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Day 1 - Elements of a Story: Writing Your Own Narrative while Using Conjunctions
*Lesson plan based on a 90-minute class period
Purpose/rationale: This lesson plan is designed for a 6th grade English/Language Arts class who
is beginning to learn the elements of writing a narrative story. For this flipped lesson, the
students will be required to watch the YouTube video Flocabulary Five Things (Elements of a
Short Story) prior to coming to class along with Schoolhouse Rocks Conjunction Junction.
For this 50-minute lesson plan students will work with partners to collaborate in choosing their
5 elements of their own narrative, and reviewing the conjunctions in the video. They will be
writing in the remaining time of the class period. During their writing time they will be required
to use 3 conjunctions. This is the appropriate timing for this lesson because it is at the beginning
of the year when students are first learning how to write in a longer capacity in preparation for
the standardized timed writing test every student must take. This lesson will take place before
instruction on more difficult types of writing such as expository and argumentative. Students
have not previously learned the 5 elements of a story, so this will be their introductory lesson.
Students will be acquiring this knowledge through the use of the flipped classroom technique due
to the fact that direct instruction is static therefore is more effective when completed at home, so
that students can practice executing the desired task with their peers and teacher present in order
to support learning in the most effective way.
Florida State Standards:
LAFS.6.W.1.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or
characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
o Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop
experiences, events, and/or characters.
o Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and
signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
o Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language
to convey experiences and events.
o Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
LAFS.6.W.2.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new
approach.
LAFS.6.SL.1.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly.
o Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly
draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to
probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
o Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define
individual roles as needed.

2
o Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making
comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion.
o Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple
perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing.

Objectives:
Students Will Be Able To

Identify the 5 main elements of a story (plot, character, conflict, theme, setting)
Define the 5 main elements of a story (plot, character, conflict, theme, setting)
Identify the three main conjunctions (and, but, or)
Create a plan for a narrative story using the 5 main elements of a story (plot, character,
conflict, theme, setting) and examples of the three main conjunctions (and, but, and or)
Write as much of a narrative story as they can in the allotted 25-minute time frame

Materials:

Internet access
Streaming device
Paper
Pencil
Colored pencils
Printer paper

Anticipatory Set: To begin class all students will come in and take their seats before the bell
rings. Teacher will quickly take role, and brief the students on the objectives for the day. Teacher
will begin class with a class discussion that reviews the video students were required to watch
the night before for homework.
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
Time

Student is doing

Teacher is doing

1 minute (Anticipatory Set)

Getting settled in their seats,


taking out a pencil and paper

Taking role, welcoming


students into the classroom

20 minutes

Participating in a class

Leading a class

discussion/verbal non-graded
survey on the flipped lesson
video

discussion/verbal non-graded
survey on the five elements
of a story, and three main
conjunctions that were
discussed in the flipped
lesson videos that students
were assigned for homework.
Be sure to review each of the
elements with students and
address any outstanding
questions that students may
have on the material as
follows:
Five elements of a story: 1.)
Plot: the main events of the
story; what is happening? 2.)
Character: a person in the
story; who is this about? 3.)
Conflict: the struggle in the
plot; what went wrong? 4.)
Theme: the main idea; whats
the point? 5.) Setting: The
where and when
Have students write three
sentences; one sentence for
each conjunction: and, but,
and or. Have three students
volunteer to read one of their
sentences, write it on the
board, and discuss if it is or
isnt done correctly (if done
incorrectly show the students
how to fix it).

5 minutes

Listening to the teacher


explain the objectives for the
day

Explaining the objectives for


the days class to the students
as follows: Today we will
begin with a solo activity. I
want you to come up with 5
elements for a story that you
will write later today. Your
story will be about one thing

you did this weekend. I will


give you 15 minutes to come
up with your 5 elements, and
will be walking around if
anyone needs help. You will
then have about 20 minutes to
draw a picture illustrating
your story and the 5 elements
of it. You will have about 20
minutes to start writing your
narratives. Make sure to
include your five elements
and use each of the three
conjunctions at least one
time.
Ask students how much they
think they can write in 20
minutes, take a vote, and then
ask students to try to meet
that writing goal within the
20-minute time frame. Take
time to answer any questions
students may have on the
activities and then dismiss
them to start their work.
15 minutes

Work individually to come up


with their individual narrative
outline as follows:
Setting: _______________
Plot: _______________

Walk around the room to help


students come up with ideas
or differentiate between any
of the 5 elements, or 3
conjunctions. Use this time to
informally assess students
understanding of the material
at hand.

Character: _______________
Conflict: _______________
Theme: _______________
2 minutes

Talk quietly while teacher


passes out paper and colored

Pass out colored pencils and


printer paper for illustration

pencils.

activity.

20 minutes

Work individually on their


narrative illustrations at their
desks.

Walk around room while


monitoring student progress,
and providing any needed
assistance to students.

1 minute

Transition to writing activity.

Transition students to the


writing activity. They may
keep their illustration to refer
back to, but collect the
colored pencils and make
sure each student has lined
paper and a pencil out (all
other materials put away).

20 minutes

Work individually to start


writing their narrative papers.

Walk around room while


monitoring student progress,
and providing any needed
assistance to students.

6 minutes (Summary/closure)

Turn in narrative story,


planning sheet, and
illustration to the teacher;
participate in debriefing

Collect student narratives,


planning sheets, and
illustrations and briefly
debrief on how students felt
about their writing; teacher
will remind students of their
homework for that night.
*I have previously discussed
with students all aspects of
accountability with the videos
that are assigned as
homework, as well as what to
do if they dont have internet
access.

Summary/closure: Students will end class by turning in their narrative stories, planning sheets,
and illustrations to the teacher. The teacher will lead an extremely brief discussion to get a quick

6
understanding for how the students feel about their writing so far. Students will be reminded of
their homework for the night which will be to watch some videos on revising and editing.
Assessment:

Formal assessment: The teacher will formally assess students understanding of the 5
elements of a story, and the 3 conjunctions and, but and or by looking for them in the
narrative story the students will turn in at the end of the class period; if students do not
have enough time to finish their personal narratives in class, then the teacher will assess
them based off of the 5 elements and conjunction examples they wrote down with their
partner at the beginning of the class period. Each student will be awarded one point per
story element, and one point per conjunction sentence giving them a total of 8 points for
completing the activity.
Informal assessment: The teacher will informally assess students understanding of the 5
elements of a story, and 3 conjunctions by engaging with them in discussion throughout
the class time.

Homework/follow-up assignment: For homework students will be assigned videos discussing


the process and importance of revising and editing their writing (another preparation for a flipped
lesson).
Accommodations/adaptations:

Herbert Millner: Male student with ADHD will be given preferential seating,
so that they may stand up and walk around when needed, and as to
not distract other students. This student will also be provided daily with
a classroom sequence of events, with time frames, in order to help
them stay on task. The teacher has previously worked out a silent
queue with the student (tapping on the shoulder) to provoke the
student to stay, or get back on task. At the end of every class period
this student must show the teacher where he/she has marked in
his/her agenda the homework for the day/what is due the next class
period. To sway the student away from frequently interrupting, the
student will be rewarded a star for each day they raise their hand and
wait to be called on for everything they have to say. Once the student
reaches 5 stars they will be allowed to take a treat from the treat jar.

Paten Vander: Female student with a speech impairment will be given teacher support in
partner work. Paten will work weekly with the schools speech therapist. There will be a
strict anti-bullying culture in the classroom to make sure Paten feels welcome and safe.
The teacher will always model patience and acceptance when the student is speaking for
the class.

Lya Gross: Female student with mild dyslexia will be given extra time on all writing and
reading assignments. She will also be given supplemental materials such as videos and
audio recordings to ease her process of reading.

Oliver Fore: Male student with mild autism will be given a daily schedule handout the
class period before this schedule takes place in order to prepare them. If there are any
drastic changes in the classroom routine, the teacher will verbally discuss with the student
at least one- day prior. When making a transition from one activity to the next in the
classroom, the teacher will walk over to the students desk and verbally cue them to ease
the transition. An example of this verbal queue is Are you ready to move on, now. The
teacher will avoid slang and idiomatic speech due to the students literal translations of
language. The teacher will avoid sarcasm and will not rely on facial expressions to
communicate; the teacher will be verbal and direct when communicating with the
student. If the student is acting inappropriately the teacher will clearly, concisely, and
directly tell the student what they should be doing instead. When the teacher is giving
multistep directions, they should pause in-between to check for comprehension with the
student. The teacher will avoid situations that lead to sensory overload for the student.
The teacher will have tennis balls on the bottom of all chairs to minimize noise in the
classroom. The teacher should also limit the amount of items hung on the walls. If the
student does get overwhelmed, the teacher will assist the student in making a quiet, and
graceful exit to go to the agreed upon safe place (nurses office) where the student can
relax and calm themselves for a while. The teacher will use a stuffed Edgar Allen Poe
doll when speaking to gain the students attention due to the difficulty the student has in
maintaining eye contact. To assist the student with social interaction for group activities,
the teacher will first role-play with the student. The teacher will allow extra time for
handwritten work, and will allow the student to turn in all homework via a word
processer. If the student feels the need to ask more than 5 questions during a class period,
the teacher will have the student write down any extra questions to be discussed after the
class period in order to keep the classroom on task. The teacher will also reduce
homework assignments for the student.

Attachments/appendices:

Flocabulary Five Things (Elements of a Short Story):


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6I24S72Jps
Schoolhouse Rock: Grammar Conjunction Junction Music Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPoBE-E8VOc
Homework on revising: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLcjb0t6SRI
Homework on editing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNs9zZm9jzg

Plan B: If after the video debrief it seems that the students are not understanding the 5 elements
of a story, then the teacher will continue to explain by showing a video clip of The Hunger
Games movie and having students identify the 5 elements that way, if they cannot get it still then
the teacher will explain what the 5 elements of the story are based on the video clip. If the
students are not understanding how to use the 3 conjunctions, then the teacher will provide more
verbal examples for the students. If the students seem to have no trouble understanding the 5
elements of a story and the 3 conjunctions, then they will move onto the activities as planned. If
the partner activity is finished early then the teacher will give the extra time to students to
continue writing their narrative stories.

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Day 2 - Elements of a Short Story: Revising and Editing
*Lesson plan based on a 90-minute class period
Purpose/rationale: This lesson plan is designed for a 6th grade English/Language Arts class who
is beginning to learn the elements of writing a narrative story. For this flipped lesson, the
students will be required to watch two YouTube videos Writing a Personal Narrative: Editing
for Kids and Writing a Personal Narrative: Revising for Kids prior to coming to class. For this
90-minute lesson plan students will participate in a class discussion on the importance of revising
and editing. Then students will work individually on revising and editing their personal
narratives from the previous class; specifically focusing on making their writing more detailed.
The teacher will be walking around and conducting a workshop. This is the appropriate timing
for this lesson because it is at the beginning of the year when students are first learning how to
write in a longer capacity for academic purposes. This lesson will take place before instruction
on more difficult types of writing such as expository and argumentative. Students have not
previously learned how to revise or edit their own writing, so this will be their introductory
lesson. Students will be acquiring this knowledge through the use of the flipped classroom
technique due to the fact that direct instruction is static therefore is more effective when
completed at home, so that students can practice executing the desired task with their peers and
teacher present in order to support learning in the most effective way.
Florida State Standards:
LAFS.6.SL.1.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly
draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to
probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define
individual roles as needed.
Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making
comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion.
Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple
perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing.

LAFS.6.W.1.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using


effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator
and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop
experiences, events, and/or characters.

10
Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and
signal shifts from one-time frame or setting to another.
Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language
to convey experiences and events.
Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

LAFS.6.W.2.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new
approach.
LAFS.6.L.1.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard
English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off
nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.
Spell correctly.

Objectives:
Students Will Be Able To
Explain the importance of revising and editing
Explain the process of revising and editing
Add adjectives to their writing to make it more descriptive
Find and correct grammatical and structural mistakes in their writing
Materials:
Internet Access
Streaming Device
Paper
Pencil
Anticipatory Set: To begin class all students will come in and take their seats before the bell
rings. Teacher will quickly take role, and brief the students on the objectives for the day. Teacher
will begin class with a class discussion that reviews the video students were required to watch
the night before for homework.
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
Time
1 minute (Anticipatory Set)
15 minutes

Student is doing
Getting settled in their seats,
taking out a pencil and paper
Participating in a class
discussion/verbal non-graded
survey on the flipped lesson

Teacher is doing
Taking role, welcoming
students into the classroom
Leading a class
discussion/verbal non-graded
survey on revising and

11
video

5 minutes

Listening to the teacher


explain the objectives for the
day

editing a short story, that


were discussed in the flipped
lesson videos that students
were assigned for homework.
Be sure to review revising
and editing thoroughly with
students and address any
outstanding questions that
students may have on the
material as follows:
Editing: Checking spelling,
punctuation, and
capitalization, and fixing any
mistakes.
Revising: Making sure our
writing makes sense by
adding words, removing
words, and changing words.
Explaining the objectives for
the days class to the students
as follows: Today we will be
working on revising and
editing your personal
narratives. I want you to work
with a partner and focus on
correcting the following
grammatical mistakes:
making sure you have each
sentence starting with a
capital letter, each sentence
ending with a period, correct
use of conjunctions, and
spelling. Also work on adding
adjectives to paint a picture
about what is happening in
your story; be as specific as
you can! I will be walking
around the classroom to work
with each of you one on one
on revising and editing. I
want you to switch papers
with your partner and
highlight any mistakes you
see, then discuss with your
partner the mistakes and work

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together to fix them. You will
have the remainder of the
class period, roughly 50
minutes, to edit and revise
your narratives. Okay, any
questions? Take time to
answer any questions
students may have on the
activities and then dismiss
them to work with their
partners

60 minutes

Work with a partner to revise


and edit their personal
narratives.

9 minutes (Summary/closure)

Turn in narrative story to the


teacher. Participate in
debriefing

Walk around the room taking


about 3 minutes per student
to workshop their writing and
assist them in the editing and
revising process. Use this
time to model the editing and
writing process with each
partner group. Also be
available to answer any
questions the students may
have at this time.
Collect student narratives and
briefly debrief on how
students felt about their
writing; teacher will remind
students of their homework
for that night.
*I have previously discussed
with students all aspects of
accountability with the videos
that are assigned as
homework, as well as what to
do if they dont have internet
access.

Summary/closure: Students will end class by turning in their narrative stories to the teacher.
The teacher will lead an extremely brief discussion to get a quick understanding for how the

13
students feel about the editing and revising process. Students will be reminded of their
homework for the night which will be to watch some videos on publishing.
Assessment:

Formal assessment: The teacher will formally assess students understanding of the
editing and revising process by looking for them in the narrative story the students will
turn in at the end of the class period. This assignment will be a completion grade worth a
total of 10 points.
Informal assessment: The teacher will informally assess students understanding of the
revising and editing process by engaging with them in discussion throughout and work
shopping with them.

Homework/follow-up assignment: For homework students will be assigned a video discussing


the process and importance of publishing (another preparation for a flipped lesson).
Accommodations/adaptations:

Herbert Millner: Male student with ADHD will be given preferential seating,
so that they may stand up and walk around when needed, and as to
not distract other students. This student will also be provided daily with
a classroom sequence of events, with time frames, in order to help
them stay on task. The teacher has previously worked out a silent
queue with the student (tapping on the shoulder) to provoke the
student to stay, or get back on task. At the end of every class period
this student must show the teacher where he/she has marked in
his/her agenda the homework for the day/what is due the next class
period. To sway the student away from frequently interrupting, the
student will be rewarded a star for each day they raise their hand and
wait to be called on for everything they have to say. Once the student
reaches 5 stars they will be allowed to take a treat from the treat jar.

Paten Vander: Female student with a speech impairment will be given teacher support in
partner work. Paten will work weekly with the schools speech therapist. There will be a
strict anti-bullying culture in the classroom to make sure Paten feels welcome and safe.
The teacher will always model patience and acceptance when the student is speaking for
the class.

Lya Gross: Female student with mild dyslexia will be given extra time on all writing and
reading assignments. She will also be given supplemental materials such as videos and
audio recordings to ease her process of reading.

Oliver Fore: Male student with mild autism will be given a daily schedule handout the
class period before this schedule takes place in order to prepare them. If there are any
drastic changes in the classroom routine, the teacher will verbally discuss with the student
at least one- day prior. When making a transition from one activity to the next in the

14
classroom, the teacher will walk over to the students desk and verbally cue them to ease
the transition. An example of this verbal queue is Are you ready to move on, now. The
teacher will avoid slang and idiomatic speech due to the students literal translations of
language. The teacher will avoid sarcasm and will not rely on facial expressions to
communicate; the teacher will be verbal and direct when communicating with the
student. If the student is acting inappropriately the teacher will clearly, concisely, and
directly tell the student what they should be doing instead. When the teacher is giving
multistep directions, they should pause in-between to check for comprehension with the
student. The teacher will avoid situations that lead to sensory overload for the student.
The teacher will have tennis balls on the bottom of all chairs to minimize noise in the
classroom. The teacher should also limit the amount of items hung on the walls. If the
student does get overwhelmed, the teacher will assist the student in making a quiet, and
graceful exit to go to the agreed upon safe place (nurses office) where the student can
relax and calm themselves for a while. The teacher will use a stuffed Edgar Allen Poe
doll when speaking to gain the students attention due to the difficulty the student has in
maintaining eye contact. To assist the student with social interaction for group activities,
the teacher will first role-play with the student. The teacher will allow extra time for
handwritten work, and will allow the student to turn in all homework via a word
processer. If the student feels the need to ask more than 5 questions during a class period,
the teacher will have the student write down any extra questions to be discussed after the
class period in order to keep the classroom on task. The teacher will also reduce
homework assignments for the student.
Attachments/appendices:

Writing a Personal Narrative: Editing for Kids: https://www.youtube.com/watch?


v=SNs9zZm9jzg
Writing a Personal Narrative: Revising for Kids: https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=HLcjb0t6SRI
Homework on publishing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=lrViTgWEhTE&feature=youtu.be&hd=1

Plan B: If after the video debrief it seems that the students are not understanding the revising
and editing process, then the teacher will continue to explain by showing his/her own
editing/revising process of their own writing with a projection cam. If the students seem to have
no trouble understanding the editing and revising process, then they will move onto the activities
as planned. Depending upon the students needs the teacher will extend or shorten the class
discussion. If students claim to have finished editing and revising before the end of the allotted
time period, then will either work on practicing their vocabulary words for the week, or read
silently.

15
Day 3 - Elements of a Short Story: Publishing your Writing
*Lesson plan based on a 90-minute class period
Purpose/rationale: This lesson plan is designed for a 6th grade English/Language Arts class who
is beginning to learn the elements of writing a narrative story. For this flipped lesson, the
students will be required to watch a screencast video lecture on the publishing process, and what
will be expected of them in the following class prior to coming to class. For this 90-minute
lesson plan students will work individually with a class set of laptops to type their final draft of
their personal narrative. By the end of the class each student will post their short story to the
class blog. This is the appropriate timing for this lesson because it is at the beginning of the year
when students are first learning how to write in a longer capacity for academic purposes. This
lesson will take place before instruction on more difficult types of writing such as expository and
argumentative. Students have not previously learned the publishing process, so this will be an
introductory lesson to publishing. Students will be acquiring this knowledge through the use of
the flipped classroom technique due to the fact that direct instruction is static therefore is more
effective when completed at home, so that students can practice executing the desired task with
their peers and teacher present in order to support learning in the most effective way.
Florida State Standards:
LAFS.6.SL.1.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one,
in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly.
Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly
draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to
probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define
individual roles as needed.
Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making
comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion.
Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple
perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing.

LAFS.6.W.1.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using


effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator
and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop
experiences, events, and/or characters.

16
Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and
signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language
to convey experiences and events.
Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

LAFS.6.W.2.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as
well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of
keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single setting.

Objectives:
Students Will Be Able To
Explain the process of publishing
Identify what makes a piece of writing a published piece of writing
Type their personal narrative on a computer
Create an account at edublogs.org
Upload their typed personal narrative to the class blog
Materials:
Internet access
Streaming device
Class set of laptop computers
Anticipatory Set: To begin class all students will come in and take their seats before the bell
rings. Teacher will quickly take role, and brief the students on the objectives for the day. Teacher
will begin class with a class discussion that reviews the video students were required to watch
the night before for homework.
Teaching Strategy/Procedure/Activity:
Time
1 minute
(Anticipatory
Set)

20 minutes

Student is
doing
Getting
settled in
their seats,
taking out a
pencil and
paper
Participating
in a class
discussion/v
erbal nongraded

Teacher is doing
Taking role, welcoming students into the classroom

Leading a class discussion/verbal non-graded survey on the


process of publishing that was discussed in the flipped lesson
video that students were assigned for homework. Be sure to
review each of the components with students and address any
outstanding questions that students may have on the material

17
survey on
the flipped
lesson video

as follows:
Pull video up and replay the section on how to make a blog
using edublogs.org.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=lrViTgWEhTE&feature=youtu.be&hd=1
Explaining the objectives for the days class to the students as
follows: Today we will be working on publishing our short
story narratives. When I am done giving instructions I will
lead you by groups of 4 to come up and get a laptop computer
for you to take back to your desk. Once everyone has a
computer, you will launch edublogs.org and begin typing your
publishing our personal narratives. Once you have finished
typing your narrative and adding your 3 illustrations I want
you to upload it to the class blog. Okay, any questions? Take
time to answer any questions students may have on the
activities and then dismiss them to work with their partners
Walking around the room assisting students wherever needed
in creating their account at edublogs.org, typing their blog
post, and uploading/publishing their post.

5 minutes

Listening to
the teacher
explain the
objectives
for the day

50 minutes

Working on
creating an
account at
edublogs.org
, typing, and
uploading
their
personal
narratives.
Putting away Leading students by groups to put up their laptop computers
laptop
computers
Participate
Lead the class in a short discussion on how they felt about the
in debriefing publishing process.
discussion

5 minutes
9 minutes
(Summary/clo
sure)

Summary/closure: The teacher will lead a brief discussion to get a quick understanding for how
the students feel about their writing process. Students will be reminded of their homework for
the night which will be to finish reading and commenting on all of their peers short stories.
Assessment:

Formal assessment: The teacher will formally assess students understanding of the
publishing process by evaluating their blog post and final writing product; rubric found
on page 18
Informal assessment: The teacher will informally assess students understanding of the
publishing process by engaging with them in class and personal discussion.

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Homework: For homework students will finish typing, illustrating, and posting their blog post if
they did not finish in class.
Accommodations/adaptations:

Herbert Millner: Male student with ADHD will be given preferential seating,
so that they may stand up and walk around when needed, and as to
not distract other students. This student will also be provided daily with
a classroom sequence of events, with time frames, in order to help
them stay on task. The teacher has previously worked out a silent
queue with the student (tapping on the shoulder) to provoke the
student to stay, or get back on task. At the end of every class period
this student must show the teacher where he/she has marked in
his/her agenda the homework for the day/what is due the next class
period. To sway the student away from frequently interrupting, the
student will be rewarded a star for each day they raise their hand and
wait to be called on for everything they have to say. Once the student
reaches 5 stars they will be allowed to take a treat from the treat jar.

Paten Vander: Female student with a speech impairment will be given teacher support in
partner work. Paten will work weekly with the schools speech therapist. There will be a
strict anti-bullying culture in the classroom to make sure Paten feels welcome and safe.
The teacher will always model patience and acceptance when the student is speaking for
the class.

Lya Gross: Female student with mild dyslexia will be given extra time on all writing and
reading assignments. She will also be given supplemental materials such as videos and
audio recordings to ease her process of reading.

Oliver Fore: Male student with mild autism will be given a daily schedule handout the
class period before this schedule takes place in order to prepare them. If there are any
drastic changes in the classroom routine, the teacher will verbally discuss with the student
at least one- day prior. When making a transition from one activity to the next in the
classroom, the teacher will walk over to the students desk and verbally cue them to ease
the transition. An example of this verbal queue is Are you ready to move on, now. The
teacher will avoid slang and idiomatic speech due to the students literal translations of
language. The teacher will avoid sarcasm and will not rely on facial expressions to
communicate; the teacher will be verbal and direct when communicating with the
student. If the student is acting inappropriately the teacher will clearly, concisely, and
directly tell the student what they should be doing instead. When the teacher is giving
multistep directions, they should pause in-between to check for comprehension with the
student. The teacher will avoid situations that lead to sensory overload for the student.
The teacher will have tennis balls on the bottom of all chairs to minimize noise in the
classroom. The teacher should also limit the amount of items hung on the walls. If the
student does get overwhelmed, the teacher will assist the student in making a quiet, and
graceful exit to go to the agreed upon safe place (nurses office) where the student can

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relax and calm themselves for a while. The teacher will use a stuffed Edgar Allen Poe
doll when speaking to gain the students attention due to the difficulty the student has in
maintaining eye contact. To assist the student with social interaction for group activities,
the teacher will first role-play with the student. The teacher will allow extra time for
handwritten work, and will allow the student to turn in all homework via a word
processer. If the student feels the need to ask more than 5 questions during a class period,
the teacher will have the student write down any extra questions to be discussed after the
class period in order to keep the classroom on task. The teacher will also reduce
homework assignments for the student.
Attachments/appendices:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrViTgWEhTE&feature=youtu.be&hd=1

Plan B: If after the video debrief it seems that the students are not understanding the publishing
process then the teacher will show the students an example of a post on her personal bog page,
and show them other random bog pages. If the students seem to have no trouble understanding
the publishing process, then they will move onto the activities as planned. If the computers are
broken for some reason, then the students will create a paper blog post in neat handwriting and
illustrate it; the commenting portion of the assignment will be void.
Project Rubric: /50 points

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