FOI 160516

Document 1

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FOI 160516
Document 2


  

o  Feral Animal Strategy; 
o  Weed Management Strategy (currently being updated); and 
o  The Threatened Species Strategy 
  
 In addition, the Park’s 1,500+ rock art sites are actively being managed through a comprehensive and 
internationally recognised rock art monitoring and management program that minimises risk to these 
sites. 
  
 The Park has some of the longest monitoring data sets of crocodiles and turtle populations and in 
partnership with scientific organisations to monitor water bird. The data to date identifies these species 
populations as ‘steady’. 
 The Park works with various research agencies and partners in assessing climate change, most notably 
the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility. 
 The Australian Government has supported numerous research projects in Kakadu through the National 
Environmental Research Program (NERP). These projects focused predominantly on aquatic and 
terrestrial biodiversity conservation. 

  
o  Spatial data on Kakadu’s floodplains has been developed by researchers and will assist with 
management of these critical areas in park. 
 
 

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From: Feros, Kate [mailto:Kate.Feros@environment.gov.au]
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2016 5:10 AM
To:s22
Cc: s22
Mina, George; Oxley, Stephen
Subject: RE: Kakadu National Park to be featured in the publication "Destinations at risk: World Heritage & tourism"
[SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]
Thanks s22

s33(a)(iii)
s33(a)(iii)

We will therefore review the suggested text and images
and get back to you. Given other priorities next week, this may not be for a little while ...
Thanks
Kate
5

s22

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FOI 160516
Document 3

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Thanks
Kate

s22

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From: s22
environment.gov.au]
Sent: Tuesday, 16 February 2016 5:59 AM
To: s22
Cc:s22
Feros, Kate
Subject: FW: Kakadu National Park to be featured in the publication "Destinations at risk: World Heritage & tourism"
[SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

s22

s33(a)(iii)
As per Kate’s earlier  email with comments on the draft Tasmania text, we will get back to you by Friday with
comments on the draft GBR text.
Cheers

s22
 
s22
A/g Director
International Heritage Section
Marine & International Heritage Branch

s22
 
 

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From: s22
Sent: Monday, 15 February 2016 10:07 PM
To: s22
Cc: s22
Johnston, Chris
Subject: RE: Kakadu National Park to be featured in the publication "Destinations at risk: World Heritage & tourism"
[SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

Hi s22
 
Please find cleared points below from Parks Australia. Cheers
 
  Kakadu is a very highly managed tourist destination and so any climactic impact on the park is unlikely 
to be amplified s33(b)


  

  

 Under Joint Management arrangement and strict National Park zoning, Territory and Commonwealth 
legislation, no development can occur without: 
1.  Consulting with Traditional Owners and undertaking clearances from appropriate Aboriginal 
agencies; 
2.  Taking into account the Park’s various access restrictions which are not only limited to tourists but 
staff and researchers alike (e.g. sacred sites,  sickness country, exclusive use areas); 
3.  The permit process and pending on the development, an Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA’s) 
processes. 
  
 The Kakadu National Park Management Plan 2016‐2026 states that the main objective for its tourism is, 
‘To increase visitation in a sustainable way and to provide opportunities for diverse and enriching visitor 
experiences which are promoted in an appropriate way.’ And to, ‘Manage access to visitor sites using 
permits, commercial activity licences and leases, and booking systems in addition to temporary or 
permanent closures of sites under the EPBC Regulations’. 
 There have been no extinctions recorded in Kakadu and the 6th Kakadu National Park Management Plan 
2016 – 2026 prioritises actions to stabilise and recover threatened species and ecosystems in the park. 
 A fire mitigation strategy, using traditional fire management methods, has been used to great effect in 
the Stone Country and floodplains of the park will be extended to broader fire management throughout 
Kakadu. 
 Kakadu National Park has developed a Tourism Master Plan as well various related climate 
management strategies and programs. This includes: 
o  The climate change strategy http://www.environment.gov.au/resource/climate‐change‐strategy‐
2010‐2015‐kakadu‐national‐park (currently being updated); 
o  Fire Management Plan for the Stone Country & (draft) Fire Management Strategy which focuses 
on reducing hot, late season fires; 
o  Feral Animal Strategy; 
o  Weed Management Strategy (currently being updated); and 
o  The Threatened Species Strategy 
  
 In addition, the Park’s 1,500+ rock art sites are actively being managed through a comprehensive and 
internationally recognised rock art monitoring and management program that minimises risk to these 
sites. 
  
 The Park has some of the longest monitoring data sets of crocodiles and turtle populations and in 
partnership with scientific organisations to monitor water bird. The data to date identifies these species 
populations as ‘steady’. 

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From:Feros, Kate [mailto:Kate.Feros@environment.gov.au]
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2016 5:10 AM
To: s22
Cc: s22
Mina, George; Oxley, Stephen
Subject: RE: Kakadu National Park to be featured in the publication "Destinations at risk: World Heritage & tourism"
[SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]
Thanks s22

s33(a)(iii)
s33(a)(iii)

We will therefore review the suggested text and images
and get back to you. Given other priorities next week, this may not be for a little while ...
Thanks
Kate

s22

s33(a)(iii)
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FOI 160516
Document 4

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Many thanks
Kate

Dr Kate Feros
A/g Assistant Secretary
Marine and International Heritage
Wildlife, Heritage and Marine Division
Department of the Environment

s22

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