You are on page 1of 14

7/28/2016

Project 3 Writing
Portfolio
A display of technical documents produced
throughout with an English 2100 class

Hunter Bernstein
SALT LAKE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

9656 S 2760 E
Sandy, Utah 84092

July 24, 2016

Salt Cycles Bike Shop
2073 E 9400 S
Sandy, Utah 84092

Dear Sir or Madam:


I am writing this cover letter to introduce myself, Hunter Bernstein, and give you an
insight to my work and life experience. I would like to apply for a position in the
shop section of Salt Cycles. I have been involved in the bike community for about
five years and have always done my own upkeep on my bicycles, but am seeking to
expand my skills within the shop.

My personal background in bicycles has always entailed me working on my bikes.
My personal history with bicycle repair and maintenance would benefit Salt Cycles
and also reduce needed training time. I have converted 80s bicycle into fixed gears,
built mountain bikes from extra parts and developed a mental handbook of various
bicycle repairs and tune-ups.

I am currently attending Salt Lake Community College full-time and am working on
my Associates of Pre-Engineering. I plan to go to the University of Utah afterwards
to achieve my Bachelors in Mechanical Engineering. I would like to pursue a career
path in the bicycle or recreational industry as an engineer once I have completed
school. I have been working full-time in order to support funding for my education.

Many of the jobs that I have had include selling a product or a service up until more
recently. I am now involved in the manufacturing of products for a local model
company named Field of Armor Tanks LLC. In winters prior, I have been working at
Brighton Ski Resort as a Ski Rental Technician. I would work in both the repair shop
and rental section. Working in a rental and repair shop required mandatory testing
to verify that I know how to properly adjust and set equipment.

Repairing equipment, whether it be skis, snowboards, bicycles, or even shop tools
has always been a part of my life. I am a fast learner and work well with my hands.
With my background education in pre-engineering I can effortlessly solve problems
and believe that I would perform exceptionally well given the opportunity. Thank
you for your consideration and I look forward to hearing/seeing you soon.

Sincerely,

Hunter Bernstein

Page 2

Table of Contents

Technical Documents
i.


Brake Bleed Instructions

i. Detailed in this section are instructions on how to properly bleed hydraulic


Shimano disk brakes. This was written for beginners up through novice bicyclists
who would like to self maintain their equipment. These would suit well for quickreference when being used in a bicycle shop.

ii.


Static and Kinetic Friction

i. This is a laboratory report conducted for a Physics 2210 class. The paper
compares the amount of friction (both static and kinetic) created between two
objects given different weights. There are calculations and graphs to create a
fact-based conclusion. This is a scientific paper and is intended for educational
purposes.


iii.

Field of Armor Training Handbook

12

i. Prior to my employment at Field of Armor, there was no official training manual


or reference guide for any of the new employees. I resolved this issue by writing a
training manual that continues to get modified as new topics arise. This was
originally intended for a school assignment but now is read by the new employees
at Field of Armor.


Work and References
iv.
v.


Cover Letter
Resume

2
14

Page 3

Page 4

Page 5

Page 6

Static and Kinetic Friction



Objective

Use a Dual-Range Force Sensor to measure the force of static friction.


Determine the relationship between the force of static friction and the weight of an object.
Measure the coefficients of static and kinetic friction for a particular block and track.
Use a motion detector to independently measure the coefficient of kinetic friction and compare it to
the previously measured value.
Determine if the coefficient of kinetic friction depends on weight.


Equipment

Computer
Vernier computer interface
Logger Pro
Vernier Motion Detector

Vernier Force Sensor


String
Block of wood with hook
Mass set


Preliminary Questions

1. Since the static friction will be fighting to overcome the force of my pushing, it will require more force to
begin moving the object than it will to continue moving it.

2. The heavier the object is, the greater the force of friction will be. This is modeled by Fk= kN, where N is the
normal force, which has a direct relationship to the mass of an object.


Procedure

Part I

1.1 Measure the mass of the block in the data table. Connect the sensors and set up the computer. Tie the
ends of the string to the force sensors hook and the hook on the block, ensuring the block does not move.
1.2 Pull the block in a straight line, applying minimal pressure for at least one full second before increasing the
force. Once the block starts to move, keep it moving at a constant speed for another second.
1.3 Zero the forces using the computer, and click collect. Pull the block the same as before being careful to
gradually increase the force. Repeat the graph as necessary until the graph satisfies the desired motion
graph. Print the graphs.

Part II

2.1 Measure the kinetic friction force and the peak static friction force.
2.2 Remove the 1000 g mass from the block and repeat the trials starting with no mass. Record the experiment
like before and examine the graph using the statistic button.
2.3 Record the maximum value of force and the average force. Repeat this process two more times and
average the results, recording all results.

Page 7

2.4 Repeat this process with a mass of 250 g attached to the block. Continue doing this until you recorded the
values up to 1000 g (in increments of 250 g).

Part III

3.1 Measure the coefficient of the kinetic friction and compare it to the results in Part II. Using a Motion
detector, measure the velocity of the block as it comes to a stop and then determine the acceleration of
the block. Since the only force acting on the block to slow it down is friction, you are able to find the
coefficient of kinetic friction.
3.2 Connect the Motion Detector to the computer and set it the to Track mode.
3.3 Place the Motion Detector on the table 2-3 m away from the block, facing it.
3.4 Slide the block towards the Motion Detector so when you release the block it slides for about 1 m before
coming to a stop (no closer than 0.4 m away). Minimize the rotation of the block.
3.5 Click the collect button and push the block so it slides towards the Motion Detector.
3.6 Select the region on the velocity vs. time graph that indicates the block slowing down (the linear section).
The slope is the acceleration.
3.7 Determine the acceleration using the Linear Fit button and record the value in the data table. Repeat this
process three more times and record the values.
3.8 Repeat the process with a mass of 500 g on the block and record these results.


Data and Calculations

Part I

Mass of block

Part II

Total Mass (m) Normal Force
(n)
133 g
1.3034 N
383 g
3.7534 N

Trial 1
0.4954
1.433

632 g
882 g
1132 g

2.149
2.936
4.235

.133 kg

6.1936 N
8.6436 N
11.0936 N

static= sN

s=

Peak static friction


Trial 2
Trial 3
0.5797
0.3813
1.409
1.259
2.041
4.115
4.133

$%&'&()
*

2.563
3.357
4.157

Wood Block

+.-.//
0.1+1-

Average peak
static friction (N)
0.4855
1.367

static
0.372
0.364

2.251
3.469
4.175

0.363
0.401
0.376

= 0.372 = static


The coefficient of friction is modeled with static and represents the slope of the best fit line. Through my above
calculations, I am able to average the results and find the slope of the best fit line, which is also the coefficient
of static friction.

3.72 + 3.64 + 3.63 + 4.01 + 3.76
= 0.375
5

Page 8

Total Mass (m)


133 g
383 g
632 g
882 g
1132 g

Normal Force
(n)
1.303 N
3.753 N
6.194 N
8.644 N
11.094 N

kinetic= kN

Kinetic Friction
Trial 2
0.2992
1.011
1.702
2.656
3.573

Trial 1
0.3514
1.139
1.904
2.684
3.101

k=


Part III

$;(<=&()
*

Average kinetic
friction (N)
0.3126
1.010
1.8063
2.7187
3.4173

Trial 3
0.2872
0.88
1.813
2.816
3.578

Wood Block

+.10>?
0.1+1-

Data: Block with no additional mass


Acceleration (m/s2)
Kinetic Friction Force (N)
1.768
0.235 N
1.823
0.242 N
2.340
0.311 N
2.179
0.289
2.471
0.328

Trial
1
2
3
4
5

Average coefficient of kinetic friction:

Trial #1 . 133 1.768

H
%I

= 0.235 =

$
<

kinetic
0.239
0.269
0.292
0.315
0.308

= 0.239 = kinetic

k
0.18
0.186
0.238
0.222
0.252
0.216

= kinetic

+.>1/ *
0.1+1- *

= 0.180 = kinetic


Data: Block with 500 g additional mass
Acceleration (m/s2)
Kinetic Friction Force (N)
2.671
1.644
2.234
1.391
2.876
1.792
2.461
1.533
2.113
1.316
Average coefficient of kinetic friction:

Trial
1
2
3
4
5

Trial #1 . 623 2.671

H
%I

= 1.664 =

$
<

k
0.269
0.225
0.289
0.248
0.213
0.249

= kinetic

0.??- *
?.0K- *

= 0.269 = kinetic

Analysis

1. Based off the graph of force vs. time, I am clearly able to see that it requires a greater initial force to move
the block than it does to keep the block moving. This backs up my original answer in the preliminary question
stating that it will require a greater force to move the block than to continue the motion.

Page 9

2. Since static friction is what holds the block


in place, and the kinetic friction is what
relates the block sliding and the table, I
would expect the coefficient of the static
force to be greater than that of kinetic
friction. The graph shows a peak when the
block begins to move, which is the peak of
static friction.

3. Using the =

Q(%=
QR<

formula, I was able


-./

to determine the slope of the line to be =


0>
0.375 = static. Which also happens to be the
same coefficient that I had previously
calculated. According to the above graph,
the line best fit begins at just below zero on
the y-axis and then touches the first set of
data.
4. Using the =

Q(%=
QR<

formula, I was able


1.S

to determine the slope of the line to be =


0>
0.308 = kinetic. According to the above
graph, the line best fit does not pass through
the 0,0 origin of the graph. There is a shift
downward on the graph, making the
intersection a negative number.

5. The coefficient of kinetic friction does not
depend on speed; it depends on the mass of
the object.

6. The weight of the block has a parallel
effect on the kinetic friction force exerted
on the block. The graphs and tables that I
have included clearly indicate that there is
a direct correlation between the mass and
the kinetic friction.

7. The coefficient of kinetic friction seems
to also be dependent on the weight of the
block. As we increased the weight on the
block, the coefficient of kinetic friction
also increased.

8. Since the wood block is sliding in the
same environment, I would expect the
coefficient of kinetic friction to be the
same in part II as it was in part III. In part

Page 10

II, when the block had no mass attached, I calculated the average coefficient of kinetic friction to be 0.239. The
recorded average value for part II is 0.216. When I added the mass of 500 g, the coefficient increased in both
situations. In the second part it was 0.292, and in the third part it was 0.249. As you can see, the values in both
cases increased when I added the mass. However, the coefficient of Kinetic friction was not the same for the
two testing methods.

9. When the surface area of the block has a rough surface, like the rough Velcro, it increases the friction
present. In order to minimize the force of kinetic friction, you must somehow lubricate both surfaces. Changing
the surface area to a larger or smaller amount does not affect the coefficient of friction.


Conclusion

My lab partner and I were successfully able to predict the motion of the force vs. time graph and then,
using our results, I was able to determine the force of static and kinetic friction. Using the force sensors in
combination with the motion detector helped us better predict and calculate the coefficient of kinetic friction.
This was done through mapping the force vs. time graphs along with the velocity vs. time graphs. Once the
slope of a designated area was highlighted, we were able to find the coefficient of friction. If the wrong region
was selected, or too much/too little of the area was highlighted, that could lead to inaccurate data. However,
repeating the trials several times helped to eliminate experimental error.


Finding the correct speed and force to apply to the wood block was the most difficult part of this
experiment. Every time a weight was added/removed, the block required a different tension to began
accelerating across the table. When the block had no weights on it, it was nearly impossible to keep the string
taught and not move the wood block. With some trial and error, we were however able to successfully record,
graph and calculate (with the possibility of experiment error) the forces of static and kinetic friction, and the
coefficients of both frictions.

Page 11

Page 12

Page 13

Hunter Bernstein

Objective

9656 S 2760 E Sandy, UT

Cell: 801-455-9021 E-mail: hunterbrighton@gmail.com


Gain a hands on experience in bicycle shop and attain a greater understanding of the technology that powers the sport. I aspire to be
a part of the design/manufacturing team of bicycle company once I complete my education, and working in a shop now is a great start.


Education

I am now attending Salt Lake Community College and am expecting to graduate in June of 2017 with an Associates of Pre-Engineering.

I have a current GPA of 3.3 and am taking summer courses. I plan to take another 17 credit hours this fall semester, with more rigorous

courses. Once I achieve my degree from SLCC, I intend to further my education at the University of Utah for Mechanical Engineering.



Related Work Experience

Manufacturing Engineer

Field of Armor Tanks LLC







January 2016 Present
th
This is a local company that specializes in producing 1/6
model Tanks from WWII. I am currently in charge of the manufacturing of

all of the products made in house. This includes metal spin casting and resin casting. Typically, new molds are made each week to

support the production of new parts. I am also the supervisor of shipping operations and complete the invoices and customs forms.



Ski Rental Technician

Brighton Ski Resort // 8303 South Brighton Loop Drive, Brighton, UT





November 2012 April 2015

I have three years of experience adjusting and tuning skis. Working in a ski shop requires good customer service and quick thinking.
An attention to detail is a must in an industry where injuries present themselves daily. During busy times, it requires the whole shop

to work quickly, efficiently, and as a team. I have developed great leadership and team working skills from this position.



Coffee Barista

Starbucks // 77 West 10600 South, Sandy, UT



November 2015 - June 2016

Working in a coffee shop has given me drink experience and also taught me how to please a customer. Waking up at 4 AM was almost

an everyday occurrence while working here. Creating the perfect cup of coffee is an art and takes time to perfect. You develop a deep
relationship with many of the customers since they tend to be regulars.


Skills

Supervising Experience
Applications include; Word, Excel, PowerPoint,
Premier Pro, Photoshop, MatLab
Effective time management and organization

Website Construction
A quick learner and problem solver

summerofdeath.com
Self-disciplined and driven

hunterbernstein.weebly.com
Team player


Overview and Knowledge

Throughout my life I have constructed different personal and work related projects. I am familiar with fiberglass and various types of
metals, epoxies, resins, RTV silicones, rubbers, and catalysts. I recently completed a bicycle stand that I intend to use when tinkering

with my bikes. Dismantling and reassembling things comes second nature for me.



References


Other Work Experience

Loic Anthian // Field of Armor Tanks LLC.801-815-0677


Jane Hwang // Backcountry.com801-828-7499
Mike Corrigan // Brighton Ski Resort..801-599-5370

Page 14