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THE

STUDENT'S ASSISTANT
IN
^5tiouomy aiitr ^trology
CONTAINING
OBSERVATIONS ON THE REAL AND APPARENT MOTIONS OF THE
SUPERIOR PLANETS. THE GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE
SUN AND SUPERIOR PLANETS,
CALCULATED FOR 44 YEARS TO COME.
Geocentric Longitude of the Planet Herschel for 100 years during
the 18th Century, The Moon's Node on the first day of
every month, from 1836 to 1880. Heliocentric
and Geocentric Longitude of all the
planets' ascending and descending
NODES.
J.0NG1TUDE, LATITUDE, AND MAGNITUDE OF ONE HUNDRED AND
FORTY-FOUR FIXED STARS, FOR PAST AND FUTURE YEARS.
33cUpsp.s of ttic ^un biaiilc in Cnglanlr.
ALSO
A DISCOURSE ON THE HARMONY
OF
PHRENOLOGY, ASTROLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.
BY J. T. HACKET.
LONDON I
0
BRAY AND KING, 55, ST. MARTIN'S LANE,
AND E. GRATTAN, 51, PATERNOSTER ROW.
1836,

ERRATA.
Page 11, line 5, for procession read precession
Page, 36, line 5, for Nodes read Node.
Page 110, line 15, for io 30 years read/or 30 yean
Page 133, line 2, for extensive, indeed read extensive indeed,
Page 152, line 7> for of position read or position,
Page 169, line 10, for Zodiacal Planisphere read Zodiacal.
Physiognomy

TO THE
STUDENTS AND ADMIRERS
OP
ASTRONOMY, ASTROLOGY, PHRENOLOGY, AND
PHYSIOGNOMY,
To whom the Author respectfully dedicates
this production, and begs leaves to state, that
which seems to be the duty of every student has not been attempted, until the present
Author undertook this laborious task, and series
of calculations, for the benefit of his brother
students.

It is useless to mention here that a

work of this kind has been long wanted and


universally called for. If any errors should be
found in this work, in defiance of care to the
contrary, the author begs leave to state, that
the faults and deficiencies are his own, and

IV

DEDICATION,

not those of another, not being able to find any


person either inclined, and if inclined, not capable
to assist him in any part of the calculations.
He hopes on this ground to merit your indulgence and forgiveness, should any thing incorrect
be advanced on the subjects treated of. Notwithstanding all difficulties or defects, he feels
confident that his labours will prove useful to
the proficient, and instructive to the young
student.
Wishing you all happiness, wisdom and
prosperity,
I remain.
Gentlemen,
Your devoted Servant,
THE AUTHOR.

PREFACE.

A work of this kind may not be so amusing


to some individuals as a pleasing romance; yet
it is hoped will prove to the Astronomical student and learner, gratifying and instructive. At
the request of a select number of students, the
present laborious calculations were made, in
order to give others and themselves an opportunity of more perfectly understanding the apparent motions of the superior Planetary bodies
herein mentioned, together with an illustration of
the various phenomena the above planets present
to us, the observers on this Earth, caused by the
revolution of the planets and the earth, around
the Sun, as the centre and great point of attraction to the Solar System. I have given a correct
Table of the longitude and latitude of 144 fixed
stars, calculated up to 1836, which I hope will
be acceptable to the student; as by observation

PREFACE.

when it is very clear the student will he nearly able


to trace the Ecliptic line at any hour of the
night, by allowing for latitudes. The diagram
in this work will shew the proportional distance
of each planet's orbit, from the Earth and Sun,
and also, that, the various Heliocentric aspects
of the Earth in its revolution round the Sun,
causes the Planets at one period to appear moving direct, then swifter in motion, then slower,
until stationary ; the next appearance is retrogradation or an apparent motion backwards in the
degrees and signs, moving still faster hack, then
appearing less swift to retrograde, until again
stationary, soon afterwards the Planets appear
direct, according to their real motions in the
signs, i.e. from West by South to East. The
Planets' places are calculated for 44 years to
come, for once a month, which will give the
student or learner a much better idea by perusing the following pages of the motions of these
planets, than by telling him that ^ revolves
round the Sun in 84 years, Saturn in 29J years,
Jupiter less than 12 years, and Mars in 687
days, odd hours and minutes, &c. hut by these

PREFACE.
tables he can notice how much swifter
passes
1;
through
the
signs
in
his
orbit
than
the
others
O
O
his orbit being so very near the Earth and Sun
when compared with the distances of It b or
hi. The cubes of the Planets' distances from
the in their orbit, being in exact proportion
to the squares of their periodic revolution. It
was originally intended in this work to have
given the geocentric places of the superior planets in degrees only, rejecting the overplus minutes if less than 30but that has been overruled by the general opinion, that if the places
in this work differ a few minutes from the true
apparent places at one period, and be found
to agree with them at another, it will prove amusing, and give a stimulus for observation.

INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY.

This Introduction is merely intended to convey a sufficient idea to those who are not already
acquainted with the solar system, the proportional distances of the Planets' orbits from the
Sun, and the Earth, together with the apparent
motions of the superior planets, as viewed from
this Earth, called their geocentric places or
motions. The path of the Planets or circles
which their orbits describe in the heavens,
is called the Zodiac. Suppose it a belt 20
wide with the Ecliptic, orbit, or path of the
Earth in the centre thereof; in as much as a
planet's orbit differs from the exact plane of the
Ecliptic, or orbit of the Earth, so much is the
planet's latitude in degrees and minutes; the
points where these imaginary circles intersect the
Ecliptic, are called the nodes. The ascending node is that point which the planet enters

10

INTKODUCTIOIV

for north latitude, the opposite is the descending


node for south latitude. The Zodiac is divided
into 12 Constellations, called signs, each sign
divided into 30 degrees, each degree into minutes
and seconds. Of course our readers are acquainted with the
Astronomical symbols.
Of the Ram, Si the Lion,
f the Archer,
y the Bull, 'tR the Virgin, Vj" the Goat,
IT the Twins,
the Balance, theWaterhearer,
2B the Crab, Ul the Scorpion, K the Fish.
Symbols of the Planets.
Sun,
$ Mars,
$' Juno,
5 Mercury, It Jupiter,
? Ceres,
$ Venus,
1? Saturn,
$ Pallas,
Earth,
^ Herschel, S2 ascending node,
D Moon,
[3 Vesta,
IJ descendingnode.
According to the opinion of the ancients, the
constellations were formed in the heavens by the
fixed stars of various magnitudes ; I have given a
list of some of the principal stars of these constellations in another part of this work, with a
table to calculate their motions and places for
past and future years. These stars appear to

TO ASTKOiNO.MV.
11
have a motion of 5O3 seconds forward in the
signs every year, caused by the Sun or Earth
being later every year by 505 seconds to the
conjunction of the same star, which is called
the procession of the Equinox. The fixed
stars are of various colours, some are observed
to be double, others triple stars, and to change
their magnitudes from the 1st and 2nd to the
3rd, 4th, or 5th, and some again become their
usual or former magnitude; our limits are too
small to say much more about these constellations and stars, it is but right to inform the
learner and student that these stars are at such
an immeasurable distance from the most remote
planet of the Solar system, that the whole diameter of this Earth's orbit, ' 190 millions of miles,'
is like a speck, when compared to their distances
from us. Students will perceive when they
inspect the diagram, that the revolution of the
Earth in its orbit round the Sun, causes the Sun
to appear in the opposite sign, to the Heliocentric place of the Earth; a little attention to the
plate will describe it. The Heliocentric place of a
Planet is the degree and sign of the Zodiac in

12

TO ASTRONOMV.

which a planet appears when viewed from the


Sun. In October the Earth is in V, but the
Sun at that time appears to us in the opposite
sign
The Geocentric place of a planet is
that degree
and sign of the Zodiac,' in which a
DO
planet appears when viewed from this Earth.
There is often a great difference between the
Geocentric and Heliocentric place, which entirely
depends upon the distances of the planets from
the Sun, and the aspects of this Earth in its
revolution which I shall hereafter describe. It
will be extremely useful to the young student
to learn plain mathematics and the use of Geometry, it will direct him in this, and all his
studies on a much more certain foundation.
A student thus qualified will use his reasoning
powers, consequently when a science is learned
on these principles, it can never be forgotten,
whilst the said individual retains his intellectual
faculties. 1 have endeavoured to avoid the use
of technical terms as much as possible, for the
advantage of those who are not conversant therein. 1 have said before that the Earth, and all the
planets revolve round the Sun; each in the same

TO ASTRONOMY.

13

tlirection, viz. from West by South to East, at


various distances, and in proportional periods
to the said distances; hence, the nearer a planet's orbit is to the Sun, the sooner will he
perform his revolution from a star, to the same
star or sign again. The more remote from the
Sun, the longer is that planet performing his
revolution.
Those planets whose orbits lie
within the circle of the Earth's orbit are called
interior, or inferior planets, such as Venus or
Mercury, but all those planets whose orbit is
greater, and farther distant from the Sun, than
the Earth's, are called superior planets, of which
we shall speak presently. Heavenly bodies,
such as the Moon, which revolves round the
Earth, are called satellites; 6 are observed to
attend the planet Herschel, 7 to attend the
planet Saturn, with his wonderful ring ; and 4
are observed to attend the planet Jupiter, in the
same manner as the Moon revolves round this
Earth, and reflecting their light received from
the Sun on the dark places of those planets.
It has been observed that y's moons move in
a contrary direction to all the planets and other

14
INTRODUCTION
satellites, and nearly at right angles to the plane
of his orbit, which is rather singular. We shall
say nothing about comets in this work, as we intend merely to shew the reason why the superior planets appear retrorjrado, stationary, and
direct. In the first place, the further a planet's
orbit is distant from the Sun and Earth, the
less will be the difference in degrees and minutes
between his Geocentric place as viewed from the
Earth, and his Heliocentric place as viewed from
the Sun. Secondly, the nearer any planet's orbit
approximates to the Sun and Earth, the greater
will be the angle of difference between that planet's Geocentric and Heliocentric place; either
forward or backward in the degrees and signs
according to the Heliocentric position of the
Earth at the time, which is particularly Illustrated
by the orbit of Mars. The diagram shews that
when Mars is at his mean distance from the Sun,
' that is at that part of his orbit, which is 90
degrees from his Aphelion or Perihelion,' and
the Earth at the same time is making an heliocentric aspect of 45 to or from the conjunction of
Mars, that planet appears 42 degrees distant

TO ASTRONOMY.

15

from his Heliocentric or true place, in regard of


the Sun and signs ; which sum of 42 is about
Mars' greatest mean difference in that angle before mentioned. For instance, if the Earth happens to be in 20 of Aries, and Mars in 5
of Gemini, then Mars will appear as viewed from
the Earth in about 16 of Cancer, hut if the Earth
happened to be in 20 of Cancer, then would
Mars appear in about 2^ of Aries. Again,
when a planet is in its Perihelion, which is at
its nearest distance to the Sun, and aspected according to the rules we have laid down, that
planet will shew his greatest angle of difference
between his Heliocentric and Geocentric place,
that can possibly occur, in the apparent motions
of the said planet; but if in his Aphelion, then
he will appear to shew the least difference that can
occur in his longitude as above stated; hence
Herschel differs in his Perihelion 3 12', and in
his Aphelion nearly 2 51', making a difference
in the eccentricity of his orbit of about 21'. fj ,
in his Perihelion differs about 6 26', and in his
Aphelion about 5 44', making a difference of
about 42'. If., in his Perihelion differs about

16
INTRODUCTION
1 1052', and In his Aphelion about 10 27')niaking
a difference in his eccentricity of about 1 25'.
d, when in his Perihelion differs about 52, but
in his Aphelion about 34, making a difference
partly caused by the eccentricity of the orbit of
Mars, and the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit,
producing the apparent differences above stated,
between the planet's Heliocentric and Geocentric
places or motions. Let us observe here that
any part of the above planet's orbits are subject
to the same proportional apparent differences,
produced according to the part or degree and
sign in which the planet is placed at the time, on
his orbit, and the Heliocentric aspect which such
planet receives from the position of the Earth.
For example, we shall take the nodes of the
planets and state their Heliocentric places calculated up to 1836; Herschel's Q LI 13; Saturn's
22 15'; 44 R 8 45'; ^ R 18 S 17'.
The figure (3) shews the point of the planet's
orbit which intersects the orbit of the Earth or
Ecliptic at A for north latitude; B shows the
greatest north latitude, and c the point a planet
enters, (jy) called the descending node, in order

TO ASTRONOMY.

17

to proceed in his south latitude; and when at


D, the planet shows his greatest south latitude.
If you add three signs, or 90 degrees to the place
of the ascending node above stated, you will
have the place of that planet's greatest north
latitude ; if you add the same number of degrees
to the descending, or take the opposite point of
the greatest north latitude, you will then have
the degree and minute of that planet's greatest
south latitude. The learner must be aware from
what we have already stated that those places
mentioned, viz. the ascending node, the greatest
north and south latitude, and the descending
node of any planet are all subject to the apparent
mutations which we have described to belong to
each of the planet's orbits. For instance, if Herschel happens to be on his node ; or in his
greatest point of latitude, and that the Earth is in
aspect about 88 at a mean to the 6 of Herschel,
that planet would appear to shew these places
mentioned, to be situated about 3 from their true
heliocentric places, before or after, backwards
or forwards, from the degrees and signs stated
above. The planet Saturn may, when aspected

18
INTRODUCTION
by the Earth at 85 degrees distance, at a mean
from the conjunction of the planet in those places
the Q, &;c. appear 6 degrees from the heliocentric
places, backwards or forwards, in the signs, degrees or minutes distanced as above. Jupiter
likewise receiving the heliocentric aspect of SO0
at a mean from the Earth, is likely to exceed 1 lo
backwards or forwards, from the above places,
just as the aspect may be, either dexter or sinister. Mars is the next planet to he spoken
of; when the Earth happens to aspect this planet, (at any of those points described as S2 ?S, or
the point of greatest north or south latitude, or
any other heliocentric places,) or at the distance
from the conjunction of Mars of 45 degrees, at
a mean either applying to or past the conjunction at the proper aspected distance, Mars is
liable not to differ less than 34 degrees or more
than 52, between his apparent, or geocentric
place, and the heliocentric places above described.
When the Earth applies with an heliocentric
aspect to or from the conjunction of the following planets, these planets shew their greatest
angle of mean difference between their heliocentric and geocentric longitude.

TO ASTRONOMY.

19

Heliocentric aspect of the Earth to the following


Planets, with an aspect of these degrees at a
mean.
Mars .
. 47 I Saturn.
85
Jupiter
. 80 | Herschell
88
These Planets appear retrograde for the following
periods:
Mars
3 months, and less than 2^.
Jupiter .
4
4 months nearly.
Saturn
4^
41
Herschel
5
5
Periods of turning retrograde:
Mars
25J months at a mean.
Jupiter
13
ditto.
Saturn
12|
ditto.
Herschell .
121
ditto.
1836.
Longitude of their greatest Heliocentric latitudes.
Mars Worth 18^17 South
18^17
Jupiter
8b45
8qr45
Saturn
22^15
22^15
Herschel
13 0^0
13 K 0

20

INTRODUCTION

It is proper to inform the student that although


the diagram, Fig. 1, shews the orbit of the planets
at their mean distances as parts of circles, and
circles, supposing the sun as the centre of each
circle, in order to make the first idea of the
solar system more plain to the understanding;
yet really the orbits of the planets belonging to
the solar system are elliptical. Having the sun
in one centre, nearer to one side of the conjugate
diameter, which is called the Perihelion, and
furthest from the other side of the conjugate
diameter is called the Aphelion. Those distances
on the transverse sides shew the mean distances
from the sun in that orbit, the small figure No.
2, will explain it more clearly, and the table of
Aphelions will inform the student in what part
of the zodiac these places and positions are
situated. The orbit of Venus is very near the
form of a circle as dotted on fig. 1. It is also
proper to add, according to the tables of the celebrated Yince, the orbits of the planets are calculated as an exactellipsis, whichdoes not differ much
(at least to the eye of a superficial observer) from

TO ASTRONOMY.
21
the form of a circle, except when very eccentric
like the orbit of ? ; the greatest variation is
produced from the difference of centres; fj centre
differs 5 20' ; 1? differs 6 26' ; Ti differs 5 30';
<? differs 10 49', from the centre of the Sun :
which accounts for those differences above
described ; the centre of the Earth's orbit differs
nearly 2 degrees from the centre of the Sun. The
Sun appears larger at one period, viz. winter, than
when at the opposite point in summer.
Figure 1. Shews the mean proportional
distances of the planets' orbits from the Earth
and Sun. In this figure the orbits are drawn as
circles, and parts of circles, the Sun being the
centre ; we wish the student to understand that a
knowledge of the apparent motions is essential: in
order to make the diagram more explicit,we have
shewn the difference which the semi-diameter of
the Earth's orbit produces on the apparent places
of the planets, as viewed from the Sun : the darts
on the figure shew the direct motions of the
planets in their orbits. The student will perceive
the line drawn through the centre of the Earth,
and continued to each of the planets; now, if

INTRODUCTION
you suppose the Earth to move rouno the Suu
in its orbit, you will, by observing the point of
this index or line which it describes in the zodiac,
take notice as the Earth approaches the planet
in that half of its orbit, which is in the same
signs with the planet, that the nearer the Earth
approaches the conjunction, the more swift does
the planet seem to retrograde, again become
more slow, then stationary; but as the Earth
moves in the opposite semi-circle of its orbit,
the planet appears to move direct. The lines
drawn through the bodies of the planets from the
Earth in its orbit, shews the effect, which the
semi-diameter of the Earth's orbit has on the
orbit of each planet; and also shews the more
remote the planet is from the Earth and Sun, the
less is this difference perceptible. If you observe
the dotted line z, where it intersects those Heliocentric degrees marked on the orbit of each
planet, first, on the orbit of Mars a mean difference of 42 degrees; on the orbit of Jupiter
over 1 1 degrees; on the orbit of Saturn over
6 degrees; and on the orbit of Herschel a little
more than 3 degrees; by which means you can

TO ASTRONOWV.
23
see those proportions entirely depend upon the distance and angle of the semi-diameter of the Earth's
orbit, and as the Earth revolves in its orbit,
these angles above described decrease and increase
according to the aspect of the Earth at the time ;
for instance, when the Earth is in conjunction, or
opposition of any planet, there is no difference between the heliocentric place and geocentric place,
because they are in the same right line with the
Sun ; consequently there can be no angle of difference during the period of exact conjunction, but
the Earth continues to roll on in its orbit, and
soon makes another angle as described before.
In order to demonstrate the planets' apparent
motion more particularly, we shall suppose the
planet Mars is fixed on that part of his orbit at
o, suppose the Earth to be in that part of its
orbit at a, with the index line drawn through
both centres, and to continue on each centre as
the Earth revolves all round in its orbit. You
will observe that Mars would appear to the
earthly observer as stationary in the view from
a, but from a to b the planet Mars would appear
to move direct in his orbit, from B to c, he would

24

INTRODUCTION

appear still to increase his velocity; as the Earth


moves on to c, and when at c, Mars will appear in
conjunction with the Sun, there being no difference
at that point between his heliocentric and geocentric longitude on c; but from c to d Mars
will appear less swift in motion as he approaches
d, from d to e he appears slower in motion,
until at e, where he appears stationary; as the
Earth passes from e to F, Mars appears to retrograde, in the signs increasing his velocity until
at F, where the and $ are on one right line
with the Q; during this period there is no
difference between the heliocentric and geocentric longitude in degrees and minutes, being each
the same, but as the Earth revolves on to a, Mars
decreases his retrograde velocity, until the Earth
arrives at a, where Mars appears stationary for a
short period until the Earth approaches c, when
he again appears direct; which, we hope, will
perfectly explain Fig. 1, as relates to the apparent
motion caused by the aspects of the Earth. But
in reality Mars and the Earth would both move
in their orbits and the aspect of A and E would

TO ASTRONOMY.
25
happen in about every 25J months appearing
retrograde between two and three months.
Fig. 2.Shews the eccentricity of the orbit
of Mars, and its position in respect of the orbit
of this Earth ; the figure shews the Sun in one
focus of the orbit of the Earth and of the orbit of
Mars, each orbit being eccentric and differing
from the form of an exact circle, and Inclining to
the form of an ellipsis; the line cc drawn through
the centre of the Sun shews the dliference between
the position of the centre of the Sun, and the
centre of the orbit of Mars. A the Aphelion,
bb the mean distances from the Sun, and p shews
the perihelion of Mars, and also demonstrates the
reason why the difference between the heliocentric
and geocentric angle, should vary nearly 20 degrees, and all the other phenomena produced as
already described. It must seem to the most
careless observer of this figure, that Mars does
appear considerably larger to us when in that
part of his orbit called the perihelion, and the
Earth in that part of its orbit in <5 with the
planet Mars; then the said planet would at the
opposite part of his orbit called the aphelion, ap-

"26

INTRODUCTION

pears three times as large, or in proportion to the


distance between each, the aphelion or perihelion.
The aphelion of Mars is in 3 3'Virgo.
ditto
Earth 9 20' Capricorn,
ditto
Jupiter 11 42' Libra
ditto
Saturn 29 43' Sagittarius,
ditto
Herschel 17 62' Pisces.
Fig. 3.Explains the ascending and descending nodes, north and south latitude. When
a planet is in that part of his orbit at a, he is on
the ecliptic line in his node; but as the planet
moves on to b increases his north latitude, but
from b to c decreases north latitude, and on c is
again on the ecliptic in his descending node,
increasing his south latitude until at D, his
greatest south latitude; from D to a the planet
decreases in south latitude, until he arrives again
upon the ascending node at a.
Fig. 4.Shews the proportional magnitudes
of the seven planets. I have to remark that the
proportional diameter of the Sun would be ten
times greater than the largest of those planets;
much might be said on the wonderful magnitude

TO ASTRONOMY.
27
of the planet Jupiter, when compared to the
trifling proportion of the diameter of this Earth.
If those persons who impiously condemn the
science of Astrology, were but for one moment
to consider the insignificant weight of all this
great world, when compared to some of the
heavenly bodies belonging to the solar system; for
instance, the planets Saturn and Jupiter, (which
must be apparent to any one who feels disposed
to make the comparison,) are bodies known to
influence each other; it is also reasonable to suppose that this Earth is acted upon in proportion
to the distances and magnitudes of mil the
heavenly bodies.
Smaller bodies near us exert as much influence
as larger bodies four times their size at double
the distance.

GEOCENTRIC PLACES
OF
HERSCHEL.
Those persons who have not paid particular
attention, or wholly disregarded the influence of
the powerful planet Herschel, will, by the assistance of the following tables, be enabled to discover his real signification in Nativities, Directions, State, Physical, and Horary Astrology.

IV.B. The letter D signifies directthe letter R signifies


retrograde.

GEOCENTRIC PLACES
OP
HERSCHEL,
Calculated from 1700 to the Year 1800,
NEW STILE.

Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May ..
June
July.,,
August
Sept...
Oct. ,,
Nov..,
Dec.,,

1700.
25
8 K AO
7 30
6 49
6 d 52
7 42
9 9
10 48
12 40
14 12
15 10
15 20
14 R 45

1702.
25
18 R 18
16 56
16 6
15 56
16 30
17 42
19 20
21 12
22 52
24 0
24 26
24 n 6

1704.
25
27 R 52
26 34
25 34
25 8
25 D 30
26 26
28 5
0^0
1 38
3 0
3 44
2 k34

Jan.,,
Feb...
March .
April...
May ..
June ..
July...
August
Sept...
Oct....
Nov...
Dec ..

1701.
23
13 30
12 11
11 24
11 22
12 D 2
13 24
15 4
16 56
18 32
19 34
19 52
19 R 25

1703. 1705. 1707. 1709.


s
SI
SI
SI
23 4 2 40 12 fi 24 22 R 11
21 44 1 n 22 11 8 21 1
20 52 0 18 10 0 19 49
20 30 0 48 9 11 18 49
20 d 57 1 0 9 9 18 33
22 2 1 n 0 9 D 56 19 D 7
23 40 2 34 11 20 20 22
25 34 4 30 13 11 22 7
27 15 6 14 15 6 24 3
28 26 7 38 16 40 25 45
29 5 8 30 17 43 27 1
28 r 50 8 R 29 17 56 27 29

1706.
SI
TviS-i
6 14
5 6
4 26
4 D 30
5 20
6 50
8 40
10 36
12 1
13 0
13 6

1708.
a
17 R 18
16 5
14 52
14 0
13 50
14 n32
15 52
17 41
19 36
21 14
22 23
22 36

30

GEOCENTRIC PLACES
1710.
1
27 B 6
26 0
2-1 47
23 43
2.3 19
23 d 45
24 53
26 35
28 30
0^17
1 40
2 15

1713.
UK
11 h47
11 0
9 49
8 33
7 49
7 D 51
8 40
10 10
12 2
13 54
15 32
16 30

1716.
n
26 R 23
25 57
25 0
23 38
22 36
22 13
22 D 38
23 50
25 34
27 27
29^17
036

1719.

1722.

Jan. ..
Feb.,,
3larch .
April...
31 ay . .
June. .
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct..,.
Nov...
Dec...

10 d45
10 R 45
10 2
8 46
7 33
6 46
6 d 48
7 38
9 6
10 57
12 53
14 28

24 D 13
24 35
24b 11
23 6
21 50
20 49
20 29
20 D 56
28 8
23 48
25 44
27 28

Jan....
Feb....
3 larch .
April...
May...
June .
July...
August
Sept...
Oct. ,,
Nov...
Dec..

1711.
2R 0
1 0
29SI48
28 38
28 7
28d 24
29 26
1^5
3 0
4 48
6 16
7 1

1714.
16 40
16 R 0
14 52
13 34
12 43
12 37
13 d 18
14 42
16 33
18 26
20 8
21 14

1717.
1 12
OR 55
0 0
28^41
27 34
27 3
27 D 21
28 25
0 5
1 56
3 50
5 15

1720.
15 48
15 37
15 R 0
13 45
12 31
11 40
11 34
12D 17
13 42
15 29
17 26
19 5

1723.
28 46
29 17
29 H 0
28 0
26 45
25 39
25 10
25 D28
26 35
28 11
o'a g
1 53

1712.
Jan... . 6 n 54
Feb. . . 6 1
March. 4 47
April... 3 34
May.. 2 56
Juoe.. 3 D 7
July... 4 4
August 5 38
Sept... 7 33
Oct. .. 9 23
Nov... 10 56
Dec, ., 11 46

1715. 1718. 1721. 1724.


21 32 6 0 19 37 3 17
21 R 0 5 R 50 19 50 3 54
19 54 5 2 19 R 20 3 n 45
18 35 3 44 18 10 2 49
17 40 2 34 16 54 1 35
17 24 1 55 J6 0 0 26
17 D 58 2 D 4 15 46
52
19 16 3 1 16 u 22 0 D 4
21 3 4 35 17 41 1 5
22 57 6 27 19 25 2 37
24 43 8 22 21 20 4 31
25 55 9 52 23 1 6 19

OF HERSCHEL.

31

Jan. .
Feb...
March .
April...
May...
June..
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct. ..
Nov.,,
Dec. .

1725.
ni
7 n 47
8 32
8 a 28
7 39
6 27
5 15
4 34
4 D 39
5 31
7 0
8 51
10 40

1728. 1731.
t
21 D 0 3 D 49
22 4 5 12
22 22 5 49
21 R 52 5 R 42
20 48 4 52
19 32 3 38
18 36 3 31
38 18 1 52
18 D 49 2D 0
20 1 2 52
21 45 4 24
23 36 6 11

Jan....
Feb...
March .
April...
May,..
June .
July...
August
Sept...
Oct. ,,
Nov...
Dec. ..

1726.
12 13
13 6
13 9
12 n 27
11 17
10 2
9 16
9 12
9 D 57
31 19
13 9
15 0

1729.
25 19
26 30
26 53
26 R 31
25 32
24 16
23 15
22 50
23D 13
24 19
26 0
27 49

1732.
8 1
9 28
10 12
10 R 11
9 27
8 14
7 5
6 21
6 D 23
7 10
8 37
10 23

1735. 1738.
20 27 2 36
22 4 4 21
23 3 5 32
23 25 6 14
23 R 0 6 H 6
21 57 5 18
20 45 4 8
19 46 3 0
19 25 2 21
19 D 51 2 D 27
21 1 3 19
22 39 4 45

Jan. ..
Feb...
March.
April...
May ..
June..
July .
August
Sept....
Oct. ..
Nov.,,
Dec,,.

1727.
16 37
17 36
17 47
17 Rll
16 5
14 49
13 57
13 45
14 D 22
15 39
17 26
19 17

1730.
29 36
0-^52
1 23
1R 8
0 13
29rn. o
27 54
27 21
27 d 37
28 36
of 12
2 1

1733.
12 14
13 44
14 33
14 39
14 R 0
12 51
11 40
10 50
10 44
11 D 24
12 46
14 30

1736. 1739.
24 30 6 34
26 12 8 20
27 18 9 38
27 44 10 25
27 B 24 10 23
26 25 9 R'40
25 13 8 33
24 11 7 22
23 45 6 38
24 D 5 6 37
25 10 7 o 22
26 45 8 44

1734.
t
16 D 22
17 56
18 50
19 4
18 R31
17 25
16 14
15 19
15 5
15 D 38
16 54
18 35

1737.
28 D 36
0^19
1 27
2 1
1 R 47
0 53
29-^41
28 35
28 3
28 0 16
29 15
0^46

32

geocentric places

Jan. ,.
Feb. . .
March.
April...
May ,.
June ..
July...
August
Sepst...
Oct..,.
Nov.. .
Dec...

1741.
14 30
16 19
17 42
18 38
18 50
18 R 18
17 15
16 2
15 9
14 50
15 D 28
16 42

Jan... .
Feb...
March,
April...
May ..
June..
July .
August
Sept...
Oct. ..
Nov..
Dec...

1742. 1745. 1748. 1751. 1754.


18 24 0^ 4 11 33 23 2 4 26
20 13 1 52 13 16 24 40 5 54
21 38 3 24 14 54 26 16 7 28
22 42 4 40 16 24 27 54 9 8
23 1 5 16 17 16 29 0 10 26
22 R 34 5 R 8 17 25 29 30 11 13
21 35 4 21 16 R 52 29 nl4 1! 14
20 20 3 9 15 46 28 20 10 R34
19 23 2 2 14 34 27 6 9 28
19 4 1 26 13 44 26 6 8 16
19 D30 1 D 33 13 33 25 35 8 26
20 38 2 25 14 D 8 25 D 50 7 30

Jan. ..
Feb. ,,
March.
April...
May...
June,,
July...
August
Sept.,,
Oct...
Nov...
Dec...

1740. 1743. 1746. 1749. 1752.


zz
zz
zz
10 D 30 22 D 18 3D 51 1 5D26 26 ii 50
12 19 24 7 5 31 17 8 28 24
13 42 25 34 7 14 18 44
14 34 26 43 8 24 20 16 1 43
14 38 27 8 9 40 21 13 2 53
14 R 0 26 R 48 9 R38 21 30 3 27
12 54 25 52 8 26 21 R 2 3 R 16
11 42 24 38 7 30 20 0 2 24
10 53 23 37 6 14 18 46 1 13
10 47 23 12 5 31 17 53 0 9
11 D27 23 D 31 5 28 17 35 29^34
12 45 24 34 6 D 2 18 D 4 29 n 44
1744.
26 10
28 0
29 34
0^44
1 14
1R 0
0 6
28^52
27 49
27 19
27 D 32
28 31

1747.
7 44
9 8
11 2
12 31
13 17
13R 16
12 46
11 31
10 56
10 36
9 26
10D 8

1750. 1753.
19 13 0^40
20 52 2 10
22 28 3 46
24 4 5 28
25 6 6 44
25 28 7 23
25 R 6 7 u 19
24 9 6 33
23 0 5 22
22 0 4 14 |
21 33 3 34
21 D55 3 D 38

OF I1EKSCHEL.
1

33

Jan, . .
Feb. ..
March
April .
May ..
June. .
July ..
Aug...
Sept. ..
Oct.. .
Nov.,.
Dec..,

1755.
K
8 n 16
9 36
11 9
13 0
14 14
ID 4
15 10
14 R 40
13 34
12 32
11 44
11 28

1758. 1761. 1764. 1767.


cy,
ry
(Y>
K
19 D 48 1 D 24 13 D 13 25 D 18
2
20 58
20 13 52 25 40
22 24 3 36 15 4 26 33
24 10 5 30 16 44 28 7
25 43 7 3 18 26 29
26 44 8 20 19 54 1 30
27 5 9 3 20 50 2 37
26 R 52 9 R 2 21 6 3 16
25 58 8 20 20 R46 3 r 6
24 43 7 10 18 36 2 20
23 42 6 0 17 20 1 4
23 18 5 14 16 24 29<V,56

Jan. ..
Feb. .
NIarch.
April...
May ..
June ..
July ..
Aug....
Sept....
Oct...
Nov...
Dec.,.

1756.
12 D 5
13 24
15 0
16 42
18 5
19 2
19 12
18 R 44
17 43
16 30
15 36
13 28

1759.
23 D 38
24 50
26 8
27 56
29 30
0^36
1 5
0 R 58
0 5
28^50
27 48
27 13

1762.
5 D 19
6 9
7 26
9 12
10 50
12 13
13 0
13 1
12 20
11 29
10 4
9 16

1765. 1768.
17 14 29 23
17 D 49 29 36
18 56 0S30
20 32 2 2
22 14 3 44
23 46 5 22
24 46 6 36
25 9 7 19
24 R 48 7 R 14
23 52 6 32
22 34 5 16
21 36 4 6

Jan. ,,
Feb. ..
March.
April ..
May .,
June..
July ..
Aug....
Sept....
Oct. ,.
Nov.*.
Dec...

1757.
16 D 0
17 12
18 40
20 28
21 54
22 53
23 10
22R 46
21 50
20 34
19 38
19 20

1760.
27 D30
28 32
29 58
1^44
3 16
4 28
5 3
4 R 56
4 8
2 56
1 49
1 16

1763.
9 13
10 n 0
11 13
12 54
14 34
16 3
16 54
17 4
16 R 30
15 29
14 13
13 22

1766.
21 14
21 D 44
22 38
24 18
26 2
27 38
28 40
29 10
28 r 56
28 3
26 48
25 44

1769.
3 26
3 D34
4 24
5 54
7 36
9 16
10 36
11 26
11 28
10 R 48
9 34
8 18

34

GEOCENTRIC PLACES

Jan. . .
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May ..
June. .
July..
AU..**
Sept....
Oct. ..
Nov.. .
Dec.

1770.

7R34.
7 D 36
8 20
9 4-i
11 24
13 12
14 33
15 26
15 34
15 R 0
13 54
12 37

1773.

20 i< 16
20 0
20 D 26
21 34
23 10
25 1
26 33
27 40
23 9
27 a 54
27 0
25 40

1776.
n
3 R 18
2 42
2D 48
3 42
5 12
7 1
8 40
10 4
10 54
10 54
10 R 10
9 0

1779.
n
16 h 40
15 49
15 40
16 D 15
17 26
19 8
20 54
22 26
23 33
24 0
23 R 34
22 34

1782.
So
0 R26
T1
29 20
28 53
29 D 8
0 4
1 40
3 26
5 6
6 30
7 16
7R 9
6 26

Jan. . .
Feb,..
March.
April...
May ..
June..
July ..
Aug.. .
Sept....
Oct. ..
Nov.,,
Dec.. .

1771.
11 44
11 42
12 d 20
13 40
15 20
17 8
18 34
19 34
19 46
19 n 28
18 20
17 0

1774.
24 35
24 13
24 D 30
25 34
27 10
28 56
0T130
1 43
2 22
2 R 10
0 18
29 ^ 1

1777.
7 42
7 0
7D 0
7 52
9 16
11 2
12 44
14 14
15 8
15 16
14 R39
13 30

1780.
21 16
20 16
20 2
20 D 33
21 40
23 19
25 4
26 44
27 52
28 22
28 R 6
27 10

1783.
5 10
3 56
3 22
3 D 30
4 22
5 52
7 38
9 36
10 53
11 44
11 48
11 B 8

Jan. ,.
Feb...
March.
April...
May ..
June..
July ..
Aug...
Sept....
Oct. . .
Nov...
Dec. ..

1772.
16 2
15 52
16 D23
17 40
19 15
21 5
22 33
23 36
24 0
23 R34
22 34
21 18

1775.
28 56
28 29
28 D 40
29 40
1 5
3 0
4 34
5 54
6 40
6 R 34
5 48
4 33

1778.
12 8
11 22
11 18
12 D 3
13 20
15 2
16 48
18 20
19 24
19 36
19 R 5
18 2

1781.
25 42
24 50
24 26
24 D 50
25 52
27 30
29 16
09554
2 10
2 50
2 R 36
1 44

1784.
9 54
8 34
7 53
7 D 56
8 46
10 13
11 53
13 44
15 16
16 14
16 24
15 R49

F HGRSCHEL.
1788.
25
28 K 56
27 38
26 38
26 12
26 d33
27 30
29 10
1^1 2
2 42
4 3
4 48
3 K 38

Jan. . .
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May ..
June . .
July ..
August
Sept..
Oct. ..
Nov.,.
Dec.

1785.
ss
14r 34
t3 15
12 29
12 26
13 d 6
14 28
16 8
18 0
19 36
20 38
20 56
20R 29

Jan, ..
Feb. . .
March .
April...
May ..
June..
July ..
August
Sept....
Oct. ..
Nov.,.
Dec. .

1786. 1789. 1792. 1795. 1798.


19 22 3 44 18 R 22 3 R 4 17 44
18 1 2 26 17 9 2 4 17 R 3
17 10 1 22 15 56 0 52 15 56
17 0 0 52 15 2 29 42 14 38
17 D34 1 D 3 14 54 29 11 13 47
18 46 2 3 15 D 36 29 D 28 13 41
20 24 3 38 16 56 0 30 14 D 22
22 16 5 33 18 45 2 9 15 46
23 56 7 18 20 40 4 4 17 37
25 4 8 42 22 18 5 52 19 30
25 30 9 34 23 27 7 20 21 12
25R 10 9 R 33 23 40 8 5 22 18

Jan. . .
Feb. ..
March .
April...
May ,,
June.,
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct. ..
Nov...
Dec...

1787.
24 9
22 48
21 56
21 34
22 d 1
23 6
24 44
26 38
28 19
29 30
oft 9
29 Ii54

1790.
8 36
7 18
6 10
5 30
5 D 34
6 24
7 54
9 43
11 40
13 5
14 3
14 10

1791.
SI
13 R28
12 12
11 3
10 15
10 13
11 D 1
12 25
14 15
16 10
17 44
18 47
19 0

35

1793.
23 R 15
22 5
20 53
19 53
19 37
20 n 11
21 26
23 11
25 7
26 49
28 5
28 33

1794.
SI
28 R 10
27 4
25 51
24 47
24 23
24 D49
25 57
27 39
29 35
1^21
2 43
3 19

1796.
7 R 59
7 5
5 51
4 38
4 1
4D 11
5 8
6 42
8 37
10 27
12 0
12 50

1797.
12 u 51
12 3
10 53
9 37
8 53
8 D 55
9 44
11 14
13 6
14 58
16 36
17 34

1799.
22 36
22 K 2
20 59
19 39
18 43
18 28
19 D 2
20 20
22 7
24 1
25 47
26 59

GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE
OF
THE SUN, HERSCHEL, SATURN, JUPITER, MARS,
AND THE
MOON'S ASCENDING NODES,
The following table will be found of considerable utility to the Student and Professor of
Astrology, and the information it affords will be
essential in guidingtheir judgmentincalculating
the power of directions in Nativities and other
Predictions for future years.

N.B. The letter D signifies directthe letter It signifies


retrograde.

GEOCE-NTKIC LONGITUDE OF THE SUN, etc.


1836.1
Jan. . . 10 10
Feb...
March. 10^58
April... 11^47
*May..
June ..
July ..
August 9^-10
Sept... 9^ 0
Oct. .. 818
Nov.. . 9U| 7
Dec.,, 9*23

U
27 D54
29 28
1^ 8
2 47
3 57
4 31
4 R 20
3 29
2 17
8 13
0 39
0 o 49

b
TU
3 D42
5 9
5R 1
3 R28
1 15
2916
58 34
29 D 20
lnl-29
4 32
8 11
11 42

vy
10 56
12~*29
10^44
11^32

X
1 45
3 15
4 51
6 32
7 48
8 27
8 R23
7 37
6 26
5 19
4 39
4 43

"I
14 45
16 41
17 8
16 R 6
14 4
11 ;
10 34
10 d42
12 18
15 0
18 29

1837.
| Jan. ..
Feb. ..
j March,
i April..
| May ..
June. .
July . .
August
Sept...
Oct. ..
Nov...
Dec, ..

9s 20
8^56
9^46
8 4
8nl53
9* 8

10 r56
7 14
5 52
7 D 21
11 13
16 51
23 12
(A 5
6 42
12 17
16 27
18 6
a
16 R 50
13 12
9 48
8 6
9 D 14
12 53
18 3
24 23
l"t 6
7 25
13 7
17 6

^
yf
6 n 59
(r~5i
23 37
17*56
ll^ll
4835
26 22
171148
7S56
25 46
11^-42
23 3

37
Si

26
25
23
22
20
18
17
15
14
12
10
9

SI

58
20
33
55
21
41
28
49
14

26 51 7 26
19 R 2 | 5 39
9 22 4 19
8 36 2 50
V,
16 51 1'14
0 *25 29 7
16 17 27 37
26 6
24 15 24 30
14l31 23
6*36 21 30
28 52 19 54

* 9^ digits of the 0 eclipsed in the 25th 0 Taurus.


D

38

GEOCE.\TtUC LONGITUDE OF THE

1838.
Jan. ..
Feb...
March.
April...
May ..
June..
July ..
August
Sept....
Oct. ..
Nov...
Dec. . .

v?
10 42
12^16
10^38
11^19
10^36
10II28
9 6
8^43

1839.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March.
April .
May ..
June..
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct...
Nov...
Dec...

VP
10 28
12^ 1
10^15
11^ 4
10^23
10ni3
853
8^29
8"Rl8
736

b
m
25 d 24
27 48
28 49
28 R22
26 40
24 23
22 41
22 3
23 B 15
25 30
28 45
2^17

K
9 D 20
10 41
12 13
14 0
15 18
16 8
16 15
15 B 44
14 38
13 36
12 48
8-^39 12 32

COOJ
OJ
OJ

K
5 n 30
6 58
8 33
10 13
11 31
12 17
12 18
11 R 38
10 32
7 59 9 20
8ltl38 9 30
8*^53 8 35

5 35
8 32
10 3
10 7
8 r 48
6 34
4 38
3 40
4 B 11
6 c
9 3
12 30

X
"R
18 d44
17 R 24
14 l!
10 29
8 46
9 D 49
13 11
18 23
24 39
1 6
7 36
13 5

17 7
18 41
17 B34
14 6
10 40
8 51
9 D46
13 7
18 19
24 24
l'H 8
7 29

S
Vf
23 d 7
17""30
9^38
3^53
26 47
19^43
lin 3
2s 7
22 16
10^41

or
18 19
16 40
15 11
13 33
11 57
10 19
3 43
7 5
5 26
3 51
2 13
13n^30 0 37
nR
25 28
018
25"^ 2
13 55
11 33
19 D 12
229
19 38
O^O
29 31
Tit o
14^48

K
28 59
27 20
25 51
24 13
22 37
20 59
19 23
17 45
16 6
14 31
12 53
11 17

SlhV AND 8UPERI0K PLANETS.


1840.
Jan....
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May ..
June.
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct. ,,
Nov...
Dec... .

0
Vf
1(1 IS!
1146
U* 1
ll^Q
11 ^ 7
10n58
937
9^12
9"K 2
8~20
gttl 9
9^25

1841.
Jan.
Feb.,, ,
March.
April...
May...
June..
July...
August
Sept..,
Oct....
Nov.,.
Dec...

'/P
10 58
1232
10^46
iiioss
10^54
10n44
923
8^58

w
K
13 D 10
14 29
16 1
17 46
19 10
20 6
20 16
19 R48
18 47
17 35
16 41
16 32

K
17 D 4
18 16
19 45
21 32
22 58
23 57
24 14
23 R52
22 54
8 6 21 39
8rrL55 20 43
9-^10
' ^ 20 25

h
t
16 D 4
19 8
20 59
21 42
20 57
19 R 6
16 51
15 21
15 15
16 D32
19 9
22 25

13 "I
D 13
17 15
18 47
17r 35
14 16
10 39
8 56
9 D 57
13 29
18 39
25 5
1^45

<?
~~
8 D54
3^21
26 1
19'V47
11^50
4n23
25 0
15 42
5^42
24 24
13^0
0 6

JTV

26 0
29 24
1^40
2 57

8 27
14 14
18 2
19 53
18 r 55
15 36
12 0
10 6
11 D 4
14 30
19 57
26 21

15 47
28 43
5ttl-20
3u 0
22~45
18 6
24 D 41
9,ri36
26 47
15? 55
9^ 25
2^14

V44
1 RlO
29^ 0
27 7
26 26
27 Dl4
29 33
2,<?24

39
9>
X

9 39
8 0
6 28
4 50
3 14
1 36
0 1
28^22
26 44
25 8
23 30
21 54

20
18
17
15
13
12
10
9
7
5
4
2

19
39
10
32
56
18
42
4
25
50
12
36

40

GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE


0
yf
10 44
12^18
10^32
11^21
10^39
10n30
9 9
8^45
8^35
752
8nUo
8^56

X
20 D 52
22 2
23 29
25 15
26 47
27 49
28 10
27 a 56
27 2
25 47
24 46
24 22

Vj1
yf
6 d 0 3 d 27
9 31 10 21
12 3 15 52
13 57. 20 27
41 18' 22 38
13 r 12 22 r 1
11 12 19 0
9 3 15 10
7 49 13 1
8 d 32 13 D 43
9 43 17 11
12 28 22 31

1843.
Jan....
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May...
June
July...
August
Sept.. .
Oct....
Nov..,
I Dec....

yp
10 30
12"" 3
10^17
ll1*1 6
10^25
10n17

X
24 D 43
25 54
27 13
29 0
0^34
1 40
2 10
2R 2
1 10
29^54
28 52
28 17

16 0
19 35
22 31
24 50
25 45
25 r 11
23 28
21 14
19 32
19 11
20 D20
22 43

8^31
8,,^20
738
8^42

29 17
6^35
13 4
19 32
24 26
27 17
27 B.s 17
24 41
20 38
18 4
18 d22
21 32

Si
26d 17
20^14
11^34
431
26 0
l?n2?
7$36
27 53
17^45

58
19
50
12
37
58
23
44
6
30
52
7

m
2 19
19 33
3^33
15 47
21 4
15 r 57
7 32
9 d 27
21 42
9^ 5
cr~ 1
21 37

yf
11 38
10 0
8 31

0
29
27
26
24
22
21
19
18
16
25 53 14
14 6 13

0CO
'O

1842.
Jan. . .
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May.,
June. .
*July..
August
Sept...
Oct...,
Nov...
Dec. ..

0,tf25
28^46
27 11
25 32
23 57

10 digits of the Sun eclipsed in the 16th deg. Cancer, a. M.

1844.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March.
. AprilMay..
June..
July ..
August
Sept.. .
Oct. ..
Nov.. .
Dec...
1845.
Jan. .,
Feb. ..
March
*April
tMay..
June..
July .
Aug...
Sept..
Oct.,,
Nv..
Dec..

o
^

SliN AND SUPERIOR PLANETS.

11^48
nx3
11^51
11^ 9
ll11 0
938
9" 4
-n.
822
9nll0
9^27
Vf
11 0
12''"34
10^48
11^37
10^56
10n46
9 25
9^*0
s'^si
8 8
8nl-57
gt 12

X
28 D 35
29 36
l'V 2
2 48
4 20
5 32
6 7
6R 1
5 13
4 2
2 33
2 20
nr
2 D 28
3 24
4 40
6 34
8 7
9 23
10 7
10 R 6
9 24
8 14
7 0
6 19

It
b
V55
26 n 4 26 D42
29 44 3^39
2^ 37 10 37
5 37 17 59
7 4 24 31
7 R 4 0^ 0
5 33 3 19
3 30 4 0
1 30 1 R 31
0 38 27^49
1 D 15 24 44
3 15 24 28

6 22
9 59
13 16
16 23
18 16
18 54
18 R 0
16 3
13 49
12 26
12 25
13 D 57

X
27 17
2^30
8 30
15 50
23 2
29 37
336
9 37
10 59
9 R 20
5 28
2 2

41

a
s
X
t
14 0 22 22 18
7^14 20 40
28 0 19 8
19^45 17 31
lO11^ 15 54
052 14 15
20 27 12 40
10^-21 11 2
0"Ji5 9 23
19 10 7 48
815 6 7
28 26 4 34
l
17 49
7-^38
25 21
14^27
1'"'55
17 30
27 34
27 42
20 n21
20 46
1^35
D
17 35

t
2 54
1 15
29nl46
28 8
26 33
24 54
23 19
21 40
20 2
18 26
16 48
15 12

* ^ will transit the 0 in 18 2' Taurus,


for space 3h. 22m.
t 5 digits of the Sun eclipsed in 16th 0 Taurus.
d 2

42

GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE

1846.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March.
April.
May ..
June ..
July ,.
August
Sept.,,
Oct.,,.
Nov.,,
Dec.,.

0
Vf
10 46
12^20
10^34
11^23
10^41
10n32
yii
8^47
6**37
754
8"l41
8? 57

1847.
Jan....
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May...
June. .
July ..
August
Sept.. .
fOct..
Nov..,
Dec. ..

Vf
10 32
1'/" 5
10^19
11^ 8
10^27
in11 8
8^33
8n^22
740
8**27
8^43

6 D 23
7 13
8 30
10 16
11 54
13 17
14 3
14 5
13 25
12 33
11 8
10 21
T
10 17
11 D 4
12 17
13 58
15 39
17 7
17 58
18 8
17 R 35
16 33
15 17
14 27

h
16''D44
20 16
23 40
27 0
29 26
0^40
OR 24
28^43
26 29
26 d40
24 3
25 0

8
1D 4
3 17
7 30
13 44
20 35
27 53
4n36
10 36
14 57
16 45
15 R 34
12 2

****
n
h/t-t
27 26 8 12
0^44 6 43
4 8 8D 9
7 44 12 8
10 35117
41
1
12 24 24 26
12 47 116
U R39 8 5
9 30 14 7
7 22 18 29
6 10 20 35
6 i> 30 19 R 44

9.

$
T
6 d19
26 10
14 ^ 20
4n24
23 39
13 22
2^21
21 56
ll"Jl36
123
21 8
lir,l- 8

13 34
11 56
9 27
8 48
7 13
5 33
4 0
2 20
0 42
29" 7
27 28
25 53

-A-

2 4
23 38
13^27
^41
27 18
19^19
9^33
28 2
11^16
14 26
5 R 56
0 4

24
22
21
19
17
16
14
13
11
9
8
6

14
36
7
28
53
15
40
1
22
47
8
33

* 3| digits of the 0 will be eclipsed in the 5th deg. of Taurus,


t llj digits of the 0 will be eclipsed in the 16th deg. of Libra.

SIX AXD SUPERIOR PLANETS.


184S.
Jan. . .
Feb. . .
March.
April...
May...
June.,
July ..
August
Sept,,.
Oct.. ..
*Nov...
Dec. ..
1849.
Jan. . .
Feb. . .
March .
April...
May ..
June. .
July . .
August
Sept.,.
Oct. ..
Nov...
Dec. ..

yf

10 16
11^50
11* 5
11^53
1111
ll11 1
9S40
9^15
g"'1 6
-n_
824
n
9 h2
9^29
y?
11 3
1
10*51
11^39
10^58
10II48
9 J27
gSi g
8^53
811
8nl59
9^15

43

b
K
8 n 30
II 37
15 2
18 46
21 57
24 17
25 15
24 R 43
21 49
20 35
18 51
18 35

%
s
16 ii 16
12 26
10 37
1 I'd 40
15 11
20 36
26 50
3^40
10 21
16 4
20 30
22 30

Si

nr
14 D 17
14 56
16 9
17 49
19 3l
20 59
21 54
22 11
21 R 50
19 41
18 24
17 29

5 D Si
17 57
3U 0
20 ' 25
a^e
26 39
14^58
4^16
23 58
lo oO
4n'l7
25 5

4 55
3 16
1 44
0 5
28^30
26 52
25 16
23 38
22 0
20 24
18 46
17 10

V1
18 D 18
18 53
20 1
21 36
23 18
24 51
25 51
26 13
25 r 52
24 56
23 38
22 40

K
19 D58
22 45
25 56
29 46
3^14
6 6
7 41
7 49
6 H 25
4 11
2 4
1 10

a
21 n 37
18 12
14 41
12 35
13 d 21
16 41
21 40
27 52
4I'^34
10 55
16 46
21 1

t
17 5
9^49
0'"'54
24 31
17't28
10'r32
2^44
23 55
12n49
27 27
5S38
2r 14

15 32
13 53
12 24
10 46
9 10
7 32
5 57
4 18
2 40
1 4
29^-26
27 51

* Mercury will transit the Q in 1|| 17 19' for 2 hours


41 minutes.

44
1850.
Jan....
Feb... .
March.
April...
May..
June..
July...
August
Sept. ..
Oct. ,,
Nov.,,
Dec.,..

10 48 22 D 18
22 48
10^36 23 43
11 ^2.5 25 22
10^43 27 6
tOn34 28 42
9 13 39 45
8^49 0^15
8^39 0 B 1
756 29^ 7
8nl43 27 52
8^59 26 49
Vf
10 33
12^ 6
10^21
11^10
10^28
10n20
859
8^35
8^24
742
8nl29

y
njj
1 u .55 23 R
4 11 22 7
7 10 19 8
10 58 15 17
14 38 13 13
17 55 13 B 52
20 7 16 56
20 56 21 55
20 R12 28 4
18 14 4~30
15 52|11 4
14 24 16 42

nr
or
26 D 22 14 21
AA 16 D 4
26 44
27 37 18 47
29 11 22 24
0 ^56 26 10
2 34 29 47
3 41 2^31
4 20 4 5
4 nil 4 n 3
3 24 2 32
2 9 0^ 9
1 0 28^ 0

21 1
22 58
22j 13
19 0
15 21
13 14
I3n 49
16 52
21 50
27 50
4%3
11 0

9.
n
Si
21 B 0 26 12
18 11 24 34
24 D 40 23 5
727 21 26
22 23 19 51
9^-42 18 12
27 19 16 37
16^15 14 58
-A.
6- 5 13 20
25 48 11 45
17"l a 10 6
8^34 8 31
Si
Vf
1 37 6 52
25 14 5 14
***4
17"" 0 3 45
11^27 2 6
4^35 0 30
28 6 28^53
20^ 0 27 17
lln3l 25 39
129 24 0
18 54 22 25
3^ 41 20 46
12 a 39 19 11
CO

1851.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March
April..
May ..
June,,
*July..
August
Sept....
Oct.,,.
Nov.,.
Dec...

GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE

* 9^ digits of the Sun will be eclipsed in 5th degree of Leo.

45

SLN AND StPERlOR PLANETS.


1852.
fS
Jan... 10 18
Feb. .. ll^ol
March. ll-~ 6
| April... 11^55
May .. 11 812|
Jane. . 11 3
July . .1 9S41
August 9^-16
Sept... git 7
Oct. . . 825
Nov... 9"ll3
. Dec. .. 9^30

b
y
8
T
0 D 27 27 D29
0 40 28 37
1 S1 0 49
S fi 4 16
4 49 8 4
6 26 11 55
7 41 15 5
8 23 17 15
8 it 19, 17 57
7 36 17 R 3
6 21 14 52
5 10 12 33

nr
v?
'Jan. .. 11 5 4 31
Feb... n"-o9! 4 D 39
March. 10*53 5 28
6 59
.April... 1
May . 10^59 8 40
|June.. 10II50 10 21
July . . 9329 11 41
August 9^1 4 12 30
Sept.. . 8nt54 12 32
| Oct. . . 812 11 R 52
Nov. .. 9ni ! 10 39
Dec. .. 9^16 9 22

nr
11 ii
11 u28
13 is
16 18
19 58
23 57
27 28
0ni7
1 43
1 n 34
29 ^ 50
27 25

V.
S
Q
"1 11 SI
16 D 53' R 58 17 33
21 16 0^-49 15 54
23 8 24337 14 2'J
22 R21 28'D 46 12 43
19 15 9^-39 | 11 8
15 29 24 35 9 301
13 27 , 1 in^ 5 7 54
14 D 4' 29 37 6 16
17 17 19-24 4 37
22 16 gill 3 3 2
28 36 1*27 1^24
5*18 23 35 29n48
J~L.

yf
12 4 17 19
18 3 11^37
22 7 3**40
24 24 28 0
23 R 51 21^ 5
20 48 14813
17 6 5II46
14 50 ,27 0
15 D 22 117319
18 28 ' 5^25
23 43 22 34
29 5 ] 6^31

28
26
25
23
21
20
18
16
15
13
12
10

10
SL
2
24.
48
10
35
55
18
42
4
23

46

GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE

1854. 0
y?
Jan. ..10 60
Feb.... 12^24
March. 10^38
April... 11^27
May... 10^45
June,, 10^36
July .. 9^15
August S^-Al
Sept....
Oct.... 7 58
Nov...
Dec... 9^ 1
1855.
Jan. ..
Feb....
March.
April...
May,..
June..
July . .
August
Sept....
Oct...
Nov.. .
Dec...

y?
10 35
12"" 8
10*23
11^12
10^30
10n22
9 1
8^37
8,T^26
744
8^1-31
8-^47

8 38
8 41
9 25
10 48
12 28
14 16
15 37
16 30
16 38
16K 4
14 58
13 41

25 R26
24 58
26 0 5
28 40
2n 7
6 5
9 51
13 8
15 18
15 55
14 R52
12 40

12 49
12 46
13 D24
14 45
16 22
18 11
19 38
20 36
20 53
20 R 26
19 21
18 4

10 18
9 3
9 D 25
11 26
14 33
18 25
22 18
25 56
28n41
0 0
29n
R 37
27 53

l;
y?
7-D 7
14 8
19 50
24 44
27 20
27 u 12
24 30
20 36
18 4
18 D 18
21 24
26 30

a
15 D 55
16 11
7R 0
28-51.27
0"h3
D
11 26
25 58
1340
3^58
23 38
16-^ 0
8^38

n
8 .50
7 11
5 43
4 4
2 29
0 50
29 15
27 36
25 58
24 23
22 24
21 9
8

3 8
10 25
17 0
23 41
28 53
2X 9
2 41
0 u 21
26'-25
23 30
23 17
25 d 58

2 47
27 9
19*17
13^17
5^50
28 15
19n18
10 8
0-5^13
19 22
7^10
23 32

19
17
16
14
13
11
9
8
6
5
3
1

30
52
23
44
9
30
55
16
38
3
24
49

47

5L.\ AN SUPERIOR PLANETS.

17 r 6
16 36
17 I) 27
18 44
20 19
22 9
23 37
24 40
23 2
24 R39
23 38
22 22

h
n
25 R28
23 39
23 17
24 d33
27 12
0^45
4 58
8 35
11 47
13 46
14 21
13 R 12

If.
X
1D 2
7 40
14 35
22 1
28 42
4^26
8 11
9 23
7 n 12
3 47
0^21
29^34

a
jTJ.
8 D 20
18 46
21 22
13 R 8
4 3
5 D 13
1513
0*153
19 48
10^ 8
2^43
25 35

0 12
28^ 32
27 0
25 21
23 46
22 8
20 32
18 54
17 15
15 40
14 I
12 26

21 21
21 4
21 D 30
22 39
24 13
26 5
27 37
28 44
29 13
814 28 38
yWl 2 28 R 1
9^18 26 44

10 55
8 23
7 29
8D 0
10 1
13 14
16 58
20 57
24 34
27 11
28 29
28 n 4

or
l D 54
6 47
12 36
19 31
27 4
4^ 6
9 57
14 20
16 11
15 R 2
11 23
7 14

19 52
14^ 6
5T42
29 1
20 ^ 49
t2n36
3*0
23 25
13^21
2%0
21 10
857

or
10 48
9 9
7 40
6 2
4 26
2 48
1 12
29 34
27 55
26 20
24 42
23 6

1856.
Jan. ..
Feb. . .
March.
April,..
May .,
June,,
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct. ..
Nov...
Dec...

0
yf
10 20
11"~33
10^ 8
ii
11^14
lln 5
9^43
9^18
gTE 8
827
9nU3
9^32

1857.
Jan.,..
Feb. ..
March
April..
May ..
J une..
July ..
August
Sept..
Oct. .
Nov...
Dec. .

Vf
11 6
12^40
10^34
11^43
l. 1
10n32
9 31
gSi g

Si
8

48

GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE


0
Vf
10 52
12^26
10^40
11^29
10^47
10n38
9 17
8^53

8
25 b 40
25 17
25 D35
26 39
28 14
0n 1
1 35
2 47
3 26
8 0 3 R15
8nl47 1 22
9^ 3 0 5

1859.
Jan....
Feb....
March .
April...
May,..
June,,
July .,
August
Sept...
Oct...,
Nov.,.
Dec. ..

y?
10 37
12^10
10^24
11^14
10^32
10n24
9 3
8^38
8"!l23
746
8nl33
8^49

CO
>0

1858.
Jan. . .
Feb.
March.
April...
*May .,
June....
July ..
August
Sept....
Oct. ..
Nov...
Dec. ..

I?
55
26 R 8
23 38
22 0
21 40
22 D 58
25 41
29 10
3^' 9
7 0
10 5
12 6
12 28

n
0
1
29^33
29 D44
0n45
2 10
4 2
5 38
6 58
7 44
7 n 39
6 52
5 37

11 R 7
8 43
6 40
5 33
6D 7
8 12
11 19
15 8
19 6
22 31
25 10
26 16

X
8
6 D 12
7 55
11 48
17 47
24 31
ln47
8 34
14 46
19 24
21 38
20 R 56
17 40

s
26 20
12^11
23 54
1^23
18 54
16 9
24 D 42
10^26
29 27
21^21
13^39

21
19
18
16
15
13
11
10
8
7
5
3

29
50
22
43
8
29
54
15
37
1
23
48

13 41
11
12 D 43
16 17
21 37
28 12
5 0
11 52
18 0
22 41
25 12
24 R 46

7 10
0<1r32
21 14
13^31
4n21
25 21
15 8
5^12
24 59
13%?
330
22 19

2 9
0 31
29^ 2
27 23
25 48
24 9
22 34
20 56
19 17
17 42
16 3
14 28

0
* 10| digits of the 0 will be eclipsed in 23th Taurus.

SIX AND SUPERIOR PLANETS.

1861.
Jan. . .
Feb.. .
March.
April...
May . .
June. .
July . .
August
Sept.. .
f Oct..
.Nov...
|Dec..

h
a
25 R 42
23 42
21 30
19 44
19 31
20d 54
23 31
27 4
l|i 2
4 40
7 43
9 23

11
8 46
8 4
8 4
8 D 56
10 20
12 6
13 48
15 18
16 12
816 16 21
9l4 15 R 43
9-^20 14 35

11 8
12"" 42
10-^56
11^45
11 3
lO^oS
9^52
9ft 7

9 37
8 R 10
5 56
3 45
2 65
3 D31
5 34
8 45
12 31
16 16
19 42
21 58

S
"l
11 D 45
0-^41
17. .46
fj
4 48
18 50
28 1

21 u 34
12' 49
17 38
u 11
15 26
9 39
16 D 2
8 0
19 11
6 5
24 21
4 46
0^27
3 XI
7 14 19 41 1 33
13 57 19 37 29^54
19 48 29 D 19 28 19
17"" 2 2 26 40
26 52 6"~37 25 5
toCO

10 21
ll^ol
11'^ 9
1)^57
11 ^15
nu e
9S4o
g^-zo
g'tio
828
9lll7
9 ^ 33

w
n
4 r 22
3 46
3 n 52
4 46
6 16
8 5
9 45
11 8
11 58
11 58
11 R 15
10 4

to

t-fO
63CO

I860.
Jan. . .
Feb. . .
.March.
April...
May.. .
June..
July ..
August
Sept.. .
Oct., ..
Nov.. .
Dec...

49

a
26 R 24
23 15
19 40
17 13
17 D 33
20 33
25 18
8 2
14 25
20 24
24 52

K
27 37
18^54
7 ^59
28 24
18n34
8S39
27 51
17^-33
7^16
26 27
1630
e'lio

23
21
20
18
17
15
13
12
10
9
7
5

27
48
19
41
5
28
51
13
34
0
21
45

* 9.1 digits of the () will he eclipsed in the 6th degree Leo.


f ^ will transit the (), 19-54 for the space
of 2 hours.
X 6 digits of the Q will be eclipseii on the 10C afternoon.

50
1862.
Jan. . .
Feb...
March.
April...
*May..
June....
July . .
August
Sept....
Oct. ,,
Nov...
Dec. ..

GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE


o
y?
10 54
12^8
10^42
11^30
10^49
10n39
8^54
8~ 2
8nU9
9^ 3

1863. yf
Jan.... 10 39
Feb.... ,12^12
March. 10^26
April... 11^16
May.,. 10^34
n
June,, 10 23
July.. 9 3
August '8^-40
Sept.,,
Oct..,. 747
r
Nov... 8 L33
f
Dec.., 8 50

n
13 R 12
12 26
12 D22
13 7
14 25
16 6
17 32
19 23
20 28
20 41
20 R 10
19 6

1?
rm
22 R48
21 59
20 7
17 44
16 14
16 10
17 D39
20 23
23 35
27 38
113
3 33

11
m
27 R 16
26 43
24 0
20 6
17 43
17 d38
20 42
25 29
-TL
1 30
7 34
14 31
20 18

3
111
26 D49
17 "T 42
6^ 49
28 6
16^35
9X 8
27 D 19
1200 1
18 ^ 14
12 R 33
6 1
10 D 24

-n.

-A.

nr

17 43
16 53
16 44
17 d19
13 31
20 12
21 59
23 30
24 37
25 3
24 n 39
23 39

3 32
3 R 26
3 34
1 33
29,^35
28 49
29 D37
-TL.
130
5 3
8 39
12 23
13 30

24 48
27 8
26 R 46
23 46
20 3
17 38
17D 49
20 38
23 22
l"ll3
7 33
14 23

22 32
9^ 8
23 16
13n31
2 6
21 12
9^47
29 8
IB'^SO
8 3
28 30
19"ll3

14 47
13 9
11 40
10 1
8 26
6 47
5 12
3 34
1 55
0* 20
28nUl
27 6

Taurus,

* 4 digits of the 0 wil! be eclipsed in 27th


Evening.

yf
4 7
2 28
1 0
29^ 21
27 46
26 7
24 34
22 53
21 15
19 39
18 1
16 26

SUN AND SUPERIOR PLANETS.


0
y?
10 22
11^56
11*11
11^59
11 ^ 16
Un 8
9^46

Q
"I
25 27
23 49
22 17
20 38
19 3
17 24
13 49
14 11
12 32
10 57
9 18
7 43

17 i)35
18 10
17 r 17
15 7
12 56
11 34
11 D41
13 18
16 6
19 31
23 17
26 37

%
m
20 o 28
25 7
27 21
27 b 0
24 9
20 20
17 57
18 to 10
21 5
25 52
2^ 6
8 45

$
t
11 to 0
3^22
24 40
!7;~52
10*28
3 ^34
25 8
15^47
3n29
15 o 27
18 1
8 n 52

n
1865. Vf
Jan. . . 11 10 26 46 29 11
Feb. .. 1^441 25 54 28'k 19
March. 10*58 35 30 0"l 3
April... 11^46 25 d 54 2820
26 56 26 5
May
28 34 24 14
June..
July .. g-^si 020 23 43
9 1 58 24 d 40
August
Sept.. . 9T'R 0 3 14 27 1
Oct. .. 818 3 54 o^Uo
Nov.. . g"! 6 3 R 40 2 57
Dec... q/ 22 2 49 7 20

t
15 37
21 50
26 7
28 47
28 r44
25 55
22 14
19 38
19 to 44
22 30
27 31
3^44

n
HI
1 20 6 5
5 D 31 4 26
15 46 2 57
0^42 1 19
16 54 2943
4^42 28 5
22 34 26 29
ll^lO 24 51
123 28 12
21 6 21 37
X2nll3 20 0
3-^24 18 23

1864.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May ..
June..
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct. ..
Nov.,,
Dec. .

9nJl2
830
gflig
9-^35

n
22 b 21
21 21
21 6
21 to 37
22 45
24 23
26 9
27 48
28 57
29 27
29 nil
28 14

51

* 6 digits of the Q eclipsed in the 27th deg. Libra; Sun


ets at middle of obscuration.

52

GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE

1866.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May . .
June ..
J uly ,,
August
Sept...
*Oct.
Nov...
Dec.

u
b
5B
"I
10 53 1 P, 31 10 p 7
12'VWV29 0 24 12 4
10^43 29^57 12 19
11^32 u 11 K 7
10 ^ 51 1 9 9 0
10II41 2 45 6 51
9aB20 4 ft 30 5 44
8^56 6 11 7 4
8%6 7 34 7c 52
8^3 8 20 10 40
8nloO 8 R 13 14 11
gt 7 7 31 17 43

X
y?
10 D 43
17 56
23 47
28 54
1'"'54
2 21
On 2
26V'?10
23 15
23 0
25 D 43
0^34

s
t
26 n 6
19^23
10'"*54
3^ 0
28 14
21^49
13^49
3irl8
25 5
119S49
24 34
0^15

16 45
15 6
13 37
12 0
10 24
8 43
7 1<
5 31
3 53
2 16
0 39
29 4

1867.
Jan. ,,
Feb. ..
tMarch
April...
May ,.
June..
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct. ..
Nov...
Dec. . .

vy
10 41
12 14
10^28
11^17
10 ^ 36
I0n27
9 7
B^42
8^1
749
8nl36
8^52

SB

ZZ

So
24 n 0
13 3
11 48
19d 48
2siS2
18 27
5n*23
24 6
XS^aSl
3Jl51
25 35
17 ^ 28

27
25
24
22
21
19
17
16
14
12
11
9

0
vy

6 14
3 0
4 27
4 D 35
5 26
6 36
8 43
10 30
U 37
12 48
12 53
12 R 12

n
20 38
23 14
24 1
23 R 23
21 32
19 17
17 46
17 29
18 D 46
21 12
24 34
28 7

7 4
14 21
21 0
27 49
3^17
6 38
8 2
16 ft 7
2 21
29^ 5
28 20
0^35

Si

25
47
18
59
4
25
50
12
33
58
19
41
l
* 4 digits of the 0 will be eclipsed in the 16 Libra;
0 sets at this time.
t 9.] digits of the 0 will be eclipsed on 16 0 Pisces, a.m.

Six AXD SUPERIOR PLANETS.

53

1868.
Jan. . .
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May ..
June..
July..
August
Sept.. .
Oct. ..
Nov...
Dec. ..

0
vf
10 ?4
11"".5 ~
11'^12
12^ 1
11 ^ 18
lln10
9S48
9^-24
9^14
8-32
9"l21
9*36

y
T?
25
t
10 R 53 1 DoO
9 39 4 11
8 57 5 30
9 n 0 5 R 20
9 50 3 57
11 17 I 1 40
12 57 29**149
14 49 23 0
Id 20 29 D 41
17 17 1^40
17 29 4 49
16 K 53 8 19

21
X
5 D 20
11 47
18 40
26 7
2^56
8 56
13 4
14 47
13 R26
9 52
6 9
4 50

$
Vf
10 49
453
27 42
22^ 3
15^16
8 ^ 35
0n18
21 40
11S48
29 48
16^-12
28 41

5
6 27
4 55
3 16
1 41
0 2
28^-27
26 49
25 10
23 35
21 56
20 21

1869.
Jan...,
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May ,.
June,.
July..
August
Sept...
Oct. , .
Xov..,
Dec.. .

'fS
11 12
12^46
11 0
11^45
11^ 7
10n57
936
gft-ll
9^2
820
y'n 8
9-^24

or
15 39
14 19
13 23
13 30
14D 11
15 32
17 12
19 4
20 40
21 42
22 0
21 n 33

nr
11 46
14 49
16 28
17 3
16 ^ 0
14 5
12 0
10 37
10 D 42
12 11
14 54
18 15

6 d 40
11 11
16 47
23 55
1 6
8 15
14 20
19 2
21 21
20 n 41
17 19
13 27

yf
4 46
29^47
19 14
15 30
21 D 56
4^34
20 2
8- 6
27 47
IS"! 7
10^18
2,^'47

Si
18 43
17 4
15 35
13 57
12 21
10 43
9 7
7 29
6 50
4 15
2 37
1 1

R
"ji

* ^ will transit the Sun rri,l30 10' for the space of ouehour
13 miuutes,
t^

54
1870.
Jan. ..
Feb....
March.
April...
May..,
June ..
July ..
A ugust
Sept....
Oct.,..
Nov...
*Dec...

GEOCENTRIC LOISGITliDE CF THE


0
y?
10 b?
1 cJ'"s 1
lo'-ia
11^34
10^52
101I43
8^58
8%8
8 5
8nl52
9^ 8

y
S3
20 n 26
19 5
18 15
18 3
18 n 38
19 56
21 28
23 21
25 1
26 8
26 35
26 R 14-

I?
t
21 D .52
25 7
27 16
28 24
28 p. 0
26 17
24 7
22 19
21 49
22 D47
25 10
27 21

V
8
11 D 27
12 40
16 10
21 54
28 29
5II41
12 32
18 53
23 48
26 26
26 u 13
23 16

s
y?
26 D 50
21^17
13^25
7^32
0^22
23 9
14n22
5-Ji
25 SO
l4ft 2
-/So
17 35

29
27
26
24
23
21
19
18
25
14
13
11

22
44
15
3(
1
24
48
9
31
56
17
41

11
25
25
Vf
10 43 25 13 1 51 19 12 0 d40 10 3
12"^! 6 23 52 5 12 Itf 46 7^47 8 15
10 30 23 0 7 49 17 D 18 5 it 26 6 55
11^19 22 39 9 26 20 34 2/Si8 5 17
10^38 23 D 5 9 32 25 35 19 7 3 42
s5
loD^g 24 11 8 n 14 2 0 24 D 43 2 3
9 8 25 4 9 6 9 8 42 656 0 28
8^44 27 42 4 5 15 36 23 38 28n50
4 21 54 12^53 27 11
8^33 29 23
751 0^35 3 D 31 26 46 3* 18 25 3t>
8tll38 1 13 5 24 29 58 25 51 23 57
8-^54 0 it 58 8 18 29 r 37 18 43 22 22
* 10digits of the Sun eclipsed on the 1st degree of Capricorn, p. M.
1871.
Jan, ..
Feb....
March .
April,,.
May...
June..
July ..
August
Sept....
Oct. .,
Nov...
Dec. .,

SL'.N" AND SUPERIOR PLANETS.


1872.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March .
April...
iMay..
June..
July. .
August
Sept...
Oct....
Nov...
Dec ..

Vf
10 26
11^59
11 14
3
11^20
9 12
9^50
9^-25
9^16
8~34
9ni23
9 ^ 38

1873. ^
Jan... .11 15
Feb... 12^48
March . 11% 2
April... 11^60
May...
9
June.. 10^58
July... 9-38
August 9^-13
Sept.. . 9r'^ 4
Oct.... 822
Nov... 9**110
Dec.... 9^26

u
si
0B 1
28-42
27 42
27 16
27 d 37
28 34
0^-14
2 6
3 46
3 7
5 52
4 B42
Si
4 49
3 3i
2 27
1 56
2D 7
3 7
4 42
6 37
8 22
9 46
10 38
10 37

b
11 30
15 28
18 16
20 23
21 5
20 r18
18 26
16 13
14 42
14 D 34
15 57
18 29
yf
21 34
25 33
28 36
8
2 24
2 n 13
0 43
28 29
26 34
25 58
26 D41
27 49

v
S
26 R 47
22 46
20 13
20 d22
23 10
28 4
4^ 2
10 44
17 28
23 27
28 20
l"t 4
n

J!
1B 1
28^-10
24 S3
21 46
21 43
24 n 20
28 51
4**47
11 22
17 48
23 d57
28 36

zx
12 D46
7^10
29 50
23^23
13^32
77n.,.
oO
28 12
18S48
8^-46
27 29
16*^15
o bo
-n.

55

20
19
17
15
14
12
11
9
7
6
4
3

9,
u

43
5
33
54
18
40
5
26
48
13
34
0

20 12 i 21
4**1 8 o 14
12 D 51 28 ^ 4
14 21 26 35
5 R 36 25 0
2752
D 22 52
1)1132.21 22
14 2 19 51
1 ^ 45 18 1 5
21 26 16 45
13^47 15 15
t,~~20 13 39

*3 digits of the Sun eclipsed in the 6th dcg. Gemini, a. m.

GEOCEXTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE

a
w
10 59 9 r40
8 22
10^47 7 14
11^36 6 34
10 ^ 54 6 D 38
L0n45 7 28
0^24 8 58
gil 0 10 47
8"R50 12 43
8 7 14 10
8n1.4 15 7
9^10 15 14

1875.
Jan. . .
Feb...
March.
April..
May ..
June ..
July..
August
|Sept..
Oct. ..
Nov.,,
Dec...

y?
10 44
It-'"'']?
10^32
11^21
10^39
10n31
g^io
8^46
8^35
753
8n,-40
8^56

a
14 u 33
13 19
12 4
11 18
11 16
12 D a
13 22
15 10
17 3
18 29
19 44
19 59

h
2D 2
5 41
8 54
11 51
13 38
14 2
13 R 4
10 56
8 46
7 32
7 D4T
9 25

12 19
15 56
19 18
22 33
24 48
25 47
25R 17
23 SO
21 14
19 33
19 13
20 D 20

v.
-ZV
1 R22
1 14
28I,^4o
24 51
22 10
22 0
24 D 26
28 58
4^:52
11 13
17 53
23 48

X
0 i) 25
24 24
15^24
8^ 2
29 20
20n38
10^39
0^^-52
20 44
g'^sa
28 58
1725

12 4
10 25
8 56
7 18
5 42
4 4
2 28
0 50
29t 11
27 36
25 58
24 22

-ru

nr

28 37
ll,ll8
1 20
28 u 39
24 55
22 12
22 0

6 4
24 7
9^ 3
23 14
gVjgQ
2 h 46
24^ 5
21 7
0* 4
15 48
5^48
26 46

CO

1874.
Jan....
Feb... .
March.
^pril...
May..
June..
July...
August
Sept. ..
*Oct. ..
Nov...
f Dec...

to

56

29 0
4^41
11 22
17 54

9
X

22
21
19
17
16
14
13
11
9
8
6
5

44
5
36
58
22
44
8
30
51
16
38
2

* 3;^ digits of the Sun eclipsed on the 17 Libra, a. m. 1874.


j- 5
transit the (7) / 17 deg. for the space of 'ih. 40m.
j 2 digits of the (7) eclipsed on the 6 Libra, noon.

57

SUN AND SUPERIOR PLANETS.


I87G.
Jan. ..
Feb...
March.
April
May..
June..
July ..
August
Sept...
Oct. ..
Nov.. Dec...
1877.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March.
April ,
May ...
June..
July ..
Aug...
Sept...
Oct..,
Nov...
Dec...

0
Vf

10 28
12"" 1
11^16
12^ 5
11 ^22
ll11^
9^32
9"h?
836
9"l24
9-^40
Vf
11 16
12"r49
11'^ 3
11^52
11^10
iin 0
9^37
gft-u
9^5
823
9t,ll 1
9-^28

to
nr

y
a
19 r 25
18 16
16 59
16 6
15 d 58
16 40
17 54
19 40
21 36
23 14
24 21
24 42

h
r*f4
23 D 1
26 25
29 60
3^23
6 S
7 36
7 39
6 R 16
5 8
2 1
1 6
1 D 45

it
>i
24 D 0
29 3
it 38
1 43
29,1Rll0
25 20
22 40
22 27
25 D 2
29 34
3$ 41
12 20

S
K
19 D 0
11^18
1^50
23 17
13n32
4 0
23 23
IS^IS
2Tl*68
22 4
1165
l"ll5

3 24
1 45
0 13
28^35
27 0
25 21
23 46
22 7
20 29
18 53
17 35
15 39

SI
24 R 14
23 8
21 56
20 57
20 52
21 D 24
22 31
24 14
26 12
28 11
29 6
29 35

3 50
7 3
10 25
14 8
17 10
19 18
19 58
19 R12
17 13
15 0
12 28
13 D 29

19 16
25 37
0*? 12
3 17
3 38
1 H 13
2713%
24 36
24 13
26 D37
1^23
7 28

"1
21 24
11^38
29 49
19^54
a!!
26 34
lO^So
17^26
12 R 51
7 17
12 D 19
25 5

K
14 4
13 24
10 55
9 17
7 41
6 3
4 27
2 49
1 10
29^35
27 57
26 21

58 GEOCENTRIC LONGITUDE OF THE SUN, etc.


1878.
Jan. ..
Feb. ..
March.
April...
*3 lay..
June..
July ..
August
Sept.,
Oct....
Nov.,,
Dec.

11 1
12^35
10^49
11'^38
10^56
10n47
926
9a 2
a"^52
8- 9
SWIOD
9^11
V
10 46
12""19
10^34
11^23
10 ^ 41
inn33
912
8nJi37
? 55
anU2
8-?58

5?

li

9.
or

14 d 31
21 41
27 43
s~~12
6 38
7 29
5 R 31
1~"43
28^30
27 47
0^ 4
D
4 38

12 10
0^57
18 29
8n 4
27 1
16'S29
5^20
24 50
14^32
350
24 11
14nl20

24^43
23 4
21 35
19 57
18 22
16 43
15 8
13 29
11 51
10 15
8 37
7 2

m
H
3 R 59 26 d 47 11
3 3 29 14 18 12
1 52 2^18 24 53
6 9 1^52
9 47 7 35
0 D 27 12 54 11 44
1 2" 14 51 13 12
2 57 15 24 11 R47
5 4 14r23 8 8
6 52 12 17 I 4 38
8 28 10 1 3 22
9 14 8 45 5 9

5 40
27 28
17^38
10^12
1^44
24 46
15^40
5 ^ 18
20 4 9
28 16
23 R 40
23 57

5 23
3 45
2 16
0 37
29^? s
27 23
25 48
24 10
22 31
20 56
19 17
17 42

29 6
28 5
26 SS
25 49
25 26
25 D 50
26 52
28 32
0^28
2 10
3 31
4 11

IS d 8
18 0
21 17
25 6
28 27
1^ 7
2 27
2 B 19
0^42
28^27
26 28
25 44

CO
^r>
J
CO

1879.
Jan....
Feb. ..
March.
April...
May...
June . .
+July ..
Aug...
Sept...
Oct...
Nov.,,
Dec. . .

Vf

* Mercury will transit the 0 in ^ 16 4' for the space


of three hours 54 minutes.
f 4 digits of the 0 eclipsed on the 27 Cancer, a. m.

TABLE OF THE FIXED STARS,


Corrected up to 1836.

South
Pegasi
Pisces d
Andromeda
Pisces e
Pisces ^
Pisces
Andromeda

Long.
o y
0 15
6 52
11 52
12 1
15 15
17 35
27 5
28 5

0
20
13
2
25
1
0
9
25

1st % Aries S. Horn


Bright % Aries
Schedir
Alraack
Menkar
Ceti
Aries d
Algol

Bright % Pleiades
Bright >f: Persius

0
1
5
5
11
11
12
18
23
27
29

7
8
9
46
48
27
12
1
22
4
30

First Hyades, In Taurus.


Bull's Eye, Oculus Taurus.
Aldebaran
Rigel
Bcllatrix
.
Capella
First Orion's B.
Bull's N. Horn
Orion
Ciugula Orion
Bull's S. Horn .
Tail Small Bear
Betalguse Orion
Auriga

3
6
7
14
18
19
20
20
21
22
22
26
26
27

Names*
Tail Ceti

53
40
22
33
41
58
1
33
53
42
48 23 s.
n

Lat. Mag.
47 s. 2
35 N. 2
10 N. 4
41 N. 2
6N. 4
13 s. 4
5 s. 3
56 N. 2
9 N.
28 N.
57 N.
36 N.
48 N.
46 N.
37 s.
48 H.
24 N.
IN.
7 N.

4
3
2
2
2
2
2
4
2
3
2

39 7 5 46 s.
10
2 36 s.
29
3 30 s.
31 10 s.
32
40
16 51 s.
22 52 N.
34
4
23 36 s.
16
5 21 N.
10
24 33 s.
24
25 20 s.
30
2 13 s.
66 4 N.
18
27
16 4 s.
38
21 28 N.

3
3
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
3
2
1
2

60

TABLE OF THE FIXED STARS.


^aSn m

Gemini ij
Gem. fx ,
Bright foot of Gemini
e Gemini
Sirius
Gemini
Canopus Argus
Gemini S
Castor
Pollux (3
Procjon

Long.
SB '
1 9
3 0
6 49
7 39
11 51
12 42
12 46
16 14
17 58
20 58
23 33

o
0
0
6
2
39
2
75
0
10
6
15

Proecepe
North Asselli y
d South Asselli
N. ; * Great Bear
S. Lion's Head
S. *Great Bear
Leo
Leo o
Hydra
Leo 7i
S- Leo Tf
Bright Neck
a Regulus
t * Great Bear .
N. Bear

4'^'40
5 .15
6 26
12 53
18 25
17 7
19 22
21 58
25 0
23 16
23 37
27 17
27 34
28 9
28 43

3
l)
49
9
45
3
3
22
11
4
8
0
47
61

10 N,
4 k.
40 N.
41 N.
6 k.
10 s.
46 s.
25 s.
50 s.
51 K.
47 k.
27 K.
7 N.
40 n.

neb
4
4
2
3
2
4
3-4
2
3
3-4
2
1
2
3

Leo p
In Dragon's Tail
Great Bear's Tail
Bright Back Lion
Leo
In Tail of Great Bear
Leo
Part of Argus .
Leo t
Deneb
5^ Bear and Lion
Last 5k in Great Bear's Tail
Virgo

4r, 6
5 6
6 34
9 0
11 8
13 22
15 16
16 40
19 13
19 22
22 17
24 37
24 49

8
fi6
54
14
9
56
6
67
0
12
10
54
0

29 K.
22 x.
20 k.
1 9N.
40 N.
23 N, 1
5 N.
11s.
33 s.
17 N.
8 k.
24n.
41K.

4
3
2
2
3
2
3
2
4
1
2
2
3

Names,

La t,

56 s. 3
51 s. 3
47 s. 2-3
2 N. 3
32 s. 1
5 s. 3
51 s. 1
13 s. 3
4 N. 1-2
39 K. 1
58 s. 1

.FABLE OF THE FIXED STARS.


Names.

Lat,

61
Mag.

In Virgo
Virgo
Vindematrix
Virgo
In Virgo .
In Bootes
Spica Virginus
Arch turns

1
2
7
7
9
15
21
21

4
33
40
53
12
21
33
56

16
2
8*
49
2
3i

5 N. 4-3
22 N. 2
13 N. 3
49 N. 3
38 N. 3
33 N. 3
2 s. 1
ON. 1

Centaur
N. Bright Corona
South Balance
North Balance
Libra
Bright Ophiuchi. Ser.
Libra y
Libra rj
Libra k
Libra 0
Centaur
Libra X

3
9
12
17
18
19
22
25
25
27
27
28

29
58
48
5
43
46
51
5
30
35
39
12

47
44
0
8
1
25
4
4
0
3
42
0

46 s. 2
21 N. 2
22 N. 2
32 N. 2
49 s. 4-3
32 N. 2
25 N. 3-4
3 N. 4
1 N. 4
29 N. 4
28 s. 1
6?J. 4

Right h. Ophiuchi
Middle >fc Front Scorpio
South E.
N. Front Scorpio
In Scorpio
In Scorpio <t
In Ophiuchi
An tares
In Scorpio
In Head of Hercules .
In Ophiuchi
In Ophiuchi
In Head Ophiuchi
In Scorpion's Tail
In Ophiuchi
In Scorpion's Tail
In Sagittarius

0
0
0
0
2
5
6
7
9
13
15
19
20
22
23
23
28

1
18
40
55
12
31
5'j
23
10
51
42
7
8
17
3
18
58

17
1
5
1
1
4
11
4
6
37
7
1
35
13
27
19
6

17 N.
57 s.
26 s.
5 N.
40 v.
Os.
25 N.
32 s.
5 8.
19n.
14 N.
48 s.
55 N.
43 s.
58 s.
36 s.
57 s.

3
2
3
2
4
5
3
1
4
3
3
3
o
2
3
2
3

62

TABLE OF THE FIXED STARS.

Kames.
Sagittarius
Sagitt rius
Sagittarius
Sagittarius
Sagittarius
Sagittarius
Briglit Harp
Sagittarius r
Sagittarius o
Sagittarius xt
Oculus Pavonis
In Swan
Briglit Eagle

Long.
Lot. Mag.1
O yp' " 0 '
0 55 38 2 22 N. 4
11 Os. 2
2 48
4 12
2 6 s. 4
7 64
3 65 s. 5
10 6
3 25 s. 3
7 8 s. 3
11 20
12 0
61 46 N. 1
12 33
4 58 s. 4
12 42
0 53
4
13 58
1 28 n'. 4
21 31
36 11 s. 2
*8 58
49 1 N. 3
29 25 43 29 19 N. 1

Near Goat's Horn


Capricorn (3
in Swan
Capricorn e
In Tail of Goat
In Tail of Goat
Aquarius
In Tail of Goat
In Swan ,
Aquarius 8
Os. Pegasi

1
1
14
17
19
19
21
21
22
26
29

34 40 6 58 N. 3
45 36 4 37 N. 3
64 27 N. 3
0
4 58 s. 4
54
2 31 s. 3-4
30
35
56
23 s, 2
7
8 39n. 3
2 33 s. 3
15
35
57 9 s. 3
2 4 s. 4
26
35 51 22 7 s. 3

Aquarius Q
Aquarius .
Fomalliaut
In Tail of Swan
Secheat
Aquari \
Aquarius 0
Markab
Secbeat. Pegasi
North Tail Ceti

0
1
1
3
6
9
14
21
27
28

58
5
31
3
36
18
52
12
5
37

23 2 43 s.
10 41N.
19 21 5 s.
51 59 57 n.
8 11 s.
0 23 s
1 2 s.
19 25 N.
31 8 s.
19 10 1 s.

4
3
1
2
3
4
5
2
2
,

A TABLE
TO CALCULATE THE PLACES OF FIXED STARS
FOR YEARS
PAST and FUTURE
*
Years. Deg. Min. Sec.
1
a
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13. ...
14
15.. ...
16
17
18
19
20
25
30

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
2
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
10
U
12
13
14
15
15
16
20
25

50
40S
31
21
12
2
52
43
33
23
14
4
55
45
35
26
16
6
56
46
58
10

Years.
35.
40....
45..
50....
55.. ..
60.. . .
65...
70....
75..
80...
85.,
90....
95..
100.,..
200....
300..
400..
500....
1000....
2000..
3000..
4000....

Deg. Min. Sec.


0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
5
6
13
a?
41
55

29
33
37
41
46
50
54
58
2
7
11
15
19
23
47
11
35
59
58
57
56
55

22
33
45
57
9
20
32
44
56
16
28
39
50
53
46
40
32
27
53
46
39
32

To find the longitude of a star for past years, subtract


the degrees, minutes, and seconds in the Table corresponding to the number of years prior to 1836 from the longitude of the star, and you will have its true longitude for the
given year;if for future years, add the degrees, minutes,
and seconds corresponding to the number of years after
1836.

ADDRESS TO STUDENTS,

To persons that not only delight in the sublime contemplation of the heavenly bodies, but
who are desirous of adding thereto the ancient
science of Astrology,7 this small work will
be found particularly useful. 1 have no doubt
there are many Gentlemen possessing great mental endowments, and who have leisure time to dispose of, who prefer to enjoy themselves with
these studies, by inquiring into the principles,
doctrines and truth of the Astrological science,
which is by no means an easy task, much rather
than to employ their time and abilities in a mannerless amusing or profitable. Not only does this
subject require a sound judgment but also an acute
and penetrating mind ; a knowledge of geometry,
to a certain degree, will be found indispensable.
Phrenology, physiognomy, and astrology will

66
ADDRESS
be found by experience perfectly to harmonize,
and bear testimony alternately to each other;
the phrenologist ought to be an astrologer, and
an astronomer ;7 the astrologer
O ought
O to be a
phrenologist ^Vid physiognomist; and the physiognomist ought to study both, in order to form
a solid basis whereon to build and guide his
judgment. I beg leave to inform the reader that
it is only my intention to mention these hints to
the young students, therefore the more learned
will please to excuse my suggestions. A young
person who has a desire to obtain a perfect knowledge
O of either of these amusingO studies should
be well able to delineate his ideas, and have an
excellent, correct, and expert method of drawing
projections of various kinds; particularly that
kind of projection known by the name of Mercator's ; in order to be enabled to make a correct
planisphere of the heavens, the ecliptic, and the
earth, by which means the student will be assisted
very much in his ideas relative to the positions of
the planets and stars, both in respect of their
zodiacal and mundane position, which if properly
done will shew the difference between longitude,

TO STLDKNTS.
07
latitude, right ascension and declination, at
one view; the practice of the different projections necessary for astrological and astronomical purposes will so far assist to render the
most difficult problem explicit, and so easily
imprint on the mind of a clever student, that he
can thereby, as it were, survey the heavens, the
earth, and all planetary and other significations,
to guide his judgment therein ; and prevent him
from entertaining any fallacious or ambiguous
notions which are contrary to nature, science,
and truth. In the true projection of a planisphere,
the degrees of declination are to be correctly measured according to number, from a line of tangents;
the reason I think this necessary to mention for
the notice of the young student, Is, there have
been many disputations amongst persons, declaring some methods to be more correct than
others ; the fact Is, there can only be one true
method. The degrees measured on the line of tangents will exactly compensate for the loss a given
angle (with the plane of the equator towards the
poles) must sustam, If only the equatorial degrees
are measured from the equator to the north and

68
ADDRESS
south as a scale of the declinations, which is a
very incorrect idea; when the right ascensions
and declinations are drawn correctly, the student
must next proceed to project the ecliptic line
upon and from the scale of right ascensions and
declinations ; the said ecliptic line will form an
angle of twenty-three degrees, twenty-eight
minutes, or nearly so, with the plane of the equator. The student will find from tables, the right
ascension and declination that correspond with
every five degrees on the ecliptic line, which must
be marked with a fine point; a strip of flexible
brass, or lance wood, bent to take these points ;
by drawing a line through the centre of all these
points, it will give the ecliptic line complete;
the right ascension will give the place of every
degree, which must be marked with the signs,
&c. &c. The lines on which the latitudes are to
be measured must be drawn through every
degree on the ecliptic line, at right angles with
the said ecliptic line, which line of latitudes so
drawn will point to the pole of the heavens. All
right lines which are drawn through a circle
from the centre, make right angles with the

TO STUDENTS.
69
Circumference ; therefore all right lines which
point to the centre of a given circle, will form
right angles with its circumference. The reason I
mention this, the young student must be informed
that the neglect of this proposition is one of
the errors that still exists in all the planispheres
that I have observed for astrological purposes ; the lines of latitude intersecting the
zodiacal degrees and signs in those planispheres
are not drawn at right angles with the ecliptic
thereof: therefore those lines cannot point to the
pole of the heavens, but to some other place
contrary to reason; the only two places in those
defective projections that the lines are correctly
pointed to the pole of the heavens is in the first
point of Cancer and Capricorn, which happens
more from chance than reasoning. The limits of
this work will not allow me to describe all the
necessary instruments that are useful and the
methods of projecting them ; a planisphere of
the heavens and earth should not be made
shorter than three feet, nor longer than five feet;
the first would be too small if made shorter, and
the latter may be inconvenient if longer; the

ADDRESS
70
student can do as he pleases in this respect.
The tables of the planetary transits, or ingresses
in this work, will be a great guide (not only to
the student, but to the proficient in Astrology) of
the effects that may be expected at certain
periods from the ingress of the superiors over
the radical places in the natal figure, their transitory good or evil aspects with the significators,
and their ingress over the place of a solar or lunar
direction, as also when they transit the ascendant,
or either of the other angles, their effects are
always very powerful, especially when retrograde.
If primary or secondary directions were ever so
good and promising, an evil transit of Herschel
(" according to some opinions") or of Saturn,
more particularly over the place the direction falls
in, if near the ecliptic, or on the body of the
promissor, it will be found nearly to destroy all
the good resulting therefrom. The student should
be aware that the slow motion of superior planets
operate most powerfully, particularly when they
are retrograde, and if Mars happens to retrograde
over a significator or direction in a nativity as
mentioned, he will act with most powerful

TO STL'DEiVTS.
71
violence and sudden action; like gun-shot, or
lightning. It often happens at the period that
good directions come into operation, that a combination of evil transits, aspects, and positions,
frustrate or retard the benefit expected: when
evil is threatened by malign directions, the
effect of a good transit, of the ponderous Jupiter
at the exact period, should it transit or pass over
this part of the zodiac where the evil is threatened,
will by his transitory influence prevent, amelio*
rate, or neutralize the effects anticipated ; therefore those ingress Tables are of the utmost
importance for the use of students that wish
their opinions of good and evil directions to
approximate as near the truth as possible. There
is much amusement and profitable instruction to
be derived from studies of this class, and by
judging from the ancient rules of this science,
we become philosophically prepared to meet an
evil with more fortitude, and to take a more
decided advantage of a good direction ; this
science affords to the mind of the man of genius
and] ability a continual fund of amusement, by
seeing the rules of this science and his own

72

ADDRESS

predictions verified, according to scientific order


and principles. There are many things to be
considered in judicial astrology; one argument
against another; one testimony for, and perhaps
two against; at other times several testimonies
for and against the expected event; astrological,
phrenological, and physiognomical judgments
ought to be well weighed before an answer is given,
or an opinion is formed ; for if the student is too
hasty in his decision, he will soon afterwards
perceive some argument to neutralize what he,
at a hasty glance, considered positive. Students
of astrology are very often useful to their friends
by giving them a timely precaution to avoid an
evil and at other times suggesting the propriety
of taking the most advantage of a good or fortunate period or expectation.
The man who
endeavours to study human nature, and to class
different individuals by the assistance of phrenology or physiognomy, can never be expected to
complete his observations, or even to bring them
into a correct form without the aid and assistance
of mathematics and astrology, which includes with
the others, four essential branches, for persons to

TO STUDENTS.

73

be acquainted with, who choose to amuse themselves in this scientific way. The tables of the
longitude and latitude of 144 selected fixed stars
will be found correct up to the year 1836, with
rules for calculating their longitude for past and
future years, which,! have no doubt, will be found
very useful to the student in placing those stars in
the proper positions which they are to occupy in a
nativity or other figure of importance, with more
exactness than I have seen in use; there have
been tables of the fixed stars published at various
periods for astrological purposes; but unfortunately in many of those tables the longitude of
several stars is very incorrect. I need only
mention one instance, Archturus has been placed
more than a degree preceding the Virgin spica
star in longitude; whereas, the true place of
Archturus in the ecliptic succeeds the longitude
of the Virgin spica in the sign Libra. The
author hopes that students will be enabled in their
inquiries, by this table of the fixed stars, to
ascertain if those stars of the first and second
magnitudes are really significators of importance,
when in conjunction or aspect to the planets or
o

74

address

angles of a nativity ; it is, at least, worth the


experimental observation of all those who minutely
enter into the study of this science. The fixed
stars differ from each other in magnitude and
colour. " Ptolemy was of opinion that the ruddy
coloured stars were of the nature of Mars, those
fixed stars which emit a bright white light of the
nature of Venus, those like the colour of Mercury, Saturn, Jupiter, or ' Herschel,' of the same
nature as the planets whose colour they represent.
Stars of the first magnitude were more potent than
those of the second, third, or fourth magnitude in
signification. Those fixed stars near the ecliptic
line, especially such as Regulus in the sign Leo,
or the Virgin spica in Libra being more powerful significators than stars of the same magnitude
having greater latitude." I leave these important
considerations to the student's own observations,
as I have neither space nor opportunity at present
to correct the ancient errors, if any exist, on
the subject of their nature and colour. Several
of the fixed stars have been observed to change
their magnitudes, and perhaps, at the same time,
their nature, uccordiny to an astroloyical

TO STUDENTS.
75
expression ; because a star of the first magnitude
cannot appear so bright, or, perhaps, of the same
colour, as it does when changed from the first to
the third or fourth magnitude, such is my opinion
only. Herschel's tables of the fixed stars, classed
in a superior style, are well worth the perusal of
every astronomical and astrological student, in
order to give them a much better information on
the nature and colour of the fixed stars, than any
astrological work has given on the subject. Some
students are of opinion that the conjunctions and
aspects of the fixed stars of the first, second and
third magnitude should be regarded, particularly
those stars vertical to the place of birth, on the
cusps of the houses, Or in conjunction with the
planets and significators in the natal figure. The
more famous the fixed star, the more conspicuous
will its signification be manifested. The student
will always find something new and instructing in
this science, and one inquiry will lead him to
another; the pleasure which a knowledge of
astrology imparts to the mind cannot be fully
appreciated, except by those who are well
versed in all its significations, and in those
different branches of information which I have

76
ADDRESS
named before. It is necessary to inform the
student that he will find a great deal more
information upon natal and state astrology in
Ptolemy's Quadripartite, than will at the first
reading thereof seem evident, but on a more
studious observation the inquiry will handsomely
repay the young student for his endeavours
to obtain the required information. Lilly's Astrology is a valuable book to consult for horary
questions, andpossesses agreat deal of in format! on
for the astrologian; but for a small pocket
volume Eland's Tutor to Astrology by Parker,
will be found a compact little work, with tables
for calculating directions, &c. &c. I would wish
to impress on the mind of the Student that many
of the tables in old astrological works are very
incorrect ; the tmble of houses in Eland, and
many others that I have examined, ought not to
be depended upon. Placidus should be read, and
the works of Partridge on astrology will also be
found excellent: there are many new works from
which the student will obtain great assistance;
but those old works I have mentioned will be
quite sufficient to read " as standard works,'' and
will always be essential for reference.

TO STUDENTS.
77
Many persons are aware that they have at
certain periods fancied how much they should
like to become acquainted with such or such an
individual; perhaps after the desired Introduction
has taken place, and on a short or long acquaintance, they have discovered that the Individual
whose manners and disposition they Imagined so
pleasing to their own fancy, proves, from examination and experience, that the said Individual is
possessed of very different principles and disposition to what the erroneous fancy painted on the
imagination of the desirous person. But the
man who Is conversant with the rules of Phrenology, Physiognomy, and Astrology, (although the
last mentioned Is not the least decided criterion
to guide the judgment In such matters) ; a science
which teaches us to know that If the signlficators
at the birth of each, (the person and individual
who are anxious to become friends or acquaintances,} does not harmonise by position and aspect
with each others planet's places, In the natal
figure of each ; that acquaintance thus formed,
must prove Injurious to either party If of long
duration. If their planetary signlficators are in

ADDRESS
no aspect to each other, we may then conclude
that the slightest disagreement breaks off all
acquaintance between the parties, and they separate as completely as if they had never known
each other; again, when the significators in the
one nativity square, or oppose those in the nativity of the other, then they will separate with
a severe dispute or quarrel, the nature of which
the significators will show ; but if the planets in
each nativity harmonise with sextile, or trine
aspects, or by conjunctions, &c. this will be a
strong argument that kindness and mutual friendship will continually exist between such persons.
The positions and aspects of the luminaries ought
to be most particularly regarded in this enquiry,
for if the sun in one nativity is in the same sign
and degree of the sun or moon in the other's nativity, each to change places, or behold in trine
or sextile, that friendship formed by such persons, (if the other testimonies agree) will be permanent, profitable, and of long duration. In as
much as Phrenology and Physiognomy guides the
generality of persons in forming their opinions
of individuals with whom they wish to become

TO STUDENTS.
79
acquainted as friends or acquaintances, yet from
too partial a feeling the Student of Phrenology or
Physiognomy may be know n to err ; but a good
knowledge of both, united with the science of
Astrology, will be found to make a complete principle to act upon in such cases ; but without the
assistance of Astrology, the rules of Phrenology,
and Physiognomy will often cause the judgment
to be dubious ; if the rules of Astrology are consulted, it will fix, and decide the judgment and
knowledgeof Phrenology and Physiognomy. Now
if we are to admit that a selection of individuals
for friends and agreeable acquaintances is a desideratum of great importance to every one that
delights to enjoy peace and happiness in the circle of their friends and acquaintances, and that
such arrangements are necessary for the choice
of friends, or of those whose acquaintance may
be changed at pleasure; how much more particularly are these considerations to be taken into
account by those persons of each sex who are
about to unite themselves by the bond of matrimony for life, or until that period arrives, when
one or the other's dissolution or death takes

80
ADDRESS
place. Tliis consideration of agreement I am
sorry to say is a circumstance too lightly regarded
by the majority of persons who unite themselves
to each other in this way ; and very often continue to live together or separate, unhappily for
years, which might be prevented, if the parties
were to take the trouble of a few hours study,
application, or inquiry ; an Astrologer, Phrenologist and Physiognomist perfectly understands
that when the animal feelings and desires are
permitted to act more powerfully than the intellectual or reasoning faculty, considerations such
as I have described are never thought of, until
too late. That knowledge which teaches us
to guide our actions with discretion, to discern
the difference between a continual sympathy, and
a continual antipathy, or the difference between
occasional or accidental sympathies and accidental antipathies; such knowledge is valuable
to all those who love peace and good will, therefore a knowledge of astrology is decidedly profitable to any one who has sufficient abilities
to comprehend its rules, and to appreciate its
value. A difference of years in the age of persons

81
TO STUDENTS.
is not so much the cause of disagreement amongst
individuals as the radical temperament, and aspect
of the planets and stars at the birth of each individual so circumstanced. I have known individuals whose planetary positions at birth nearly
harmonised with each other's by good aspects;
and it is Impossible to describe the love, harmony,
and good will, that perpetually existed between
them; although these persons often quarrelled
withsome of their friends, yet they never quarrelled
or used angry words against each other, on the
contrary always endeavoured to please each other ;
therefore the astrological rules of agreement are
not positive assertions, without having many times
put them to the test of truth: several clrcum stances and proofs may be given and stated from
observations of my own and others on this subject, but the limits of this work will not allow of
particulars. There are many persons who are well
acquainted with the truth and information which
can be derived from an impartial astrological inquiry ; a smiling face may deceive, and a beautiful head and form may mislead our opinions,
but the silent language of the planetary positions

82
ADDRESS
at the birth of an individual will never deceive
those who are capable of making the inquiry.
If persons have not got the ability themselves
to make this inquiry, and are anxious to obtain
the astrological judgment of agreement and other
questions spoken of, there are some very respectable individuals who profess a knowledge of this
science, and may he consulted on this subject
for a moderate remuneration ; therefore on that
account, many persons are less excusable for not
making use of this inquiry, especially when either
their future happiness or misery may depend upon
the result of their union, or other critical points
to which we are all subject. Some persons will say,
certainly it must be allowed that some individuals
are very often unfortunate in their choice, and too
apt to place their strong affections upon certain
individuals of their acquaintance or seeming
friends, which all the philosophers in the world
cannot persuade them from, until overwhelmed
with disappointment or misery ; but this is no
argument against what I have advanced, as the
astrologer can perceive that inclination in the
nativity of the individual, the physiognomist may

TO STUDENTS.
83
discover a tendency thereto from the countenance
of the said individual, and the phrenologist may
find evidence of the same from the combination
of testimonies in the organic form of the cranium,
or on the external surface of the head over the
brain.
The phrenologists class the organs of the
head and brain into different compartments, for
various significations; the physiognomist does the
same with the countenance ; likewise the astrologer classes the heavens and earth each into twelve
divisions or compartments, from thence, and the
planetary significators placed therein, &c. he
judges of the nature, abilities, &c. of an individual ; every impartial man will easily discern
the utility of uniting the three sciences thus
mentioned. The phrenologist who may deny
any truth to exist in the principles of physiognomy
or astrology, must appear as inconsistent and
ridiculous, as the physiognomist who may deny
theTruth of phrenological or astrological rules ;
the astrologian must he as inconsistent as either
the physiognomist or phrenologist, if he were to
disbelieve the existence and utility of each.

84

ADDRESS

These and all other sciences, founded upon


mathematical principles, by attentive study will
be found to harmonise, one bears testimony to
support the existence, and confirm the use of
the other. Many animals are known to possess
an instinct of foreknowledge to a certain extent;
and does it appear unreasonable or impious to
suppose that men should be guided to foresee the
probable event or nature of things, from an
exertion of reason, science, or knowledge. If
such ideas are considered impious by some persons, they must also acknowledge that the brute
creation are superior to man, which is both inconsistent and absurd. What naturalists call
instinct in animals of the brute creation, I take
the liberty to term presentiment, as belonging to
man, which when combined with the rules of
science, and the reasoning powers of probability,
precedent, and comparison, that such a cause will
produce such an effect, or that a certain signification, shows that a certain effect will follow.
Every man is possessed of a certain foreknowledge
and presentiment, vet many persons deny an
existence of the possibility to foretell any thing.

TO STUDENTS.
85
How often we have heard such persons contradict
themselves by speaking to their friends about
some individual,exclaiming, " I told you that he
was a scamp, he looked like a rogue, I supposed
he would deceive youyet these very persons
deny that any one else can know as well as they
do, by judging from similar rules ; speaking of
a speculation, you often hear such persons say,
" 1 told you that business would not answer, no
one ever prospered in that house : I knew your
endeavours would fail;" this is a sort of instinctive
prophecy, which if we admit to exist in human
beings, certainly when aided by learning or
science, the judgment must be considerably irc
proved in predictions. Every man to a certain
extent is a physiognomist, phrenologist, and
prognosticator of future events ; it is actually a
part and parcel of our reasoning and preceptive
faculty, exerted to guide and assist us through the
pleasures or difficulties of this life. The mariner
predicts a storm from the appearance of a scud in
the sky; persons fearlessly judge from the colour of
the clouds at the rising or setting sun, at high
water, or at other times, by either the new or full

86
ADDRESS
moon, what kind of weather we shall have ; from
the shooting of the stars, they predict from
whence wind is likely to come, and a variety of
other significations, too numerous to mention.
Astrology has been practised and studied by
men of learning in all ages. I shall give a list of
some few names of the eminent men who either
patronized, studied, or practised this science. It
is a well known fact that many eminent men
have derived great pleasure and information from
astrological studies ; physicians in ancient times
were not considered fit to practise, if ignorant
of the astrological rules of physic, the antipathy of one plant or herb, and the sympathy of
another, the nature of the different plants, roots,
herbs, trees, &c. or of consulting the state of the
sick astrologically, constitutionally, and physically,
discovering the nature of the disease, and administering that kind of medicine which either cured
the patient by sympathy, or eradicated the disease
by antipathy. By this means many extraordinary
cures were effected; there are some students who
are truly astonishing in their judgment of diseases,
drawn from the astrological figure of decumbiture.

TO STUDENTS.
87
Those students who are fond of this kind of study
may consult the best edition ofCulpepper's Herbal
in three volumes, which contains a good deal of
information on the subject. There have been many
excellent cures performed from the ancient rules
of physical astrology from herbs, trees, seeds or
plants, according to the patient's disease, the nature
of the herb and medicine used, was either martial,
solar, venal, saturnine, lunar, jovial, or mercurial
in quality. The sympathy of the planets, of the
herbs, &c. with the different parts of the body
astrologically considered, affords much pleasing,
curious, and profitable information to an inquiring mind. The young student ought to study
human nature, the habits, customs, and inclinations of persons born in the different foreign
countries; a man bom in London, and one in
Paris, another born in Alexandria, although at
the same period of time, but from the difference
of the ascending degrees, or from the difference of
climates, the nature and disposition of the parents,
or education, conduces much to alter or prejudice
the natural qualities of each individual. If two
persons were born at the same place and moment

88

ADDRESS

of time in different spheres of life, the one in high


life, the other in poor and humble circumstances,
although the accidents or fortunate circumstances
shall happen to each person about the same
period ; this does not argue that because the
poor person's child has been born at the same
time as the rich person's child that each shall
be equally rich, most certainly not; but when
the person who has been born in high life receives
a great deal of wealth, the person in low life
shall receive a benefit great for his sphere of life,
perhaps not amounting to the one-hundredth part
as much as the rich person received ; under good
directions each perse n shall prosper according to
their sphere of life, which is a consideration that
ought never to be forgotten by the student. The
sphere of life in which we move as individuals
and our mental endowments entirely decide the
fortune and kind of proportional benefit we may
expect from good directions, and the ill effect
of malevolent directions, transits, &c. for in the
differentspheres of life, there are different classes
of troubles and annoyance. If a poor man has
got sufficient abilities to make an excellent coun-

TO STUDENTS.
89
seller, or statesman, but not moving in that class
of life to entitle him to rank equal to his abilities,
he remains in comparative oblivion, except amongst
a few friends, or perhaps shines forth in the
assembly of porters and labourers at an ale-house,
or other place of amusement, according to his
sphere of life ; if better circumstanced, perhaps
he may distinguish himself at public or parish
meetings and other places of assembly. It is a
very erroneons opinion of some persons who wish
to know the fate or abilities of a child, or an
adult, by endeavouring to keep the astrologian
ignorant of the sphere of life in which the native
moves, or is likely to move ; as that circumstance
alone will materially alter the judgment, in as
much as high life differs from low life, every
thing in nature acts in mathematical proportion,
according to order and spheres, times, seasons,
and years, every individual is subject to these
laws, which we must allow are just and impartial.
All persons who have got a princely position of
the planets at their birth will not be kings or
princes over nations, but you may depend they
will be esteemed or rank as princes and superiors

90
ADDRESS
in the sphere or class of society m which they
exist or live; it sometimes happens that a porter
or labourer in an establishment is the sole guide
and prime minister to his employer, the merchant
or tradesman; perhaps if the porter or labourer
were born in a different sphere of life as a peer of
the realm, he might become a prime minister or
confidential adviser to the king; this is the
manner in which a young student should consider things of this nature, all according to order,
rank and position.
Many students are in the habit of erecting
figures or charts of the heavens, according to the
mean clock time, this method is sometimes liable
to great errors, especially as the true position of a
figure alone can be depended upon, for the givers
of life, and all the other significators may perhaps
be actually angular in the true figure, calculated
from the solar time, but in the chart, calculated
for mean time only, these significators may be
situated in cadent houses, which makes a serious
ditiercncc.
Suppose a figure is erected for
October thr twenty-eighth, three hours twentv
minutes past noon. 1S05, the equation of time

TO STUDENTS.
91
being sixteen minutes, the mean clock time will
give eleven degrees fifty-three minutes of the sign
Pisces on the cusp of the ascendant, hut the
true and solar time will give twenty-one degrees
twenty-seven minutes of the same sign ; making
a difference in the ascendant, by neglecting the
equation of mean time to make it solar time,
of nine degrees thirty-four minutes. In the
month of February there is an equation to be
subtracted from the mean clock time of fourteen
minutes nearly on an average, which will make a
difiference from the mean clock time of eight degrees four minutes, shouldelther the sign Aries or
Pisces happen to ascend ; therefore the equation
of time, from mean to solar time, should never
be neglected. Now as this small period of time
makes so great a difference In the ascendant, how
very necessary it is for every student In astrology
or astronomy to have a correct time-piece or
watch ; there are many respectable students that
cannot afford to give forty or fifty guineas for a
watch. Feeling a desire to assist the student as
much as possible, I considered the best plan to
adopt was to consult some highly respectable

92

address

watch and chronometer maker, of long established


practice, to know If a watch could be manufactured for a reasonable sum, say between seven
and ten guineas, that could be depended upon by
astrological students ; for this purpose a friend
accompanied me to Mr. Ellsha of Piccadilly, the
result of the Inquiry was so satisfactory, and his
answer was really so candid that I feel It my duty
to give It verbatim. "In answer to your question respecting the most proper watch for
scientific purposes, I have to remark that it must
be a scape watch, viz. horizontal, lever, duplex
or the pocket chronometer, the latter Is used for
maritime purposes, and has been found to be the
only one to answer; the reason Is that such a
watch, when manufactured sound and good, well
limed In heat and cold, long, and short vibrations,
positions, &c., after such attentions, and being
brought to mean time, has been found to keep
Its rate so accurately that the Captain has not
been out In his reckoning half a mile In a long
voyage ; but as this watch when made sound and
well timed costs a large sum, say forty guineas,
in silver, or sixty guineas In gold, It would be,

TO STUDENTS.
93
perhaps, out of the question for persons in an
ordinary sphere of life to expect to be possessed
of such a machine. The duplex watch is open
to some objections, not in principle, but from
the delicacy of the escapement, it is necessary at
all times to be careful when any repairs are to be
done, or even cleaning only, and to be extremely
careful into whose bauds they are given, for I
maintain, that unless this watch, as well as the
chronometer, is repaired by a person who has
professedly learnt the principle, good going
cannot be obtained ; I therefore should recommend either an horizontal or lever watch, made
sound and good, bearing this in mind always,
that the good qualities of a watch does not
depend upon fine finishing, polishing hollows,
undercutting the shoulders, &c., until they are
nearly off, thereby making the watch in reality
unsound. The grand points to be considered
are, a first-rate movement, a sound and good
escapement, careful finishing, and next, though
not least, the selection of the steel wire, from
which the pendulum or regulating spring is to be
manufactured, for the inequalities in the wire

94

address

generally are baneful indeed; 1 could dwell


greatly upon this point, but find it scarcely necessary to enter upon more particulars, as every
good workman is aware of the consequences if
neglected. Therefore without hesitation I do
affirm that the latter watches, when made by and
obtained from respectable houses, will be found
to answer sufficiently well for the astronomical
and astrological purposes which have been
described, and can be obtained for the price you
have stated." But on a little closer inquiry
Mr. Elisha informed us, that sound and good
horizontal or lever watches in silver or gilt cases
may be obtained from six to seven guineas, in
double bottom cases, or to wind at the back,
from seven to ten guineas, the price we mentioned ; the reason I have given this statement at
length is to afford the student every opportunity
of obtaining correct figures of the heavens ; for
if at the birth of an individual a wrong time is
given, and asserted as the true time, from an
indifferent time piece, or watch more particularly,
an error in this particular is likely to prove very
troublesome; certainly the trutine of Hermes is

TO STUDENTS.

95

the most correct method I have seen tried to


rectify the figure at birth; it must be allowed
that without a correct mean time astrologers
cannot obtain the true solar time. I shall now
proceed with a few remarks and new propositions,
which if disregarded by gentlemen who are proficients in this science, perhaps the young
student may be induced to make a fair trial of
some of those astronomical, and astrological suggestions, which I shall render easy for those who
choose to adopt them. I beg leave to call your
attention to the various distances of the superior
planets from us in their periodic revolutions, when
they appear to be in opposition to the sun they
are nearer to this earth by the distance of the
whole diameter of this earth's orbit, (about one
hundred and ninety millions of miles) than when
the sun appears in the same sign, in conjunction
with the said planets. So that all superior
planets are nearer to this earth, when they appear
to be in opposition to the sun, than when in conjunction with the sun ; again, when a planet is in
that part of his orbit called his perhelion, he is
nearer to the orbit of this earth than when on

96
ADDRESS
that part of his orbit called his aphelion, which
difference in distance is caused by the eccentricity
of the planets' and earth's orbits, produced by the
variation between the centres of the orbit of the
planets and the centre of the sun. We shall
endeavour to avoid mentioning technical terms
as much as possible, in order to make the
subject better understood by the student ; commencing this part of our observations upon the
orbit and planet of Mars, which is very eccentric,
differing 10 41' from the centre of the Sun, and
more from the centre of the Earth's orbit, which
the diagram will explain. When Mars happens
to appear in opposition to the Sun from three
degrees of the sign Virgo, Mars is at that period
more than three times further distant from the
Earth, than when in opposition to the Sun from
the opposite sign three degrees of Pisces ; making
of course a considerable difference in the influential power of the planet Mars by his near approximation to the orb of this Earth, Mars having more
than nine times the influence in the sign Pisces
than when in the sign
O Virgo,
O ' accordingo to this
calculation. The influence of Mars increases from

TO STUDENTS.

97

tliree degrees of the sign Virgo to three degrees of


the sign Pisces, and decreases in power from three
degrees of the sign Pisces to three degrees of the
sign Virgo. The next superior planets we have
to mention in order are those small planets, Vesta,
Ceres, Juno and Pallas, their orbits are very
eccentric, crossing each other in different places
of their orbits, having great latitude. The
planets Juno and Pallas move in orbits whose
planes are nearer to the plane of the equator
than the ecliptic. Some astrologers say they are
of no consequence, as they are not easily seen;
some astronomers differ most essentially about the
magnitude of these planets, the foreign astronomers say they are considerably larger, which I
believe, and of greater magnitude than our
English astronomers admit. The planets Ceres,
Pallas, and Juno, are of a ruddy colour, like
Mars, and have very dense atmospheres several
hundred miles high; the planet Vesta is near the
colour of Venus of the sixth magnitude, a pure
intense white. Ceres of a ruddy colour of the
eighth magnitude, atmosphere six hundred and
seventy miles high. Pallas is not so ruddy as

98

ADDRESS

Ceres, about the eighth magnitude, his atmosphere is calculated at four hundred and sixty
miles high from the surface of the planet. The
planet Juno is free from that kind of nebulous
atmosphere that surrounds Pallas and Ceres, of a
reddish colour, and of the eighth magnitude.
As the planet Herschel has been considered by
many first-rate astrologers to be powerful in his
signification and effects, he appears about the
size of a star of the fifth magnitude, of a bluish
white light, resembling the colour of Jupiter.
Although out of place here, I only wish to
mention, that I am very much of opinion that
the small planets, Vesta, Juno, Ceres, and Pallas,
ought to be noticed, especially as significators of
accidents and hurts ; the longitude and latitude
would be a useful addition to the longitude of
the other planets in the Ephemeris, and well
worth consideration ; although it is difficult to
see the planet Herschel, yet he is potent in his
effects, and why should not those small superior
planets, at least, signify something. I hope the
student will give them a fair trial, as I am indebted
for the idea regarding the nature of these planets

TO STUDENTS.
99
to a very celebrated admirer of this science. It
is supposed that Vesta, Juno, Ceres, and Pallas,
were one and parts of the same planet, which by
internal combustion or explosion separated these
fragments from each other, and became distinct
planets; we shall leave these new planets to the
experimental observations of students iu this
science, and proceed to the next in order, the
ponderous planet Jupiter. When Jupiterappears
in opposition to the Sun, from twelve degrees of
the sign Aries, he is then at his nearest possible
distance from this earth, being in his perigee,
consequently of greater influence on this part of
his orbit than when he is in the same aspect with
the sun in the opposite sign Libra in his apogee,
or greatest distance from the centre of this earth,
and of less influence, according to the tenor of
this speculation. The planet Jupiter decreases
in this power or influence from twelve degrees of
the sign Aries, and increases from twelve degrees
of the sign Libra to twelve degrees of the sign
Aries. The planet Saturn is nearest to this
earth when in opposition to the Sun in the beginning of the sign Cancer, and if in like aspect

100
ADDRESS
from the beginning of the opposite sign Capricorn, he is then in his apogee or greatest distance
from the Earth's centre in that aspect, Saturn
increases in influence from the beginning of
Capricorn to the beginning of Cancer, and
decreases from that point to the beginning of the
sign Capricorn. The planet Herschel is nearest
to the centre of this Earth when in opposition to
the Sun from eighteen degrees of the sign Virgo,
but when appearing to make the same aspect
from the opposite sign eighteen degrees of Pisces,
he is then in his apogee, or greatest distance
from the centre of this earth.
The following table will give an idea of the
relative proportional distances of these configurations, shewing the variation of these planets being
in apogee or perigee. I am more particularly
induced to mention this idea as some gentlemen
do not allow the existence of planetary dignities,
perhaps they may be more inclined to experiment
on this proposition.

TO

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ADDKESS
This Table shews the proportional distance
between perigee and apogee ; Mercury, for
instance, when in that part of his orbit nearest
the Earth's orbit, and aspected as described,
is only two-thirds of his distance from the Earth's
centre, than when in his apogee, aspected in like
manner ; the distance of Venus when in perigee
is five-sixths of her apogeean distance from the
Earth's centre. Mars when in his perigee, and
aspected as described in the Table, is only threetenth part of the distance from us in that position
than when in his apogee; and so of the other
planets; by which it appears that the greatest
and least distances of the planets from the Earth's
centre are more potently exhibited when inferior
planets appear retrograde, and in conjunction
with the sun, and when superior planets appear
reti ograde and in opposition to the sun. The
other aspects of the planets render the proportional difierence between the apogee and perigee
less perceptible than the positions I have described in the table; because in those positions
the earth is in heliocentric conjunction with the
said planets, but when separating from or

TO STUDENTS.
103
approaching to that heliocentric conjunction, the
proportion of the diameter of the Earth's orbit
must be taken into account.
1 have been
induced to mention this idea, with those that
follow, as some individuals have thought proper
to differ in opinion from the ancient rules respecting the parts of the Zodiac in which the
planets exert their greatest influence. The
tables which I have taken the trouble to calculate
will be a means of emitting some light on this
subject, namely, the geocentric places of the nodes
of the planets, if the ascending and descending
nodes of the moon, which are continually changing
by retrograde motion, should signify the effects
described by some authors, I can see no reason
why that the nodes of the ponderous planets
Jupiter, Saturn, or Herschel, should not likewise have effect, aye, and those too of Mars,
Venus, and Mercury, will furnish some additional signification and argument for the lovers
of astrology and for the searchers into the truth
of this doctrine ; in order to expound some accidental affairs that sometimes cannot be accounted

104
ABDRESS
for in the usual way. Venus, for instance, is
generally allowed to be well placed in the sign
Libra if unafflicted, but if the descending node
of Mars was passing over the same degree of
longitude which Venus is in Libra, (here a material alteration will take place, according to the
nature of the nodes) I am conscious of one
instance thereof, which confirms my opinion
that the student will be much pleased with
the consideration of the geocentric nodes of
each planet, and their longitudinal positions,
which may happen at the birth of an individual
or in a question of consequence, including the
planets Vesta, Juno, Ceres, and Pallas, being
sixteen significators, which have not been taken
into account by astrologers. These new propositions may appear strange to some individuals,
but in order to give the young student a reason
why I have proposed them, I answer, because they
are founded on the same observations as every
significator used in astrology, that is to say, on
true astronomical principles; and on that account entitled to the investigation of those persons who consider scientific research worthy of

TO STUDENT?.
105
their attention and experimental observation,
feel confident that some of the industrious and
learned students and professors that are known to
patronize and study this science, will, by their
superior abilities, give these astronomical and
astrological propositions a fair and impartial trial.
The young student must be aware from what has
been already stated, that both the superior and
inferior planets are nearer to this earth when they
appear retrograde or stationary, than when the
planets appear direct in motion, according to the
succession of signs from west by south to east;
a planet's effects ought to appear more evident or
potently,when retrograding or stationary, according to the principles of matter approximating
closer to each other in that position, than when
situated at a greater distance. I do not wish by
suggestions
of this nature to make the science
OO
of astrology appear more difficult to the comprehension, but in order, if possible, to elucidate
some things which have appeared in certain
instances to act at variance to the rules generally
practised. It may be argued by some that astrologers did very well without a knowledge of the

106
ADDRESS
planet Herschel, but every scientific man in
astrology is well aware how much better astrologers can do by making use of his signification.
I shall here, in this place, just mention, that the
planet Herschel personally signifies men of
science, who either by curious inventions, or
studies and discoveries of a description contrary
to the belief, or of that class of researches far
above the comprehension of the generality of
individuals.
I have noticed that when Saturn transited the
place of the radical Herschel in the nativity of
a few of my friends, that some eccentric friend
of theirs, (who was fond of astrological, physical, or divine studies, and pursuits contrary to
the general opinion of worldly-minded persons)
either died, or had a severe illness or trouble.
From the position of Herschel in the radical
figure, he always denotes the most extraordinary
persons, fond of erudite and ancient learning,
such as alchymists, or very deeply experimental
chemists, and persons altogether extraordinary.
Mr. Varley, in his Zodiacal Physiognomy, has
given an excellent account of Herschel, and I

T STUDENTS.
107
shall take this opporJunity to inform every student who is fond of those sciences, that he should
have a copy of that useful work as a reference,
which gives the signs ascending, for every day
and hour throughout the year, with a variety of
very scientific and useful information, profitable
for the phrenological, physiognomical, and astrological student. I have reason to believe that,
according to the doctrine of Ptolemy, Herschel
is not so malevolent a planet as some persons
represent, if we are to judge from his colour,
he is much like the planet Jupiter in that respect;
however eccentric I may appear in my opinion,
Herschel is only a torment and plague to fools
and ignorant persons, and is like the planet
Jupiter to scientific men ; of course he acts less
powerfully, being so much smaller than Jupiter,
and more distant. Ignorant and illiterate persons always feel very uncomfortable in the company of learned and scientific men, therefore
Herschel only annoys that description of persons
who take no delight in curious pursuits, or
scientific studies. Experience and observation
will contribute more towards discovering the

108

ADDRESS

truth, when sought for by many persons, than


any single individual can accomplish, therefore
1 do not presume upon my own limited experience
of those matters ; upon the same principle 1
advise the student, if he feels inclined to discover
the slgnlficators of vicious tricks, or sudden accidents of the lesser order, let him observe the
longitude, latitude, and declination of Juno, and
particularly Ceres and Pallas, whose periods of
revolution do not differ much from each other.
As to the nature of the small lucid planet Vesta,
I think it will be found to represent things of a
pure religious and unadulterated nature, that
which pure Intense white signifies. 1 speak
allegorically astrological in this matter, as I am
well aware that experience and practice, as
alluded to before, will expound all these propositions, however strange they may appear
in some persons ideas; yet I hope there are
those whose abilities far exceed my humble endeavours, will not condemn before they give
these things a fair trial, and then impartially
declare as much with such other useful Informa-

TO STUDENTS.
109
tion, as will direct the worthy student in those
studies to greater perfection than is known at
present.
I have had the honour to peruse part of a
MS. work intended to be published, which unfolds the ancient mysteries of mythology, astrology, and other sciences, proving that the fables
of ancient mythology were written with an allegorical meaning and signification. The beauty
and scientific simplicity of language, with which
the celebrated and talented author of Zodiacal
Physiognomy conveys all his explanations to the
minds of the readers, is in a pleasing and instructive manner. In the MS. the illustration of the
figurative and allegorical stories recorded in
ancient mythology, will be a very valuable acquisition to all persons, especially to students
in these sciences.
The tables of the longitude of the planets'
ascending and descending nodes, are calculated
for every five degrees of the Sun's motion through
the different signs of the Zodiac; by a little
attention to the simple manner in which it is
arranged, the student will be enabled very easily

110

ADDRESS

to find the proportional motion of the nodes for


any degree or minute of the solar place, between
these periods. We consider an example quite
unnecessary : the author would have calculated
them for every degree, but that would increase the
size of the tables more than the limits of this
work will allow. If experience and experiments
should establish the use of these propositions,
the author, at a future period, may be induced
to pay more attention to the accommodation
of students, and furnish them with more voluminous tables on these subjects. The places
of the nodes will not differ much for 30 years
past, or for 30 years to come, from these tables,
if 15 minutes are added to 30 years to come,
and subtracted from 30 years past, the places
of the superior nodes will be found nearly correct
and in that proportion. The longitude of the
planet Herschel will also be useful to the student in order to find his place in the nativity of
any person that has been born during the
eighteenth century, which has been much wanted
by astrologers. The student will be enabled to
find out the signification of Herschel by this

TO STUDENTS.
means, if he notices the position and directions
of this planet, in the nativities of great or eminent men born during that period, and since that
period up to the present time.

112
6^
Heliocentric Longitude of the Planets.
Ascending Nodes.
The
The
The
The
The
The

Planet
Planet
Planet
Planet
Planet
Planet

1836.
Herschel Node
Saturn Ditto
Jupiter Ditto
Mars Ditto
Yenus Ditto
Mercury Ditto

Long.
n
gs

8
n
8

13
22
8
18
15
16

0
15
45
17
JO
23

Heliocentric Longitude of the Planets.


Descending Nodes.
1S36.
Herschel's Descending Node t 13 0
Saturn Ditto
Vf 22 15
Jupiter Ditto
y? 8 45
Mars
Ditto
18 17
Venus Ditto
t 15 10
Mercury Ditto
16 23
* Motion of tte Ascending Nodes of the Planets, about
half a minute per year advance in the Signs,

113
Heliocentric
Longitude of the Aphelion.
Long.
Herschel's Aphelion .
K 17 52
Saturn
Ditto
t 29 43
jTi. 11 42
Jupiter
Ditto
Mars
Ditto
"R 3 3
This Earth 's Ditto
Vf 9 0
Venus
Ditto
9 5
MercuryDitto
t 14 55

Heliocentric
Longitude of the Perhelion.
Herschel's Perhelion
Ditto
Saturn
J upiter Ditto
Mars
Ditto
Earth
Ditto .
Venus
Ditto .
* Mercury Ditto .

n
nr
X

a
n

o
17
29
11
3
9
9
14

52
43
42
3
20
5
55

* Motion of tte Aphelia about one minute per year


forward in the signs.

114 Geocentric Longitude of the Ascending


Sun's
L n
" g0incy^
5
10
15
20
25

y
n
10D17
30 20
10 25
10 ol
10 58
10 47

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A List of a few Names of the Patrons and


Admirers of the science and doctrine of
Astrology.
James Usher, Archbishop of Armagh, . 1580
Dr. John Partridge, Physician to James II. 1644
Lord Francis Bacon,
B. 1561
Valentine Naibod,
1523
Philip Melancthon,
B. 1497
George Witchell, Astronomer royal, Portsmouth,
B.1728
John Booker,
1601
Rev. John Henderson.
Sir George Wharton,
1617
Vincent Wing, Astronomer.
Dr. Geoffry Le Neve,
B. 1579
William Lilly, .
B. 1602
Rt. Hon. William Pitt,
1759
Dr. William Salmon.
Bishop Robert Hall,
B. 1574
Dr. Butler,
1626
Robert Turner, .
1626
Sir Edward Kelly,
1550
Mr. John Dryden, Poet-laureat,
1631

LIST OF PATRONS.
Sir Christopher Heydon,
Mr. Flamstead, First Astronomer Royal,
Mr. Thomas Simpson.
J. P. Kellerman, Due De Valney,
Mr. John Heydon,
Sir Henry Cornelius Agrippa,
T. B. Cardan, .
George Digby, Earl of Bristol,
Dr. Nicholas Culpeper,
Sir Robert Holburn.
Sir K. Digby.
Mr. Blake,
Nov. 28, 7h. 45' p.m.
Mercator,
Mr. Elias Ashmole,
Sir Thomas Gresham.
Mr. John Milton.
Josephus, the Jewish historian.
Polydorus Virgil.
Aristotle.
CiceroSocratesGalen.
Zoroaster.
Mercurius Trismegistus.
Placidus de Titus.
Pythagoras.

119
1561
1646
1775
1629
1486
1534
1612
1616

1757
1620
1617

120

LIST OF PATRONS.

Claudius Ptolemy, Prince of the Science,


Albumazer,
Roger Bacon,
Guido Bonatus,
Michael Nostradamus,
H. Cardan,
Kepler.
Dr. John Dee.
Dr. Ebenezer Sibley,
B.
J. B. Morinus .
Hobbs. Malmsbaria,
William Emerson,
Dr. George Starkey,
Erasmus Rhianholdus,
John Worsdale, Sen.
George Parker, .
Henry Colcy,
John Huniades.
TheophrastusB. Paracelsus.
Sir Richard Steele.
J. Montanus.
HippocratesThalcs, &c. &c. &c.

139
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1280
1284
) 553
1501

1751
1583
1588
1701
1628
1551
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1654
1633

A DISCOURSE
ON
THE HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
PHRENOLOGY AND PHYSIOGNOMY.

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DISCOURSE
ON
THE HARMONY
OP
ASTROLOGY, PHRENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.
Locke in his Epistle, speaking of new doctrines, says, " Truth scarce ever carried it by
vote any where at its first appearance ; new opinions are always Suspected and usually opposed,
without any other reason, but because they are
not already common. But truth, like gold, is not
the less so, for being newly brought out of the
mine. 'Tis trial and examination must give it
price, and not antique fashion ; and though it be
not yet current by the public stamp, yet it may
for all that be as old as nature, and is certainly
not the less genuine." This appears applicable
to the present work, the subject of which it treats
is as old as nature ; how particular (says Lavater)
we ought to be, to unveil our own hearts and

124
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
our own temperaments, before we can judge of
others, as we can only know others in proportion
to the knowledge we possess of ourselves.
There are many things in this life which
conduce to afford us happiness, but there.is
nothing more essential thereto than a knowledge
of HUMAN NATURE. Some persons contend that
it is impossible to study the various temperaments
and dispositions of individuals, and also doubt
the possibility of laying down correct rules to
guide the judgments of those who feel disposed
to make such inquiries ; whilst others are of the
opposite opinion, and prove that it is possible by
study, theory, practice, and experience to guide
the inquiring student (having a sound mind) to
obtain such a knowledge of animals and human
beings, as will appear truly astonishing to
those who are unacquainted with such rules.
But indolence, prejudice, and ignorance will
continually present obstacles in the way of
science, which can only be removed by industry,
ability, and perseverance. Persons are often
surprised at the ignorance of their friends or
acquaintance, who are not acquainted with the

PHRENOLOGV, AND I'll VSIOG.NOMV.

125

nature of the various animals and their natural


propensities; it is certain that some animals of
the same species differ in a greater or less degree
from each other. If a knowledge of the brute
creation is essential for man to be acquainted
with, and their various instincts and propensities,
their organic uses and abuses, no person will,
for a moment, doubt the propriety of our studying the nature, constitution, disposition, and
qualities of mankind, and, particularly, of those
persons with whom we hold conversation or have
transactions in business, with the nature and
disposition of those on whom, perhaps, our
future happiness or misery may depend.
The sweet intellectual pleasures that arc to be
enjoyed in friendly society, and our daily and
hourly transactions awaken us to the importance
of such knowledge. All persons are aware of
the difference that exists in the dispositions,
manners and habits of their friends or acquaintances ; there are times we perceive that particular persons resemble other individuals in
appearance and also in habits to a certain extent,
and we often judge of persons by the contour of the

126
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
head, the form of body, or figure, the gait, and
a variety of peculiarities that are often remarkable ; if this is a fact well known to the unlearned,
how often must the man of penetration and
learning be assured of its existence. Phrenologists consider man by himself, and also compare
him with other animals. When the lower animals
manifest the same feelings and propensities as
those displayed by man, the faculties which
produce them are said to be common to both ;
ancient philosophers have compared the nature of
animals to that of man, and the nature of men
to certain animals and birds. Phrenologists,
(Drs. Gall and Spurzheim,) have discovered that
the general organic arrangement of the brain in
animals of the brute creation, and birds, are found
to shew the various propensities natural to them,
and correspond to a certain extent with the cerebral developement in mankind. If there was no
other defence in vindication of the science of
phrenology than that of men possessing the
learning and abilities of Drs. Gall and Spurzheim,
who would not risk their reputation for the
gratification of an evil propensity by leading

PHRUNOLOGV, AND PHVSIOGAOM V. 127


mankind into error; can any reasonable man
suppose that Dr. Combe would have wasted his
time and abilities in writing a splendid and
compendious treatise on the discoveries of Drs.
Gall and Spurzheim, and his own, on the subject
of phrenology ? Does it appear reasonable that
eminent physicians and gentlemen, whose abilities
we cannot doubt, would also expend their time
and abilities, as their learned predecessors did, to
study a science unworthy of their attention ?
The rules of the science are open to every man
who has abilities to satisfy himself as to its utility
and truth, by consulting the works of Drs. Gall
and Spurzheim, and the latest edition of Dr.
Combe's treatise on phrenology, and after he
becomes acquainted with the theory ofthe science,
he need only put it in practice to he perfectly
convinced in favour of its doctrine. It has
always been the desire of both ancient and modern
philosophers to promote the happiness of mankind on a solid foundation. I am persuaded that
nothing will tend more decidedly to achieve this
object than a certain knowledge of the ancient
sciences of ASTROLOGV, ASTRONOMY, PHRENOLOGY

128
HAKMONY OF ASTKOLOGV,
and physiognomy united in the same individual ;
and they, as they are the offspring of the same
parent, bear testimony to the resemblance of
each other in different bodies, in order to promote
the same end, viz., a knowledge of divine
AND HUMAN NATURE.
Astrology is a science founded on astronomy
and the motions, aspects and positions of the
heavenly bodies, together with the ancient signification of the constellations, and eminent fixed
stars, according to their situation in or on the
ecliptic ; as observed during centuries of experiments, at the birth of an individual ; at the time
of asking a question for the result of any particular event; for the state of the sick: or, to
discover the strength of a kingdom or nation,
from a CHART of the heavens erected for the
exact vioment that the sun enters the equinoctial
or tropical signs. The first is termed natal
astrology, the second horary astrology, the third
physical astrology, and the last state astrology.
Natal astrology teaches us by certain mathematical rules tojudge of theform and temperament
of the individual ; the blemishes, hurts, and

PHRENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 129


mental and bodily diseases ; the quality of the
intellectual faculties and animal propensities ; the
probability of riches or poverty ; the eminence
and dignity to which the native may be elevated;
the probability of friends and enemies, their
nature and description ; of marriage; offspring ;
strength of constitution ; natural disposition ;
and many of the most remarkable periods of life,
either advantageous or disadvantageous, &c. &c.,
and in various instances the length of life has
been most correctly calculated by those who are
proficients therein.
Phrenology is a science founded on the
formation and functions of the brain. In certain
compartments on the surface of the brain, the
organs of the different faculties, sentiments, and
propensities are developed, which the external
surface of the head discovers ; and in proportion
to the number and strength of the different
organs, so does the phrenologist give his opinion,
on the intellectual faculties, moral sentiments, and
animal propensities. It is extremely useful to
ascertain the exact abilities, inclinations, and dispositions of individuals; the propriety of appoint-

130
HARMONY OF ASTROI.OGV,
ing men to certain situations and studies, m
which they are most likely to distinguish themselves to their own advancement, and for the
general good. It harmonises with astrology, in
that portion which treats of the intellectual,
moral, and animal qualities, and the probability
of arriving at eminence in the world, acquisitiveness or riches, and in several other points which
experience and practice alone can decide.
Physiognomy is a science which teaches us to
form ideas of the dispositions and natural propensities of mankind, on beholding the countenance, and judging from the lines, curves, profiles
and proportion of the various features of the face,
the form of each feature taken separately and
collectively, to which they often add the profile of
the whole head and body. Physiognomists also
assist their judgment in a variety of ways, by
observing the manners of individuals on various
occasions, their gait, and from the general personal appearance. It is said that "the countenance is the index of the mind, which can be read
by observation, study and experience every
person is a physiognomist to a certain extent.

PH RENO LOG V, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.

131

There have been many objections raised against


these sciences, generally by persons who are
totally ignorant of the rules, theory and practice
of the science they universally condemn ; persons
who hare any idea of the manner in which we are
generally educated, will not feel surprised that
early prejudice is usually a substitute for mathematical investigation, particularly if the subject
should be a little beyond the common run of
things, it is denounced immediately as visionary
or impious. Paley says in his Moral Philosophy
that, " to send an uneducated child into the
world is injurious to the rest of mankind ; it is
little better than to turn out a mad dog or a wild
beast into the streets. The health and virtue of
a child's future life is a consideration superior to
all others." If Paley is right, the parents or
teachers of young persons ought to be well read
in the ancient science of astrology, and the
useful and important science of phrenology, by
this means the parents or teachers will be
enabled to perceive in what business or science
the abilities of the child will be found most useful.
The astrologian is aware that if the planet

132
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
Mercury is afflicted, impedited, and combust, at
the birth of an individual, that the intellectual
faculties of that individual will he unfit for study,
hut may he fit for business where great abilities
are not requisite ; the phrenologist will perceive
the deficiency of those organs necessary for study,
and the physiognomist will discover a vacancy in
countenance in proportion to the inability; a
proficient in each science would thus he capable
of giving the same judgment, and thus these
sciences act in union or harmony with each
other. It must appear as cruelty to the individual,
and prove injurious to the general welfare, by
endeavouring to educate men for situations or
professions which from their natural organization
they are incapable to fill. An astrologian would
consider it vanity to expect a man could rise to
great honour in the world whose nativity is
unfortunate and obscure; it is equally vain to
expect benevolence to exist in a man because he
has wealth, when the organ of benevolence is
deficient. The ancients displayed great judgment in the appointment of their public officers.
The mischief that results to society at large by a

PHRE.NOLOGV, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 133


neglect of those sciences in this respect is extensive, indeed we ought not to be surprised at the
many examples both in ancient and modern times,
of the world rejecting with the most intolerable
tyranny and ridicule, that which is intended for
(heir advantage. It is the priests of the Established Churches, by various acts contrary to
their profession, who have brought religion into
disrepute.
Persons who are appointed to public stations
should certainly undergo a scientific examination,
asin ancienttimes, when the honourof thecountry,
and public fidelity were considered superior to
private motives. Can we expect a man, whose
animal propensities predominate, or the man who
has the organ of conscientiousness small, acquisitiveness large, and benevolence deficient, to be
a fit and proper person to fill an office in the
Church, or even any office of trust. We
ought not to expect impossibilities when we hear
of a man placed in such a situation, unsuitable
to his natural propensities or disposition to fill,
and should rather pity than censure him, especially when we consider what he must have en-

134
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
dured under this organisation, being contrary to
the quality of the office he had to sustain ; the
person that appoints the individual in this case,
ought to be made the responsible person, for if
the said individual had been placed in a situation
which the science of Astrology, Phrenology, and
Physiognomy, would dictate, there is every probability that he would fill that situation with
credit to himself, and advantage to his employers.
Tiberius Ccesar was well skilled in Astronomy
and Astrology, (he was taught by Tharasyllus,
during his recess or exile at Rhodes) he was
correct in his predictions of future events ; on
inspection of Gabin's nativity (when he was a
youth,) Tiberius foretold that he should one day
be an Emperor. He had always by him the genitures of all his nobility, and according as he
found his own, or the kingdom's horoscope to be
affected, or aspected, or beheld by theirs, so he
let them remain or cut them off accordingly.
Hippocrates and Galen wrote on the judgment
of diseases and cures, by the rules of Astrology.
Josephus relates of Berosus the Chaldean, that
he left it recorded that among the Chaldeans, he

PHRENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.

135

observed Astronomical Ephemerides for four


hundred and eighty years, inscribed on baked
bricks and tiles ; he also signalised himself by his
astrological predictions. The Athenians rewarded
him for his learning, with a statue in the gymnasium at Athens. Epigenes Byzantinus, being
an author of credit, has recorded that amongst
the Babylonians, there were found Ephemerides
Containing observations of the stars for the space
of seven hundred and eighty years, inscribed on
tablets of brick and tiles; the same author wrote
with correctness on comets. The Roman Emperor Adrianus, was well skilled in Astronomy,
and particularly in judicial Astrology, he used to
erect an astrological chart of the heavens in the
calends of January, for the purpose of knowing
what should happen to him during the whole
year. Thales, one of the seven wise men of
Greece, flourished nearly 600 years before the
Christian Era, and, like other philosophers, he
travelled in quest of wisdom; by the priests of
Memphis he was taught geometry, astronomy,
astrology, and philosophy, he nearly measured
the vast height and extent of a pyramid, by

136

IIAKMONY OP ASTUOLOGY,

its shadow, he was the first that calculated an


eclipse of the Sun with accuracy, he discovered
the solstices and equinoxes, he divided the heavens into 5 zones, and recommended by the Egyptian philosophy, the division of the year into 365
days, which is a proof of the ancient learning in
astronomy and astrology. Pythagoras flourished more than 500 years before the Christian
era, he made the occult sciences his private
study. In Egypt and Chaldea, he gained the
confidence of the priests, and learned from them
the symbolic characters and mystic learning of
the ancients. His skill in music, medicine,
mathematics, and natural philosophy, gained
him friends and admirers. He considered proportionate numbers the principles of every thing,
and perceived in the universe regularity, correspondence, beauty, proportion, and harmony,
intentionally produced by the Creator; it is worthy of remark that the most accurate calculations
and observations of modern Astronomers, proves
that his system of the universe was perfectly
correct, viz., the Sun as the centre, and all the
planets moving in elliptical orbits round it; hut

PHREMOLOGV, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.

137

this idea was considered as chimerical nd improbable by persons in those days ; yet there
are many persons who attempt to deny that
the ancients were acquainted with the periods
and motions of the heavenly bodies, however,
it is quite certain the present system was known
two thousand three hundred years ago. Zoroaster, king of Bactria, was a great philosopher
and astronomer, he lived 2460 years before the
Christian era ; another of that name, and the
restorer of the religion
O of the Magii,
O 7 is fixed at
590 years before the Christian era; both were
astrologers. Thales, Pythagoras, Socrates, and
all the philosophers derived their information and
knowledge, bytheirown abilities and perseverance,
and from the instructions of the priests who presided in the temples of learning in ancient days.
It appears that no persons were admitted to study
in those temples or colleges, except those who
proved themselves worthy and possessed capacity
to appreciate and understand the mysteries and
learning of the ancients. We are quite at a loss
in forming an idea of the extent of their learning,
so many valuable libraries being destroyed by

138

HARMONY OF ASTROLOOV,

various accidents and destructive conquerors;


the ancients would rather make any sacrifice than
permit their learning to fall into the hands of the
vulgar, therefore we cannot say whether they
understood Phrenology or not, neither can we
assert that they were ignorant thereof; the ancients being such close observers of nature, we
ought rather to suppose that they were well acquaintedvvith both Phrenologyand Physiognomy,
and many other sciences of which we have no idea.
Pythagoras taught that the most ample and
perfect gratification was to be found in the enjoyment of moral and intellectual pleasures, and
in order to suit the mind for such qualities, and
to render virtue possible in practice as well as in
theory, recommended that the tender years of his
disciples should be employed in continual labour,
in study, in exercise, and in repose, for unless
young persons are continually employed in body
and mind, indolence with all its baneful influence,
will destroy the perfection of both body and
mind. Studies in either moral and intellectual
pursuits, if continued for too long a period will
produce a diseased body and a disordered mind ;

PHarNOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 139


scarcely any individual is organised in the same
manner exactly as another, which in some manner accounts for the difference of dispositions ; in
some men the intellectual faculties, in others the
moral sentiments, and in most men the animal
propensities are strongly developed; some are
strong and healthy, and others are weak and
sickly in their constitutions, it is useful and necessary for the student to ascertain the extent of
his abilities. It appears from the study of Phre nology, that exercise of both body and mind is
absolutely necessary to preserve the health of both,
if we neglect to cultivate bodily activity and
strength, we become unfit for the necessary Occupations of life, if we neglect our intellectual
and moral faculties, we shall become unfit for
society, and burthensome to ourselves. " The
brain, (says Combe) is the fountain of nervous
energy to the whole body, many persons are
habitual invalids, without actually labouringunder
any ordinary or recognised disease, solely from
defective or irregular exercise of the nervous
system. The best mode of increasing the strength
and energy of any organ and function is to exer-

1-10
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
cise them regularly and judiciously, according to
the laws of their constitution ; punishment
is the inevitable consequence of disobeying the
organic laws of our constitution, therefore the
more intimately a man becomes acquainted with
his own organisation, the nearer will he be able
to judge of others, and the happier and more
contented he is likely to be himself." I verily
believe that there is nothing new under the sun,
and that the nature of mankind was cultivated by
the ancients to far greater perfection than many are
likely to credit at present, they not only cultivated the mind, but also paid particular attention
to the health and strength of the body, in proportion as the animal health, strength, and spirits decline, so does the functions of the mind
become enfeebled and unfit for the exercise of
those abilities which an individnal is known to
possess in a sound state of health. " What obstructions are to be found (says Lavater) in the
way of improvement, from the nature of our
climates, in the forms of our government and
education, in the polish and insincerity of our
manners, the unsubstantial aliments, the closeness

PHRENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.

141

and heat of our apartments, the general use of


pernicious liquors, all concur alas to extinguish
the poor remains of vigour transmitted to us
from our fathers." Locke in his thoughts on
education, says, "A sound mind in a sound body,
is a short but full description of a happy state
in this world, he that wants either of these, will
be little the better of any thing else."
A smatterer in physiognomy, whose mind is
feeble and his heart corrupted, is in the opinion
of Lavatee the most contemptible of beings ; it
is certain that the student who is anxious to
learn physiognomy, must in the first place cast
off all prejudice, his eye must not be evil, his
health and mind must not be impaired, he must
know the effects of a sympathetic feeling, and
the language of the eyes and countenance ; conversant with the different temperaments of various
classes of individuals, he must associate in all
conditions of society, he ought not to limit his
acquaintance to one circle, he should associate
with artists and those having a knowledge of
man, perfection in physiognomy is not to be attained without long experience and experiments,

142
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
combined with the assistance of phrenology and
astrology. There have been many arguments urged
against the physiognomical opinions of different
individuals. Particularly because Zopyrus the
physiognomist said that Socrates was naturally
of a licentious disposition, and that his heart
was the most depraved, immodest, and corrupt,
that ever was in the human breast,this opinion
nearly cost the physiognomist his life ; but
Socrates declared that his assertions were true,
and that he had corrected and curbed all his
vicious propensities by means of reason. The
opinion of Zopyrus does not condemn the science
of physiognomy, but shews that he was too
hasty in giving his judgment, and that if Zopyrus
were as well acquainted with phrenology or with
astrology as he was with physiognomy, that
he would not have erred in his opinion of that
great Philosopher; it is also an argumentiu favour
of the utility of combining the knowledge of
each; there are some phrenologists that cultivate
a knowledge of physiognomy, and find a very
satisfactory result. The countenance generally
shews the emotions of the mind; it is not easy, says

PIIREXOLOGV, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 143


a physiognomist, to screen dissimulation from the
observer, we know the individual cannot change his
bony outline, or the colour of his hair and eyebrows; as a man can only do what he is capable
of, because capacity is limited to a point at which
it ceases, the physiognomist must know that the
source of a great deal of disappointment proceeds
from our expecting more than persons are able to
grant, or capable to fulfil. Can honesty be expected from a knave, or roguish actions to belong
to an honest man ? It is certain that some men
lose by being seen too near, and the same men
gain by a more intimate knowledgeof them, there
is no man so bad but that he may possess some
good qualities; an imperfect knowledge of man is
the foundation of intolerance. Men of bad
habits themselves, or those who have been often
deceived by persons, are usually apt to think evil
of others, on the other hand good men consider
mankind generally better than they really are ;
as a general rule this is most valuable, "judge of
the tree by the fruit,'' pear trees do not produce
apples, neither does the apple tree produce
plums, every thing in nature produces and acts

144
HABMOMY OF ASTROLOGY,
according lo its quality, kind, and disposition.
Run over the whole kingdom of nature with a
rapid eye (says Voltaire), or confine yourself to a
comparison of a few of her productions, no
matter which, and you will find in all a confirmation of this truth, That there is a constant
harmony ietween internal powers and external
signs.
Many persons have expressed surprise that the
early years of Socrates should have been spent in
drunkennesc and disorderly propensities until he
arrived at 24 years of age. It is very easily
accounted for in astrology, the degreess of the sign
on his ascendant being run up to another sign, the
planets in his nativity changing their signs from the
earthy, and watery trigons to the aerial, and fiery,
fixed,and cardinal, which is frequently conspicuous
in nativities, where the significators and aspects
are powerful : changing the course of life from
strong evil propensities to powerful and good
qualities, seeing that the concourse of good
primary and secondary directions, in his nativity
effected a different organization in the phrenological point of view, by a powerful developement

I'HUENOLOGY, AKD PHYSIOGNOMY.

145

of the intellectual and moral faculties. Phrenologists have found the organs that at one
period are obscure, in time become strongly developed, this proves the truth of the quotation,
"There is a constant," &c. Phrenologists have
often observed a great alteration in several organs
between 23 and 30 years of age. This is an
age at which the phrenologist will be most certain
in his opinion on this subject, and of course
when a change takes place in the developement
of the faculties and propensities, we are to expect
an alteration in the disposition, the countenances
of men undergo great changes and alterations,
and in fact we all change with our years, the
ideas of the child are different from the young
man, and the young man differs from the middle
aged, and from the old man ; the same individual
undergoes as many changes as the planets that
rule those ages are different in quality, as the
I) rules the I st age, 5 2nd, 5 3rd, 0 4th, $ 5th,
It 6th, T? and fi 7th. In harmony with the
changes of man, the planets are continually changing their places in tjie ecliptic, all moving on in the
same order, continually changing every circum-

146
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
tance and day different from every other. Physiognomy is one of the studies which an astrologer is
obliged to be acquainted with, in order to distinguish
the sort of person signified by the various planets,
not only are different classes of persons signified
by the same planet, caused by the aspects the
planet receives, but also from the nature of the
different signs of the zodiac in which the planet
is situated, therefore phrenology is found to
harmonise with astrology.Astrological and
zodiacal physiognomy has long been observed
and often used to assist in the rectification of a
nativity, when the time of birth is not exactly
known. So precisely is the difference perceptible, that an astrologer of experience can discover
nearly the degree or part of the sign which ascended at the birth of the individual, as judged
from the peculiarity of the countenance and
personal appearance of the individual. The
erudite author of the Zodiacal Physiognomy
in one part of that valuable work says, " Those
persons who are born under the signs of the
watery and earthy trigons, often bear some resemblance to foreigners; whilst those born under

PHRENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.

147

the signs of the fiery triplicity (which gives fair


persons) are particularly characteristic of the
English nation, which is under the sign Aries."
Not only does particular individuals partake of
the physiognomy of the signs and planets that
ascend or preside at birth, but nations are ruled
and signified by the different signs of the zodiac;
as, England is signified by the sign Aries,
Ireland by Taurus, and cities are also signified
by the signs; Rome under the regal sign Leo, and
London by Gemini, particularly from the 10th
to the 24th degree ; now if evil planets afflict
these signs, the kingdoms, or cities, and nations
are known to suffer, which is particularly observed
in what is called state astrology. Mr. Varley
has given several plates and figures in his work
to describe the peculiarities that belong to each
trigon. Aries, Leo, and Sagittarius, the fiery
trlgon; Taurus, Virgo, and Capricorn the earthy;
Gemini, Libra, and Aquarius, the aerial trigon;
Cancer, Scorpio, and Pisces the watery trigon.
" By far the less numerous portion of society is
born under the fiery and aerial signs; the world in
its dispositions and habits, are governed chiefly by

148
HARMtNY OF ASTROLOGY,
the earthy and melancholic saturnine, and the
watery phlegmatic signs ; while the superior
princes and nobles of the world, and the sublime
and poetical writers, painters, and composers,
emanate from the fiery and regal trigon; and
under the humane and courteous aerial signs,
Gemini, Libra, and Aquarius, are mostly produced the professors and instructors of music,
the fine arts, and the ceremonies and embellishments of life and civilization."
We have shewn that there is an inseparable
harmony between the science of phrenology and
physiognomy; a thousand cases may be cited;
such as that of Socrates and Zopyrus, which proves,
that to give a judgment in one or the other,
both must be consulted, which is a rule observed
by a few phrenologists that are very correct in
their opinions on the dispositions of individuals ;
an harmony no less striking between the astrological judgment of the form and dispositions of
the planetary significations, of the celestial signs
of the zodiac, of phrenology and of physiognomy,
in fact physiognomy and phrenology cannot be
separated. Neither can the astrological signifi-

PHRENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 149


eators of persons differ from the meaning of
phrenological and physiognomical rules, both
thereof treating of individuals ; the one assists the
other, and by the unity of each renders the mind
more competent to judge with accuracy, causing
us to use mathematical demonstration, beyond
which there can exist no doubt. This subject is
so varied, and the field of comparison so wide,
that it is with difficulty that I can confine myself
within the prescribed limits ; however, I cannot
refrain from suggesting an idea that Occurred to
me one day, on observingthe cast of a head facing
the east, and divided into various compartments
used for phrenological purposes. There appears
a great analogy between the compartments or
organs as arranged in position by phrenologists,
and those of the heavens as divided by astrologers ; they divide the diurnal arc of the heavens
which is above the earth, from the eastern to the
western horizon, into six divisions or compartments, and the nocturnal arc from the western
horizon under the earth to the eastern horizon,
also into six divisions or compartments, called in
astrology houses. These divisions of the equator

150
harmony of astrology,
passing through the poles of the world, contain
30 degrees, each making 12 houses, six houses
above the horizon and six houses under the horizon ; just by the same reason as phrenologists
call the compartments of the head the place or
locality of the organs, so are those houses the
place of locality for the signs and planetary bodies therein, just as they happen to be situated.
There are four principal houses and cardinal
points called angles ; the cusp of the first house
or ascendant, the east point or angle ; the tenth
house, zenith, or south angle ; the seventh house,
or western horizon or angle; the fourth house or
nadir and north angle of the figure. Astrologers, according to Ptolemy, consider the eastern
hemisphere to be the superior portion of the
heavens, being far more powerful, famous, and
^ictive than the western ; because in the eastern
grand division the planets and stars are always
ascending when in this part of the heavens, and
introducing themselves into public notice, which
division is termed oriental, and the western division is called occidental. In order to put this
idea to the test we perceive, according to the

PURENUUIGV, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 151


rules of phrenology, that the division of the brain,
situated from the orifice of the ear forward towards the east, is the most superior part of the
brain, containing the intellectual and moral faculties, and the posterior part of the brain, from the
orifice of the ear towards the west angle, to contain the organs of the animal propensities and
inferior region of the brain ; which, in the first
instance was an encouragement to proceed: we
are led to compare that, as the development of
organs in the front part of the head conduce to
the more illustrious advancement in this world,
so do planets in this part of the heavens, according to astrological doctrine, promote the same
object. Again, phrenologists divide the brain
into three general spheres of faculties ; the intellectual faculties, the moral sentiments, and the
animal propensities, and as either of these great
compartments exceed in development, quantity
and quality, so does the principal action of each
come into operation according to size, weight,
and configuration. Astrologers, according to
Ptolemy, say that the intellectual faculties are
governed by the planet Mercury, as first ruler

152
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
and significator; the moral and religious sentiments under the dominion of the benevolent
planet Jupiter ; and the animal inclinations and
propensities under the influence of the Moon;
and inasmuch as those planets harmonize and
agree with each other in what is called good
aspect of position, in proportionate and agreeable
figures, so is perfection conferred upon the mind
of the individual. If the testimonies are discordant or contrary, either in quality, position, or
quantity, amongst each other, and as they are
afflicted by the evil influence of the malific planets, so does the mind suffer in point of endowments, inclinations, and propensities. Inasmuch
as the planet Mercury is ruler of the intellectual
faculties, so Venus is a co-ruler governing melody, joy, wit, tune, and assisting the intellectual
faculties. These planets, when combined in commendable positions, bearing testimony to each
other, and in good aspect with Jupiter, the Sun,
or Moon, or each of them, the intellectual endowment is very superior ; if Mercury and Venus
are in good aspect to Mars (or the organ of combativeness, in phrenology), it confers a great

PHRENOLOGY, AND PHVSIOGNOML.


1.53
acuteness to the intellectual faculties,' OgivingO a
spirit and determination to carry those good qualities into effect with a martial and firm resolution. The Sun is co-ruler with the planet Jupiter of the moral and religious qualities or sentiments, and Saturn and Mars are co-rulers with
the Moon over the animal propensities and inclinations, as the planet Venus harmonizes with
the planet Mercury In ruling the Intellectual faculties, so does the Sun harmonise with the planet
Jupiter as co-ruler of the moral sentiments. The
Sun usually personates, according to the rules of
astrology, kings, princes, judges, and all superior
persons, and is significator of honour and grandeur, the Sun being the centre of the solar system,
the great fountain of heat and light. The planet
Jupiter is significator of the dignitaries of the
church, priests, judges, truth, benevolence,
justice, religion, &c. Do not these two most
ponderous bodies of the solar system inspire us
with wonder, marvellousness, hope, veneration,
consentiousness, and benevolence ? Both have
been worshipped in former ages by the common
people as gods ; the planet Jupiter as the god of

154

HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,

benevolence and justice, and the Sun as the sole


life and spirit of the heavens, which will be found
to harmonise in signification with the organs belonging to the moral sentiments as arranged by
phrenologists. The co-significators of the animal propensities are the planets Satum (ruling
the organ of destructiveness), and Mars (ruling
the organ of combativeness); the planet Satum
effects destruction by secretiveness, coldness, deliberation, and death; but Mars by violence,
fury, and combativeness. If these organs are
strongly developed, and the lunar region also
extensive, destruction and murder will most
likely result from the combined influence or "testimonies of the animal powers and organs when
brought into operation ; but if the planets Mercury and Venus are in power, and in a friendly
aspect or position, with the planet Jupiter and the
Sun, predominating in quality and quantity over
the animal development, then will the action, of
the good faculties overcome the evil propensities,
just as the phrenologist says that the intellectual
faculties and moral sentiments are more strongly
formed and developed than the animal propensi-

P1IUENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 155


ties, consequently it is an argument in favour of
the actions of such an individual. This subject,
alone, would require a volume to state the facts
requisite to class and define the analogy that
exists between astrology and phrenology. Many
persons are of opinion that a knowledge of these
sciences will elucidate many matters in natural
philosophy, which have not been taken into consideration.
We shall proceed with the comparison of
the angles in the natal figure of the heavens,
and the organs that appear in the plate to
be located in them ; the eastern angle is termed
the ascendant, because the sun, stars, and planets
are first observed to ascend above the horizon in
this part of the heavens; it is also called the
house of life, and often, according to the planetary positions and signs in this house, defines the
zodiacal or planetary physiognomy of the individual. When Mars is in this house he generally indicates a mark or scar on the face, according to the number of mundane degrees in which
he is posited, either higher up or lower down on
the face. Venus in the ascendant at birth, par-

156
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
ticularly if in the sign Libra, usually gives a
beautiful round face, inclining to oval, with a
dimple or other graceful mark on the countenance. Mr. Varley, in his Zodiacal Physiognomy, has given several specimens to illustrate
this part of physiognomy.
In this, the first house or ascendant, we notice
the perceptive faculties are located and exercised
to observe all things that ascend or present
themselves to our view, we judge of their weight,
resistance, colour, form, arrangement and order,
the quality of the ascendant may be said to belong to this class; individuality, love for variety,
and desire of being acquainted with ascending
or passing events, therefore these faculties are
based upon the eyes and language by which
they are brought into operation. This house
is also said to be the house of life, the nostrils
are located in this house, we are told in Genesis,
that "life was breathed into the nostrils of man
by his Creator, and he became a living soul
the eyes and the perceptive faculties are particularly useful to man, in order to preserve his life,
and to defend his head and face from injuries

PIIREKOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 1.57


and accidents, the eyes are continually on the
watch, assisted by language, and the ears, in order
to avert approaching danger, or to gratify the
intellectual or animal desires. The ears of man
are in trine to the eyes and perceptive faculties,
forming also a triangle by the chin, the point or
end of things as regards the countenance, and
when strongly developed, this feature often adds
a shiewd sharpness to the decision and expressions of the individual, and when ill proportioned
and not in character with the jaw-bone and face,
folly instead of shrewdness will be the result of
the individual's conclusions. It has been observed by some persons acquainted with this
subject, that what Physiognomy declares, it is
very seldom entirely contradicted either by the
Phrenological or Astrological judgment, on the
contrary, most generally confirmed on a minute
and deliberate examination of each, which has
led me from various experiments to express my
opinion in favour of the harmony that exists
between these sciences. We shall next take the
south angle, zenith or mid-heaven, into consideration. In astrology this angle signifies, pro-

158
harmony of astrology,
fession, dignity, the house of kings, princes,
governors, and all men in authority, the highest
degree of eminence in the figure, the angle of
honour ; and being in the highest point, and
midst of heaven, and in a spiritual sense of the
word, the Deity Himself; on reference to the
diagram, we perceive in this elevated angle of
the heavens, the moral sentiments ruled by the
planet Jupiter and the Sun are located here!
the organ of veneration, supported by the trine
on each side of marvellousness, or wonder, on
one side, and on the other side by the organs of
justice or conscientiousness. Astrologians and
theologians are well acquainted that the equilateral
triangle signifies harmony, perfection, and friendship. It appears that this angle is not deficient
in bearing testimony to the analogy that exists
in the position of the Phrenological head with
the Astrological figure; can any thing be more
classical than that the organ of veneration should
be located on the highest point of the head, and
in the midst of all the other faculties, which concur to support and maintain this noble and
grateful sentiment ? In the astrological figure

PHRENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 159


this angle is situated in the highest point and
midst of heaven, being the tenth house thereof,
and preceded on one side by the ninth house,
the house of religion and science, and succeeded
by the eleventh house on the other side, the
house of frieirds, assistance, and hopes, so that
whether we consider the organs which surround
the organ of veneration, or the nature and significations of the houses in aspect and on each
side the mid-heaven or south angle, we cannot
but feel convinced that a certain analogy exists,
which will become the more evident as we seek
to make the comparison of agreement. The
western angle is that part or division of the
heavens, in and above the point of the western
horizon, it is numbered the seventh house cf
heaven by astrologers, and signifies the house
or compartment allotted for wife, husband, or
lovers, the persons with whom we are in partners,
the public foes, or open enemies of the native ;
it has also signification of the place we travel to,
or the house and country in which we wish to
reside; a division of the posterior part of the
head and brain is located in this angle or astro-

160
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
logical house. The nature of the animal propensities as arranged by phrenology appear to
correspond with the signification of this angle,
here we have the organ of inhabitiveness, or
concentrativeness, which imparts a strong desire
(when well developed) for some particular place,
person, an eagerness to settle in life, or to form
matrimonial alliance. Philoprogenitiveness or
love of offspring, is also located here, which has
a near affinity to the desire of lovers, partners,
or wives, the organ of attachment is also associated with this concourse in the western angle, and
seventh house, thus forming the social portion
of this angle. The organs combativeness and
destructiveness, are rather retired, but still in
the western field, and when these organs are
strongly developed, the public opponents and
open enemies of such individuals often feel the
effects of their utility, and when blended with
the moral and intellectual faculties, give a noble
and manly spirit to overcome every obstacle by
perseverance and activity, but when united with
the animal propensities, it inclines to overcome

PHttE.XOLCGV, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.

161

difficulties by destruction, violence, persecution,


and sometimes death of the opposing party.
The nadir, or north angle, which is under the
earth and horizon, being perpendicular thereto,
and is the opposite point to the south angle;
astrologers call this north angle the fourth house.
It is an occult house of the first order, wherein
things are hidden from our view and secret. It
is termed the Father's House of Life. Estates,
land, and houses, from the father; mines and
secret places, the wife's angle of honour. From
this angle the brain is supplied with blood by the
great arteries from this house, and from which
the nerves communicate their action to the brain,
by which means the whole system of phrenology
is brought into action, and the functions of the
brain are kept alive. It is generally allowed
that unless the act of a father concurs, the child
cannot be formed or produced, therefore if that
is the case there cannot be anything more appropriate than the fluids and nerves communicating
existence, are by this act brought into energy,
proceeding from the father's house of life or existence. This appears m order and harmony

16'2

HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,

with the signification of both in the astrological


and phrenological point of view. The descendants of royalty and kings are usually denoted by
or styled princes of the royal blood, which title
proceeds from the father's house, and that legitimate honours usually proceed from this angle,
which applies both to nobles and commoners,
being descended from a high family or illustrious
parents, usually are attended with titles, land,
property, and possessions, proceeding from the
father's house or north angle. Now it appears
evident that the functions of the brain depend
entirely upon the support and assistance received
from this house or angle, in order to diffuse life
and energy to the whole system; and as the supply from this angle is diminished in quantity or
vitiated in quality, so must the organization of
the individual suffer in a greater or less degree in
a phrenological point of view, and how this harmonises as regards property, estates, possessions,
&c. inherited from the father or fourth house.
Astrology teaches us thus much regarding this
part of phrenology, that if the organs be ever so
well developed in the head and brain, that their

1'HRENOLOGV, AND PHVSIOGNOMV. 1^3


t'orcc, strength, power, and operation, will he
only in proportion as thev are supplied from this
house, the nerves and arteries, and as regards
property and estates the quality of the blood and
nerves, and all things inherited from the father.
For instance, the organ of benevolence may be
strongly developed and associated with other
sood qualities, the intellectual and moral organs
in the brain of a man descended from obscure
parents in poverty, what would that avail for the
benefit of mankind at large?it would actually
serve to make the poor man more miserable by
not having it in his power to act according to
his desire, which is by no means an uncommon
circumstance. But let us suppose that the said
individual was horn in an elevated position in
life, and supplied from this angle by his revenues,
land estates, &c. then this individual's good
qualities will become conspicuous, and have their
full effect to benefit bis countrymen or fellowcreatures. Mot only is the strength and bodily
health of an individual to be taken into account
by phrenologists, but the wealth and pecuniary
circumstances ought at all times to be regarded.

164
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
There are many men who are actually living in a
state of starvation and cannot form an idea of what
their organization is until they are supplied with
the necessary nourishment to bring the circulation of the blood and the nervous system into
operation. We cannot doubt but many worthy
members of society are obscured from the view of
the world, in an intellectual point of view, and in
a worldly sense, despised, not for anything more
criminal than " poverty alone.'' But who is
there among us that is possessed of manly feelings,
who would not endeavour to advance the objects
of a science that teaches us to discern the valuable portion of society, and to bring them into a
situation to benefit themselves, and at the same
time to promote the general good of society ?
Wealth is not always the attendant of wisdom,
virtue, and talented individuals ; it is most generally observed in those persons whose animal
propensities and acquisitiveness, self-esteem and
other organs in operation, make a rapid advance
in life, and obtain the good things thereof, whilst
the man of intellectual and moral endowments is
wading through difficulties and privations, per-

PlIltENOL' OV, AN fhvsiognomv. 165


haps labouring for the good of his fellow-creatures, during the period that the other individual
is amassing riches, and indulging himself in all
manner of recreations and enjoyments. As the
rude and illiterate portions of society raise themselves in the world by accumulating wealth, it
proves to the man of learning that wealth is the
one thing needful: they do not scruple to call
such men mad and infatuated ; but when the
man of learning has got sufficient property to
supply his wants, the contrast of happiness
which he enjoys is far superior to any pleasure
the illiterate man is capable of imagining ; thus
is .wisdom rewarded by leading us to true happiness, which can only be derived from the exercise
of the intellectual faculties and moral sentiments,
all other enjoyments are merely transitory when
compared with it, according to the opinion of the
greatest philosophers. But to return to the subject ; we have only considered the analogy of the
angles with the head and brain, but if we were
to consider all the astrological houses we should
find that they all bear equal testimony to the first
idea thereof.

166
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY,
In the second house of heaven we perceive the
mouth and chin located in this house, which
signifies riches, jewels, money, and moveable
goods, this organ chiefly belongs to the physiognomist's consideration. Perhaps the portion of
the brain hidden from our view, and pointing to
this house, may shew the organic qualities
described by the mouth to the physiognomist;
the form of the mouth is considered one of the
most expressive features of the face. Men are
generally guided in their language and expressions by the nature and extent of their riches or
wealth; the boaster is known by the form of this
feature, the man capable of keeping a secret, and
the language of those who exult to degrade and
oppress those persons that misfortune has placed
in a capacity under them : the various forms of this
feature alone, with its signification, would require
the pen of a Shakspeare or a Byron to describe.
But in those who are fortunate enough to have a
well developed formation of mouth it will be found
to harmonize with the organ benevolence at one
point, and with amativeness or love in the other
point, in exact trine to each other; it will

PHHENOX-OGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY.

167

generally be observed that when benevolence is


well developed and associated with other good
organs that the mouth of such individual is well
formed. Benevolence expressed by harmonious
language
O O or words from the house of wealth
generally produces a noble effect. The third
house signifies relatives, neighbours, and short
journeys for business and pleasure; the under
part of the chin, throat, and jaw bone is located
in this division ; how often is it said that such a
person is held up by the chin, either by relatives
or neighbours. Men often hold up their chin if
they happen to be the distant relatives of a Lord
or Duke, let their circumstances be ever so humble. I perceive the organ of gustativeness
situated to the front of destructiveness, and under
the organ acquisitiveness, (signifies, desire of
food or appetite) this organ points towards this
house, short journeys for pleasure, and to dine
out with relatives or friends is appropriate, and
proves that each science will unfold each other as
we trace their analogy. In the fifth house, or
house of pleasure, children, embassies, &c. in
which is located the organ of amativeness, fond-

1 G8
HARMONV OF ASTROLOGV,
ness for pleasure, propagating the species, and all
other pleasures which are necessary to uphold the
spirit of this influential organ, and when harmonised with benevolence well developed, the person
then delights in giving pleasure to others, and
making them happy,jolly, and comfortable.
The sixth house signifies servants, tenants, vassals, sickness, and small animals; the organ adhesiveness or attachment belongs to this house.
Persons are usually attached to their servants,
vassals, and tenants, excessive attachment to
sundry propensities, especially those located in
this part of the heavens, will often produce
sickness or disease. The seventh house has
been mentioned. The eighth house is said to
be the house of death, being an occult house,
and the house of our opponent's riches, the organs
destructiveness and secretivcness have a strong
affinity for the house of death. The ninth house
signifies religion, the organ conscientiousness is
located in this house, supported by veneration,
firmness in the cause of religion. The eleventh
house of heaven is the house of friends, hopes,
and expectations ; the organs of hope are in trine

PHRENOLOGY, AND PHYSIOGNOMY. 169


to benevolence which harmonizes with expectations
and friendship. The twelfth house signifies the
place of private enemies, imprisonrmnt, affliction,
large cattle, great machines, locomotive engines,
&c., the organ of constructiveness, ideality, comparison, and many of the organs in the front
part of the brain are required for the use of this
division of the heavens. This subject may he
greatly enlarged, and other views of the head
taken as respects the figure.
The author of the Zodiacal Planisphere has
remarked that in the view of a front face in the
diagram for a man when placed as a judge, one
ear is in the plaintiff's or complainant's house,
and the other in the defendant's or opponent's
house, that is one ear for each side of the question.
We then percuve all the noble faculties located
in the house of justice and honour, with comparison in the centre, exerted to discover and
distinguish between right and wrong ; although
some persons may not discern the testimonies of
analogy at the first view, experience will prove
that neither the science of astrology, phrenology ,
or physiognomy are delusions invented by mad-

170
HARMONY OF ASTROLOGY, &C.
men. It must appear evident that the Babylonians and Chaldeans would not have preserved
the observations of the heavenly bodies for so
many years, if it was not to cultivate astrology,
and to compare the effects of the planets and
aspects at different periods, and then from the
experience and observations in the course of
several hundred years they were enabled to form
rules which have been handed down to posterity,
and from which the ancients and moderns have
derived great advantages. Astrology goes far
beyond the limits prescribed by phrenology or
physiognomy ; Moses says, that the sun, moon,
and stars were not only created to give light,
but to bear rule both by day and night, for signs,
and for seasons, for days and for years.

FINIS.

MILTON PRESS t J. NICHOLS, 9, CHANDOS STREET, STRAND.

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