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CDP 2016 CDP Cities 2016 Information Request

CDP

Prefeitura do Rio de Janeiro

Module: Introduction
Page: Introduction
0.1

Please give a general description and introduction to your city including your citys boundary in the text box below.

0.2

Administrative
boundary

Description of city

City/Municipality

Rio de Janeiro City, the capital of the state with the same name, is located at 2254'23" south and 4310'21" west in the Southeast region of
Brazil. It is a coastal city with land area of 1,224 square kilometers and 6,320,446 inhabitants according to a 2010 census (6,476,631 in 2015
according to estimates). The city has three coastal massifs that helped to shape and direct its urban development. The climate is Tropical with
medium temperature of 23.7C and annual rainfall of 1,069 mm according to the last climate normal available (1961-1990). Rio de Janeiro is
the city with the second highest GDP in Brazil. The two largest Brazilian companies have headquarters in Rio - Petrobras and Vale; the largest
media group in Latin America - the Globo Organizations - and large companies in the telecommunications industry, such as Oi, TIM, Embratel,
Intelig, Net and Star One are also in the city. Besides these sectors, there are also the headquarters to the largest companies in the building,
transnational and chemical industries, among others. Tourism brings more than a mere addendum to the local economy, since many tourists
are attracted by the physical and cultural city. After a period of low economic growth, the recovery process and the preparation for the 2016
Olympic Gamesencourages investment in City conservation, with the implementation of projects in urban infrastructure (Porto Maravilha,
Bairro Maravilha e Morar Maravilha), by rationalizing and integrating the physical and fare public transport (BRS, BRT Transoeste,
Transolmpica, Transbrasil and Transcarioca) and cycling network expansion (Rio Capital da Bicicleta), in urban sanitation (the expansion of
West Zone Sanitation Project, Jacarepagu Macro drainage Project), in waste policy (Waste Treatment Centre of Seropdica), and the
increase of green areas by reforestation (Rio Capital Verde). The main vector of urban expansion in Rio is towards the West Zone, where
there is still land available and infrastructure is being improved. City administration is divided in five planning areas, which are subdivided into
34 administrative regions. The City Hall comprises the following agencies of Direct Administration: the Mayor Office, 24 Municipal Secretariats,
General Attorney and General Controller. Municipal Administration also comprises: 4 autarchies, 8 Public Companies and 6 Foundations. As
the City is also state capital and the former country capital, it has a high concentration of public buildings and employees.

Emissions Accounting Choice

Reporting emissions is optional for all cities. By checking the boxes below you are indicating that you have fuel and/or greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions data to
report at this time.
Select Government to report emissions from your local government operations (sometimes referred to as corporate or municipal emissions).
Select Community to report emissions from the entire city area over which the city government can exercise a degree of influence through the policies and
regulations they implement (sometimes referred to as geographic or city-wide emissions).

Select both boxes to report fuel and/or emissions for both inventories.

IF YOU HAVE NO FUEL AND/OR GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS TO REPORT DO NOT CHECK EITHER BOX.

Community

Module: Governance
Page: City Details
0.3
Please provide information about your city's Mayor in the table below.

Leader title

Prefeito

Leader name

Eduardo Paes

Current term
start

2013

Current term end

Total time in office


(years)

2016

0.4

Please provide details of your citys annual operating budget.

Annual operating budget

Budget year start

Currency

30900000000

BRL

Brazilian Real

Fri 01 Jan 2016

Budget year end

Sat 31 Dec 2016

0.5

Please provide details of your citys current and projected population.

Current population

6476631

Current
population year

2015

Projected population

6593099

Projected
population year

2020

0.6

Please provide details of your city's GDP.

GDP

282538827000

Year of GDP

Currency

BRL

Brazilian Real

2013

Source

IBGE

0.7

Please provide further details about the geography of your city.

Average annual
temperature (in
Celsius)

23.7

Land area (in square km)

1224.6

Average altitude (m)

Latitude (e.g. 41.25)

Longitude (e.g. -120.9762)

-43.17

-22.92

Page: Governance
1.0
Please describe the impact of national and/or regional climate change activities on your city's own climate change activities.
We maintain permanent contacts with other spheres of government in order to obtain better results for mitigation and adaptation processes of the city. As Rio de
Janeiro is the state's capital, measures and mitigation projects have a strong impact on state level and vice versa, principally in sectors managed by the state (eg:

wastewater treatment, water supply, among others). On the other hand, current national government policies regarding energy use (lowering prices of oil, which
stimulates the use of thermoelectricity instead of the hydroelectricity), which aggravate major congestion problems in the large and medium-sized cities, are having a
detrimental effect on air quality and carbon emissions.

1.1

Does your city incorporate desired sustainability goals and targets (e.g. GHG reductions) into the master planning for the city?

Response

Yes

Description

The Master Plan of the City (Complementary Law number 111/2011) includes attenuation, mitigation and adaptation to the effects of climate change
between the Policy Guidelines for the Environment, which must be carried out by making effective structural actions for the prevention of damaging
climate change. It is the joint responsibility of the agencies linked to the environmental planning and management system to control, reduce or
mitigate emissions of greenhouse gases, through multi and intersectorial actions to prevent and adapt the city to the harmful effects of global
warming, in accordance with policies and actions of regional and federal public spheres. Among the structural actions for the treatment of solid
waste, we highlight the encouragement to projects in the context of Clean Development Mechanism to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases
and allow to obtain funds by selling carbon credits, in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol and its substitutes. The Rio de Janeiro Strategic Plan
2017-2020 incorporates many actions designed to reduce carbon emissions in the city, besides including the achievement of the emissions
reduction targets stablished in the Climate Change Mitigation Policy as an action too. The new Plan "Rio Viso 500" has the goal to achieve neutral
carbon status in 2065, when the city completes its 500th anniversary.

1.2

Please describe how your city collaborates with businesses in your city on sustainability issues or projects?

Projects like "Selo Qualiverde", "Morar Carioca Verde" and the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), from UN, are good examples on how the City
of Rio de Janeiro collaborates with businesses in the city to promote sustainability.
"Selo Qualiverde" is a sustainability certification for private building created by the City Government that gives fiscal incentives to enterpenuers that add sustainable
features to its constructions.
Morar Carioca Verde is a habitation project for improving infrastructure and building habitat in the citys slums with green infrastructure, using low carbon material
and increasing energy efficiency through architectural features.
The SDSN has a regional network in Brazil, hosted in Rio de Janeiro. The City Government has participated in its creation and supports the network activities.

Module: Risks & Adaptation C40


Page: Cities-C40-ClimateHazards
2.0

Has a climate change risk or vulnerability assessment been undertaken for your local government area?

Yes

2.0a

Please attach and provide details on your climate change risk or vulnerability assessment.

Publication
title

PROJETO
MEGACIDADE
S,
VULNERABILID
ADES E
MUDANAS
CLIMTICAS

Year of
publicat
ion

2011

Attach the document

https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/
CDP Cities 2016/Shared
Documents/Attachments/Cities-2.0a-C3AttachtheDocument/Megacidades_Sumri
o_Executivo.pdf

Boundar
y of
assess
ment

Metropoli
tan area

Primary
author
of
assess
ment

Web link

Other:
Academ
y and
City
mixed
team

http://www.laget.eco.br/index.php?option=com_content&view=arti
cle&id=77:megacidades-vulnerabilidades-e-mudancasclimaticas-regiao-metropolitana-do-rio-dejaneiro&catid=47:relatorio&Itemid=5

2.0b
Please select the primary process or methodology used to undertake the risk or vulnerability assessment of your city.

Primary
methodology

Other:

Description

The research processes are based on thematic working groups that work in producing diagnostics and finding solutions to identified problems.
The collaboration with the Academy and research centres is permanent. These activities generate subsidies to the knowledge of the physical
risks that affect Rio de Janeiro City. The largest grant now available is Rio Operation Centre (COR), which includes about 30 agencies
(municipal, state, and utilities) in monitoring and optimizing the city functions on a daily basis. The meteorological data required for weather
events anticipation are received by weather radar with a range of 250 km located in Sumar, and processed by the system forecast Weather
High Resolution (PMAR), developed by IBM. The Climate Vulnerability Report - Vulnerabilidades das Megacidades Brasileiras s Mudanas
Climticas: Regio Metropolitana do Rio de Janeiro (INPE, 2011), which addresses the impacts on the physical environment and the
vulnerabilities of natural systems and socio-economic vulnerabilities of the city is key to a perspective view of the risks that hang over the city.
The interpretation of the contents of the Inventory - Inventrio e Cenrio de Emisses dos Gases do Efeito Estufa da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro
(COPPE / SMAC, 2013), associated with information and training opportunities and qualification arising from institutional linkages established
with the Academy, Research Centres, Institutions public and private, allow to debug the technical findings. Several other sources can be
consulted, such as: Seminary Rio: Prximos 100 Anos Anals (IPP, 2008); articles from the scientific community in the following areas: physical
vulnerabilities of the coast; liable city areas to flooding by rising sea level; extreme weather events and microclimate; ecosystem of the Atlantic
forest on the hillsides; mangroves and lagoon systems; infrastructure for urban drainage; water supply and sanitation systems; public health and
social risk.

2.1
Do the current and/or anticipated effects of climate change present a significant risk to your city?

Yes

2.1a

Please list the most significant climate hazards currently faced by your city and indicate the probability and consequence of these hazards.

Climate hazards

Extreme hot days


Heat wave
Forest fire
Rain storm
Tropical storm
Extratropical storm
Lightning/thunderstorm
Landslide
Rockfall
Storm surge
Flash/surface flood
River flood
Water-borne disease
Vector-borne disease
Air-borne disease
Ocean acidification
Permanent inundation
Salt water intrusion
Drought

Probability of hazard

High
High
Don't know
High
High
Don't know
High
High
High
High
High
High
High
High
High
High
High
High
Don't know

Consequence of hazard

Medium
High
Medium
High
High
High
Medium
High
High
Medium
Medium High
Medium
Medium High
Medium High
Medium High
Medium
High
Medium
High

2.1b

Please explain why the anticipated effects of climate change present no significant risk to your city.

2.1c

Please identify how you expect climate change to affect the frequency and intensity of the hazards faced by your city and when you expect to experience
those changes.

Climate hazards

Rain storm
Heat wave
Coastal flood
Flash/surface flood
Other: Extreme hot weather
Severe wind
Drought

Change in frequency

Increasing
Increasing
Increasing
Increasing
Increasing
Increasing
Increasing

Change in intensity

Increasing
Increasing
Increasing
Increasing
Increasing
Increasing
Increasing

Anticipated timescale

Short-term
Current
Medium-term
Short-term
Current
Medium-term
Current

Page: Climate Hazards II.


2.1d

Please describe the magnitude of the impact of these hazards and identify three critical assets or services that may be most impacted.

Climate
hazards

Rain storm

Magnitude
of impact

Extremely
serious

Impact description

Systematic occurrence of storms, linked to local topography and occupation,


dates back to the early history of the City and represents the most serious risk
factor for the population, due to the landslides and flooding episodes. The tragic
history of life and properties losses and the severe social and public health
consequences contributed to the creation of the Operation Center COR Centro
de Operaes Rio by the Municipality, in order to monitor and optimize the city

Asset or
service

Health and
community

Asset or
service

Energy

Asset or
service

Transport

Climate
hazards

Magnitude
of impact

Heat wave

Extremely
serious

Coastal flood

Serious

Impact description

functions. The Center seeks to anticipate solutions and minimize the occurrences,
alerting the responsible sectors of the risks and the urgent measures to be taken
in cases of emergencies such as heavy rainfall; Short duration or high density
rainfalls should also exacerbate the degradation of urban forests, generating
landslides, debris flows and rock falls. The increased frequency of rainfall
especially in summer should lead to more frequent landslides. The vulnerability of
the slopes tend to increase due to the rains, especially where there is informal
and uncontrolled expansion of buildings. In scenario projected for 2099, the
Tijuca Massif tends to have forest cover reduced to 6% to 20% of its total covered
area, considering the rhythm of occupation. With increasing intensity of rains and
winds, lagoons and other water bodies must suffer the acceleration of siltation
and decreased water quality due to increased sewage discharges, re-suspension
of sediments and decreased oxygen concentration, There should be greater input
of sediment from the slopes to the lagoons in Barra da Tijuca and Jacarepagu.
In water supply and sanitation systems, there must be an overload on treatment
plants, depending on the over-elevation of turbidity, fecal contamination due to
heavy rainfall and increased run-off.
Heat waves are known to have an important impact in health, mainly in the most
vulnerable population, kids and elders, causing hyperthermia, dehydration and
respiratory diseases. They have also impact in water and energy consumption
and may be a factor to increase the risk of fires.
The Rio de Janeiro coast already presents a 3mm/year increase in mean sea
level. The acceleration of the phenomenon should lead to: loss of sand on urban
beaches, and changes by transposition and erosion on non-urbanized beaches.
There are tendencies of risk in the port sector, sanitation systems, oil pipelines
and emissaries. Concerning to the areas liable to flooding risks by rising sea
level, we highlight the following results of modeling the phenomenon to the end of
the century: areas affected by flooding: 30 (0,5m sea lever rise) to 125 km2 (1,5m
sea level rise); Average population to be affected (sea level rise up to 1.50 m and
up to 5.00 m): 80,320 to 969,526 inhabitants; city area rate to be affected (up to
1.50 m): 10.3%. The lagoon systems should be affected as follows: Baixada de
Jacarepagu lagoons should suffer an increase in water surface area, creating
new areas flooded by sea water inlet and increased groundwater; Barra da Tijuca
lagoons should undergo expansion in Recreio and Vargem Grande area. The
salinisation of low lying areas should lead to an ecological decharacterization. In
urban drainage infrastructure, is expected to increase the restriction to flow, with
loss of efficiency of the drainage system. Spots of flooding are expected to reach

Asset or
service

Asset or
service

Asset or
service

Health and
community

Energy

Water

Residential

Health and
community

Other:
Tourism

Climate
hazards

2.2

Magnitude
of impact

Flash/surface
flood

Serious

Other: Extreme
hot weather

Serious

Severe wind

Serious

Drought

Extremely
serious

Impact description

places not previously flooded with increasing water depths and times of
permanence. The elevation of the groundwater level should cause flooding in low
lying areas with blockade of the flow of streams and rivers. It is possible to occur
the disruption of Restinga de Marambaia, which protects the Sepetiba Bay from
the high energy of sea waves. In water supply and sanitation systems, the saline
intrusion could affect the quality of locally extracted groundwater and
depressurized distribution system. Sewage treatment plant of Pavuna, which is in
periodically flooded area, can be affected physically. The submarine emissaries
of Ipanema and Barra da Tijuca can be affected with the change in the hydraulic
flow. The damage to sanitation infrastructure should increase the environmental
contamination risk. The increase in salinity in deposits of ground water should
lead to the loss of quality for consumption, causing health problems. The salt
intrusion in estuaries tends to have medium to high risk, and aquifers, low risk.
Systematic occurrence of flash/surface floods linked to rain storms dates back to
the early history of the City and represents one of the most recurring climate
hazards Rio de Janeiro already suffers. It can lead to the spread of water born
diseases, like leptospirosis, and depending on the event extent the flooding can
cause major disrupts in traffic and to the public transportation system of the city.
Other potencial area of impact is in the economic sector, bringing damage to
properties flooded and the possible temporary interruption of economic activity in
the city.
It is estimated an increase in water and energy consumption, pushing the
demand on the energy and water supply and sanitation public system.
Eutrophication problems will worsen if climate change causes higher water
temperatures in lakes and estuaries, like Guanabara Bay, Sepetiba Bay, Rodrigo
de Freitas Lagoon and Jacarepagu Lagoon System.
Falling trees, with possible blocking streets and damage to human life; falls of
suspended equipment, such as roofs, water tanks slabs, antennas etc; damage to
the power grid by cable detachment, wiring etc.
Climate change is provoking weather extremes, challenging existing
meteorological models. Prolonged droughts can cause dramatic decrease in
reservoir level, a fact that has come true in the second half of 2014 in So Paulo,
affecting the water supply of 12 million people.

Asset or
service

Asset or
service

Asset or
service

Commerical

Transport

Health and
community

Health and
community

Energy

Water

Energy

Transport

Health and
community

Water

Food and
agriculture

Energy

Do you consider that the effects of climate change could threaten the ability of businesses to operate successfully in your city?

Response

Yes

Explanation

If the sea level rises 1 meter, which could happen in the next decades, it will threaten the lowlands of the West Zone, which concentrates most of
the industries of the city. If the sea level rises it can also threaten the beaches, which are a major tourist attraction of Rio de Janeiro. Large storms
often paralyze the city. Once in 2010 and once in 2013 the mayor had to request the city's population to remain at home because most of the roads
were blocked, those being the first time in Rio's history that such a policy was undertaken. The droughts that we faced in the end of last year were
one of the reasons that made the federal government increase the electricity tariffs, which impacted residential and industrial users.

Page: Adaptation C40


3.0

Please describe the process by which the city reviews its progress and manages overall responsibility for climate change adaptation.

The Law n. 5.248/2011 establishes City adaptation policy to face the climate change effects. In 2014 Rio applied and was chosen to be part of the 100 Resilient
Cities program. Complying with the first phase of the program, the city created a Resilience Office in the Operation Center, center that integrates 30 different
institutions and monitors the city 24h, every day. A comprehensive diagnostic study was elaborated by the resilience team and raised the main critical hazards and
risks for the city. The city has entered the second phase, developing the action plan for adaptation.

3.1

Has the Mayor or local government committed to adapting to climate change across the geographical area of the city, town or settlement?

Yes

3.1a

Please select the type of commitment(s) and attach evidence.

Type of
commitment

Attach

Comments

Compact of
Mayors

https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/CDP Cities 2016/Shared


Documents/Attachments/Cities-3.1a-C2Attachment/85_Rio_Compact_Compliant_FINAL.pdf

Other:

https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/CDP Cities 2016/Shared


Documents/Attachments/Cities-3.1a-C2-Attachment/Noticia_Rio_Resiliente_Rockefeller.pdf

Rio de Janeiro also has a commitment with


the 100 Resilient Cities project from
Rockefeller Foundation.

3.2
Does your local government have a plan that addresses climate change adaptation?

In progress

3.2a

Please provide more information on your plan that addresses climate change adaptation and attach the document.

Publication title

Year of publication

Attach the document

Scope of plan

Area under your


city's control

Primary
author of plan

3.2b
Please explain why not and/or any future arrangements you have to create a plan.
The Municipal Plan for Climate Change Adaptation is currently being developed by an academic partner (COPPE/UFRJ) in partnership with every organization in the
City Government that has direct influence in the adaptation process via thematic working groups. The release of this plan is expected to the beginning of the second
semester of 2016.
In other hand it is also being developed a plan for city resilience, via the collaboration with Rockefeller Foundations 100 Resilient Cities project. It will cover several
areas in city resilience, but with great focus in climate change adaptation activities in order to increase resilience. The release date for this plan is May 3rd, 2016.

3.3

The Compact of Mayors requires cities to complete these additional questions on the climate hazards affecting your city and your city's plans to adapt to
these hazards. Other cities wishing to disclose further detail about their adaptation efforts are also encouraged to fill out the download.

https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/CDP Cities 2016/Shared Documents/Attachments/Cities-3.3-Adaptation/CRAFT_Questionnaire_CDP-Download.xlsm

3.4a

Please describe the actions you are taking to reduce the risk to, or vulnerability of, your citys infrastructure, citizens, and businesses from climate
change as identified in the Climate Hazards section.

Climate
hazards

Action

Lever

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action in
the
future?

Action description

Climate
hazards

Action

Lever

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action in
the
future?

Rain storm

Crisis management
including warning
and evacuation
systems

Currently in
effect at a
Programme/Project significant scale
across most of
the city

Yes

Heat wave

Heat mapping and


thermal imaging

Currently in
Programme/Project effect and being
piloted

Yes

Coastal flood

Sea level rise


modelling

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Flash/surface
flood

Flood defences
development and
operation & storage

Policy

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Policy

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Other: Extreme
hot weather
Severe wind

Drought

Tree planting
and/or creation of
green space
Real time risk
monitoring
Water smart
metering

Programme/Project

Policy

Currently in
effect (city-wide)
Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city

Yes

No

Action description

The Emergency Action Plan of Civil Defence aims to combat


landslides and through an alarm system based in sirens and SMS
messages and evacuation plans to safe spots near the risk areas.
These actions are connected to the activities of the Rio Operations
Center, like weather forecast and alerts, that are designed to avoid,
neutralize and counter the impacts of climate change in the city of
Rio de Janeiro.
Rio de Janeiro City Hall is developing a partnership with NASA in
which one of the work fronts is to use Landsat images in order to
map the urban heat islands of the city through thermal imaging
from Landsat satellites.
Pereira Passos Institute, an autarchy from the City Government, is
updating its studies in sea level rise impacts with new Digital
Elevation Models (DEMs) developed with LIDAR data, which allow
more accuracy in the results. This study will also cover the
Metropolitan Region of Rio de Janeiro in the near future.
The city is investing in big public works for urban drainage
infrastructure, like the Macrodrainage of the Jacarepagu
Lowlands and the Flood Control Program of Tijuca Area, which
includes three big reservoirs for storing rain water.
Rio de Janeiro invests in urban arborization, planting around
50.000 tree seedings each year. The city also invests in
Reforestation Projects.
The city monitors wind speed and direction in two of the
meteorological stations from the Rio Operations Centre.
The Rio City Hall has approved a new legislation obliging new
multifamiliar buildings to have individual hidrometers.

Page: Adaptation II
3.4b

Please provide some additional information on the adaptation actions you are taking.

Actions to reduce vulnerability

Crisis management including


warning and evacuation systems
Heat mapping and thermal imaging
Sea level rise modelling
Flood defences development and
operation & storage
Tree planting and/or creation of
green space

Which exchange most


helped to deliver this
action?

None of the above


Working with cities in a
specific C40 Network
Working with cities in a
specific C40 Network
Working with cities in a
specific C40 Network
None of the above

Real time risk monitoring

None of the above

Water smart metering

None of the above

Primary (major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

City's own funds /


savings
City's own funds /
savings
City's own funds /
savings
City's own funds /
savings
Developer
contributions
City's own funds /
savings
Other: Private
investment

Developer
contributions
City's own funds /
savings

Page: Social Risks C40


4.0
Does your city face any social risks as a result of climate change?

Yes

Action start
date (mm/yy)

Action end
date (mm/yy)

5.000.001 10.000.000

2010

0 - 100.000

2015

Loans

500.001 1.000.000

2015

Grants / subsidies

10.000.001+

2011

10.000.001+

2009

0 - 100.000

2010

0 - 100.000

2011

City's own funds /


savings
City's own funds /
savings
City's own funds /
savings

Total capital
cost ($USD)

4.0a
Please complete the table

Social risks

4.0b

Anticipated
timescale in
years

Increased risk to already


vulnerable populations

Current

Increased resource
demand

Short-term

Increased incidence and


prevalence of disease

Short-term

Increased demand for


public services
(including health)

Short-term

Population displacement

Current

Impact description

Irregular occupation (occupation of hillsides and wetlands) entails increased susceptibility to flooding and landslides in
case of large storms, which often cause fatalities. In 2010 20,000 families were living in high-risk areas, mostly
mountain slopes. City government has resettled approximately 4,000 and intends to resettle all families in need until
2016. However, larger and more frequent storms might increase the probability of landslides in areas already under
risk. Resettling is a sensitive political issue because people are relocated to distant areas they are not familiar with
and lose ties with their communities.
Increased temperature means more usage of air-conditioning, which demands more energy. Because of excessive
demand we have had widespread blackouts in the city during summer season. Also, most of the extra energy would
possibly come from thermoelectric plants, which are ideal for short-term production, but have a negative effect on
carbon emissions of the city/country. The city depends on energy for water distribution, as the sole water treatment
plant is located outside the city limits, from a considerable distance, and there are no viable alternatives. Increased
temperature also means higher water consumption which can be a risk if it is combined with a drought like the one
occurred in 2014/2015.
Expected increase in the cases of dengue fever, chikungunya, zika, leptospirosis and leishmaniosis, because of a
longer summer season and more rainy days, causing floods and the procreation of disease vectors. Heat waves can
increase the number of hospitalizations due to dehydration and respiratory diseases.
Increased demand on health services, particularly in the case of dengue fever epidemics, that can be fatal and has
infected at least 200,000 people (the recorded cases) in 2003. Public services of water and energy offer can be
affected by the increase in demand. Transportation services can be disrupted in cases of severe storms.
Rio de Janeiro has historical issues with landslides occurrences due to heavy storms. This issue leads the current
municipal government to resettle populations in high landslide risk areas. In other, mean sea level rise is projected to
affect populated areas in the surroundings of Jacarepagua Lagoon System, for example, and this can also lead to the
need of resettling population.

Please explain why not.

Module: Opportunities
Page: Opportunities
5.0
Does climate change present any economic opportunities for your city?

Yes

5.0a
Please indicate the opportunities and describe how the city is positioning itself to take advantage of them.

Economic opportunity

Development of new
business industries (e.g.
clean tech)
Additional funding options

Additional funding options


Additional funding options

Describe how the city is maximizing this opportunity

Through new building regulations we can provide incentive for cleaner technologies. This has already been established in the Port
Area (project Porto Maravilha), which provides tax incentives for green buildings (water reuse, LEED, recycling, etc).
Afther the 2010 floods, Rio de Janeiro received almost 200 million dollars from the federal government for slope contention, aimed
at protecting the population of favelas from further landslides.
Rio has a 1 billion dollar loan from World Bank that includes the hiring of a new GHG Emissions Monitoring System, based in GPC
Protocol methodology. Also, the Low Carbon Development Project was developed in partnership with the World Bank through
grants. It aims to monitor all GHG emissions reductions in projects carried out by the municipality, in order to assess their potential
for emissions and help devise mitigation or compensation measures.
Clinton Foundation has funded the substitution of lamps from 4.000 traffic light for new ones with LED technology.

5.0b
Why not?

5.1
List any climate change-related projects for which you hope to attract private sector involvement, and provide any details on the estimated cost of the
project

Project area

Waste
management
Other:
Reforestation

Project description

Cost of project
(USD$)

Rio de Janeiro has a project for changing the fuel type from the waste collection fleet,
managed by COMLURB, a municipal company responsible for waste management.
Rio de Janeiro has a VCS project for Reforestation that is ready to be implemented.

20000

Module: Emissions - Community


Page: Community - Date and Boundary
C1.0
Please state the dates of the accounting year or 12-month period for which you are reporting a GHG measurement inventory for your community.

Sun 01 Jan 2012 - Mon 31 Dec 2012

C1.1
Please indicate the category that best describes the boundary of your community GHG emissions inventory.

Administrative boundary of a local government

Page: Community - GHG Emissions Data


C1.2
Please give the name of the primary protocol, standard or methodology you have used to calculate GHG emissions.

Primary protocol

Global Protocol for Community-Scale


Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories (GPC),
(WRI, C40 and ICLEI)

Comment

Rio de Janeiro was one of the pilot cities to use the GPC first version. We updated the last inventory (2005)
and calculated the new one (2012). We used IPCC 2006 with some adaptations to the local context,
following the GPC requirements and procedures.

C1.3
Which gases are included in your emissions inventory? Tick all that apply.
CO2
CH4
N2O

C1.4

Please detail total (Scope 1 + Scope 2) emissions for your community, in metric tonnes CO2e and provide a comment on the level of confidence in the
accuracy of your community emissions figure.

Total
emissions
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

20268045

Level of
confidence

Attach your inventory

https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/CDP Cities 2016/Shared


Documents/Attachments/Cities-C1.4-C2-Inventory/CRJ_InventarioGEE2012_resumo_tecnico_final - INGLES - 25-03-2015.pdf

Medium

Comment on level of confidence

"This statement also certifies that DNV GL provides a


reasonable confidence level that the greenhouse
gases emissions informed by the Rio de Janeiro City
Hall for 2012 are verifiable." Text section from DNV
Verification Statement

C1.5
If applicable, please provide a breakdown of your GHG emissions by scope.

Scope

Scope 1 emissions excluding emissions from grid-supplied


energy generation
Scope 1 emissions from grid-supplied energy generation within
the city boundary
Total Scope 1 emissions (Row 1 + Row 2)
Total Scope 2 emissions

C1.6

Metric tonnes CO2e

Level of confidence

12919895

Medium

3251638

Medium

16171534
4096511

Medium
Medium

Where it will facilitate a greater understanding of your community's emissions, please provide a breakdown of these emissions by end user (buildings,
water, waste, transport), economic sector (residential, commercial, industrial, institutional), IPCC sector (stationary combustion, mobile combustion,
industrial processes, waste) or any other classification system used in your city.

End user / Economic sector / IPCC sector / Other

Sector

Scope

Emissions (metric tonnes CO2e)

C1.7
Please give the total amount of fuel (referring to Scope 1 emissions) consumed in your city during the reporting year.

Fuel

Amount

Units
End user / Economic sector / IPCC sector / Other

Sector

C1.8
How much electricity, heat, steam, and cooling (referring to Scope 2) has been consumed by your city during the reporting year?

Amount
Type

C1.9a

Units

End user / Economic sector / IPCC sector / Other

Sector

Please provide a summary of emissions by sector and scope as defined in the Global Protocol for Community Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories
(GPC), (WRI, C40 and ICLEI). Please complete the corresponding emissions for each row in the table below.

Sector and scope (GPC reference number)

Stationary Energy: energy use Scope 1 (I.X.1)


Stationary Energy: energy use Scope 2 (I.X.2)
Stationary Energy: energy use Scope 3 (I.X.3)
Stationary Energy: energy generation supplied to the grid Scope 1 (I.4.4)
Transportation Scope 1 (II.X.1)
Transportation Scope 2 (II.X.2)
Transportation Scope 3 (II.X.3)
Waste: waste generated within the city boundary Scope 1 (III.X.1)
Waste: waste generated within the city boundary Scope 3 (III.X.2)
Waste: waste generated outside the city boundary Scope 1 (III.X.3)
Industrial Processes and Product Use Scope 1 (IV)
Agriculture, Forestry and Land Use Scope 1 (V)
TOTAL Scope 1 (Territorial) emissions
TOTAL BASIC emissions
TOTAL BASIC and BASIC+ emissions

Emissions (metric tonnes CO2e)


4074626
4009418
1495374
3251638
5349967
87094
1665805
1088388
1247412
0
2398328
8586
16171534
15856906
21424999

C1.9b

Please provide a breakdown of fuel use and emissions by subsector and scope as defined in the Global Protocol for Community-Scale Greenhouse Gas
Emission Inventories (GPC), (WRI, C40 and ICLEI) and attach GHG emissions report. Download the GPC Reporting Tool here.

https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/CDP Cities 2016/Shared Documents/Attachments/Cities-C1.9b-GHGEmissionsAttachment/GPC Reporting Tool_V1


7_Rio_v6.xlsm

C1.11
Do you measure Scope 3 emissions?

C1.11a
Please complete the table

Source of Scope 3 emissions

Emissions (metric tonnes CO2e)

Comment

C1.11b
Please explain why not and detail your plans to do so in the future, if any.

C1.12

Please indicate if your emissions have increased, decreased, or stayed the same since your last emissions inventory, and please describe why.

Reason
for
change

Please describe why

Increased

The numbers presented here are from the same inventory reported to CDP last year. However, since it was submitted to external verification and
the numbers were reviewed according to the recommendations of the verifier there was just a slight increase due to this review. In comparison to the
last Inventory made for the city, which has 2005 as the base year, there was a significant increase in emissions (around 75%) mainly due to the start
of operations in 2010 of a new steel mill plant inside the city border, TKCSA.

Further Information
"Fundao Planetrio da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro", the city Foundation responsible for the management of the two Planetariums from Rio, develops a yearly
operations Inventory according to GHG Protocol (https://registropublicodeemissoes.com.br/index.php/participante/1831). This process started in 2012 and the last
report published is of 2014, attached in this questionnaire and also available online in the following link:
http://www.planetariodorio.com.br/index.php/gestao/planetariosustentavel
Attachments
https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/CDP Cities 2016/Shared Documents/Attachments/CDPCities2016/CommunityGHGEmissionsData/Relatorio_Inventario_GEE_FPCRJ_2014_VF_-_Compactado.pdf

Page: Community - External Verification


C1.13

Has the GHG emissions data you are currently reporting been externally verified or audited in part or in whole?

Yes

C1.13a

Please provide the following information about the emissions verification process.

Name of
verifier

Det Norske
Veritas

Year of
verification

2015

Attach verification certificate

https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/CDP Cities 2016/Shared Documents/Attachments/Cities-C1.13aC3-AttachVerification/4_Relatrio_de_Verificao_de_Inventrio_Rio 20150324 INGLES.pdf

C1.13b

Please describe your plans to verify your emissions in the future.

Module: Strategy C40


Page: GHG Emissions Reduction - Local Government C40
6.0
Do you have a GHG emissions reduction target in place for your local government operations?

No

6.0a
Please provide details of your local government operations emissions reduction target.

Comments

Sector

Define target
boundary

Baseline year

Baseline emissions
(metric tonnes CO2e)

Percentage
reduction target

Target date

Comment

6.0b
Please explain why you do not have a local government operations emissions reduction target.

Our targets are citywide, pertaining to the total emissions.


Law n. 5.248/2011 does not determine specific targets for emissions of responsibility of the Municipal Administration.
But most of the reduction in emissions will be a result of governmental actions, mainly infrastructural changes, such as new harvesting system for biogas from
landfills, new BRT systems, reforestation projects, subway expansion and modernization of public lighting.

6.1.

What actions are you undertaking to reduce your emissions in your local government operations?

Emissions
reduction
sector

Buildings

Emissions
reduction
activity

Energy efficiency/
retrofit measures

Emissions reduction
action

Institutional (municipal)
buildings and facilities:
Building energy
management system

Lever

Scale and status

Still under
consideration or
Programme/Project
awaiting final
authorisation

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action in
the
future?

Yes

Action description

Partnership with the World Bank to


develop a comprehensive assessment
of the energy consumption in the public
buildings (schools and hospitals first)

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

Scale and status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action in
the
future?

Action description

and evaluation of feasible technical


and financing solutions to increase
energy efficiency.
Energy efficiency/
retrofit measures

Institutional (municipal)
buildings and facilities:
Heating and cooling
efficiency

Buildings

Energy efficiency/
retrofit measures

Institutional (municipal)
buildings and facilities:
Installation of CFL or
other efficient lighting
mechanisms

Programme/Project

Outdoor
Lighting

LED / CFL / other


luminaire
technologies

More efficient luminaires


(e.g. LED)

Still under
consideration or
Programme/Project
awaiting final
authorisation

Waste

Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Residential non-organic
waste: Municipal recycling
points or centers

Policy

Currently in effect
at a significant
scale across most
of the city

Yes

Private
Transport

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport

Cycle hire/ share


programs

Procurement

Currently in effect
at a significant
scale across most
of the city

Yes

Private
Transport

Awareness and
education for non
motorized

Cycle training

Programme/Project

Currently in effect
and being piloted

Yes

Buildings

Procurement

Currently in effect
and being piloted

Currently in effect
and being piloted

Yes

Yes

Yes

The national PROCEL program


encourages adoption of efficiency
measures in public buildings.
This initiative is being conducted by
some city departments themselves and
in partnership with the energy
distribution company, which is required
by national law to invest part of its
revenue in energy efficiency projects.
Partnership with the World Bank in the
development of a comprehensive study
to assess technical and financing
feasibility to change street lightning to
LED.
The municipal company for waste
collection is continuosly increasing its
capability for recycling and has
ambitiuos goals to increase this
capacity.
Rio de Janeiro has a bike-share
program called BikeRio, with currently
around 260 bike share stations
throughout some of the most dense
part of the city.
"Rio Capital da Bicicleta" (Rio Bike
Capital) Program develops training and
educational campaigns for bike users

Emissions
reduction
sector

Private
Transport

Emissions
reduction
activity

transport
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
motorized
vehicles

Emissions reduction
action

Switch City authority fleet


of vehicles to electric/
hybrid/ hydrogen

Lever

Scale and status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action in
the
future?

Still under
consideration or
Programme/Project
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

Yes

Buildings

Building codes
and standards

Institutional (municipal)
buildings and facilities:
Appliance efficiency
standards for new
construction

Policy

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

CommunityScale
Development

Compact cities

Mixed use
development/live-work
targets

Policy

Currently in effect
and being piloted

Yes

Compact cities

Strategic refurbishment/
re-use of unused buildings
for new purposes

Policy

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

CommunityScale
Development

Transit oriented
development

Integrating low carbon


transportation solutions
into development
(walkability/ bikeability)

Programme/Project

Currently in effect
(city-wide)

Yes

CommunityScale
Development

Transit oriented
development

Increase coordination
between transport modes

Policy

Currently in effect
(city-wide)

Yes

Outdoor

LED / CFL / other

More efficient luminaires

Programme/Project Still under

CommunityScale
Development

Yes

Action description

and bus drivers in the city.


The municipal company for waste
(COMLURB) is, with C40 support,
studying and planning to change its
fleet fuel for biogas collected from
municipal waste disposal facilities.
Implement Qualiverde certification for
15% of new private and public
buildings by 2020 and implement
incentives for other buildings. This
certification was created by the
municipality under municipal Decree
n. 35745 (June 6, 2012).
Increasing population living in
downtown, reducing home-work
travels.
Occupy 15% of empty or underutilized
properties in downtown area focusing
on housing.
Add cycle lanes and bike racks to new
and old developments in the city,
helping to increase and connect cycling
routes to each other and to public mass
transportation and other services.
Creation of integrated tariff for public
transportation. Connecting BRTs
corridors with other public mass
transportation systems, like subway,
LRV, train.
Replace 60% of existing street lighting

Emissions
reduction
sector

Lighting

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

Scale and status

luminaire
technologies

(e.g. LED)

Energy Supply

Low or zero
carbon energy
supply generation

Provision/ encouragement
for new low carbon power
project sites

Policy

Waste

Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Residential organic waste:


Municipal recycling points
or centers

Currently in effect
at a significant
Programme/Project
scale across most
of the city

Water

Water recycling
and reclamation

Water recycling or
reclamation

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action in
the
future?

consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Policy

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Page: GHG Emissions Reduction - Local Government Operations II


6.2

Please provide some additional information on the local government activities you are taking.

Action description

points for LED lamps with Smart Grid


technology.

Yes

Promote the generation of energy from


renewable sources by encouraging the
installation of microgeneration systems
and attracting firms specialized in
renewable energy technologies.

Yes

Installation of two new composting


plants to expand composting capacity
already existing in the City.

Yes

Expand the production and use of


recycled water by the city. Creation of
municipal reuse water distribution
network. Implementation of reuse water
production station.

Emissions
reduction
activity

Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures
Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures
Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures

LED / CFL /
other luminaire
technologies
Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities
Infrastructure
for non
motorized
transport
Awareness and

Emissions
reduction action

Institutional
(municipal) buildings
and facilities:
Building energy
management system
Institutional
(municipal) buildings
and facilities: Heating
and cooling efficiency
Institutional
(municipal) buildings
and facilities:
Installation of CFL or
other efficient lighting
mechanisms

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary (major)
financial
mechanism

Working
with cities
in a specific
C40
Network

370000

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

None of the
above

30000

City's own funds /


savings

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver this
action?

None of the
above

City's own funds /


savings

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Developer
contributions

More efficient
luminaires (e.g. LED)

Working
with cities
in a specific
C40
Network

Residential nonorganic waste:


Municipal recycling
points or centers

None of the
above

Loans

City's own
funds /
savings

Cycle hire/ share


programs

None of the
above

Other: Private
Public
partnership

Tolls / user
charges

Cycle training

None of the

City's own funds /

320000

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

10.000.001+

2009

100.001 250.000

2011

2012

10.000.001+

10.000.001+

2011

2011

2010

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Emissions
reduction
activity

education for
non motorized
transport
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from motorized
vehicles

Building codes
and standards

Compact cities

Compact cities

Transit
oriented
development
Transit
oriented

Emissions
reduction action

Switch City authority


fleet of vehicles to
electric/ hybrid/
hydrogen
Institutional
(municipal) buildings
and facilities:
Appliance efficiency
standards for new
construction
Mixed use
development/livework targets
Strategic
refurbishment/ re-use
of unused buildings
for new purposes
Integrating low
carbon transportation
solutions into
development
(walkability/
bikeability)
Increase coordination
between transport

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary (major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

above

savings

Working
with cities
in a specific
C40
Network

City's own funds /


savings

2015

None of the
above

City's own funds /


savings

2012

Working
with other
C40 cities

City's own funds /


savings

2017

2020

Working
with other
C40 cities

City's own funds /


savings

2017

2020

None of the
above

City's own funds /


savings

2010

2020

None of the
above

City's own funds /


savings

2009

10.000.001+

Other:
Private
investiment

Emissions
reduction
activity

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

More efficient
luminaires (e.g. LED)

Working
with other
C40 cities

44000

Emissions
reduction action

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary (major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

City's own
funds /
savings

10.000.001+

2017

2020

2017

2020

2017

2020

2017

2020

development
LED / CFL /
other luminaire
technologies
Low or zero
carbon energy
supply
generation

modes

Provision/
encouragement for
new low carbon
power project sites

Working
with other
C40 cities

City's own funds /


savings

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Residential organic
waste: Municipal
recycling points or
centers

Working
with cities
in a specific
C40
Network

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Water recycling
and
reclamation

Water recycling or
reclamation

None of the
above

City's own funds /


savings

City's own
funds /
savings
2.000.001 5.000.000

Page: GHG Emissions Reduction - Community C40


7.0

Please describe the process by which the city reviews its progress and manages overall responsibility for emissions reduction.

Climate change measures are coordinated by the Municipal Environment Secretariat (SMAC), through its Climate Change Office (GMC), and by the Mayor's Office.
Management actions are based on the development of a Regulatory Framework in order to allow feasible actions. The main piece of the Regulatory Framework is

the Law n. 5.248/2011, that establishes the Climate Policy of the City and sets measurable, reportable and verifiable reduction targets of GHG emissions for 2012
(8%), 2016 (16%) and 2020 (20%), based on emissions recorded in Greenhouse Gas Inventory of Rio de Janeiro City, published in 2011 (2005 is the base year).
Law n. 5.248/2011 establishes elaboration, updating and publication of the GHG Municipal Inventory every four years.

7.1

Does your city have a climate change action plan for reducing GHG emissions?

Yes

7.1a

Please attach your citys climate change action plan below.

Publication title

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory


and Climate Change Action Plan of
the City of Rio de Janeiro

Year of
publication

2012

Attach

https://www.cdp.net/sites/2016/76/31176/CDP Cities 2016/Shared


Documents/Attachments/Cities-7.1a-C3-AttachPlan/CRJ_InventarioGEE2012_resumo_tecnico_final - INGLES - 25-03-2015.pdf

7.1b

Please describe any future plans to create a city climate change action plan.

7.2

Web
link

Do you have a GHG emissions reduction target in place for your community?
Yes

7.2a
Please provide details of your total city-wide emissions reduction target. In addition you may provide details of your sector-specific targets, by providing
the baseline emissions specific to that target.

Sector

Total

Total

Total

Define target boundary

Road Transportation, Railway, Residential,


Commercial, Public Sector, fugitive emissions and
other, Forest and land use, Urban Solid Waste,
wastewater.
Road Transportation, Railway, Residential,
Commercial, Public Sector, fugitive emissions and
other, Forest and land use, Urban Solid Waste,
wastewater.
Community-scale emissions and emissions of Rio
responsibility from outside the city boundary. Carbon
compensation is considered for achieving this goal.

Baseline
year

Baseline
emissions
(metric tonnes
CO2e)

Percentage
reduction
target

Target
date

Comment

2005

11933280

16%

2016

Measurement of avoided GHG


emissions.

2005

11933280

20%

2020

Measurement of avoided GHG


emissions.

100%

Other:
2065

Rio has just launched its goal for


being carbon neutral until 2065,
fifty years from now.

Other: No
baseline

7.2b
Please explain why you do not have a city-wide emissions reduction target.

7.3.

What actions are you undertaking to reduce emissions city-wide?

Emissions
reduction
sector

Buildings

Buildings

Buildings

Emissions
reduction
activity

Building
performance
rating and
reporting
Building
performance
rating and
reporting
Building
performance
rating and
reporting

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

Industrial buildings and


facilities: Audits and
advice

Policy

Industrial buildings and


facilities: Benchmarking

Policy

Industrial buildings and


facilities: Energy
performance certification

Policy

Buildings

Carbon emissions
reduction from
industry

Carbon emissions
reporting

Policy

Buildings

Carbon emissions
reduction from
industry

Carbon reduction targets

Policy

Buildings

Carbon emissions
reduction from
industry

Industrial emissions
trading system

Policy

Buildings

Energy efficiency/
retrofit measures

Buildings

Energy efficiency/

Commercial buildings
and facilities: Building
energy management
system
Commercial buildings

Incentive
/Disincentive
Incentive

Scale and
status

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Action description

Yes

Lei 4.372/2006; Lei 5.133/2009; Dec.


32.975/ 2010; Res. 510/2012

Yes

Lei 4.372/2006; Lei 5.133/2009; Dec.


32.975/ 2010; Res. 510/2012

Yes

Lei 4.372/2006; Lei 5.133/2009; Dec.


32.975/ 2010; Res. 510/2012

Yes

Industries are regulated by environmental


agencies at the state level

Yes

Lei 4.372/2006; Lei 5.133/2009; Dec.


32.975/ 2010; Res. 510/2012 LEI N 5.248
DE 27 DE JANEIRO DE 2011

Yes

Part of National strategy towards low carbon


energy

Yes

Incentives within green building regulation QUALIVERDE Decreto n. 35745 de 06 de


junho de 2012

Yes

Incentives within green building regulation -

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

retrofit measures

and facilities: CFL or


other efficient lighting
mechanisms

/Disincentive

Buildings

Energy efficiency/
retrofit measures

Commercial buildings
and facilities: Daylighting

Incentive
/Disincentive

Buildings

Energy efficiency/
retrofit measures

Commercial buildings
and facilities: Heating
and cooling efficiency

Incentive
/Disincentive

Buildings

Energy efficiency/
retrofit measures

Residential - Private
housing: Energy efficient
appliance purchases

Programme/Project

Buildings

Energy efficiency/
retrofit measures

Residential - Private
housing: Installation of
efficient lighting systems

Programme/Project

Buildings

On-site
renewable energy
generation

Commercial buildings
and facilities: Distributed
solar electricity

Incentive
/Disincentive

Buildings

On-site
renewable energy
generation

Commercial buildings
and facilities: Distributed
solar heating/ hot water

Incentive
/Disincentive

Compact cities

Strategic refurbishment/
re-use of unused
buildings for new
purposes

CommunityScale
Development

Policy

Scale and
status

consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Action description

QUALIVERDE Decreto n. 35745 de 06 de


junho de 2012

Yes

Incentives within green building regulation QUALIVERDE Decreto n. 35745 de 06 de


junho de 2012

Yes

Incentives within green building regulation QUALIVERDE Decreto n. 35745 de 06 de


junho de 2012

Yes

Incentives within green building regulation QUALIVERDE Decreto n. 35745 de 06 de


junho de 2012

Yes

Incentives within green building regulation QUALIVERDE Decreto n. 35745 de 06 de


junho de 2012

Yes

Incentives within green building regulation QUALIVERDE Decreto n. 35745 de 06 de


junho de 2012

Yes

Incentives within green building regulation QUALIVERDE Decreto n. 35745 de 06 de


junho de 2012

Yes

Complementary Law number 116 from April


25th 2012 - It establishes a special urban
interest area. Additionally, the
Complementary Law number 108 from

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

the city

Action description

November 25th 2010 permits new


commercial buildings on an existing under
utilized industrial area of the city
Until 2020, two green corridors are planned
to be implanted to connect forest fragments:
the Bosque da Barra-Marapendi-Chico
Mendes-Prainha Corridor and Guaratiba
Corridor.
RESOLUO CONAMA N 001/1986
Establishes definitions, responsibilities,
basic criteria and general guidelines for the
use and implementation of the
Environmental Impact Assessment as an
instrument of the National Environmental
Policy.
City Reforestation Program has 25 years of
experience and has already recovered more
than 3,000 hectares of degraded sites. The
main concept of reforestation projects of the
city is based on the principle of bio-diversity,
through the restoration of original
ecosystems of the Mata Atlantica. For the
next four years the program will focus in
maintenance of the already reforested
areas.

CommunityScale
Development

Green space and/


or biodiversity
preservation and
expansion

Conservation or
restoration of ecological
corridors/connectivity

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

CommunityScale
Development

Green space and/


or biodiversity
preservation and
expansion

Environmental Impact
Assessment of new
development

Policy

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

CommunityScale
Development

Green space and/


or biodiversity
preservation and
expansion

Reforestation

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

CommunityScale
Development

Green space and/


or biodiversity
preservation and
expansion

Tree
planting/Afforestation

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Green spaces revitalization with planting of


almost 52,000 trees.

CommunityScale
Development

Low carbon
industrial zones

Supporting sustainable
infrastructure parks

Policy

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

Lei 4372/2006 Grants tax incentives to the


construction and operation of port terminals
related to implementing Steel Complex in

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

CommunityScale
Development

Low carbon
industrial zones

Zoning land to
encourage low carbon
industries

CommunityScale
Development

Transit oriented
development

Food and
Agriculture

Mass Transit

Encourage
sustainable food
production and
consumption
Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations

Lever

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Action description

the West Zone of the city of Rio de Janeiro.


Decreto 32975 Regulates tax incentive
Lei 4372/2006 Grants tax incentives to the
construction and operation of port terminals
related to implementing Steel Complex in
the West Zone of the city of Rio de Janeiro.
Decreto 32975 Regulates tax incentive

Policy

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

Prioritising development
in areas well connected
by transit

Policy

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

Revision by Urbanism Secretary of Urban


Structuring Plans in the areas around BRT
Network

Community gardens or
allotments

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

Pilot community gardens have been


developed with cooperation of the
Prefeitura, non-profit organizations Ministry
of Social Development.

Bus rapid transit

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Implementation of four BRT systems (Bus


Rapid Transit) Transoeste, TransCarioca,
TransOlmpica and TransBrasil

Yes

24-hour BRT Operation

Yes

IImplementation of four BRT systems (Bus


Rapid Transit) Transoeste, TransCarioca,
TransOlmpica and TransBrasil

Yes

Creation of exclusive lanes for buses (Bus


Rapid System) and efficient management of

Mass Transit

Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations

Increase routes,
frequency and night
services

Programme/Project

Mass Transit

Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations

Increase the number of


bus stops

Programme/Project

Mass Transit

Improve bus
infrastructure,

Priority lanes

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city
Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city
Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

services, and
operations

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
bus and/or light
rail
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
bus and/or light
rail
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
bus and/or light
rail
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
bus and/or light
rail
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
trucks

Action description

bus traffic

Provide more bus


shelters

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city

Improve rail, metro and


tram fuel economy and
reduce CO2

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

New trains reduce 20% of electric energy in


comparison with the old ones.

Switch buses to bio fuels

Policy

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

Increase the use of green fuels.

Programme/Project

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

The City of Rio participates in hybrid and


electric buses with C40 with support of IDB

Programme/Project

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

The City of Rio participates in hybrid and


electric buses with C40 with support of IDB

Programme/Project

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

Develop a project for the outsourced fleet of


collection vehicles operates on renewable
fuels or hybrids, since the alternative
identified is technical, economical and

Switch buses to electric


engines

Switch buses to hybrid


engines

Introduce low carbon


waste collection vehicles

Yes

BRT system and BRS system will have


improved bus shelters with confort and
technology

Emissions
reduction
sector

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Mass Transit

Emissions
reduction
activity

Improve rail,
metro, and tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations
Improve rail,
metro, and tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations
Improve rail,
metro, and tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations
Improve rail,
metro, and tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations
Improve rail,
metro, and tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations
Smart public
transport

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Action description

environmentally viable.
The metro line has 40km of extension and is
being expanded in one more line. Also,
increasing the number of carriages in the
metro lines, reducing the waiting time at
stations.

Improve rail transit times

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Improve station facilities

Incentive
/Disincentive

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

The stations are adapted for people with


physical disabilities, making access easier.
Creation of bike parking spots in some of
the train and metro stations.

Increase number of
carriages

Incentive
/Disincentive

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Increase the number of carriages in the


metro lines, reducing the waiting time at
stations.

Increase routes,
frequency and night
services

Incentive
/Disincentive

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

The metro line has 40km of extension and is


being expanded in one more line.

Increase the number of


rail stations

Incentive
/Disincentive

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

The metro lines have 40km of extension


and the route is being expanded in one
more line, including new rail stations that
are being built.

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city

Yes

Rio de Janeiro has the Bike Rio bike share


system, which has this capabilities.

Bike scheme systems


that track availability of
bikes and locations for
drop off

Yes

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

Yes

Yes

Replacement of obsolete equipment for


more efficient ones.

Yes

Rio plans to develop this in a smart grid


project.

Yes

Modernizing lighting system in the city with


smart grid technology.

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

The city seeks greater integration of


transport modes installing bike racks in
metro stations and elsewhere in the city.

Programme/Project

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

Develop a project for electric car share.

Incentives/ rebates to
switch personal vehicles
to electric vehicles

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

We recently have implementing a pilot


program for electric taxi cabs in the city

Registration fees tied to

Programme/Project

Currently in

Yes

Legislation have recently changed to foster

Mass Transit

Smart card ticketing

Policy

Outdoor
Lighting

LED / CFL / other


luminaire
technologies

More efficient luminaires


(e.g. LED)

Policy

Outdoor
Lighting

Smart lighting

Sensor-based lighting

Policy

Outdoor
Lighting

Smart lighting

Timed lighting

Policy

School and workplace


travel plans

Incentive
/Disincentive

Electric vehicle charging


infrastructure

Private
Transport

Private
Transport
Private

Awareness and
education for non
motorized
transport
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
motorized
vehicles
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
motorized
vehicles
Improve fuel

Action description

In association with the State Government,


Rio de Janeiro users of public transport
have Bilhete nico, a smart card that allows
trip integration with only one fare.

Smart public
transport

Private
Transport

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Currently in
effect (city-wide)
Currently in
effect and being
piloted
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city

Emissions
reduction
sector

Transport

Emissions
reduction
activity

economy and
reduce CO2 from
motorized
vehicles

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

Scale and
status

vehicle efficiency

effect (city-wide)

Cycle hire/ share


programs

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city

Private
Transport

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport

Private
Transport

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport

Cycle parking

Private
Transport

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport

Private
Transport

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport

Private
Transport

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport

Private
Transport
Private
Transport

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Action description

energy efficiency in cars

Yes

The city holds 260 bike share stations.


Nowadays, there are around 2600 bicycles
available for rent.

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

The city seeks greater integration with mass


transportation modes installing bike racks in
and near metro, BRTs and train stations
and elsewhere in the city.

Cycle priority at traffic


lights

Programme/Project

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

Painting in the traffic lanes giving priority to


bicycles in walking prior to cars when traffic
lights open.

Cycle signage

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

All bike lanes and guards are signed.

Dedicated cycle lane

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport

Create pedestrian plazas

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport

Shared cycle lane

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

The city has 440 km in April 2016, from


which around 56% are dedicated cycle
lanes. The city plans to have 585km of
general cycle lanes in 2020.
The city is creating boulevards and walking
paths in several areas of the city specially
downtown and closing to cars
The city has 440 km in April 2016, from
which around 44% are shared cycle lanes.
The city plans to have 585km of general
cycle lanes in 2020.

Emissions
reduction
sector

Private
Transport

Private
Transport
Private
Transport

Waste

Emissions
reduction
activity

Infrastructure for
non motorized
transport
Transportation
demand
management
Transportation
demand
management
Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Emissions reduction
action

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Lever

Scale and
status

Walking maps and


signage

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city

Yes

The city is expading public information to


encourage walking.

Restrict parking

Policy

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

The city hall is converting several parking


spots in streets in bike share stations,
parklets and other non car related facilities.

Road tolls

Policy

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

Some inner city and trans city highways


have tolls.

Residential non-organic
waste: Reuse schemes

Policy

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

Craft activities

Yes

Increase the volume and quality of


separation of potential recyclable material,
improving existing facilities through
mechanization.

Yes

Increase organic composting through


construction of new composting facilities.

Yes

Increase the volume and quality of


separation of potential recyclable material,
improving existing facilities through
mechanization.

Yes

Reverse logistics.

Waste

Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Residential non-organic
waste: Municipal
recycling points or
centers

Policy

Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city

Waste

Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Residential organic
waste: Municipal
recycling points or
centers

Policy

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Waste

Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Commercial non-organic
waste: Municipal
recycling points or
centers for businesses

Policy

Waste

Recycling or
composting

Residential waste:
Electronic waste

Policy

Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city
Still under
consideration or

Action description

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

collections and/or
facilities
Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

recycling

Industrial waste:
Incentives for recycling

Policy

Waste

Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Collection for dry


recyclables (glass,
plastic, paper)

Policy

Waste

Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Composting agricultural
waste

Programme/Project

Waste

Landfill
management

Landfill planning/
engineering/ construction

Programme/Project

Waste

Recyclables and
organics
separation from
other waste

Commercial non-organic
waste: Source
separation policies

Policy

Waste

Waste

Waste prevention
policies and
programs

Construction and
demolition waste:
Reduce dumping of
waste

Waste

Improve the

Sectoral consolidated

Scale and
status

awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Action description

Yes

Encouraging the recycling supply chain (the


property tax exemption - IPTU) for
beneficiaries industries.

Yes

Currently the collection reaches 8% of the


potentially recyclable materials collected by
the municipal waste company - COMLURB.

Yes

Composting of waste from Rios central


food supply facility - CEASA. PS: reverse
logistics for contaminated packaging

Yes

Construction of new landfill facility to receive


construction and demolition waste.

Yes

Currently some are separated at source to


reuse the packaging of pesticides and
lubricating oil.

Policy

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

Policy

Currently in

Yes

Ensure the use of recycled aggregates from


construction waste in construction and
engineering services in the municipality
performed directly and indirectly (public
procurement and concessions) by
government (20% by 2016 and 40% by
2020).
Seven treatment stations to minimize the

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

efficiency of
waste collection

Waste

Improve the
efficiency of longhaul transport

Emissions reduction
action

Lever

waste collection

Towards a mode with


better tonne-km litre

effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city

Policy

Landfill
management

Landfill planning/
engineering/ construction

Waste

Landfill
management

Landfill gas
management/ Landfill
gas to energy

Policy

Waste

Landfill
management

Leachate management

Policy

Waste

Landfill
management

Reuse of sites

Programme/Project

Water

Wastewater to
energy initiatives

Methane recovery for reuse

Programme/Project

Waste

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Policy

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city
Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city
Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation
Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Action description

flow of trucks.

Yes

Develop project for that the outsourced fleet


of collection vehicles operate on renewable
fuels or hybrids, since the alternative
identified is technical, economical and
environmentally viable.

Yes

CTR-Seropdica has been constructed with


triple inferior impermeabilization; and
leachate treatment.

Yes

Burning biogas in flair at Seropdica Landfill


and in Gramacho Landfill production of
between of biogas and use by the refinery
REDUC in place of natural gas from the
Campos Basin.

Yes

Biologic treatment.

Yes

Future project to convert the former


Gramacho landfill in a park for the
community.

Yes

The Methane Recovery Project conducted


in partnership with COPPE / UFRJ, consists
in the use of biogas resulting from the

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

Water

Water metering
and billing

Connection fees for new


buildings

Water

Water recycling
and reclamation

CommunityScale
Development

Lever

Scale and
status

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

Incentive
/Disincentive

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Water recycling or
reclamation

Programme/Project

Still under
consideration or
awaiting final
authorisation

Yes

Green space and/


or biodiversity
preservation and
expansion

Conservation or
restoration of
natural/semi-natural
areas

Policy

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Yes

Food and
Agriculture

Encourage
sustainable food
production and
consumption

Community supported
agriculture

Programme/Project

Currently in
effect and being
piloted

Yes

Waste

Recycling or
composting
collections and/or
facilities

Commercial organic
waste: Municipal
recycling points or
centers for businesses

Policy

Energy
Supply

Low or zero
carbon energy
supply generation

Investment incentives

Incentive
/Disincentive

Currently in
effect at a
significant scale
across most of
the city
Still under
consideration or
awaiting final

Action description

anaerobic digestion of sludge segregated


from the aqueous fraction of ETE Alegria.
Biogas passes through a treatment to fit the
usage patterns desired for power
generation. This process is economically
feasible to the station, 33% of the energy is
used in own station.
A recent law obligates new buildings to
have individual hydrometers.
Rio Strategic Plan demands and sets goals
for that the City Government increases the
production and use of recycled water, as
also creates a network for distribution of this
water.
Increasing the legally protected Mata
Atlantica Vegetation area in city to reach a
total of 4,800 hectares protected. Create
new legislation to encourage increasing and
conservation of forested areas.
Increasing in 20% the local agricultural
production by 2020, with emphasis in
agroecological products and using fragile
and underutilised lands.

Yes

Increase organic composting through


construction of new composting facilities.

Yes

Promote the development of renewable


energy sector through the front Renewable
Energy Carioca, focused on the use of all

Emissions
reduction
sector

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions reduction
action

Scale and
status

Lever

Do you
plan to
expand
this
action
in the
future?

authorisation

Private
Transport

Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2 from
motorized
vehicles

Incentives/ rebates to
switch personal vehicles
to other lower-carbon
fuel

Incentive
/Disincentive

Currently in
effect (city-wide)

Page: GHG Emissions Reduction - Community II C40


7.4

Please provide some additional information on the city-wide actions you are taking.

Action description

the potential that the city has for power


generation from renewable sources by: (i)
facilitation for the development and
installation of microgeneration systems ; (ii)
attraction of specialized engineering and
technology companies in renewable energy;
(Iii) attraction of industry events to
consolidate intelligence and strategic
discussion on the sector in the city.

Yes

The State Government gives tax reduction


for cars that use CNG as fuel.

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

Building
performance
rating and
reporting

Industrial buildings
and facilities: Audits
and advice

Building
performance
rating and
reporting

Industrial buildings
and facilities:
Benchmarking

Building
performance
rating and
reporting

Industrial buildings
and facilities: Energy
performance
certification

Carbon
emissions
reduction from
industry
Carbon
emissions
reduction from
industry
Carbon
emissions
reduction from
industry

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Carbon emissions
reporting

None of
the above

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Carbon reduction
targets

None of
the above

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Industrial emissions
trading system

None of
the above

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures
Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures
Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures
Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures
Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures
Energy
efficiency/
retrofit
measures

Commercial buildings
and facilities: Building
energy management
system
Commercial buildings
and facilities: CFL or
other efficient lighting
mechanisms

On-site
renewable
energy
generation

Commercial buildings
and facilities:
Distributed solar
electricity

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

2012

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

2012

Commercial buildings
and facilities:
Daylighting

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

2012

Commercial buildings
and facilities: Heating
and cooling efficiency

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

2012

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

5.000.001 10.000.000

2012

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

5.000.001 10.000.000

2012

Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40

City's own funds


/ savings

2012

Residential - Private
housing: Energy
efficient appliance
purchases
Residential - Private
housing: Installation
of efficient lighting
systems

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

City's own funds


/ savings

2012

2012

1987

2010

2039

Secondary
financial
mechanism

On-site
renewable
energy
generation

Commercial buildings
and facilities:
Distributed solar
heating/ hot water

Compact cities

Strategic
refurbishment/ re-use
of unused buildings
for new purposes

None of
the above

Developer
contributions

Conservation or
restoration of
ecological
corridors/connectivity

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

Environmental
Impact Assessment
of new development

None of
the above

Developer
contributions

Reforestation

None of
the above

Developer
contributions

City's own funds


/ savings

Tree
planting/Afforestation

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

Emissions
trading credits

Green space
and/ or
biodiversity
preservation
and expansion
Green space
and/ or
biodiversity
preservation
and expansion
Green space
and/ or
biodiversity
preservation
and expansion
Green space
and/ or
biodiversity

17289

518683

Total
capital cost
($USD)

10.000.001+

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

preservation
and expansion
Low carbon
industrial
zones

Supporting
sustainable
infrastructure parks

Low carbon
industrial
zones

Zoning land to
encourage low
carbon industries

Transit
oriented
development

Prioritising
development in areas
well connected by
transit

Encourage
sustainable
food
production and
consumption

Community gardens
or allotments

Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations

Bus rapid transit

Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific

107000

City's own funds


/ savings

2006

City's own funds


/ savings

2006

City's own funds


/ savings

Grants /
subsidies

City's own funds


/ savings

Grants /
subsidies

City's own funds


/ savings

10.000.001+

2012

2018

2012

2012

Emissions
reduction
activity

Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations
Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations
Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations
Improve bus
infrastructure,
services, and
operations
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from bus
and/or light rail
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from bus

Emissions
reduction action

Increase routes,
frequency and night
services

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network

Increase the number


of bus stops

None of
the above

Priority lanes

None of
the above

Provide more bus


shelters

None of
the above

Improve rail, metro


and tram fuel
economy and reduce
CO2

Working
with nonC40 cities

Switch buses to bio


fuels

Working
with cities
in a
specific

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

211100

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

City's own funds


/ savings

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Loans

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

10.000.001+

2012

2018

City's own funds


/ savings

17600

City's own funds


/ savings

Other: Public
Transport
Utilities
investment

10.000.001+

2011

2010

2018

2010

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

and/or light rail


Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from bus
and/or light rail

Switch buses to
electric engines

Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from bus
and/or light rail

Switch buses to
hybrid engines

Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from trucks

Introduce low carbon


waste collection
vehicles

Improve rail,
metro, and
tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations
Improve rail,
metro, and
tram
infrastructure,

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network

Improve rail transit


times

None of
the above

Improve station
facilities

None of
the above

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

10.000.001+

2010

Other: Public
Transport
Utilities
investment

Other: Public
Transport
Utilities
investment

289900

Other: Public
Transport
Utilities
investment

Emissions
reduction
activity

services and
operations
Improve rail,
metro, and
tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations
Improve rail,
metro, and
tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations
Improve rail,
metro, and
tram
infrastructure,
services and
operations

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Emissions
reduction action

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Increase number of
carriages

None of
the above

Other: State
level investment

Increase routes,
frequency and night
services

None of
the above

Other: Public
Transport
Utilities
investment

Increase the number


of rail stations

None of
the above

Other: Public
Transport
Utilities
investment

Smart public
transport

Bike scheme
systems that track
availability of bikes
and locations for drop
off

Smart public
transport

Smart card ticketing

Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with other
C40 cities

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Other: Public
private
partnership

City's own funds


/ savings

Secondary
financial
mechanism

City's own funds


/ savings

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

2011

2009

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

LED / CFL /
other luminaire
technologies

More efficient
luminaires (e.g. LED)

Smart lighting

Sensor-based
lighting

Smart lighting

Timed lighting

Awareness
and education
for non
motorized
transport
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from motorized
vehicles
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from motorized
vehicles
Improve fuel
economy and

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with other
C40 cities
Working
with other
C40 cities

School and
workplace travel
plans

Working
with other
C40 cities

Electric vehicle
charging
infrastructure

Working
with other
C40 cities

Incentives/ rebates to
switch personal
vehicles to electric
vehicles

Working
with other
C40 cities

Registration fees tied


to vehicle efficiency

Working
with other

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

320000

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

City's own funds


/ savings

10.000.001+

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

City's own funds


/ savings

City's own funds


/ savings

Other: Public
private
partnership

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

Emissions
reduction
activity

reduce CO2
from motorized
vehicles
Infrastructure
for non
motorized
transport
Infrastructure
for non
motorized
transport
Infrastructure
for non
motorized
transport
Infrastructure
for non
motorized
transport
Infrastructure
for non
motorized
transport
Infrastructure
for non
motorized
transport
Infrastructure
for non

Emissions
reduction action

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

2011

C40 cities

Cycle hire/ share


programs

Working
with other
C40 cities

Other: Public
private
partnership

Cycle parking

Working
with other
C40 cities

City's own funds


/ savings

Cycle priority at traffic


lights

Working
with other
C40 cities

City's own funds


/ savings

Cycle signage

Working
with other
C40 cities

City's own funds


/ savings

Dedicated cycle lane

Working
with other
C40 cities

Create pedestrian
plazas

Working
with other
C40 cities

City's own funds


/ savings

Shared cycle lane

Working
with other

City's own funds


/ savings

64000

City's own funds


/ savings

Other: Public
Transport
Utilities
investment

2010

2010

Emissions
reduction
activity

motorized
transport
Infrastructure
for non
motorized
transport
Transportation
demand
management
Transportation
demand
management

Emissions
reduction action

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

2.000.001 5.000.000

2015

2016

C40 cities

Walking maps and


signage

Restrict parking

Road tolls

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Residential nonorganic waste: Reuse


schemes

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Residential nonorganic waste:


Municipal recycling
points or centers

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Residential organic
waste: Municipal
recycling points or
centers

Working
with other
C40 cities
Working
with other
C40 cities
Working
with other
C40 cities
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40

City's own funds


/ savings
Other: Public
private
partnership

City's own funds


/ savings

Tolls / user
charges

City's own funds


/ savings

City's own funds


/ savings

Loans

2011

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Commercial nonorganic waste:


Municipal recycling
points or centers for
businesses

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Residential waste:
Electronic waste
recycling

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Industrial waste:
Incentives for
recycling

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Collection for dry


recyclables (glass,
plastic, paper)

Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities

Composting
agricultural waste

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

10.000.001+

2011

2016

2018

Other: Private
investment

City's own funds


/ savings

City's own funds


/ savings

Loans

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

Landfill
management

Landfill planning/
engineering/
construction

Recyclables
and organics
separation
from other
waste

Commercial nonorganic waste:


Source separation
policies

Waste
prevention
policies and
programs

Construction and
demolition waste:
Reduce dumping of
waste

Improve the
efficiency of
waste
collection
Improve the
efficiency of
long-haul
transport
Landfill
management

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network

Sectoral consolidated
waste collection

Working
with other
C40 cities

Towards a mode with


better tonne-km litre

Working
with other
C40 cities

Landfill planning/
engineering/

Working
with cities

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

2009

2012

Developer
contributions

City's own funds


/ savings

1240000

Developer
contributions

Loans

Emissions
reduction
activity

Emissions
reduction action

construction

Landfill
management

Landfill gas
management/ Landfill
gas to energy

Landfill
management

Leachate
management

Landfill
management

Reuse of sites

Wastewater to
energy
initiatives
Water
metering and
billing
Water
recycling and
reclamation
Green space
and/ or
biodiversity
preservation

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with cities
in a
specific
C40
Network
Working
with other
C40 cities
Working
with other
C40 cities

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

2013

2011

5.000.001 10.000.000

2016

2020

10.000.001+

1987

Total
capital cost
($USD)

City's own funds


/ savings

City's own funds


/ savings

Methane recovery for


re-use

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

Connection fees for


new buildings

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

Water recycling or
reclamation

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

Conservation or
restoration of
natural/semi-natural
areas

None of
the above

12

City's own funds


/ savings

Developer
contributions

Emissions
reduction
activity

and expansion
Encourage
sustainable
food
production and
consumption
Recycling or
composting
collections
and/or facilities
Low or zero
carbon energy
supply
generation
Improve fuel
economy and
reduce CO2
from motorized
vehicles

Emissions
reduction action

Which
exchange
most
helped to
deliver
this
action?

Community
supported agriculture

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
per annum
at action
end date
(metric
tonnes
CO2e)

Anticipated
emissions
reduction
cumulative over
the lifetime of
the
action (metric
tonnes CO2e)

Primary
(major)
financial
mechanism

Secondary
financial
mechanism

Total
capital cost
($USD)

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

2.000.001 5.000.000

Commercial organic
waste: Municipal
recycling points or
centers for
businesses

None of
the above

City's own funds


/ savings

Source pending
identification/not
yet determined

Investment incentives

Working
with other
C40 cities

City's own funds


/ savings

Incentives/ rebates to
switch personal
vehicles to other
lower-carbon fuel

None of
the above

Other: State
level tax
redution

Page: Renewable Energy C40


8.0
Please indicate the energy mix of your electricity at the city-wide scale.

10.000.001+

Action
start
date
(mm/yy)

Action
end
date
(mm/yy)

2016

2020

Energy source

Coal
Gas
Oil
Nuclear
Hydro
Biomass
Wind
Geothermal
Solar

Percent

3.20%
13.00%
6.90%
2.50%
65.20%
7.30%
2.00%

8.1

Does your city have a renewable energy or electricity target?

No - my city does not have any renewable energy or electricity target

8.1a
Please provide details of your renewable electricity targets and how the city plans to meet those targets.

Scale

8.1b

Total installed capacity of


renewable electricity (in MW)

Proportion of total electricity from


renewable energy sources

Target date

Plans to meet target (include


details on types of energy)

Please provide details of your renewable energy targets and how the city plans to meet those targets.

Scale

Total installed capacity of


renewable energy (in MW)

Proportion of total energy from


renewable energy sources

Target date

Plans to meet target (include details


on types of energy)

8.1c
Please explain why you do not have a renewable energy target or a renewable electricity target and any plans to introduce one in the future.
The usage of renewable energy, as apposed to fossil fuels, is hindered in Brazil for aspects for which the municipalities have no responsibilities. Currently the
federal government subsidizes oil and the automotive industry. Also, environmental concerns are slowing the creation of new hydroelectric plants in the Amazon,
and therefore the extra energy is mostly coming from thermal plants.

Page: Water Supply Risks C40


9.0

Do you foresee substantive risks to your city's water supply in the short or long term?

Yes

9.0.a
Please identify the risks to your citys water supply as well as the timescale and level of risk.

Timescale
Risks

Level of
risk

Other: Source

Short-term

Extremely
serious

Flooding

Current

Serious

Increased water
stress or scarcity

Short-term

Serious

Declining water
quality

Current

Serious

Inadequate or
aging
infrastructure

Current

Extremely
serious

Risk description

Rio de Janeiro has a sole reservoire for water treatment, in the Guandu river, which provides potable water for
about 80% of the metropolitan region. There currently is no alternative to river Guandu, no other water
treatment station with enough capacity to substitute Guandu in case of major failure. Guandu reservoire is
managed by Rio de Janeiro state, in particular CEDAE, the State Company Water and Sewage Treatment.. The
reservoire borders the main road (Via Presidente Dutra, privatized) that links Rio de Janeiro and So Paulo, the
country's two largest cities, with heavy traffic of trucks. For four kilometers there is no physical contention
between the road and the waters of the river, which poses a risk regarding the spilling of chemical products into
the water supply. The road is outside the Rio de Janeiro municipality borders, therefore its protection is out of
city jurisdiction.
The latest IPCC report forecasts increased rainfall for the Southeast of Brazil. In such case, we predict flooding
in the region of the Guandu water treatment plant. In the case of landslides, mudslides or flooding, the waters of
the river could be taken up by mud, which would make the treatment of the water slower and more expensive,
with possible interruptions in the distribution. The reservoire does not border the city of Rio de Janeiro,
therefore work on flood prevention must be done by bordering municipalities, state or federal government.
Urban heat islands and the expected increase in temperature in the plant will cause more expenditure of potable
water, as well as use of electricity. Uneven rain regimens could mean scarcity in summer months. Water
distribution in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro is heavily dependent on electricity, as all the potable water
comes from the Guandu river, outside the city's borders. Blackouts already cause interference with distribution,
sometimes affecting the end of the lines for two or three consecutive days. The matter is more serious because
Brazil's energy is 80% dependent on hydroelectric power, a single source that depends heavily on rainfall.
During the summer of 2014 some reservoirs were at really low capacity, thus raising speculation in the federal
government whether a rationing policy would have to be implemented. In such cases, water distribution is
prioritized. However, in the medium-term, there are risks associated with a widespread energy scarcity. Energy
supply and transmission are national issues, and the energy distribution in the city of Rio de Janeiro is provided
by Light, a private company regulated by the state government. The Guandu reservoir is fed by the Paraba do
Sul river, whose waters are shared with the state of So Paulo and Minas Gerais. Current drought in So Paulo
is putting pressure that Rio de Janeiro diverts some of Paraba do Suls water for So Paulo, which would
potentially cause water scarcity within the state of Rio, affecting agriculture and food security.
Increased economic activity in the state of Rio means increased pollution in river beds, causing the quality of
Guandu reservoir to decline, demanding a longer and more expensive cleaning process. The salt intrusion can
also be a risk for the quality of water used for human consumption, mainly in areas still using underground water
near the coast.
Around 40% of potable water supplied by the state company are lost due to leakages and illegal connections.

9.0.b
Please explain why you do not consider your city to be exposed to any substantive water-related risk

Page: Water Supply Management C40


Please note.

If you did not select 'Yes' in the dropdown list for Q2.0 on the Water Supply Risks page, nothing will be displayed on this page.
Please go back to the Risks page to confirm your choice or continue to the next section.

9.1.
Please describe the actions you are taking to reduce the risks to your city's water supply.

Risks

Adaptation action

Other: Source

Watershed preservation

Flooding

Stormwater management
(natural or man-made
infrastructure)

Increased water
stress or scarcity

Conservation awareness
and education

Action description

Water supply and distribution falls under State jurisdiction, outside of the municipality's competecies, and is
managed by CEDAE - The State Company for Water and Sewage. However the city is starting to discuss
ways to approach other municipalities and the state to address the problem.
Water supply and distribution falls under State jurisdiction, outside of the municipality's competecies, and is
managed by CEDAE - The State Company for Water and Sewage. The city has lots of interventions being
implemented or planned to be implemented very soon regarding this issue as commented in other sections,
for exemple, reforestation in hillsides.
Rio is investing in assessments to identify energy and water consumption in buildings in order to raise
awareness and apply solutions to increase energy and water efficiency. 250 new schools with efficiency

Risks

Declining water
quality
Inadequate or
aging
infrastructure

Adaptation action

Conservation incentives
Investment in existing
water supply infrastructure

CDP 2016 CDP Cities 2016 Information Request

Action description

standards will be built in the city until 2016.


Water supply and distribution falls under State jurisdiction, outside of the municipality's competecies, and is
managed by CEDAE - The State Company for Water and Sewage.
Water supply and distribution falls under State jurisdiction, outside of the municipality's competecies, and is
managed by CEDAE - The State Company for Water and Sewage.