from  this  endeavor.    Implementing  score  modifications  in   strophic  arias  provides  variety  to  otherwise  repeated  musical  material.  such  as  “Nel  furor  delle  tempeste”   from  Il  Pirata  and  “A  te.

  91  
CONCLUSION    
 
Literature  selection  is  one  of,  if  not  the  most  important  tasks  associated  with  
pedagogy.    Teachers  and  teachers  of  singing  have  only  a  short  while  to  impact  each  student  
before  that  student  has  decided  for  or  against  continuing  to  study.    In  studying  the  voice  as  
an  instrument,  it  is  important  that  the  student  likes  what  he  sings,  but  there  is  more  to  
liking  a  piece  than  simply  enjoying  the  melodic  and  harmonic  interplay.    If  the  literature  is  
too  easy  or  too  difficult,  then  the  student  will  become  disinterested.    Literature  should  be  
selected  with  each  specific  student  in  mind.    Tailoring  literature  selection  to  each  individual  
student  is  one  way  to  ensure  that  he  has  the  best  experience  possible.      
As  such,  one  should  not  begin  voice  study  immediately  with  Bellini  arias,  nor  should  
they  be  attempted  within  the  first  several  years  of  voice  study.    Because  of  the  difficulty  
associated  with  the  arias,  attempting  them  in  the  primitive  years  of  study  will  likely  
discourage  the  student  and  will  possibly  lead  to  a  loss  of  interest  in  vocal  study.    However,  
if  there  is  interest  and  aptitude  in  the  study  of  Bellini  arias,  the  art  songs  and  methods  that  
have  been  outlined  in  this  document  will  provide  an  effective  means  of  training  a  tenor  for  
their  goal  of  being  able  to  study  and  perform  the  arias.    
To  many,  Bellini  is  regarded  as  third  in  the  line  of  the  three  most  notable  bel  canto  
composers,  with  the  top  spot  a  virtual  “toss-­‐up”  between  Rossini  and  Donizetti.    Two  
factors  –  sheer  volume  of  output  –  and  lack  of  “fanfare”  virtuosic  material  –  hinder  Bellini’s  
perception  as  an  equal.    Due  to  the  brevity  of  his  life  and  the  considerable  amount  of  time  
he  spent  on  each  work,  Bellini  could  never  match  the  output  of  Donizetti,  whose  operatic  
output  is  roughly  75.    Likewise,  he  seemed  not  to  possess  the  flare  for  the  dramatic,  as  

 

  92  
exemplified  by  Rossini’s  famous  art  song  “La  Danza.”    Perhaps  this  is  due  to  the  
conservative  nature  of  his  musical  training.          
One  could  conceive  of  many  other  factors  that  contributed  to  Bellini’s  compositional  
output.    One  of  these  may  be  that  he  simply  did  not  possess  the  inherent  ability  that  
Donizetti  had.    This  is  evidenced  by  Donizetti’s  ability  to  compose  one  of  the  repertory’s  
most  famous  tenor  arias  in  “Una  furtiva  lagrima”  from  L’elisir  d’amore.    As  the  story  goes,  
Donizetti  composed  this  aria  in  20  minutes.    
Bellini,  on  the  other  hand,  spent  significantly  more  time  composing  his  operas,  
ultimately  leading  to  the  smaller  total  output.    This  is  attributed,  at  least  in  part,  to  librettist  
Felice  Romani  and  delays  in  providing  Bellini  texts.    It  is  not  known  how  much  time  Bellini  
spent  composing  his  art  songs,  but  it  is  reasonable  to  conclude  that  he  was  not  efficient  in  
this  endeavor,  either.    Twenty-­‐four  art  songs  remain  from  Bellini’s  roughly  30  total  art  
songs,  which,  compared  to  Donizetti  and  Rossini,  is  also  a  diminutive  number.    Text  must  
have  been  important  to  Donizetti  and  Rossini,  but  it  is  hard  to  imagine  that  they  placed  as  
much  importance  on  text  as  did  Bellini.    This  is  evidenced  in  Bellini  pioneering  the  canto  
declamato  style.    Possibly  then,  toiling  over  the  perfect  union  of  text  and  music  was  a  major  
factor  in  Bellini’s  comparatively  small  output  of  art  songs  and  operas.    
Nonetheless,  Bellini  deserves  to  be  placed  alongside  his  contemporaries  rather  than  
distantly  behind  them.    His  art  songs,  due  to  their  harmonic  and  melodic  accessibility,  are  
perfect  for  the  beginning  singer,  yet  they  demand  so  much  in  terms  of  technique  and  
interpretation  that  they  are  worth  studying  even  as  a  seasoned  performer.      
Part  of  the  genesis  of  this  project  was  to  champion  Bellini’s  operatic  material,  which  
is  less  frequently  performed  than  Donizetti’s  or  Rossini’s.    Bellini’s  operatic  tenor  arias,  as  

 

  93  
exemplified  by  this  essay,  require  the  same  stability  of  technique  and  interpretation  that  
his  art  songs  require.    It  is  for  this  reason  that  the  art  songs  and  arias  should  be  studied  in  
conjunction  with  one  another,  thereby  ensuring  that  the  tenor  has  fully  prepared  himself  
for  the  rewarding  experience  of  performing  Bellini’s  vocal  music.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

   The  Life  of  Bellini.   94   BIBLIOGRAPHY     Books   Apel.  Battaglia.  ariette.  1971.  Donizetti.    New  York:  Garland.  1993.    Toronto:  University  of  Toronto  Press.  UK:  Scarecrow  Press.       Rosselli.    Adelson  e  Salvini.    Vincenzo  Bellini  –  His  Life  and  His  Operas.     McGinnis.    Cambridge:  Harvard  Press.  2004     Bellini.  KY:  Routledge.  1980     Bellini.    The  Opera  Singer's  Career  Guide:   Understanding  the  European  Fach  System.    Beatrice  di  Tenda.    New  York:  W.         Grout.  A.    The  Harvard  Dictionary  of  Music.  A.    Bianca  e  Fernando.   Stark.     Miller.  1960.  1969       Osborne.  Charles.  Leslie.    Vincenzo  Bellini  and  the  Aesthetics  of  Early  Nineteenth-­‐Century  Italian   Opera.  Stephen  Ace.  Vincenzo.  2009.  Norton  and  Company.   2003.     Orrey.  Marith  McGinnis.  John.  1980     Bellini.  e  romanze.  Vincenzo  Bellini:  A  Guide  to  Research.  New  York.    Arie.  Farrar.  and  Bellini.    Bellini.    New  York:  Garland.  Vincenzo.  1989.    Portland:  1994.    Florence.    The  Bel  Canto  Operas  of  Rossini.    Plymouth.  Simon.    Melville.  Richard.    New  York:  Cambridge  University  Press.        Maguire.  2010.    Training  Tenor  Voices.  New  York.W.  NY:  Belwin  Mills.  Donald  Jay.    Milano:    Ricordi.  Pearl  Yeadon.  1996.    New  York:  Schirmer.  ed.  Elio.  2000.    Canzoni  per  Voce  e  Pianoforte.         Musical  Scores     Bellini  et  al.  Dent.  1980       .         Weinstock.     Willier.    Bel  Canto:  A  History  of  Vocal  Pedagogy.    Melville.    Milano:  Ricordi     Bellini.  Wili.  and  Willis.  Vincenzo.  Knopf.    London.  NY:  Belwin  Mills.  James.  Herbert.  A  History  of  Western  Music.  Vincenzo.  Straus  &  Giroux.

.  Columbia  University.  1.”    Journal  of  the  American  Musicological  Society  100/1.    “In  Praise  of  Convention:  Formula  and  Experiment  in  Bellini’s  Self-­‐ Borrowings.    Milano:  Ricordi.  1992)     Pulte.  1969)     Greenspan.         Wagner.  March  1996.  Bellini.”  (Ph.    Il  Pirata.   27.  2003     Bellini.  Soo  Yeon.    Milano:  Ricordi.  University  of   California  at  Berkeley.    New  York:  Schirmer.  1977)     Kim.  Vincenzo.  1929     Bellini.  “The  Revival  of  Bel  Canto  and  its  Relevance  to  Contemporary   Teaching  and  Performance.”    (D.  Vincenzo.  Mary  Ann.    “More  on  the  Messa  di  Voce.  1944     Bellini.  Vincenzo.  1954     Bellini.  Ingo.  Feb.”    The  Musical  Times  and  Singing  Class  Circular.               Theses/Dissertations     Franzone.D  diss.    Le  Più  Belle  Arie  Per  Tenore.  52.    “The  Messa  di  Voce  and  its  Effectiveness  as  a  Training  Exercise  for  the  Young   Singer.  Spring  2000.   95   Bellini.    Milano:  Ricordi.  Vincenzo.  University   of  Illinois  at  Urbana-­‐Champaign.M.”  (Ph.  2007     Bellini.  1886.  Vincenzo.  “The  Operas  of  Vincenzo  Bellini.D  diss.  2005)       .    Milano:  Ricordi.    The  Chamber  Songs  of  Rossini.    La  sonnambula.  1959     Bellini.A.  Charlotte  Joyce.  diss.    Norma.  The  Ohio  State  University.  Vincenzo.  Richard.    I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi.    “Wagner  on  Bellini.  and  Donizetti.    Milano:  Ricordi.  Diane.  Margaret  Smith..       Titze.”    The  Journal  of  Singing.    La  straniera.    New  York:  Schirmer.    Vol.    I  Puritani.  No.  516.  Vincenzo.    (DMA  thesis..  19–         Periodicals     Smart.  Vol.

 Vincenzo.  1957.  1997.  2005.  Vincenzo.  piano.  Vincenzo.  et  al.    La  sonnambula.    EMI   Classics.    Notturno.    La  sonnambula.     Bellini.     Bellini.    I  Capuleti  e  I  Montecchi.    Recorded  live  21  August.  1985.  tenor.    Adelson  e  Salvini.    Arias  for  Rubini.  1993.    Norma.       Published  London:  Opera  Rara.  2007     Bellini.    Middlesex:  EMI.   2000.    Published  Portland:  Allegro.    Bianca  e  Fernando.    I  puritani.    Italy:  Nuova  Era.  tenor.     Bellini.  Vincenzo.  2003.     Bellini.    Milano:  CGD.  Orchestra  dell'Accademia   Nazionale  di     Santa  Cecilia.  Vincenzo.    Published  Como:     Istituto  Discografico  Italiano.   London.  2005     Bellini.  Vincenzo.    Decca.    Recorded  live  29  May  1952.       Published  Portland:  Columbia  River  Entertainment  Group.  1985.    New  York:  London.    Juan  Diego  Flórez.  Kent.    Recorded  7  January  1970.    Middlesex:  EMI.     Bellini.  Roberto  Abbado.    I  Capuleti  e  I  Montecchi.     Bellini  et  al.  Martin  Katz.  Vincenzo.     Bellini.  Vincenzo.    I  puritani.  1986.  Vincenzo.   96   Discography   Bartoli.    I  puritani.    Lawrence  Brownlee.     Bellini.  1986.  Vincenzo.  conductor.       .    La  sonnambula.  Vincenzo.  1998.  Vincenzo.  1988.     Published  Bromley.    Recorded  5  March  1955.     Bellini.  2008.    Italy:  Fonit  Cetra.  Vincenzo.  Cecilia.     Bellini.  England:  2008.     Bellini.    Italy:  Nuova  Era.    Live  in  Italy.         Bellini.  Vincenzo.    London:  Opera  Rara.    USA:  Legato  Classics     Bellini.    Recorded  October-­‐November  2007.  Henry  Wood  Hall.  1992.    La  straniera.    Middlesex:  EMI.     Bellini.    Debut  Song  Recital.    La  straniera.

 Franco.com     J.”    Grove  Music  Online.”  in  Grove  Music  Online.    Recorded  live  29  June  1955.    Tenor  arias.com     Julian  Budden.    Italian  Songs.  Carlo.    London:  Decca.    Carlo  Bergonzi.  www.  Ingrid  Surgenor.    Zaira.  Marcello.    Zaira.     1994.  Simon  and  Forbes.  Nicolai.    Luciano  Pavarotti.  tenor.    Nuova  Era  Internazionale.     Corelli.     Bellini.  tenor.    Hong  Kong:  Naxos.    Recorded  25-­‐27  September  1990.    Joan  Sutherland.  Joan.  www.  Luciano.    “I  Capuleti  e  i  Montecchi.  “Lyric  Tenor.  1998.    Published  Portland:  Allegro.oxfordmusiconline.  2007.”    Grove  Music  Online.  Vincenzo.    New  York:  RCA.  Volume  1.     Grove  Articles  Accessed     Anonymous  author.  Vincenzo.    New  York:  Sony  Classical.    Heroes.oxfordmusiconline.  1998.  David.  www.  Vincenzo.    Marcello  Giordani.    Dennis  O’Neill.  “Giovanni  Batista  Rubini.com     Julian  Budden  et  al.  piano.  2001.com     Julian  Budden.    Songs.    The  Voice  of  the  Century.  tenor.   www.   www.  soprano.  Vincenzo.oxfordmusiconline.oxfordmusiconline.     Pavarotti.com     Fallows.     Bergonzi.  et  al.”  in  Grove  Music  Online.”  Grove  Music  Online.oxfordmusiconline.  www.    Hong  Kong:  Naxos   2006.B.com         .  www.   97     Bellini.     Bellini.”  in  Grove  Music  Online.  1991.    “Vaccai.oxfordmusiconline.  Steane.    Zaira.oxfordmusiconline.     Giordani.  tenor.com     Maguire.  “La  sonnambula.     Bellini.   2006.    Norma.  Vincenzo.  Elizabeth.   1994.    Italy:  Nuova  Era.   Sutherland.    Published  Italy:  Nuova  era.    “Norma.  2003.    “Tenor.     Bellini.  NJ:  Musical  Heritage  Society.    Oakhurst.    The  Early  Years.”    Grove  Music  Online.

”  in  Grove  Music  Online.com     Owen  Jander  and  Ellen  T.  www.  Elizabeth.oxfordmusiconline.com     Simon  Maguire  and  Elizabeth  Forbes.oxfordmusiconline.”    Grove  Music  Online.   www.oxfordmusiconline.  “Norma.  “Bellini.   www.”  in  Grove  Music  Online.  www.oxfordmusiconline.   98   Maguire.    “Zaira.com           .  “Bel  Canto.   www.com     Simon  Maguire  and  Elizabeth  Forbes.com     Simon  Maguire  and  Elizabeth  Forbes.oxfordmusiconline.oxfordmusiconline.  “I  Puritani.  Simon  and  Forbes.”  Grove  Music  Online.  “La  straniera.com     Mary  Ann  Smart.com     Simon  Maguire  et  al.”  in  Grove  Music  Online.”    Grove  Music  Online.     www..”  Grove  Music  Online.oxfordmusiconline.  Harris.  Vincenzo.   www.    “Il  Pirata.