Black couples took

pride in being first
to wed in D.C.
By JOEY DiGUGLIELMO
jdiguglielmo@washblade.com
On the eve of this weekend’s
Black Pride festivities, the Blade
checked in with two of the first
same-sex couples who wed here
in March to find out how they’re
doing now that the hoopla has
subsided, how they’ve fared as
gay or lesbian couples among
their black friends and families,
and get their thoughts on the
importance of Black Pride.
Three of the first couples to wed
in Washington on March 9, the first
Black Pride
weekend
Jeffrey Richardson
among this year’s
honorees; full
schedule of events.
PAGE 27
national
news
Gov. Martin O'Malley
offends audience of
wealthy gay donors while
seeking their support.
PAGE 12
local
news
Trial of 3 gay men
continues in Wone
case, as interrogation
video is played in court.
PAGE 8
the lgbtq community news source
washingtonblade.com • vol. 41, issue 22 • may 28, 2010 • Still sharp after 40 years
‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’
compromise draws
mixed reactions 
By CHRIS JOHNSON
cjohnson@washblade.com
Editor’s note: House and
Senate votes on repeal of ‘Don’t
Ask, Don’t Tell’ were expected after
the Blade’s print deadline. Visit
washingtonblade.com for updates.
The legislative compromise
that “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” repeal
supporters in Congress unveiled
this week has inspired mixed
reactions and led LGBT leaders
to advocate for its passage even
as some expressed disappoint-
ment over its shortcomings.
Among those expressing dis-
pleasure was Lt. Dan Choi, a gay
U.S. Army infantry soldier who was
arrested twice for chaining himself
to the White House fence in
protest of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”
In an interview with the Blade
on Monday, Choi said the pro-
posal requires LGBT people to
compromise themselves without
getting much in return.
“In a compromise, it’s insinuated
that both sides have given some-
thing, and I don’t see that,” he said.
“So it’s too generous to call it that.
It’s a delay and it’s asking us to fur-
ther put our political agenda before
the needs of the soldiers, and that’s
who’s getting compromised.”
Despite his disappointment in
the compromise language, Choi
said he didn’t want the measure to
fail this week when it came before
Congress. He noted that “it’s only
one step” in the path for non-dis-
crimination in the U.S. military and
people should keep fighting.
Newly out singer Chely Wright joins Capital Pride lineup. Page 6
localnews
Black Pride’s Earl Fowlkes answers 20 questions. Page 28
socialagenda
Revs. Darlene Garner (left) and Candy Holmes were married March 9
at the Human Rights Campaign headquarters.
Photo by Joe Tresh
Looking back on the hoopla
Mission accomplished or another setback?
President Barack Obama’s administration endorsed Monday a path to repeal the law that prohibits gays,
lesbians and bisexuals from serving openly in the U.S. armed forces. But some criticized the compromise
because it lacks a non-discrimination provision.
Photo by Pete Souza; courtesy of White House
Continues on page 14
Continues on page 18
2 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 3
Jack Keegel, 68
John Jack Keegel, a longtime
D.C. resident and professor of
mathematics at the University of
the District of Columbia for near-
ly 35 years, died of cancer May
11 at his home in Boynton
Beach, Fla. He was 68.
With a specialty in statistics
and statistical analysis, Keegel
played a lead role for more than
20 years in designing and direct-
ing an annual, federally mandated
study of seatbelt usage by drivers
in the District of Columbia.
The D.C. Department of
Transportation retained Keegel
to organize the study with the
help of student interns at UDC
and others, who methodically
observed whether drivers travel-
ing along various D.C. streets
wore their seatbelts. Although he
retired as a professor in 2004, he
continued to conduct the seat-
belt study through 2009, when
his findings showed a 93 percent
seatbelt usage by D.C. drivers,
according to UDC Professor
Eugene Shiro, who assisted
Keegel in the study.
Keegel’s friends said they and
his UDC colleagues became
inspired and moved in 1995 over
Keegel’s devotion to his domes-
tic partner of 24 years, Edward
Levine, who was hospitalized in
critical condition while awaiting a
heart transplant. They said
Keegel juggled his teaching
schedule to make time each day
to drive from the District to
Fairfax Hospital, where he spent
part of the day with Levine for
nearly two months before Levine
died while waiting for a replace-
ment heart that never arrived.
During Levine’s hospital stay,
he and Keegel agreed to
become the subject of a feature
story in the Washington Blade,
becoming the first known same-
sex couple to publicly share their
experiences in grappling with the
uncertainty of a hoped for heart
transplant.
Keegel was born in Jersey City,
N.J. and was raised in Rahway,
N.J. He received a bachelor’s
degree in 1963 from Rutgers
University and his master’s degree
in 1966 from the University of
Delaware, both in mathematics.
He received a doctorate degree in
statistics in 1975 from George
Washington University.
Keegel served as a statisti-
cian with the National Institutes
of Health from 1966 to 1969 and
worked as a statistical consultant
to a contracting company provid-
ing services to the U.S. Postal
Service from 1968 to 1969. He
began his tenure as a mathemat-
ics professor at UDC in 1969.
While at UDC, he worked as a
statistical consultant during the
summer months for a number of
outside consulting firms. In the
summer of 1979 he served as a
lecturer at the NATO Advanced
Statistics Institute in Urbino, Italy.
Keegel also is the author or co-
author of at least nine books or
book chapters on statistics and
statistical analysis.
Upon his retirement, he
retained his home in D.C. while
spending winters in Boynton
Beach, Fla.
Keegel was preceeded in death
by Levine, his domestic partner of
24 years. Survivors include a for-
mer domestic partner, Brian Lee;
his father, John Keegel; a step-
mother, Margo Keegel; several
cousins; and many longtime
friends in Florida and D.C.
Plans to celebrate Keegel’s life
in Florida and D.C. are pending.
LOU CHIBBARO JR.
4 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
LOCALNEWS
OBITUARY
Lesbian named president
of Montgomery College
DeRionne Pollard, a lesbian
who has served as California
Community College’s president
since 2008, has been named
president of Montgomery
College, a community college
in Montgomery County, Md.
The college’s board of trustees
announced her appointment May
18, saying Pollard, 39, was cho-
sen following a nationwide search
and a review of more than 50
applicants. She holds a doctorate
degree in educational leadership
and policy studies.
“Throughout the search
process, Dr. Pollard impressed
both the board and the search
advisory committee by her passion and devotion to the advance-
ment of the community college mission and the students we
serve,” the board said in a statement.
In its announcement of her appointment, the board noted that
Pollard and her domestic partner of more than 20 years, Robyn Jones,
“are the proud parents of a 3-year-old son, Myles Julian Pollard-Jones.”
Pollard is the first known black lesbian to be named president
of a U.S. college. Earlier this year, Grinnell College of Iowa
named National Institutes of Health deputy director and physi-
cian Raynard Kington as its president, making him the nation’s
first known black openly gay college president.
“I am thankful and truly honored that the board of trustees
selected me as the next president of Montgomery College,”
Pollard said. “I am impressed with the caliber of the faculty, staff,
administrators and students at Montgomery College.”
The Washington Post reported that Pollard’s predecessor,
Brian Johnson, was removed as president following allegations
of overspending and “lapses in management.” The Post said fac-
ulty and staff at the college were looking forward to Pollard’s
leadership after a tumultuous nine months of tension leading up
to Johnson’s forced resignation.
Faculty and staff rose to their feet and greeted her with pro-
longed applause when she was introduced to them at an audito-
rium last week at the college’s Rockville, Md., campus.
LOU CHIBBARO JR.
Realtors approve LGBT
non-discrimination policy
The Professional Standards Committee of the National
Association of Realtors voted unanimously May 13 in Washington,
D.C., to approve a policy prohibiting the denial of real estate-relat-
ed services to someone based on his or her sexual orientation.
The action was proposed last year by the National Association
of Gay & Lesbian Real Estate Professionals, which works closely
with NAR, according to a statement by the gay group.
It calls for amending NAR’s code of ethics to add the term
sexual orientation to a litany of other protected classes.
The amended policy, if ratified as expected by the NAR’s del-
egate body in November, would say, “Realtors shall not deny
equal professional services to any person for reasons of race,
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin or
sexual orientation.”
The proposal would also change the code of ethics to say,
“Realtors shall not be parties to any plan or agreement to dis-
criminate against a person or persons on the basis of race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin or sexual
orientation.” It additionally says that Realtors or real estate firms
shall not engage in discrimination based on the same litany of
categories in employment practices for their offices.
If the delegate body gives final approval to the policy change,
the change would take effect Jan. 1.
LOU CHIBBARO JR.
Stonewall Democrats name Capital Champions
National Stonewall Democrats honored U.S. Rep. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wisc.), AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka
and Frank Kameny, a longtime gay civil rights activist, May 20 during an event in the AFL-CIO headquarters in D.C.
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
DeRionne Pollard is the new
president of Montgomery
College in Maryland.
Photo courtesy of Montgomery College
Photo courtesy of Brian Lee
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 5
Gabriela Fernandez-Coffey and Tim Getman; Photo by Stan Barouh
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The Gertrude Stein Democratic
Club on Monday passed over the
incumbent D.C. “shadow” member
of the U.S. House of
Representatives, whom it backed
in the last two elections, and
instead endorsed a little-known
challenger for the ceremonial post.
In receiving 60.8 percent of the
vote, challenger Nate Bennett-
Fleming barely surpassed the
required 60 percent threshold for
obtaining the club’s endorsement,
becoming the first non-incumbent
to win the Stein backing this year.
He beat incumbent Mike Pannetta,
who the club endorsed in his 2006
and 2008 bids for the shadow seat.
“Tonight’s vote reflects a shift
that I believe is happening within
the District of Columbia, where we
have younger voices standing up
to take leadership,” said Jeffrey
Richardson, the Stein Club’s pres-
ident. “Nate Bennett-Fleming
clearly has the support of his
peers and a strong bloc of LGBT
activists from across the city.”
D.C. voters approved the cre-
ation of one “shadow” U.S. House
seat and two “shadow” U.S.
Senate seats in a ballot initiative
in the 1980s as part of their sup-
port for a D.C. statehood constitu-
tion. The positions have no pow-
ers or authority in Congress and
don’t come with a salary.
Backers of D.C. statehood
said they modeled the positions
after other U.S. territories that
created shadow congressional
positions when they applied for
statehood in the 1800s. People
in the positions generally lobby
Congress to approve D.C. as the
nation’s 51st state and give the
city budgetary autonomy and full
voting rights in Congress.
Bennet-Fleming and Pannetta
each expressed support for LGBT
rights, including support for the
city’s same-sex marriage law.
In a separate development, the
club voted Monday to endorse the
re-election bids of D.C. City Council
members Mary Cheh (D-Ward 3)
and Tommy Wells (D-Ward 6). The
two are running unopposed in the
September primary.
LOU CHIBBARO JR.
Police in Montgomery County,
Md., announced the arrest last
week of a fourth suspect charged
in the murder of gay D.C. middle
school principal Brian Betts.
Joel Johnson, 19, whose
address could not be confirmed,
was apprehended by D.C. police
at 5:30 p.m. May 18 along the 100
block of Ivanhoe Street, S.W.,
according to a police statement.
The statement from Montgomery
County police says he was charged
with one count of first-degree mur-
der, one count of armed robbery and
three counts of conspiracy to com-
mit first-degree murder. He was
being held at the D.C. jail pending
extradition proceedings that would
move him to Montgomery County.
Betts, 42, was found shot to
death April 15 in an upper floor bed-
room in his house in Silver Spring,
Md. Earlier this month, police arrest-
ed Sharif Lancaster, Alante
Saunders, and Deontra Gray —
each 18 years old — on first-degree
murder and armed robbery charges
in connection with the Betts murder.
Police also charged Artura Otey
Williams, 46, the mother of Lancaster,
with receiving and using a credit card
stolen from Betts by the three men
charged in the murder.
Police said Betts met one or
more of the three teens charged
with his murder through a tele-
phone sex chat line. Betts
became the second D.C. area
gay man to be murdered and at
least the third to be attacked and
robbed by someone they met
through an Internet or phone
chat line since last December.
Gays & Lesbians Opposing
Violence recently issued alerts
urging people to use caution when
meeting strangers through social
networking venues such as the
Internet or phone chat lines.
LOU CHIBBARO JR.
6 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
LOCALNEWS
Lead entertainers cancel
Pride appearances
The lead entertainers scheduled to perform at D.C.’s Capital
Pride and Black Pride festivals abruptly cancelled their appear-
ances last week, prompting organizers to scramble to rearrange
their programs.
D.C. born and nation-
ally recognized rapper
Wale informed Black
Pride organizers by e-
mail last week that he
backed out of his May 30
appearance at the D.C.
Convention Center for the
Black Pride annual festi-
val because he was
uncomfortable perform-
ing at a gay event.
Shortly thereafter,
singer and actress Mya,
who was scheduled to
perform June 13 at the
Capital Pride festival, dis-
closed that complications
associated with recent
foot surgery would prevent her from appearing at that event.
“While we are sad to learn that Mya will be unable to entertain
at Capital Pride due to medical reasons, we wish her a speedy
recovery,” said Dyana Mason, Capital Pride’s executive director.
Replacing Mya is country singer Chely Wright, who recently
came out as lesbian. Wright, who’s best known for her songs
“Jezabel” and “Single White Female,” is scheduled to perform at
Capital Pride on June 13.
Earl Fowlkes, a board member and spokesperson for Black Pride,
said organizers were able to book nationally known rhythm and blues
singer J. Holiday as a replacement for Wale. Holiday, 25 and a D.C.
native, is best known for his 2007 hit song “Bed,” which rose to the No.
1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, according to Billboard Magazine.
Wale, 25, became a nationally recognized rapper in 2006,
when his song “Dig Dug (Shake It)” caught the eye of a record
company producer who arranged for a wider distribution of his
music. Among other things, he has performed on MTV and
appeared recently on the David Letterman Show.
Fowlkes said Black Pride organizers were startled last week when
they received two e-mails from Wale’s agent, one saying the rapper had
to cancel due to “family obligations,” and the second saying he didn’t
know Black Pride was a gay-related event when he agreed to appear.
“We were clear about what kind of event this is,” Fowlkes told
the Blade. “After doing this for 20 years, we certainly don’t want
to put ourselves and the artist in an uncomfortable situation by
not telling them what we are.
“We’re Black Gay Pride, and the people coming out there are
members of our community,” he said. “We made that very clear.”
Fowlkes said Black Pride officials believe homophobia was the
underlying reason that Wale cancelled his appearance. He noted
that Wale’s agent has refunded an advance fee that Black Pride
made to book the rapper, but the group is considering taking legal
action for what Fowlkes described as a breach of contract.
“What was important to us on our 20th year is we really wanted to
break some new ground,” Fowlkes said. “And one of the things we
wanted was a male black artist. We always had female artists and
we’ve never really had a male black heterosexual identified artist.”
He said organizers carefully vetted Wale, whose music is pop-
ular within the black LGBT community, for any signs of anti-gay
themes in his lyrics and statements, and none were found.
Jeffrey Richardson, president of the Gertrude Stein
Democratic Club and one of the local black LGBT leaders sched-
uled to be honored at this year’s Black Pride events, called
Wale’s cancellation a sign that the LGBT community still has a
long way to go to overcome prejudice.
“This is pure homophobia on his part,” Richardson said. “This
reflects the feelings of the broader community. For a lot of folks,
the biggest fear is of being labeled as gay. It’s a stigma we still
have a lot of work to do to overcome.”
LOU CHIBBARO JR.
Stein Club endorses challenger
in ‘shadow’ U.S. House race
Fourth suspect arrested for gay principal’s slaying
GLAAD launches D.C. council
The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation launched its D.C. leadership council with an event May 25 at
the Mitchell Gold & Bob Williams store on 14th Street. Speakers included Jarrod Chalpowski of the Human Rights
Campaign, Alex Nicholson of Servicemembers United, and Tony Varona and Jessica Katz of GLAAD.
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
Wale, a rapper and D.C. native,
backed out of performing at this year’s
Black Pride. Organizers said homo-
phobia is to blame.
Photo courtesy of Interscope Records
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 7
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Gay defendants insist
intruder is to blame
By LOU CHIBBARO JR.
lchibbaro@washblade.com
As the conspiracy trial continued this
week for three gay men implicated in the
2006 murder of Washington lawyer Robert
Wone, it remained unclear whether the men
would take the witness stand to testify.
But defendants Joseph Price and
Dylan Ward effectively appeared as virtu-
al witnesses Monday and Tuesday as
prosecutors showed in the courtroom a
police video of homicide detectives ques-
tioning the men about the murder.
The interrogations took place in the
early morning hours of Aug. 3, 2006, a
few hours after Wone was found stabbed
to death in a second-floor guest room at
Price, Ward and Victor Zaborsky’s
upscale townhouse on Swann Street,
N.W., near Dupont Circle.
“At no time did Price appear very emo-
tional or upset,” reported Craig Brownstein,
a writer with the Who Murdered Robert
Wone blog, which described Price’s
responses to questions by two detectives
sitting beside him in the interrogation room.
Brownstein reported that Ward
watched the video intently while sitting
behind the defense table, but Price
looked straight ahead at the lawyers and
never looked at the video.
The men have been charged with
obstruction of justice, conspiracy to
obstruct justice and evidence tampering.
If convicted on all three counts, they face
a possible maximum sentence of 38
years in prison. No one has been charged
with Wone’s murder.
Transcripts of the videotaped interro-
gations of Price and Ward show that
detectives repeatedly challenged their
claim that an unidentified intruder killed
Wone after entering their house from a
rear door while they were asleep in their
respective bedrooms.
Wone’s wife testified last week that her
husband, a longtime friend of Price from
their days as students at the College of
William & Mary, spent the night at the men’s
house after working late at his nearby office.
The detectives noted that they found no
evidence of a forced entry into the house.
They said nothing was taken or disturbed,
including valuable items in clear view on
the first floor, including a flat screen televi-
sion. Why would an intruder presumably
arriving to burglarize the house bypass
expensive items, go upstairs, walk past
Ward’s bedroom and enter the room
where Wone was sleeping and stab him,
the detectives wanted to know.
“I understand it doesn’t make sense,”
Ward told them.
Defense attorneys, including gay for-
mer D.C. Attorney General Robert
Spagnoletti, asked the detectives during
their cross examination whether investi-
gators and prosecutors “jumped to con-
clusions” that the three men were impli-
cated in the murder because of their sex-
ual orientation and their three-way
romantic relationship.
The defense has repeatedly referred to
Det. Sgt. Daniel Wager’s questioning of Price
about why Wone, whose family says he was
straight, wanted to stay at their house.
“I got three homosexuals in a house
and one straight guy,” he told Price in the
interrogation room. “What is he doing
there?” Wagner added, “I think you were
all drinking wine and you know what’s
going to happen tonight.”
Price responded by calling what he con-
sidered Wagner’s suggestion that the gay
housemates were interested in a sexual
encounter with Wone as being “insulting.”
Spagnoletti and defense attorneys
David Schertler and Bernard Grimm each
pressed the detectives in cross examina-
tion about whether they pursued other sce-
narios in the investigation, including Price’s
claim that other people such as contractors
had keys to the men’s house. Grimm
repeatedly asked Wagner whether his
approach to the investigation was shaped
by his “attitudes” toward homosexuals.
The detectives replied that, after what
they called a thorough assessment of the
evidence, they concluded that no intruder
entered the house on the night of the murder.
Police and prosecutors say they have
evidence showing the three men delayed
calling 911 to report the stabbing and
appeared to have tampered with the
crime scene and covered up evidence to
protect the killer. Prosecutors say they
believe one or all three of the men know
the killer’s identity.
Defense attorneys say they will show
that police botched the investigation by fail-
ing to pursue and identify the intruder that
the defense says murdered Robert Wone.
The trial is expected to continue for at
least another three weeks. Judge Lynn
Leibovitz, who is presiding over the trial,
will decide the defendants’ guilt or inno-
cence following their decision to give up
their right to a jury trial.
8 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
LOCALNEWS
Wone trial video shows
interrogation of Price, Ward
Defense attorney Bernard Grimm, who
represents Joseph Price, asked a detective
in court whether his approach to the mur-
der investigation was shaped by his ‘atti-
tudes’ toward homosexuals.
Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key
The Palisades
Community Church
Celebrating
86 Years of Diversity
BriAN MerriTT Pastor
5200 Cathedral Ave., N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20016
202-966-7929
brianmerritt@mac.com | thepalisadeschurch.com
DIRECTORY
Wedding
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 9
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8148 Electric Avenue
Vienna, VA 22182
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jonna.wooten.loy3@statefarm.com
Like a Good Neighbor, state farm is there.
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statefarm.com
®
Job bias bill remains
pending in committee
By CHRIS JOHNSON
cjohnson@washblade.com
Local activists seeking an end
to job discrimination against LGBT
people protested last week outside
the U.S. Capitol, urging Congress
to take action on the issue.
Holding signs reading, “I can
still be fired for being me” and “1
in 7 LGBTQ face job discrimina-
tion,” about one dozen protesters
marched along Independence
Avenue on May 20 to demand
passage of the Employment
Non-Discrimination Act.
The bill, pending in committee
in both chambers of Congress,
would bar job bias based on sex-
ual orientation and gender iden-
tity in most private and public
workforce settings.
Supporters have said for
months they’re expecting immi-
nent action on the bill, but it has
yet to move out of committee in
either the House or Senate.
Jay Carmona, a D.C. lesbian,
led much of the protest by shout-
ing chants into a bullhorn. She said
the protest was held because law-
makers made several promises on
ENDA and now Democrats are
“silent” on those promises.
“This is something that is real-
ly, really important, especially in
these tough economic times,”
Carmona said. “We can’t afford
longer unemployment lines
because people are being fired
just because of their gender
expression or their sexuality.”
Brad Catoe, a gay D.C. resi-
dent, said he wants to see ENDA
pass because it’s “important for
everybody to be treated equally
under the law.”
Catoe, whose partner, Brian
Fricke, is a gay former Marine
and board member of the
Servicemembers Legal Defense
Network, said passage of ENDA
and repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t
Tell” are particularly important
issues for him.
“Obviously, ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’
is important to me firstly because
my partner was in the Marines, but I
think that the Employment Non-
Discrimination Act is also very
important to our entire community,”
Catoe said. “They’re sort of con-
nected in a lot of ways.”
Last week’s protest got the
attention of some people work-
ing on Capitol Hill. A Democratic
aide told the Blade the action
alerted several officials in the
Cannon House Building, includ-
ing Rep. Pete Stark (D-Calif.).
Still, it was unclear when the
House might take action. Federal
lawmakers are taking a week off fol-
lowing the Memorial Day holiday.
Organizing the event was
GetEqual, the group responsible
for several recent protests and
rallies in D.C. and elsewhere that
have drawn attention to LGBT
issues. Although previous
GetEqual events have included
arrests, nobody was detained
during the May 20 protest.
Heather Cronk, managing direc-
tor for GetEqual, said last week’s
protest was intended to “give visibil-
ity” to LGBT people and their need
for workplace protections.
“While other groups are lobby-
ing and doing phone calls and
doing e-mails, we also make
sure that we’re feeling visible in
that process,” she said.
Cronk, a lesbian who lives in
Riverdale, Md., said passing ENDA
is important because LGBT people
“are one of the few groups left that
are not protected by federal law.”
“We can continue working on a
local and a statewide level, but folks
in middle states who can be fired for
who they are need protection at the
federal level, so we’re standing up
for those folks today,” Cronk said.
Much of the protest was
directed at U.S. House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). At one
point, protesters gathered just
outside Pelosi’s office in the
Cannon House Office Building
and shouted, “Nancy Pelosi! We
want ENDA!”
In an interview with The Hill
newspaper last week, Pelosi said
she’s supported passage of ENDA
for decades and feels the pending
bill is strongly positioned, but
expressed some uncertainty about
moving forward.
“When the opportunity is
there, we want to bring that up,
and I hope that will be soon,” she
said. “We’ll see what people
want to do. It’s not my own per-
sonal decision. We’ll just see
where we go from here.”
Supporters of ENDA have
expressed concern that oppo-
nents could use a legislative
maneuver known as the motion
to recommit to scuttle the bill
when it comes to the floor. The
maneuver could force a vote on
stripping the gender identity pro-
visions from the legislation.
June committee
meeting to consider
policy change
By CHRIS JOHNSON
cjohnson@washblade.com
The Food & Drug Administration is
starting a review process that
could end the longstanding policy
prohibiting gay and bisexual men
from donating blood, according to
the Federal Register.
A notice published earlier this
month says the Department of
Health & Human Services has
scheduled a meeting next month
of the Advisory Committee on
Blood Safety & Availability to dis-
cuss the issue. The committee is
charged with providing recom-
mendations to HHS on blood
supply and blood products.
The meeting, which is open to
the public, is set to take place at the
Universities of Shady Grove in
Rockville, Md. Discussion is sched-
uled over the course of two days,
June 10-11. The meetings on both
days are set for 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Fred Sainz, a Human Rights
Campaign vice president and
spokesperson, said the meeting “will
determine whether or not the blood
ban is repealed and what conditions,
if any, would apply going forward.”
The FDA instituted the blood
donor ban in 1983 in response to the
AIDS crisis. The policy prohibits any
man who’s had sex even once with
another man since 1977 from donat-
ing blood. At the time, the policy
was deemed necessary because
gay and bisexual men have a higher
rate of HIV/AIDS infection.
LGBT rights supporters have
been seeking to overturn the ban
on the grounds that it unfairly tar-
gets gay and bisexual men —
and that testing procedures for
HIV/AIDS have improved signifi-
cantly since 1983.
According to the Federal
Register notice, the committee will
consider “the most important fac-
tors … to consider in making a
policy change” as well as whether
current scientific information is
sufficient to support ending the
policy, and what studies and safe-
ty measures are needed before a
change takes place.
In a statement last week,
HRC President Joe Solmonese
called on the FDA to end
the blood donor ban, noting that
the policy “cannot be justified by
today’s science.”
“In 2010, we cannot continue to
turn away healthy donors based
on outdated stereotypes and a
decades-old understanding of HIV
and AIDS,” Solmonese said.
The HRC statement says that
the organization plans to testify
at the hearing and send a letter
with an allied organization to
urge a revision to FDA policy.
In a statement, Laurie Young,
interim director of public policy and
government affairs for the National
Gay & Lesbian Task Force, said
the re-examination of the gay
blood donor ban is “long overdue.”
“The lifetime ban was initiated in
1983, at the beginning of the AIDS
crisis,” she said. “Nearly 30 years
later, the science has changed but
the outdated policy remains.”
Young said the re-examination
of the policy should “take into
account” new disease screening
techniques for blood donations,
and “distinguish between high-risk
and low-risk behavior in donors.”
In recent months, efforts to lift
the ban have become more visi-
ble as many lawmakers have
publicly urged the FDA to
change its policy. In March, Sen.
John Kerry (D-Mass.) and 17
other senators wrote a letter to
the FDA asking for an end to the
ban, calling it “outdated, medical-
ly and scientifically unsound
deferral criteria for prospective
blood donors.”
In a statement to the Blade
this week, Kerry said the admin-
istration “is doing the right
thing” by re-examining the ban.
“I believe the ban strikes
everyone as outdated based on
the science,” he said. “It’s a relic
and it doesn’t make sense, espe-
cially compared to other policies
we have in place.”
Kerry noted that under current
regulations, a man who’s had
sex with a prostitute is able to
donate blood, but a gay man in a
committed monogamous rela-
tionship is prohibited.
“That just doesn’t make sense
to me on its face,” he said. “I look
forward to hearing the results of
this meeting as well as the FDA’s
recommendations.”
10 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
NATIONALNEWS
Protesters again demand ENDA passage
FDA to review gay blood donor ban policy
Protesters on Capitol Hill last week called on Congress to pass the
Employment Non-Discrimination Act.
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 11
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Maryland governor,
looking for donations,
offends high-profile
contributors
By LOU CHIBBARO JR.
lchibbaro@washblade.com
A controversial appearance by
Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley
prompted participants in a closed-
door conference of wealthy LGBT
political donors, held May 15-16 in
Chicago, to breach a strict a confi-
dentiality policy after he told the
gathering he favors civil unions
over same-sex marriage.
O’Malley was one of at least
four U.S. governors invited to
address the annual Political
OutGiving conference, a highly
confidential event for a network of
more than 200 big-stakes LGBT
contributors to political campaigns.
The network is operated by
the Denver-based Gill Action
Fund, which was founded in
2006 by gay entrepreneur and
multimillionaire Tim Gill.
Members of the network are
warned that violating the confi-
dentiality policy could result in
their expulsion.
But several participants, speak-
ing on condition that they not be
identified, ignored the warnings
and informed the Blade about an
exchange between O’Malley and
Julie Goodridge, the lesbian plain-
tiff in the Massachusetts lawsuit
that led to the legalization of same-
sex marriage in that state.
Goodridge reportedly interrupt-
ed O’Malley and told him that he
appeared to be talking about civil
unions the way people did in the
early 2000s, according to multiple
sources that attended the event.
“It’s 2010,” the sources quoted
Goodridge as saying. It’s totally
unacceptable to be pushing civil
unions in a state like Maryland at
this time when full marriage
equality is gaining momentum
among voters, sources para-
phrased Goodridge as saying.
Three people present during
the exchange said the audience
applauded Goodridge for her
comments.
They said O’Malley, who
expressed support for LGBT rights,
replied that voters in his state aren’t
ready for gay marriage. But a
recent Washington Post poll found
for the first time that more
Marylanders now support same-
sex marriage than oppose it.
Joanne Kron, a spokesperson
for Gill Action Fund, said in an e-
mail that the group would not com-
ment on the Goodridge-O’Malley
exchange because “we don’t dis-
cuss the Political OutGiving confer-
ence, which is a private event.”
“Political OutGiving is a focused,
bipartisan state-based strategy
that concentrates on delivering
resources from dedicated and gen-
erous donors to select campaigns
in a limited number of states,” Kron
said in her e-mail.
“Political OutGiving started in
2006 when hundreds of donors
contributed around $3 million to
targeted campaigns aimed at pro-
tecting or increasing the number of
pro-LGBT supporters in state leg-
islatures,” she said. “Political
OutGiving similarly engaged in
elections in 2008 and will be
involved in campaigns in 2010.”
Goodridge did not return calls
Tuesday seeking comment on
her interaction with O’Malley.
Rick Abbruzzese, a spokesper-
son for O’Malley’s re-election cam-
paign, said O’Malley flew to Chicago
to attend the OutGiving conference
May 15, after presenting the winning
trophy at Baltimore’s annual
Preakness horse racing event.
“The governor’s position has
been clear on this issue and con-
sistent — that he does support
civil unions and that he felt we
could have reached a consensus
within the Maryland General
Assembly to move the issue of
civil unions forward,” Abbruzzese
said. “He has not supported gay
marriage in the past.”
But O’Malley once favored
same-sex marriage. He privately
told LGBT supporters in 2006
and 2007 in e-mails and during
meetings that he supported civil
marriage rights for gay couples,
before the state’s high court
ruled against such rights. And he
once told a Baltimore television
station that he backed civil mar-
riage rights for gays.
Sources familiar with the
OutGiving conference, which was
held in Chicago’s upscale
Peninsula Hotel, said O’Malley was
joined at the event by Democratic
Govs. Chet Culver of Iowa, John
Lynch of New Hampshire, and
Edward Rendell of Pennsylvania.
Also attending were Democratic
Lt. Gov. Diane Denish of New
Mexico, who is running for governor,
Chicago Mayor Richard Daley, and
U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy (D-Pa.).
Attendees said a session in
which O’Malley, Denish and other
panelists participated was moder-
ated by gay journalist Jonathan
Capehart, an editorial writer for the
Washington Post. Capehart could
not immediately be reached for
comment. Sources familiar with
the event said Capehart, like most
other participants in the event,
agreed to keep his role and the
meeting itself off the record.
Due to OutGiving’s confidentiali-
ty policy, it could not be determined
whether the Gill Action Fund, which
operates the donor network, would
give support to O’Malley, who is
being challenged this year by
Republican former Gov. Robert
Ehrlich. O’Malley defeated Ehrlich
in 2006, and political insiders are
predicting a close race between the
two rivals this year.
Morgan Meneses-Sheets, exec-
utive director of Equality Maryland,
a non-partisan statewide LGBT
group, said that while the group is
disappointed in O’Malley’s support
for civil unions over same-sex mar-
riage, he has repeatedly pledged to
sign a same-sex marriage bill
should it reach his desk.
By contrast, Meneses-Sheets
pointed to Ehrlich’s decision to veto
during his tenure as Maryland gov-
ernor a limited domestic partner-
ship bill that called for giving hospi-
tal visitation rights to same-sex
partners and medical decision-
making authority for an incapacitat-
ed partner. She said Ehrlich has
expressed opposition to same-sex
marriage and, unlike O’Malley,
could be expected to veto a mar-
riage bill passed by the legislature.
Meneses-Sheets said that
although pushing a same-sex mar-
riage bill through the legislature next
year would be a “challenge,” she and
her Equality Maryland colleagues
are hopeful that members of the
State Senate who have blocked
advancement of the bill will be
defeated in the November election.
“We have a plan in place and
we’re working on all of the pieces
it will take to get a win,” she said.
“This is not a pie in the sky.”
Other LGBT activists in the state
have expressed concern that
O’Malley’s pledge to sign a marriage
bill rings hollow because he refuses
to use his political influence to push
wavering lawmakers to back a mar-
riage measure. Some activists said
they doubt the November election,
in which all members of the legisla-
ture come up before the voters, will
result in enough new supporters to
pass a marriage bill.
‘Moneyed gay people
making things happen’
Although Gill Action’s Political
OutGiving has been the subject
of media coverage, including
coverage in the LGBT press, the
exchange between Goodridge
and O’Malley appears to have
triggered for the first time discus-
sion and questions among mem-
bers of the donor network about
the need for the secrecy
imposed by Gill Action’s leaders.
In response to the Blade’s
inquiries about the Chicago con-
ference, Gill Action Fund’s execu-
tive director, Patrick Guerriero, and
its deputy executive director, Bill
Smith, sent a joint e-mail to net-
work donors Tuesday urging them
not to speak with the media.
“Doing really important work
often attracts the media and we’ve
been informed that a reporter is
buzzing about the 2010 Political
OutGiving conference,” the two
said in their e-mail. “As you know,
the event is private and participant
attendance is confidential.”
Smith, who heads the Gill Action
Fund’s Washington office, is a for-
mer aide to Bush administration
official Karl Rove. Smith told the
Advocate in a 2008 interview that
pragmatic and sometimes hard-hit-
ting tactics employed by Rove can
be used by Gill Action for the
advancement of LGBT equality.
“We’re not afraid to learn from
anyone across the political spec-
trum who’s doing really smart
work, be it EMILY’s List or
GOPAC,” Smith told the Advocate.
EMILY’s List is a Democratic, liber-
al leaning group pushing for women’s
rights that’s credited with helping elect
Democrats to Congress. GOPAC is a
Republican political action commit-
tee said to be responsible for help-
ing Republicans win control of
Congress during the 1990s.
Guerriero is a former Republican
state legislator from Massachusetts
and former president of the national
gay partisan group Log Cabin
Republicans.
Guerriero and Smith have said
in the past that Gill Action Fund
assesses candidates running for
public office to determine whether
they should be supported or
opposed. It then sends its recom-
mendations to its “top secret”
donor list, according to one source
familiar with the group.
The donors make individual con-
tributions to the recommended can-
didates. The system makes it diffi-
cult to measure which candidates
are benefiting from the gay network.
Although the names of con-
tributors must be reported to the
Federal Election Commission,
which makes its reports available
for public inspection, reviewing
FEC records would be useless
for identifying OutGiving donors
because Gill Action Fund never
releases their names.
“The fact that it’s being kept out
of the public eye — that’s bad
news,” said Bill Dobbs, a New York
gay rights attorney and activist.
“It’s too much wheeling and deal-
ing behind closed doors.”
One of the OutGiving donors
who spoke to the Blade on condi-
tion of anonymity disagreed with
the strict confidentiality policy.
“I think part of it is they don’t want to
run the risk that there would be stories
that these rich gay people get together
and push their agenda and it’s the
moneyed gay people that are making
things happen,” the donor said.
But the donor said the donations
were helping the LGBT civil rights
movement in the long run by send-
ing more supportive lawmakers to
Congress and the state legislatures.
Sources who attended the
Political OutGiving conference said
that in addition to the donors, a num-
ber of prominent officials with other
LGBT rights groups attended the
event. Among them were Evan
Wolfson, executive director of the
same-sex marriage advocacy group
Freedom to Marry; Steve Elmendorf,
a gay former congressional staffer
and Washington political consultant;
Mary Breslauer, a Boston-based
consultant for the Human Rights
Campaign; Chuck Wolfe and Robin
Brand, director and deputy director
of the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund;
and Matt Foreman, former National
Gay & Lesbian Task Force director
and a current official with the
Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund,
which awards grants to LGBT
organizations and causes.
12 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
NATIONALNEWS
Rare peek behind closed doors of secret gay donor confab
Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley told a group of 200 LGBT donors that he
supports civil unions over marriage rights for same-sex couples.
Photo courtesy of Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell’s oofice
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 13
703 D St NW
Washington, DC
202-628-1288
1221 Mass Ave NW*
Washington, DC
202-628-7979
The measure in the Senate
was made public Monday by
Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-
Conn.), the sponsor of stand-
alone legislation for repeal in the
Senate. On Tuesday, Rep. Patrick
Murphy (D-Pa.), champion of
standalone repeal legislation in
the House, unveiled an identical-
ly worded companion bill.
The Senate Armed Services
Committee and the full House
were expected to vote on the
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” measures
this week during consideration of
Pentagon budget legislation
known as the fiscal year 2011
defense authorization bill. Neither
vote occurred before Blade dead-
line. Check washingtonblade.com
for the latest information.
The measures presented by
Lieberman and Murphy would
repeal the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”
statute mandating that openly
gay, lesbian and bisexual people
be discharged from the U.S.
armed forces.
However, the law would only
be repealed after the Pentagon
completes its study — due Dec.
1 — on how to implement repeal
in the U.S. military.
Further, President Barack
Obama, Defense Secretary
Robert Gates and Chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm.
Michael Mullen would have to
certify that the U.S. military is
ready for the transition and that
the change “is consistent with the
standards of military readiness,
military effectiveness, unit cohe-
sion and recruiting and retention.”
The legislation doesn’t give a
timeline when the president, the
defense secretary and the chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
would have to issue the certifica-
tion. On Monday, the Associated
Press reported that meeting
those conditions for repeal would
allow the Pentagon “perhaps
even years” to prepare for repeal.
Notably, the legislation also
lacks non-discrimination lan-
guage and would return authori-
ty on discharging LGBT service
members to the Pentagon.
Choi said the provisions in the
legislation are “essentially com-
promising the integrity of the sol-
diers until a time to be deter-
mined” and compared the lack of
a deadline for certification to a
military commander issuing an
order without a timeline.
“It’s devastating to the soldiers
who don’t know and it leaves a lot
of questions out there,” Choi said.
“My question back to the presi-
dent is how long are we going to
force our soldiers to lie? Nobody
can answer the question when.”
But Choi said “what bothers”
him the most is the absence of
the non-discrimination language
that was contained in the stand-
alone version of the bill.
“I thought the most heinous
part of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ was
that it enforced discrimination,
and now it just says that’s alto-
gether not as important,” Choi
said. “I think it’s within every-
body’s mandate to get rid of dis-
crimination where it exists.”
Choi said as a result of the
compromise, LGBT soldiers
could be subject to a policy
that’s “turbulent and precarious.”
Also expressing disappoint-
ment about the lack of non-dis-
crimination language was Alex
Nicholson, executive director of
Servicemembers United, who said
removal of the non-discrimination
language was “unnecessary” to
get more support for repeal.
“I think we would have been in
the same position had we not
made three concessions and only
made two,” he said. “Other minor-
ity groups have not received
statutory non-discrimination pro-
tection in the military — this
would have been something extra
— but it was something we were
on track to secure.”
Aubrey Sarvis, executive
director of the Servicemembers
Legal Defense Network, said
he’s not sure who initiated the
idea of omitting non-discrimina-
tion language, but said those
supporting repeal thought such a
move would improve its chances
of passage.
“It’s not anything that SLDN
volunteered to give up,” Sarvis
said. “I think at the end of the day,
we all realized that we would have
to live with this new compromise.”
The idea of removing non-dis-
crimination language and return-
ing authority on discharges to
the Pentagon was advanced pre-
viously by the Palm Center, a
think tank on gays in the military.
Earlier this month, the Blade
reported that the Palm Center
had been asking other LGBT
groups to support such a move.
But Aaron Belkin, director of
the Palm Center, said he didn’t
know why the non-discrimination
language was removed and
noted that Palm wasn’t active in
pushing for such a move as part
of the compromise measure.
“This was news to me when I
was told,” he said. “I was actually in
bed when I was told and I promise
you we had nothing to do with it.”
Still, Belkin said passing legis-
lation with non-discrimination
language is “not politically realis-
tic” and the compromise meas-
ure advanced earlier this week is
“what we can get.”
But Nicholson said the Palm
Center pushed hard to have the
non-discrimination language
removed from the legislation,
noting recent reports in which
Belkin advocated the proposal.
Nicholson said Belkin was
responsible for Saturday’s opinion
piece in the Washington Post in
which former Chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. John
Shalikashvili advocated for a
return of authority to the Pentagon.
“There’s been no secret about
that fact that the Palm Center has
lobbied hard to take out the non-dis-
crimination language, including the
[Shalikashvili] op-ed and several
other pieces of media that the Palm
Center has done,” Nicholson said.
Compromise brought
White House support
While the compromise fell
short of what repeal supporters
initially sought, the conditions set
forth in the proposal brought
support from the White House,
which opponents of “Don’t Ask,
Don’t Tell” had long sought.
In a letter published Monday,
Peter Orzag, director of the Office
of Management & Budget, writes
the repeal measure adheres to
the Pentagon’s request to finish its
study on the issue at the end of
the year and therefore is support-
ed by the Obama administration.
Orzag says that the Pentagon
review would be “ideally” completed
before Congress takes action on
the issue, but notes the administra-
tion “understands that Congress
has chosen to move forward with
the legislation now and seeks the
administration’s views on the pro-
posed amendment.”
In the letter, Orzag says he
understands the amendment would
ensure implementation of repeal is
consistent with “standards of mili-
tary readiness, effectiveness, unit
cohesion, recruiting and retention.”
“The administration therefore
supports the proposed amend-
ment,” Orzag writes.
Geoff Morrell, a Pentagon
spokesperson, issued a statement
Tuesday saying Gates supports
the measure, although he still
believes Congress should hold off
on tackling the issue until after the
Pentagon completes its study.
“Secretary Gates continues to
believe that ideally the [Defense
Department] review should be com-
pleted before there is any legislation
to repeal the ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’
law,” he said. “With Congress having
indicated that is not possible, the
secretary can accept the language
in the proposed amendment.”
Having earned support from the
administration, Sarvis said the
amendment is “a path to repeal”
and predicted that its passage
could lead to open service “by the
end of the first quarter of next year.”
After the review is complete
and certification happens, Sarvis
said the Pentagon “would then be
free” to implement regulations for
open service and Obama could
issue an executive order for non-
discrimination in the U.S. military.
“In fact, all of the federal poli-
cies of non-discrimination have
been issued by executive order
since 1948,” Sarvis said, refer-
ring to the order that President
Truman issued to end racial seg-
regation in the armed forces.
Sarvis said he didn’t think a
future administration would
tamper with such an executive
order or “try to tinker with this
and make it a political football.”
“For instance, the four execu-
14 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
NATIONALNEWS
Following weeks of protests on its doorstep, the White House has backed a path to overturning ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.’ But some activists, including U.S.
Army Lt. Dan Choi, were critical of the compromise.
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
Continued from page 1
‘Don’t Ask’ deal lacks non-discrimination language
Continues on page 19
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 15
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NATIONALBRIEFS
Iraq veteran to lead
Log Cabin Republicans
Log Cabin Republicans has chosen a for-
mer diplomat and veteran to serve as the orga-
nization’s new executive director.
R. Clarke Cooper, who worked in the
George W. Bush administration most recently
as counselor and chief of staff at the U.S.
Mission to the United Nations, was announced
Monday as the candidate Log Cabin’s board of
directors selected to lead the partisan group.
Cooper said he will emphasize “the princi-
ples of limited government, individual liberty,
individual responsibility, free markets and a
strong national defense” as he pursues
“equal treatment under the law for gay and
lesbian Americans.”
Log Cabin Board Chair Terry Hamilton said
Cooper’s “16 years of public policy and political
experience has uniquely prepared him to lead
Log Cabin” and would help “ensure our role as
a key player in strengthening an inclusive
Republican Party.”
“As Congress is debating the failed ‘Don’t
Ask, Don’t Tell’ policy, we could not have a bet-
ter advocate in ensuring that this policy gets overturned,” Hamilton said.
Cooper served in Iraq in 2004 as an Army reserve officer on active duty, earning the
Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Joint Meritorious Unit Award and other deco-
rations. He later worked as legislative affairs adviser for the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad
and senior legislative adviser for a division within the Office of Iraq Affairs.
Franken introduces bill to aid LGBT students
U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) has introduced a bill aimed at protecting LGBT stu-
dents throughout the country from discrimination in schools.
Introduced on May 20, the Student Non-Discrimination Act would bar schools from
discriminating against LGBT students or ignoring harassing behavior that targets
them. Potential penalties could include a loss of federal funding or a legal cause of
action for victims.
Franken told the Blade in a statement that the legislation is necessary because “kids
need to feel safe in their schools in order to learn.”
“Our nation’s civil rights laws protect our children from bullying due to race, sex, religion,
disability and national origin,” Franken said. “My proposal corrects a glaring injustice and
extends these protections to our gay and lesbian students who need them just as badly.”
Eliza Byard, executive director of the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network,
praised Franken for introducing the bill and said the legislation is needed to ensure
LGBT students “can learn without the fear of being discriminated against simply for
who they are.”
In the House, gay Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) is sponsor of companion legislation.
Supporters of the measure have said they’re considering including the bill as part of
upcoming Elementary & Secondary Education Act authorization legislation in Congress.
Gutierrez wants UAFA in immigration reform
An influential, pro-immigrant U.S. House member has endorsed including language
to benefit LGBT bi-national couples as part of comprehensive immigration reform.
In a statement May 20, Rep. Luiz Gutierrez (D-Ill.) said inclusion of language allow-
ing LGBT Americans to sponsor foreign partners for residency in the United States is
an important part of a broader reform bill.
“Our efforts to fix our broken immigration system and protect basic civil rights are
not truly comprehensive if we exclude same-sex couples,” he said.
Standalone legislation that would enable an estimated 36,000 bi-national same-sex
couples to stay together in the United States is known as the Uniting American
Families Act. Proponents of the bill have sought its inclusion in UAFA as part of upcom-
ing comprehensive immigration reform legislation in Congress.
Late last year, Gutierrez introduced a version of comprehensive immigration reform
legislation that was seen as an alternative to the working bill. However, even though
Gutierrez is a co-sponsor of UAFA, his bill didn’t include UAFA-like language.
According to the statement from Gutierrez’ office, the lawmaker’s recent announce-
ment means he’s “recommitting himself” to inclusion of specific UAFA-like language as
part of comprehensive reform.
Steve Ralls, a spokesperson for Immigration Equality, called Gutierrez a “key ally”
because of “his leadership on immigration issues, his membership in the
Congressional Hispanic Caucus.”
“He’s someone who carries a huge amount of influence and credibility on immigra-
tion reform generally,” Ralls said.
R. Clarke Cooper, a former diplomat
and Iraq veteran, was named this
week as the new executive director of
Log Cabin Republicans.
Photo courtesy of Log Cabin
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day it was legally possible, were
Angelisa Young and Sinjoyla
Townsend, Reggie Stanley and
Rocky Galloway and Revs. Darlene
Garner and Candy Holmes. All three
couples exchanged vows and rings
at a carefully orchestrated event at
Human Rights Campaign head-
quarters. All three couples are black.
“We were all asked to identify
couples we knew locally who were
planning to seize the opportunity
immediately and we all put feelers
out,” said Ellen Kahn, HRC’s fami-
ly project director.
Garner said she thinks it was
a coincidence that all three cou-
ples are black, but says it was
still significant.
“Washington, D.C., is known
by some as a chocolate city, so it
was great that the first couples to
be married were African-
American couples,” she said.
Stanley and Galloway, a couple
for six years, said no one would have
noticed if all the couples had been
white and that although they
planned to wed regardless, contro-
versial remarks made by City
Council member Marion Barry,
who’s black and represents D.C.’s
predominantly black Ward 8,
inspired them to get married as soon
as the law would allow. Barry, who’d
previously been supportive of gay
rights, said last year after voting
against a bill to recognize same-sex
marriages performed elsewhere in
D.C., that his ward “don’t have but a
handful of openly gay residents” and
that the majority of his constituents
are opposed to same-sex marriage.
“He was basically saying that
black gay folks don’t exist in his ward
so we thought it was important to be
visible and present,” Stanley said.
Though he and Galloway live in
Ward 4, they said they felt it impor-
tant to show Barry there are many
black gay D.C. residents.
Garner and Holmes, who had
dated off and on for 14 years, said
they decided to wed immediately for
several reasons, some practical,
others symbolic. As ordained minis-
ters in the Fellowship of
Metropolitan Community Churches,
a liberal, mostly gay Christian
denomination, they felt it was impor-
tant to make a public stand.
“We recognized in many ways
our place as role models as both
representative of the black commu-
nity and the LGBT community
locally,” Garner said. “So we were
happy to take our stand as a legal-
ly married couple standing side by
side through the struggles.”
Garner works full-time in ministry
but Holmes ministers part-time while
also holding a full-time government
job. She said that was also a factor in
their decision to wed at HRC.
“None of it was lost on us,”
Holmes said. “Being a couple and
being African American and being
lesbian, and with me being a feder-
al government worker and also cler-
gy, that’s a lot and so there are a lot
of voices and things we represent,
so it’s something we took very seri-
ously and I think that’s significant.”
Stanley knew some HRC
leaders through his own LGBT
activism work.
“HRC was very forward looking
and they were really interested in
showing all aspects of what mar-
riage can look like both here and
across the country,” he said. “They
realized there would be national cov-
erage so I think they realized it was
important for this visual to be seen.”
Garner and Holmes initially
planned to make themselves avail-
able on HRC’s behalf to help field
press inquiries and counter the
anti-gay marriage stances several
local black clergy, such as Bishop
Harry Jackson of Hope Christian
Church, had taken.
“We were initially going to fly
away somewhere and get mar-
ried,” Garner said. “But when it
became clear that we could get
married here, they asked if we’d
like to do it with them. It became
kind of a collaboration.”
Was there any concern their spe-
cial day would become a circus?
Both couples said HRC handled the
day so well, it didn’t feel that way.
“There really was no media
barrage at all,” Galloway said.
The women agree.
“We were able to experience
the typical giddiness of any
engaged couple looking forward to
their wedding,” Garner said. “HRC
did a phenomenal job and our pri-
mary focus stayed on the fact that
we were getting married. We did
not take into consideration at all
that the world might be watching.”
Garner and Holmes plan a
religious ceremony during their
denomination’s annual confer-
ence in Acapulco in June.
The couples met standing in
line that morning to get their
licenses. They had their cere-
monies at HRC in the order they
got their licenses.
“We all cried and applauded and
supported one another,” Holmes
said. “Then when one came back,
the next couple marched in so we
were all there together, then we had
a joint reception.”
“It was lovely,” Garner said.
“HRC converted one of their big
meeting rooms into a wedding
chapel and we were able to create
the ceremony we wanted to have
from processional to recessional,
with music and presiders and
everything just as we wanted.”
The couples — Young and
Townsend did not respond to
interview requests — said life
has returned to normal after the
barrage of media attention.
“Things are great,” Galloway said.
“Just like with any wedding, there’s a
lot of activity leading up to it, but
we’re back to a normal life now.”
Both couples said they encoun-
tered zero negative feedback but
were greeted with many cheers,
applause and congratulations, both
on the day itself and after.
“People have recognized me
and stop me in the hall to con-
gratulate me,” Holmes said. “It’s
been wonderful.”
And both couples say Black
Pride remains important. Some of
the reasons why, they said, popped
up during the marriage wars, with
the Barry incident and elsewhere.
“We were more active with it in
our single days than in later years,”
Galloway said. “But it’s still impor-
tant to show diversity among the
gay community. It’s a wonderful
weekend and continues to be a
very important event.”
Garner and Holmes will be out of
town this weekend but said they
fully support Black Pride. Garner,
one of the founders of the National
Coalition of Black Lesbians & Gays,
said misperceptions about black
gays persist.
“There’s still this perception that
all gay people are white and that
all black people are straight and
many people really cling to that
myth,” she said. “So it’s especially
important for black LGBT people
to come out, be visible and speak
out so we continue to break down
the barriers that other people have
constructed to keep us all segre-
gated from each other.”
LOCALNEWS
Continued from page 1
Black couples reflect on marriage hoopla
18 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
Rocky Galloway (left) and his partner, Reggie Stanley, on their wedding day in March at the Human Rights Campaign headquarters.
Photo by Joe Tresh
tive orders that I’ve referred to since 1948
have not been undone by new administra-
tions,” Sarvis said. “I think that if the presi-
dent issues an executive order after ‘Don’t
Ask, Don’t Tell’ is eliminated — I don’t see a
new Congress or a new administration try-
ing to undo an executive order.”
But Choi said he doesn’t want support-
ers of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” repeal mis-
taking the Orzag letter in support of the
proposal as Obama taking action on the
issue. He noted the president could have
transmitted repeal language to Congress
for the defense budget legislation.
“Obviously, if he would have put the
defense authorization bill language through
to include the repeal legislation, then we
wouldn’t be in this situation where he’s try-
ing to get us to celebrate a win,” Choi said.
To follow-up on his earlier arrests at the
White House and put more pressure on the
president, Choi said he plans to take part in
new acts of civil disobedience to draw
attention to the issue of LGBT service
members serving openly in the U.S. military.
“I not only plan to, but I encourage every-
body else to,” Choi said. “The fact of the mat-
ter is so long as telling the truth is consid-
ered civil disobedience, we need to be com-
mitting civil disobedience every single day.”
Mission accomplished?
Several major LGBT organizations
issued statements this week praising the
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” compromise shortly
after it was announced.
In a statement, Human Rights Campaign
President Joe Solmonese said Monday the
new support from the administration means
people rallying against “Don’t Ask, Don’t
Tell” are “on the brink of historic action to
both strengthen our military and respect the
service of lesbian and gay troops.”
“Today’s announcement paves the path
to fulfill the president’s call to end ‘Don’t
Ask, Don’t Tell’ this year and puts us one
step closer to removing this stain from the
laws of our nation,” Solmonese said.
Nicholson of Servicemembers United
said in a statement that Monday’s letter
was “long awaited, much needed, and
immensely helpful.”
Choi said the organizations apparently had
their statements “all set up” to celebrate the
compromise regardless of the deal’s content.
“Just from my military perspective, it
seems very much like they’re putting a
‘mission accomplished’ banner on top of a
carrier, and saying our part is done and
we have fulfilled our mission,” Choi said.
“For people to revel in this kind of cele-
bration instead of encouraging people to
demand the fullness of repeal of ‘Don’t
Ask, Don’t Tell’ is certainly a misstep.”
Other LGBT groups that advocate for
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” repeal as one issue
in their portfolios indicated support for the
compromise measure, although they
acknowledged some shortcomings.
In a statement to the Blade, Rea Carey,
executive director of the National Gay &
Lesbian Task Force, said her organization was
“encouraged” that Congress and the adminis-
tration was “taking a step” to address the legal
discrimination of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”
“This presents a path that could end in
men and women being able to serve open-
ly, honestly and to great benefit of our coun-
try, but it falls short of providing clear assur-
ances of protection and a specific timeline
for implementation,” she said. “The impor-
tant action this week is to ensure passage
of this step toward full repeal.”
In another statement, Kate Kendell,
executive director of the National Center for
Lesbian Rights, offered a similarly lukewarm
statement on the compromise measure.
“The amendment and compromise fall
short of an outright repeal, which was
what we had all been hoping for,” she said.
“While we are cautiously optimistic that
this agreement will lead to a full repeal, it
is not yet time to celebrate the end of this
appalling and shameful law.”
Among the organizations to strongly
support the White House’s endorsement
of the compromise was SLDN. In a state-
ment, Sarvis called the agreement a “dra-
matic breakthrough.”
In response to Choi’s criticism of the
statements of support for reaching an agree-
ment with the White House, Sarvis said he
respects Choi’s service and commitment to
overturning “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”
“His view of the legislative process and
the strategy is not a view that I
share,” Sarvis said. “On this one, in terms of
legislative strategy and timing, I have a dif-
ferent view and my view is I want to get
what’s realistic and I want to get something
that will ensure that service members can
serve openly as soon as possible.”
NATIONALNEWS
Not everyone happy with ‘Don’t Ask’ compromise
Continued from page 14
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 19
A window on facet
of the movement
most of us don’t see
By KEVIN NAFF
When the LGBT rights move-
ment encounters setbacks —
something that happens regular-
ly — fingers inevitably point at
the Human Rights Campaign.
As the most prominent and visi-
ble organization working for LGBT
equality, that’s to be expected. But
there’s another group that doesn’t
get nearly the amount of media
attention as HRC that also deserves
scrutiny: Gill Action Fund and its
separate entity, Political OutGiving.
Gill Action Fund, founded by
wealthy gay entrepreneur Tim Gill
in Colorado, “provides resources
to individuals and organizations
working to advance equality,”
according to its web site. Gill him-
self is notoriously press shy and
the organization works behind the
scenes to elect pro-LGBT political
candidates across the country
and defeat anti-gay figures.
It’s important, effective work for
the movement but sometimes a
little sunshine can be a good
thing. For that, read Lou
Chibbaro’s story in this week’s
issue about a recent meeting of
Political OutGiving, Gill’s 527
group that works to elect politi-
cians committed to LGBT equali-
ty. The story offers a peek at a
facet of the national movement
that most of us never see: the
world of prominent LGBT donors.
About 200 such donors met at
the Peninsula Hotel in Chicago
earlier this month to hear a sales
pitch from a few politicians who
desperately want their money.
The donors assembled at the
hotel for a small panel discussion
with the politicians, moderated by
the Washington Post’s Jonathan
Capehart, who, like all others in
the room, agreed to keep the
meeting off the record. Among
those hoping to impress the
wealthy gays was Maryland Gov.
Martin O’Malley, who flew halfway
across the country for the secret
weekend confab. Of course, keep-
ing a meeting of 200 people off the
record in this era is next to impos-
sible and so the Blade began get-
ting reports of what happened
behind those gilded closed doors.
O’Malley spoke to the donors
and, during his remarks, advocated
for civil unions over marriage for
same-sex couples because he
thinks voters aren’t ready for it. It’s a
cowardly and ill-informed viewpoint,
considering the Washington Post just
released a poll showing that more
Marylanders now support marriage
equality than oppose it. If O’Malley
had done his homework he would
have known that key, relevant fact.
According to multiple sources
who were in the room, Julie
Goodridge, a plaintiff in the
Massachusetts case that legalized
same-sex marriage there, was in the
audience and vocally objected to
O’Malley’s position, informing him
that his view of civil unions sounds
more 2001 than 2010. Indeed,
O’Malley isn’t just on the wrong side
of history, he’s on the wrong side of
the present and his dim view of mar-
riage doesn’t jibe with his own state’s
blue demographics and voters’ grow-
ing support for marriage rights.
When Goodridge criticized
O’Malley, the audience reported-
ly broke into applause. Let’s
hope this means they will resist
supporting O’Malley in his re-
election bid this year.
And here’s where OutGiving’s
secrecy does a disservice to the
movement at large: Real progress
won’t come as long as politicians,
particularly Democrats, can rely on
big gay money even after doing
nothing to earn it. O’Malley has
been criticized in Maryland for his
failures on our issues. He did not
spend an ounce of political capital
to help boost the marriage or trans
bias bills this year, both of which
died in committee. Again. What’s
worse: In 2007, after privately telling
the plaintiffs in Maryland’s marriage
lawsuit that he backed them,
O’Malley expressed support for the
high court ruling against marriage
rights and invoked the Catholic
sacraments to explain his position.
Worse still is that O’Malley has a
gay brother, Paul O’Malley, a D.C.-
area attorney. D.C. has legalized
marriage and so Martin O’Malley is
advocating against a right for his
own brother that neighboring D.C.
says he is entitled to.
Why would any gay donor give
this man a cent? He betrayed the
plaintiffs in the marriage case and all
the LGBT voters who helped elect
him. He’s even willing to throw his
brother under the bus out of cynical
political expediency. O’Malley does
not deserve Political OutGiving’s
support. But if a handful of sources
hadn’t told the Blade about the
meeting, he might have benefitted
from a flood of gay money and no
one would know about it or be able
to hold O’Malley accountable for
receiving such support.
Gill Action Fund has done
tremendous work on behalf of LGBT
rights, most of which goes deliber-
ately unrecognized. But sometimes
Tim Gill’s quest for secrecy threat-
ens to undermine his cause.
The LGBT movement needs
more transparency, especially now
that Democrats are facing re-elec-
tion after two years of wide majori-
ties in both houses that yielded
decidedly mixed results for our
community. Showering traitorous
Democrats like O’Malley with more
gay money won’t advance mar-
riage or trans rights in Maryland.
Gill and his Political OutGiving
group should reject O’Malley as a
recipient of national gay money —
and they should tell him why.
Maybe when politicians pay a
financial price for their
inaction and duplici-
ty, they will change
their behavior.
20 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
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Holding wealthy gay donors accountable
City must replenish
supplies in time
for Pride
By DANIEL O’NEILL
In recent years, the D.C.
Department of Health has been
tremendously supportive of our
community’s fight against HIV,
especially through its condom
distribution program. Yet, a series
of unfortunate oversights has
resulted in the DOH running out
of condoms for the entire months
of March and May.
In the recently released Men-
who-have Sex-with-Men HIV
Surveillance Report, 15 percent
of those sampled tested HIV
positive — a “staggering” yet
likely deflated representation of
the disease’s impact on our com-
munity. One of the most telling
figures from this report indicated
that only 57.4 percent of MSM
used a condom during their last
anal intercourse. Considering
our sky-high HIV prevalence, this
number simply is not good
enough. We need to be using
more condoms, more frequently.
Despite this urgent need,
local organizations like the DC
FUK!T and TOOLK!T safer sex
kit campaign, which currently
distribute as many as 5,000 con-
doms at local gay venues each
week, are left scrambling to pre-
vent stock-outs that will happen
just before Capital Pride. Why
the shortfall? Our government
has had a billing issue with
Durex, which contracts with
DOH to supply the bulk of the
city’s condoms.
As Terry Gerace, co-founder of
DC FUK!T and TOOLK!T states,
“This is very unfortunate tim-
ing. When the campaign
launched last year, we distributed
more than 30,000 kits at D.C.
Capital Pride events. It takes a
month of volunteer packing to get
that number ready, and this year
we’ll have about a week to do
that, which will be impossible.”
Gerace continues, “Missing
shipments in both March and May
depleted our reserves and squan-
dered hours of volunteer time. We
had dozens of volunteers that we
had to turn away from kit packing
because there were no condoms
and lube. It’s rather embarrassing
that we are running out just in time
for Pride, and it undermines our
credibility as a reliable distributor
of condoms in D.C.”
A recent report in the
Washington Post lauds the DOH
for its distribution of more than 3
million free condoms over the
past year and highlights its
recent decision to switch to
Trojan brand condoms exclusive-
ly for D.C. youth. Meanwhile, the
more important issue of whether
we are actually getting condoms
into people’s hands and onto
their penises has been ignored.
Rather than caving to popular
opinion over which brand is best,
wouldn’t it serve us better to
focus on educating people about
the proper use of condoms and
lube? I think so. But that can’t be
done if we have no supplies.
Next month more than 200,000
gay men will descend upon
Washington to celebrate Pride
and there will be insufficient con-
doms to go around. I hope those
who were relying on DC FUK!T for
their condoms understand that
they will need to find some other
means of protecting themselves.
Otherwise, we may have a notice-
able spike in new HIV transmis-
sions this June.
Now is the time for the
D.C. government to
ensure our community
is protected. We need
condoms!
D.C.’s condom conundrum
Kevin Naff is editor of
the Washington Blade.
Reach him at
knaff@washblade.com.
Daniel O’Neill is chair of
the DC Center’s HIV
Prevention Working
Group. Reach him at
danielfoneill@gmail.com.
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 21
INSIDELGBTWASHINGTON
Obama must keep
his promises or risk
alienating Dem base
By PETER ROSENSTEIN
I read with interest John
Aravosis’ recent column dissecting
President Obama’s 30 biggest gay
accomplishments during the first
18 months of his presidency.
I agree with Aravosis that the
time has come to get real about
what it is that we as a communi-
ty are being asked to say thank
you for. It appears that all of the
accomplishments that the
Obama administration is claim-
ing credit for are those that were
politically safe to do. I thank the
president for doing them and
appreciate his efforts on the
many small issues that benefit
our community. But it appears
that the issues that require
heavy lifting and courage — and
the use of his political capital —
haven’t been tackled yet.
It’s fair to ask what this means for
us as a community and in turn for
the Democratic Party if, after two
years with huge majorities in the
Congress and a president who
claims he is our friend, we don’t get
Employment Non-Discrimination
Act passed or “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”
repealed. I think the Democratic
Party needs to take stock of what
it needs to do if we are to keep the
House of Representatives and not
lose more than five or six seats in
the Senate.
We have to motivate the peo-
ple that elected Barack Obama
to come back out in large num-
bers for the midterm elections
when his name isn’t on the bal-
lot. I question how we do that if
the Democratic base is unhappy
with the administration.
As Aravosis says in his piece,
we voted for capital letter
“CHANGE” and we seem to have
gotten small letter “change.” I
would add that we voted for
“HOPE” but many constituencies
in the Democratic Party are
quickly losing it.
The president came into office
facing the worst economy since
the Great Depression, skyrocket-
ing unemployment and two wars.
Not easy tasks to deal with. But
the problem he now faces is that
he got elected promising many
things to many people, not the
least of which was to change the
way we operate in Washington.
People really believed that.
They translated that into believing
that he would have the courage to
fight for social change and stand
up for the various constituencies
that elected him, among them the
LGBT community.
One way for the president to
motivate the LGBT community is
to actually enter the fray on “Don’t
Ask, Don’t Tell” and the ENDA. He
needs to make the phone calls,
call the meetings and use his bully
pulpit. True courage would have
been to call for the repeal of “Don’t
Ask, Don’t Tell” during his speech
at the West Point graduation. It did-
n’t take courage to call for it at the
Human Rights Campaign dinner.
When it comes to the military’s
gay ban, the majority of the coun-
ty is on the side of repeal. Polls
show more than 70 percent of the
electorate and 60 percent of
Republicans support repeal. Sen.
Barbara Boxer asked recently,
“How can this president justify
having his Secretary of Defense
send a letter to the Congress
telling them he needs to first poll
the troops before anything is
done? Can you imagine if we
polled the troops before opening
the military to African Americans
and women? It is possible that if
that occurred the military would
still be segregated and women
prohibited from serving.”
As I write this late on Monday
evening, Sens. Joseph Lieberman
and Carl Levin and Rep. Patrick
Murphy have asked the White
House to act to get Secretary
Gates and Joint Chiefs of Staff
Chair Mike Mullen to support
repeal efforts now. Budget director
Peter Orzag is acting as an inter-
mediary between Congress and
the White House. I am hopeful that
by the time anyone reads this col-
umn that these last minute efforts
will have proven successful. The
signing of the Matthew Shepard &
James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes
Prevention Act, giving Medals of
Freedom to Billie Jean King and
Harvey Milk, lifting the ban on
entry for those with HIV, and sign-
ing the U.N. Declaration on Sexual
Orientation & Gender Identity
while all great, aren’t enough.
Those actions alone won’t
bring out the troops and money in
November. The Democratic Party
will need both to hold on to mean-
ingful majorities in Congress.
Mr. President, I trust that you
will stand up and display the
courage I know you have. Be
counted now and use all the
power of your office to keep your
commitments. The LGBT commu-
nity put their trust in you and in the
Democratic Party. We are asking
that you don’t betray that trust for
our future and for
the future of the
Democratic Party.
The following comments
were posted to our web site.
Visit washingtonblade.com to
join the conversation.
Re: “White House endorses
delayed ‘Don’t Ask’ repeal”
(news article by Chris Johnson,
May 24)
The legislation to repeal the
law would not become effective
EVEN after the Pentagon com-
pletes its study on the issue. It
could NEVER become effective. It
requires a host of people to say if
and when it will become effective.
This is the non-repeal repeal.
Some “fierce advocate”! Obama is
NOT a friend and never was.
— JC
So the Pentagon will still be
able to discriminate against gay
soldiers at will and for any rea-
son; they just won’t have a law
that orders them to do so,
instead the law will empower
them to do so at their leisure.
Some compromise. Where’s
the nondiscrimination policy?
— Daniel
This is a misguided waste of
priorities. Why does a compro-
mise plan on DADT take center
stage over a vote on ENDA?
Lifting DADT only protects a frac-
tion of us. Most of us don’t work
in the military yet this gets more
attention, press and action than
ENDA. It’s obnoxious and unac-
ceptable! Wake up before it’s too
late that is if it isn’t too late
already! ENDA needs to get
through while the Congress still
has enough people likely to vote
for it and Obama is President. By
the Fall elections it may already
be too late!
It’s obvious that the Pentagon
study is simply a delaying tactic.
They hope to drag this on indefi-
nitely believing that if they can
delay it long enough, Obama will
be out of office and a right-wing
President will reserve course.
— EL Dorado
Re: “Lead entertainers cancel
appearances at Capital Pride,
Black Pride” (news article by
Lou Chibbaro, Jr., May 21)
At least he was honest. I don’t
understand what changed. Oh,
thats right, he sold enough music
for the year. He doesn’t need the
gay/lesbian sales. C’YA!
— Whatever
Well, they do call it “Black Pride.”
Organizers need to do a better job.
So I don’t see why they hide the
word “gay” in “Black Pride.” Look at
your advertisement. It’s “Black
Pride” not Gay Black Pride, so Black
Pride just might not have a leg to
stand on. If you’re clear about it,
then call yourself Gay Black Pride.
— John
Re: “Can you be a good gay
and conservative?” (op-ed by
Jessica Lee, May 21)
The gay community supports
diversity as long as you hold the
exact same views as liberal democ-
rats. Dissent will not be tolerated.
— Rik
It’s not a matter of “gay: liberal” or
“straight: conservative.” It’s selecting
items from a palate of issues. I find
that most of the gay issues tend to be
in the liberal column, because of the
conservatives’ propensity not to
respect individual rights and values.
However, there are many other con-
servative issues that I agree with. If I
were in charge of things, instead of a
system where you elect one repre-
sentative and expect that person to
decide all things for you according to
your own belief, my system would
present the electorate with a list of
individual issues and let voters
decide each issue, and then let a
representative cast a vote based on
the voters’ individual pollings. This
should reduce the voters’ anger at
their elected representatives.
— Robert McJunkin
I’d like just one of the haters
here to explain to me why the
Republicans’ refusal to repeal
DOMA is somehow worse than
the Democrats WRITING IT AND
SIGNING IT INTO LAW.
It was the Democrats who
wrote laws such as DOMA and
DADT. I feel absolutely no com-
pulsion whatsoever to show any
fealty to the Democrats or any
liberal ideal when, in reality,
they’re just as bad as you say
conservatives are.
I just love all the tolerance
going on here. Superb!
— MelMaguire
I find it amusing that so many
GayLeftBorg types are so certain
that Republicans hate gays and
oppose gay rights (whatever that
is), but never seem capable of
naming any. Be it here or on
GayPatriot or elsewhere. I should
think it would be easy and would
come with all the talking points
pap regurgitated everywhere.
Nor does there seem to be any
interest in any reasoning behind
such opposition. One could be
opposed to special rights for cer-
tain victim groups, but instead
they’re castigated as evil racist,
sexist, bigot homophobes.
Nevermind, of course, the
homophobes their elected pres-
ident hangs with. Nevermind, of
course, their elected president
is defending DADT in court.
Nevermind, of course, their elect-
ed president doesn’t worship their
golden calf of gay marriage.
If Obama didn’t have that pro-
tective “D” after his name, the
GayLeftBorg would be wiping the
blogs with him.
— Rob
Re: “Wone’s widow takes the
stand” (news article by Lou
Chibbaro, Jr., May 21)
There is no justice for Katherine
or Robert Wone as long as the
killer is not convicted of the murder.
Where I have a problem with the
3 defendants is their actions on the
night of the killing. If I had a friend
staying with me and found him in
the condition described, my first act
would be to call for emergency
help, not try to clean the mess up in
the room. I have heard statements
that Mr. Wone was still barely alive
when the EMS people arrived. An
earlier call to them might have
made the difference in his survival.
— Jerry
Not sure if the troubling thing
about this case is there are still so
many questions or that with so
many of the answers, still nothing
happens. Maybe Robert will get
justice. Still i wonder why he was
there. I think it matters there are 3
defendants and 3 wounds.
— CD in DC
Still waiting for ‘hope’ and ‘change’
Peter Rosenstein is
a D.C.-based LGBT
rights and Democratic
Party activist. His column
appears twice monthly
in the Blade.
FEEDBACK
By GREGG BUSCH
Government run agencies
Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and FHA
have all tightened their guidelines on
condominium buildings around the
country after the fallout from the
housing boom. Not only do lenders
need to look at the borrowers'
strength in getting a loan, but they
are now being required to evaluate
the condo association and its opera-
tions. These changes are having a
significant impact on buyers and cur-
rent owners looking to refinance in a
particular condominium. You may
ask “why would it matter if the gov-
ernment agencies want to buy loans
in my condominium or the condo-
minium I am thinking about buy-
ing”??? Because loans that don't
meet Fannie, Freddie are both hard-
er to finance and more expensive in
interest rate and could require a
point (a fee of 1% on the balance of
the loan). This could affect the mar-
ketability of the unit when you go to
sell (which means you may have to
sell for less) or if you are refinancing,
a higher monthly payment. Not a
good thing I must say. The govern-
ment agencies have implemented
requirements with respect to condo
master insurance policies, financial
statements, percent of delinquent
dues each month, ownership break-
down of the units in the condo asso-
ciation, and any litigation issues
within the building.
Here is a checklist to review
and see if your building meets the
litmus test:
1) Condominium buildings can
not have 15% or more of the units
delinquent in their condo fees
beyond 30 days.
2) No more than 49% of the units
can be of second home nature (not
as much of an issue in our area, but
think about a unit you own or are
buying in Rehoboth or Florida.
3) No pending litigation allowed
(ie: a lawsuit against the condo
association from a previous owner
that got bit by his neighbor’s dog).
4) The condo can not have week-
ly rentals offered (ie: condo hotel) nor
can the condo be part of, or market-
ed with an attached hotel. These are
strictly viewed as condo hotels even
if they have separate entities.
5) HO-6 insurance (walls-in cov-
erage) must be on every unit. Walls-
in coverage goes beyond the mas-
ter policy that is paid for in your
condo fee. Walls-in coverage
insures everything that is attached
to the drywall or plaster like your
kitchen cabinets and wood floors.
Your master policy on the building
usually does not cover these items.
6) No one person or entity can
own more than 10% of the total
units in the building. No one owner
can own 11 units in a 100 unit con-
dominium for example.
7) No more that 40% of the total
units in the condominium can be
rented (FHA loans will allow up to
49%). This is called the “investor
ratio,” which is just the number of
rented units in the building divided
by the total units in the building.
8) No more than 25% of the
building can be of commercial use.
9) 10% of the total budget must be
in cash reserves (for capital expendi-
tures and deferred maintenance).
Fannie Mae will allow exceptions
to some or one of these rules if you
submit for an exception to Fannie
Mae, Your lender can further explain
how this process works.
In addition to meeting the Fannie
Mae/Freddie Mac guidelines you
may also have to look at other obsta-
cles as well. If there is less than 20%
equity in the condominium unit you
must also adhere to mortgage insur-
ance guidelines (we in the lending
business call these “overlays” to the
Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac guidelines).
With less than 20% equity, a unit
needs to have mortgage insurance to
guarantee the lender payment if a
borrower goes into foreclosure.
Mortgage insurance companies
require not more than 30% of the
units in the condominium be rented
(investor ratio) and have their different
guidelines on exposure in any one
building (usually no more than 25%).
In addition to meeting the mortgage
insurance guidelines, several of the
big banks have their own set of
guidelines that they have to follow
which are even more inflexible.
You are always advised to
speak with a local mortgage lender
(a direct lender that funds in their
own name and does not broker
loans) like First Savings Mortgage
before taking a bank rejection on a
particular condominium.
An alternative to Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac for first time homebuy-
ers is FHA financing. This program
allows first time homebuyers who
might not qualify for Fannie Mae or
Freddie Mac guidelines with looser
guidelines when it pertains to
income thresholds, down payment
requirements and credit scores. With
FHA financing the risk of the loan is
removed from the lender and private
mortgage insurance company and
placed on FHA, the governments
loan insurance program adminis-
tered under HUD. FHA has also
recently tightened its condo financ-
ing guidelines to mirror more closely
to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
However, FHA has more lenient
guidelines on investor concentration.
There is some good news for new
construction condominium buildings
that are currently selling: Fannie,
Freddie, and FHA have all dropped
their pre-sale requirements (meaning
how many units must go under con-
tract before a lender can start allowing
buyers to take title and close the loan).
Fannie Mae now allows as little as
50% presale from the previous 70%.
If all else fails there is non-war-
rantable financing (meaning loans
that are originated with the intention
of not meeting Fannie, Freddie, or
FHA), which can be offered through
some local banks and local mort-
gage companies. They are usually
with higher rates than the govern-
ment agency backed loans. Keep
in mind that these loans are not
guaranteed to be easy to qualify for
and depend on many factors,
including specific condo develop-
ment as well as size of the down
payment and are evaluated on a
case by case basis by a local bank
or local mortgage company,
Through discussions with some fel-
low real estate professionals and local
lenders, the impact here in the D.C.
market is not as bad as some of the
harder hit states, but it’s proving to be a
major thorn in many transactions. Real
estate agents, condo board members
and unit owners on are all working
hard to get existing condominium
developments in compliance with the
new regulations. As this occurs more
projects will increase in value as our
market continues to recover from the
economic crisis of 2009.
If you have any further questions
please feel free to e-mail me at
gbusch@fsavings,com or visit me
at WWW.GREGGBUSCH.COM
Gregg Busch
Vice President
First Savings
Mortgage Corporation
8444 Westpark Dr
The Fourth Floor
McLean VA 22102
(W)703-883-9580
(Fax)703-564-4685
(Cell)202-256-7777
www.greggbusch.com
washingtonblade.com • vol. 41, issue 22 • may 28, 2010 • Page 22
Condo financing under the microscope!!!
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Corner Home w/ 3
Exposures, Numerous
Windows & Overlooks
Lincoln Park.
Renovated Kitchen w/
Granite, Italian Glass
Back-Splash, Custom
Cabinets & Stainless Appliances. Hardwood Floors,
Wood Burning Fireplace w/Portuguese Tile Surround, All
New Windows in 2009, Washer/Dryer &
Patio. Unit Entrance at Bottom of Stairs.
COLDWELL BANKER DUPONT
202-387-6180
EXTRAORDINARY!
BISHOP’S GATE
1715 15th Street,
NW #5
$1,170,000
* * JAW- DROPPI NG!
Unique property
carved out of 1930's
chapel in Bishop's
Gate -Gated communi-
ty. 30ft ceils, huge lead-
ed & stained glass win-
dows, marble & granite wainscoting, choir loft w/ guest
BR & BA. Gorgeous S/S kit. Huge MBR w/ den & office
area, twin dressing areas & enormous
tub. Filmed for HGTV and glossies.
COLDWELL BANKER DUPONT
202-387-6180
NEW LISTING!
PENN QUARTER
400 Massachusetts Av
#607
Stunning sun-drenched
huge 1BR/1.5BA Manhattan-
type flat with over
1,300sf. Unique open
floor-plan perfect for
entertaining. Plus parking
and storage convey. Bldg
amenities include: 24hr concierge, lap-pool/deck/bbq-
grill, gym and social room with pool table. Two blocks to
Safeway, metro and 4 blocks to Gallery Plaza/Chinatown.
An awesome unit. An excellent location.
Pefect price.
COLDWELL BANKER DUPONT
202-387-6180
OPEN SUNDAY 1-3
LOGAN CIRCLE
PRICE REDUCED
$394,000
910 M Street NW #802
You’ll love living at the
sophisticated “Whitman”
with its rooftop pool, 24/7
lobby attendant, fitness
center & party room! SS
appliances, granite coun-
ters & luxury bath with
soaking tub. Pet friendly
building.
MICHAEL MARRIOTT
801-201-7373 CELL
WWW.DCGOTOGUYS.COM
PRICE REDUCTION!
$999,000!
COLUMBIA HEIGHTS
1309 Euclid Street NW
Great 4 unit, 4 level Victorian in
Columbia Heights. Sep electric
and gas for each unit, including
sep electric house meter. Easy
condo conversion of existing units.
Parking is a non issue being locat-
ed so close to metro. Needs work
and sold Totally As-is, how you see
it, just as it is. Seller will make no
repairs. All rea-
sonable offers
considered.
J.T. POWELL
202-465-2357
WWW.JTPOWELL.COM
GEORGETOWN
2718 P Street, NW
$1,549,000
Treetops, now Bank
Owned, was fully reno-
vated and rebuilt in
2003 includes chefs
kitchen w/top-of-the-
line appliances, cus-
tom kitchen cabinets,
speakers throughout
home; marble & granite fireplaces, built in office & library,
whirlpool baths, premium windows. SOLD AS-IS, SELLER
WILL MAKE NO REPIARS. BROKER
MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS RE
PROPERTY CONDITION.
J.T. POWELL
202-465-2357
WWW.JTPOWELL.COM
LOGAN CIRCLE
1201 Q Street, NW #1
$379,000
2Br/1BA
Surrounded by south-
ern facing windows,
this corner unit with
turret is flooded with
sun. Fantastic loca-
tion only 3 blocks to
Whole Foods, 1 block
off Logan Circle. The stone floors, huge closets, recessed
lights, granite counters, extremely low condo fee, and the
unusually large number of parking
spaces surrounding the building make
this a Slam Dunk!
J.T. POWELL
202-465-2357
WWW.JTPOWELL.COM
OPEN SUNDAY 2-4
COLUMBIA HEIGHTS
1207 Girard Street, NW #2
$769,000
2BR/2.5BA
Wow! Ultra-modern Penthouse
unit in a classic townhouse.
Amazing outdoor spaces.
Open floor plan on main level
stretches 65'. Gourmet Kitchen
with 10' long island, granite
counters, SS appliances.
Owner's suite with 2nd deck,
stunning mar-
ble baths. Secured parking!
BO BILLUPS
202-431-4052
WWW.BOBILLUPS.COM
LOGAN CIRCLE
1322 15TH STREET,
NW B-3
$295,000
1BR/BA
• Newly Renovated
Kitchen and Bath
• Brand New Hardwood
Floors
• Freshly Painted
• Fantastic Location -
1 Block to Whole
Foods/Vida
Fitness/Restaurants
• Close to Dupont Metro
• Pets Welcome
ROBERT (BOB) WILLIAMS
202.436-0032
WWW.CBMOVE.COM/ROBERT.WILLIAMS
THE CLYDESDALE
2801 Adams Mill
Road, NW #113
$279,900
A B S O L U T E L Y
ADORABLE light-filled
1BR home in one of
Washington's most
beautiful neighbor-
hoods. Large rooms,
updated kitchen and
bath, original hardwood
floors, high ceilings
and crown molding. Wake up with the lions at the
National Zoo, jog or bike in Rock Creek Park. Walk to
two Metro lines, shopping, dining and
nightlife. Convenient to everything.
J JAMES BRAEU
202-215-2240
WWW.JAMESBRAEU.COM
LOGAN CIRCLE
1111 11 St NW #105
$419,900
2 Bed/2 BA
Like new, light filled end
unit on the first floor. Two
Bedroom, 2 full baths,
dbl. sink in master bath.
Black granite kitchen
and bamboo floors. In-
unit central air, washer/
dryer. Loads of closet
and cupboard space.
Close to Metro.
MICHAEL MARRIOTT
801-201-7373 CELL
WWW.DCGOTOGUYS.COM
The Dupont Office of
Coldwell Banker
Residential Brokerage
Welcomes
OMAR VIDAL
301-213-4070
OMAR@CBMOVE.COM
REALESTATE
24 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010







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Living in Shaw/Howard? Find your copy of
washingtonblade
at one of the following locations:
930 Club • 815 V St. NW
National Minority AIDS Center • 2112 Georgia Ave. NW
Nellie's Sports Bar • 900 U St. NW
Town Nightclub • 2009 8th St. NW
United Church of Christ • 1701 11th St. NW
Shaw Interim Library • 945 Rhode Island Ave. NW
REALESTATE
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 25
washingtonblade’s
featured realestate listing of the week
EXTRAORDINARY!
BISHOP’S GATE
1715 15th Street, NW #5
$1,170,000
**JAW-DROPPING! Unique property carved
out of 1930's chapel in Bishop's Gate -Gated
community. 30ft ceils, huge leaded & stained
glass windows, marble & granite wainscot-
ing, choir loft w/ guest BR & BA. Gorgeous
S/S kit. Huge MBR w/ den & office area, twin
dressing areas & enormous tub. Filmed for
HGTV and glossies.
COLDWELL BANKER DUPONT • 202-387-6180
GARDENWI SEI NC. COM
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Elizabeth Blakeslee
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26 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
arts & entertainment
washingtonblade.com vol. 41, issue 22 • may 28, 2010 • Page 27
Black Pride honors Jeffrey
Richardson, who wins
over one ally at a time 
By SARAH McKIBBEN
Special to Washington Blade
Jeffrey Richardson, 31, is the type of
guy who you’d want to sit down and have
a beer with, to talk about everything from
politics to the best local hiking spots. His
magnetic personality and genuine out-
look on life are admirable, but it’s his abil-
ity to find common ground with almost
everyone he encounters that has earned
him respect around the District.
Yet from his humble demeanor, few
would guess that this self-proclaimed
introvert was one of the pivotal figures
fighting on the front lines of D.C.’s battle
for same-sex marriage. An influential
leader in the Democratic Party and
staunch advocate for the LGBT com-
munity, Richardson has accomplished
more by age 30 than most people hope
to accomplish in a lifetime.
On May 28, during the 2010 D.C. Black
Pride Opening Reception, Richardson will
be honored with the Welmore Cook
Award, along with the late Charlotte
Smallwood. The award is given annually to
two members of the local black LGBT
community for outstanding leadership. Earl
Fowlkes, board member and spokesper-
son for Black Pride, believes that recogniz-
ing Richardson’s efforts is long overdue.
“He’s a young man who has accomplished
quite a bit, and he hasn’t received the cred-
it he deserves,” Fowlkes says.
Ironically, Richardson never intended
to get tied up in politics, but his work
with local youth laid the groundwork for
his political involvement. After a short
stint with AmeriCorps, the North
Continues on page 34
Black Pride’s Earl Fowlkes
answers 20 questions.
Page 32
Jeffrey Richardson recently posted to Facebook: ‘Thought: Are you living your life or the life you have been told you should live?’
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
Black Pride events
D.C. plays host to a wide array of Black
Pride events this weekend, from poetry
slams and fashion shows to workshops and
musical performances. For more informa-
tion, visit dcblackpride.org.
The host hotel for this year’s DC Black
Pride is Hamilton Crown Plaza, 1001 14th St.,
N.W. (14th & K streets), Washington, D.C.
FRIDAY, MAY 28
DC Black Pride opening reception (Free)
Hamilton Ballroom
7-10 p.m.
Reception honoring the District of Columbia
City Council, Charlotte Smallwood & Jeffrey
Richardson. Refreshments and cash bar.
SATURDAY, MAY 29
DC Black Pride workshops (free), 10:30
a.m.-3 p.m. at Hamilton Crown Plaza Hotel
10:30 AM – Noon, “Do You See What I See?
Personal Vision Development,” with Angela
Harvey of Let’s T.A.L.K. Participants will learn
how to create a vision board and ways to “see”
their way to greatness.Hamilton Ballroom
11 AM – Noon,Somewhere Over The
Rainbow-The Joy of Lesbian and Gay Travel,pre-
sented by Donna Shands-Island. There will be a
chance to win a trip for two.Lafayette Park Room
11 AM–Noon,Operation: REBIRTH –
Overcoming Homophobia in the Black
Church,presenter: Tuan N’Gai. Franklin
Square Room
Noon–1 PM,“Yes We Can!” How do we cre-
ate and sustain healthy, positive, empowering,
monogamous relationships?Presented by Dr.
Christopher A. Lester. Lafayette Park Room
Noon–1 PM,“Out on Campus”moderated
by Samantha Master. Franklin Park Room
1 PM – 2 PM,“The Generation Gap,”mod-
erated by Sterling Washington,featuring Sheila
Alexander-Reid,Genesis Nunlee,Andre
Rosario,Courtney Williams.Panel will discuss
ageism. Lafayette Park Room
1 PM – 2 PM,Health Care Reform –
What’s in it for me? Franklin Square Room
2 PM – 3 PM,“The Thickness: A Discussion
About Healthy Bodies.”Lafayette Park Room
2 PM – 3 PM,“Imagine,”moderated by
Katrina Kirchoff, Microsoft Staffing & HR.
Franklin Square Room
Continues on page 34
The art of
building relationships
28 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
How long have you been out and
who was the hardest person to tell?
All my adult life and telling a childhood
friend was the hardest person to tell.
Who’s your gay hero?
Billy Strayhorn
What’s Washington’s best nightspot,
past or present?
The Circle Bar, a really laid back bar
where the HRC shop is now on
Connecticut. It was just one of those
great city spaces. A nice, clean bar.
What’s your dream gay wedding?
Having a wedding at the Hillwood
Estate Gardens.
What non-gay issue are you most
passionate about?
Women’s reproductive rights
What historical outcome
would you change?
The assassination of Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr.
What’s been the most memorable
pop culture moment of your lifetime?
The Jackson Five on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”
On what do you insist?
I am in my seat at a baseball game
before the National Anthem.
What was your last
Facebook post or Tweet?
May 13 was my mother’s birthday and I
wrote on Facebook that I missed her.
If your life were a book,
what would the title be?
“A Successful Failure”
If science discovered a way to
change sexual orientation,
what would you do?
Stay the way God made me.
What do you believe in
beyond the physical world?
I believe there is a higher power beyond
this world that I live in and for me this
power is called God. God created me
exactly the way I am supposed to be
and loves me for who I am.
What’s your advice for
LGBT movement leaders?
Don’t take yourself too seriously. Learn
to laugh and find ways of bringing joy to
your life beyond your work.
What would you walk
across hot coals for?
An invitation from President Obama to
attend a State Dinner at the White
House.
What gay stereotype
annoys you most?
Gay men can’t play sports.
What’s your favorite
gay movie?
“Boys in the Band”
What’s the most overrated
social custom?
Exchanging business cards with people
whom you will never contact.
What trophy or prize
do you most covet?
Major League Baseball’s World Series
MVP.
What do you wish
you’d known at 18?
How to tie my own bowtie.
Why Washington?
It’s a wonderful place to live and has
great opportunities particularly if you’re
black and LGBT.
By JOEY DiGUGLIELMO
Earl Fowlkes never thought his career
would end up focusing on HIV and LGBT
work, but that’s the way it’s unfolded.
Growing up just outside of Philadelphia in
Willingboro, N.J., Fowlkes spent most of
his adult life in Manhattan and spent many
years streamlining companies for maxi-
mum effectiveness. He gradually became
impacted by the toll AIDS was taking on
his friends and started volunteering, which
eventually led to a low-paying position.
“I kind of got sucked in at a very low rate
of pay but it’s something that I saw happen-
ing to so many of my friends,” he says.
“Fortunately I have a loving and caring fam-
ily so I can’t imagine what happened to
some of my friends where they were basi-
cally dumped completely. This was before
Ryan White and all those other programs
and a time when you really did, as they say,
have to rely on the kindness of strangers.”
Fowlkes relocated to Washington 14
years ago to take a job with D.C.’s AIDS
program Damien Ministries where he
worked for eight years before joining the
D.C. Care Consortium, another AIDS
charity. He’ll be phasing out of that this
summer to manage the International
Federation of Black Prides, which he
founded 11 years ago. D.C.’s Black Pride,
now in its 20th year, predates the
Federation. Fowlkes was D.C. Black
Pride president for seven years and has
continued volunteering ever since.
“I believe it’s very important for people
who are black and LGBT to have a space
that’s culturally sensitive,” he says.
“Ultimately you want everybody to be com-
fortable in the larger LGBT world but Black
Pride is the gate a lot of our people come
through because homophobia is still so
insidious and entrenched in our community.”
Fowlkes is officially single but has
been seeing someone lately. He’s a
baseball fanatic and has a special cable
subscription that lets him see all the
Phillies games. He lives in Mt. Vernon
Square and likes reading about history,
shopping and sipping apple martinis in
his free time.
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
QUEERY: 20 Questions for Earl Fowlkes
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 29
Friday, May 28
Premiere of the newest LGBT Latin dance
party: S-KANDALO at Remington’s, 639
Pennsylvania Avenue S.E., from 10 p.m.-
2 a.m. Music by DJ Fantasy, visit latin-
souldc.com for more information.
GIRL PARTY every Friday night at the
Black Squirrel, 2427 18th St., N.W.,
21+/no cover, starts at 9:30 p.m.
GAY DISTRICT, from 8:30-10:30 p.m. at
St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church, a
weekly, non-church affiliated discussion
and social group for GBTQ men between
18 and 35. The group meets at St.
Margaret’s Episcopal Church, 1820
Connecticut Ave., N.W. For more information,
e-mail gd@gaydistrict.org.
FRIDAY NIGHT EREV SHABBAT SERVICES
8:30-10 p.m., Washington, D.C. Jewish
Community Center, 1529 16th St. Friday
Night Services are followed by an Oneg
Social. Please use the Q Street entrance.
SUNSET CELEBRATION AT MOUNT
VERNON, 6-9 p.m. Enjoy evening tours of
the mansion, 18th century music, danc-
ing, games and wagon rides. Stroll the
lantern-lit grounds and visit with Lady
Washington and her granddaughter Nelly.
Adults, $18; children 6-11, $12; and chil-
dren under 5 are admitted free.
Saturday, May 29
SHIFT takes over Cobalt, 1639 R St.,
N.W., from 10 p.m.-3 a.m. with music by
guest DJs Zack Rosen and Wesley D.
DJ BILLY STEELE at Town Danceboutique,
2009 8th St. N.W. A former Elite fashion model,
Steele began his DJ career two months after
purchasing his first set of turntables with a
Saturday night residency at Manhattan’s
Limelight at age 22. $2 drinks from 10-11 p.m.
Drag show starts at 10:30 p.m. Music and
videos downstairs by Wess. $8 from 10-11 p.m.
and $12 after 11 p.m. 21 and over.
DELAPLANE STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL,
Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at
Sky Meadows State Park, Delaplane, Va.
The annual festival includes live entertain-
ment, children’s games, pony rides, hayrides,
a petting zoo, a 5K fun run, a raptor exhibit,
antique cars, food, crafts and strawberries.
MANdance at Rehoboth’s Double L Bar,
622 Rehoboth Ave., with DJ Stephen
Durkin, drink specials, go-go dancers.
And if you’re not danced out, come back
for COCKdance on Sunday.
Sunday, May 30
DRAG BRUNCH at Nellie’s Sports Bar,
900 U St., N.W., hosted by Shi-Queeta
Lee. Every Sunday from 11-4 p.m. $20
brunch buffet and your first mimosa is free.
X: BLACKOUT at Cobalt, 1639 R St.
N.W., with music by DJ Pete Glow. Cobalt
will blanket the dance floor with low light-
ing, black lights — and at times complete
darkness. Doors open at 10 p.m., 21+, $5
before 11 p.m., $7 after.
African-American Collective Theater debuts
new play “SOMETHING BORROWED,
SOMETHING BLUE” at Warehouse
Theater, 645 New York Ave., N.W., one block
away from the D.C. Convention Center where
D.C. Black Pride’s “Legacy Festival and
Wellness Expo” is being held earlier that after-
noon. A limited number of tickets are available
at $15. For additional ticket, performance time
and venue information, e-mail asharpe-
bgm@msn.com or call 202-745-3662.
A very special WTF at Town
Danceboutique, 2009 8th St. N.W. WTF
PRESENTS: PROM NIGHT. 18+, $5.
PBS’ NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY
CONCERT starts at 8 p.m.; gates open at
5 p.m. PBS sponsors a free concert on the
West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol. The con-
cert features actors Joe Mantegna and
Gary Sinise and other guest artists along
with the National Symphony Orchestra.
Wolf Trap Farm Park’s Summer Blast
Off, “THE PRESIDENT’S OWN,” at 8
p.m. The park for performing arts kicks off
the summer season with a free perform-
ance by the U.S. Marine Band followed by
fireworks. The Filene Center gates open
at 6:30 p.m. Arrive early because the park
closes once capacity is reached.
Monday, May 31
NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY PARADE,
beginning at 2 p.m. The parade of marching
bands and veterans units from all 50 states
steps off at the corner of Constitution
Avenue and 7th Street, N.W., and pro-
ceeds along Constitution Avenue, past the
White House, ending at 17th Street.
The National Park Service and the
Friends of the National World War II
Memorial will sponsor a wreath-laying cer-
emony in honor of U.S. veterans at the
World War II Memorial at 9 a.m. Guest
speakers will give remarks. The theme for
the commemoration is “HONORING OUR
FALLEN WARRIORS.” Many surviving
WWII veterans will be in attendance.
COUNTRY WESTERN DANCE LESSONS
at Remington’s, 639 Pennsylvania Avenue,
S.E. (½ block West of Eastern Market Metro)
from 8:30-9:30 p.m., $5 per person, per les-
son (dance class participants should wear
boots or shoes with leather soles).
Tuesday, June 1
DRAG BINGO at Nellie’s Sports Bar, 900
U St., N.W., hosted by Shi-Queeta Lee,
every Tuesday starting at 8 p.m. Free to play.
Wednesday, June 2
THE TOM DAVARON SOCIAL BRIDGE
CLUB meets at 7:30 p.m., at the Dignity
Center, 721 8th St., S.E. (across from
Marine Barracks) for Social Bridge. No
partner needed. Visit lambdabridge.com.
Each Wednesday at the Green Lantern is
POZ WEDNESDAY. Starting at 8 p.m.,
POZ mixers provide a supportive atmos-
phere for those who are HIV positive and
those who want to help eradicate the stig-
ma surrounding HIV. The Green Lantern is
located at 1335 Green Ct., N.W.
30 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
SOCIALAGENDA
The African-American Collective Theater debuts its new production, ‘SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING BLUE’ at
Warehouse Theater on Sunday.
Photo by Omar Miguel, courtesy of African-American Collective Theater
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SOCIALAGENDA: Frank Kameny’s birthday @ Stein Club
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 31
A look at the top
10 super foods
By KEVIN M. NORRIS
In deciding on this list of super
foods, I turned to sources such as
Dr. Nicholas Perricone who has
written several books on weight
loss and aging and the role nutrition
and super foods play in maintaining
excellent health. I also referred
to articles in the Environmental
Nutrition Newsletter, the Center for
Science in the Public Interest
Nutrition Action Newsletter and
online sources.
The 10 foods I have chosen are
from those lists but also based on
some of my favorites and on the
totality of their beneficial vitamins
and nutrients and in their disease-
fighting qualities. I chose foods that
are rich in antioxidants, possess
multiple disease-fighting qualities,
contain fiber or essential fatty acids,
regulate blood sugar and choles-
terol, help prevent obesity, slow the
aging process and boost mood.
Use this list as a guideline and
regularly seek out other nutrient-
rich foods.
ACAI BERRIES
Acai berries are indigenous and
imported from South and Central
America. These berries are only
available frozen or processed in
drinks. They are loaded with age-
and disease-fighting antioxidants
and contain 10 times more antioxi-
dants than red grapes. Acai berries
are also loaded with fiber that aids in
digestion and cardiovascular health.
ALLIUM FAMILY
(garlic, scallions, leeks and onions)
Alliums lower cholesterol and
high blood pressure, helping to pre-
vent atherosclerosis and diabetic
heart disease, and reduce the risk of
heart attack and stroke. They also
contain multiple cancer-fighting fla-
vanoids, support gastrointestinal
health and increase bone density.
BEANS AND LEGUMES
Loaded with protein and potas-
sium, beans are a good substitute
for vegetarians and are low in fat.
Beans help reduce the risk of
stroke and high blood pressure
and heart disease and are filling,
assisting in weight control. Choose
dried or fresh beans over canned
to avoid the excess sodium.
CHILI PEPPERS
From obesity to diabetes and
beyond, chilies are a super food
because they provide numerous
health benefits. Chilies are a natural
decongestant and are a powerful can-
cer-fighting compound. Aside from
being tasty flavor enhancers, chili con-
sumption increases circulation, pro-
vides pain relief and aids in digestion.
EGGS
There are many health benefits
to eggs. One egg contains six grams
of high-quality protein and all nine
essential amino acids. Eggs also
help prevent blood clots, stroke and
heart attack and stimulate brain
function. Eggs are beneficial to the
eyes, and the only food that contains
naturally occurring vitamin D and
may help prevent breast cancer.
GREENS
Go green whenever possible.
Green vegetables are the most
nutritious of all vegetables.
Greens are loaded with disease
fighting nutrients that help with
cholesterol, blood pressure and
cancer prevention. Greens are
high in fiber, low fat and reduce the
risk of heart disease and stroke.
GREEN TEA
The health benefits of green
tea are vast and have been stud-
ied extensively. Green tea has
been purported to stave off heart
disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes
and obesity. Green tea is also
known to lower cholesterol, blood
pressure and dementia and is
packed with antioxidants.
NUTS
Nuts pack a powerful nutri-
tional punch high in fiber and
protein and include monounsatu-
rated and polyunsaturated fats.
Nuts lower bad cholesterol and
reduce the risk of coronary heart
disease and type II diabetes.
SALMON
Salmon is high in essential
omega-3 fatty acids. Consuming
salmon regularly helps lower the
risk of heart disease and helps
lower triglycerides, which are linked
to cardiac diseases while boosting
HDL cholesterol, the good choles-
terol. Eating omega-3 rich foods
such as salmon also helps to pre-
vent high blood pressure, aids in
the prevention of strokes and
increases cognitive brain function.
YOGURT
The combination of regular
yogurt and Greek yogurt is the best
case scenario. Each type of yogurt
contains the healthy “probiotic” bac-
teria, beneficial to digestion. Greek
yogurt contains twice the amount of
protein of regular yogurt and fewer
carbohydrates. By contrast, regular
yogurt has fewer calories and more
vitamin C, generally because of the
fruit content. Both forms of yogurt
are great sources of calcium and
help with bone density.
Incorporate these foods into your
eating plan along with regular exer-
cise, and enough sleep and you
will look, feel and per-
form better than ever.
Eat well and be well!
32 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
FITNESSAGENDA
You are what you eat
Kevin M. Norris is a
health and fitness columnist
for DC Agenda and owner
of Mind Your Own Body,
LLC. Personal Training.
Reach him at
kevinmnorris@aol.com.
Super foods can help prevent obesi-
ty and even slow the aging process.
Photo by iStockphoto.com/brasil2
SOCIALAGENDA: GLAAD D.C. Leadership Council @ Mitchell Gold
Washington Blade photos by Michael Key
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 33
Carolina native relocated to the
nation’s capital to run civic edu-
cation seminars for students.
Eventually, he took a position at
Howard University where he
spread awareness of adolescent
sexuality and pregnancy preven-
tion. It was during that time that he
formed solid partnerships with DC
public schools and local families,
fostering bonds that would soon
prove indispensable to the District’s
fight for same-sex marriage.
With encouragement from local
parents, Richardson volunteered for
the state Democratic Party, and his
involvement at the local level snow-
balled into a ready-made national
political career. Within two years, he
became the vice chair for the State
Democratic Party and before his
30th birthday, Richardson was in
the midst of serving a second term
as the Gertrude Stein Democratic
Club president.
He also held the distinction of
being the only openly gay black
superdelegate to the 2008
Democratic National Convention.
“I’m still in awe of having been so
blessed that folks thought enough
of me for whatever reason to be
put in a leadership role of that
magnitude,” Richardson says.
As a tireless activist for the
LGBT community, Richardson
makes a point to be present at
meetings, hearings and other
events. Fowlkes praises
Richardson for his efforts to pass
same-sex marriage and for the
“courageous conversations” he
had with community and Council
members almost nightly. During
those “stressful and difficult
times,” Fowlkes says, “Jeff was
having quiet one-on-one discus-
sions with people in the African-
American community who are not
LGBT. He is one of those rare
people with connections on both
sides of the fence, and he quieted
down some of the opposition.”
Through all of his political and
community experience, Richardson
learned that building relationships is
the key to advancing equality. “You
have to find common ground with
others — and that common ground
is humanity. And while there are
people who we can’t bring closer to
the middle on some issues, we
don’t stop trying,” he says.
For Richardson, the fight for
equality hit home on a very person-
al level. His partner of four years
died of cancer in 2005 and it was
after he fell ill that the gravity of the
situation came to light. “Marriage,
healthcare, power of attorney —
those issues suddenly became real
to me. In the middle of the night,
when we needed to go to the hos-
pital, we’d have to make sure that
we had our papers with us. You
never think people have that much
power over you until something like
that happens,” Richardson says. “I
never got the opportunity to marry
my partner, my best friend, so when
the issue of marriage came around,
it was something that I was person-
ally connected with. That became
my drive to do my part.”
With his involvement in the
Gertrude Stein Democratic Club,
Richardson has expanded LGBT
rights on many fronts. The group,
which has been in existence for
more than 30 years, has been
instrumental in advancing legis-
lation to increase partner bene-
fits in the District and in electing
more pro-equality, pro-LGBT
members to City Council.
The future looks bright for
Richardson, both politically and
professionally. Currently working
with the D.C. Children’s & Youth
Investment Trust Corporation,
he’s set to switch gears on June
14 when he will join the Center
for Progressive Leadership as
the group’s national program
director. There he will help create
opportunities for minorities to
enter the pipeline of organiza-
tional leadership.
As he finishes out his second
term as Gertrude Stein presi-
dent, Richardson is unsure of
where his path will lead. All he
knows is that he will try to live
authentically and seize “every
opportunity to do something
new, something that will affect
change.” A recent post on his
Facebook page neatly sums up
his outlook: “Thought: Are you
living your life or the life you have
been told you should live?”
DCAGENDA
34 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
Continued from page 27
Black Pride honors
Stein Club president
DC Black Pride Writer’s Forum (free)
Hosted by Fire & Ink,noon – 2 PM,Hamilton Crown Plaza Hotel
“Why Do You Write? Why Do You Read? How Do You
Succeed?”Moderated by Reginald Harris.
DC Black Pride Film Festival ($10)
Hamilton Ballroom, co-hosted by Glo–TV, 2-6 PM,
Hamilton Crown Plaza Hotel
Films:“Happy Birthday” – Abigail wants a dildo. Hannah
wants a baby. Jack and Madeleine are happy with things just the
way they are. Written and directed by Roberta Munroe (15 min)
“Finding Juliet” – Heartbroken and struggling to forget the
image of her girlfriend cheating on her with an ex, Meeko
Brown attempts to put the past behind her by setting out to find
her one true love, her Juliet. (28 mins)
“Spoiled” – Tuffy Alexander is successful, smart, and has a
demanding relationship. How far will she allow herself to be stretched
to keep it? Written and directed by Michelle Sewell. (11 min)
“Dani and Alice” – After an evening out Dani and Alice must
come to terms with the end of their violent relationship. Written
and directed by Roberta Munroe (12 min)
“Flipping the Script” – excerpts of sit down interviews of
forthcoming documentary feature. Written and directed by
Demetrius Bady. Produced by Maurice Jamal (30 mins)
“Friends and Lover” – a spinoff from the hit “The Ski Trip.” The story
follows Corey and Omar as they relocate to Los Angeles and contemplate
getting married. Written and directed by Maurice Jamal (90 mins).Special
appearances by directors Michelle Sewell and Maurice Jamal.
DC Black Pride Poetry Slam ($5)
Hamilton Ballroom,6-9 PM,Hamilton Crown Plaza Hotel,
hosted by ButterFlySoul
DC Black Pride Fashion & Entertainment ($20)
EXTRAVAGANZA!
The Sphinx,1315 K Street, N.W., 9:30 PM – 12 AM. Hosted by
Rayceen Pendarvis.
SUNDAY MAY 30
Church service, Hamilton Ballroom,Hamilton Crown Plaza
Hotel,10 AM-Noon.
Rev. Eric P. Lee is president/CEO of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference-Los Angeles.
Health and Wellness Expo Entertainment ($15)
J Holiday headlines, Washington Convention Center,1-7 PM
Segment 1: 2–3 PM, hosted by Rayceen Pendarvis and fea-
turing Running Water, Romance, Sabrina Blue, Yarde, Monet
Dupree, Tina Tuna Adams, Telle Thomas, Eric Rainbow,
Shadina/Topaz, Yahzarahand Beat Ya Feet Kings.
Segment 2, 4:15-4:45 PM, hosted by Shi-Queeta Lee with
Epiphany Bloomingdale, Tyria Iman, Raquel Savage,
Lacountress Farringtonand Brandi Courvisler.
Segment 3, 6:15-7 PM, hosted by ButtaFlySoul and featuring
DJ Flexx and J Holiday.
Continued from page 27
Black Pride events
Jeffrey Richardson will be hon-
ored by Black Pride for his
contributions to the local LGBT
community.
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
Living in Logan Circle? Find your copy of
at one of the following locations:
Barrel House Liquors • 1341 14th St. NW
Bet Mishpachah • 16th & Q St. NW
Crew Club • 1321 14th St. NW
MOVA • 1435 P St. NW
Nat’l Gay & Lesbian Task Force • 1325 Mass Ave. NW #600
Playbill Café • 1409 14th St. NW
Thai Tanic Restaurant • 1326 14th St. NW
William Lewis House Bed & Breakfast • 1309 R St. NW
washingtonblade
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 35
OPENINGS
friday, may 28
R. BUCKMINSTER FULLER: THE HIS-
TORY (AND MYSTERY) OF THE UNI-
VERSE. Arena Stage at Crystal City
Theatre. 202-488-3300. arenastage.org.
saturday, may 29
COMMON BOND EXHIBITION. Strathmore.
strathmore.org.
FINE ARTIST IN RESIDENCE EXHIBITION.
Strathmore. strathmore.org.
tuesday, june 1
THURGOOD. The John F. Kennedy Center
for the Performing Arts. 202-467-4600.
kennedy-center.org.
wednesday, june 2
RIVERDANCE. The Filene Center at Wolf
Trap National Park for the Performing
Arts. 703-255-1868. wolftrap.org.
thursday, june 3
IVAN FISCHER, CONDUCTOR / STRAVIN-
SKY & RIMSKY-KORSAKOV. National
Symphony Orchestra at The John F.
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
THE MANHATTAN TRANSFER. Strathmore.
301-581-5100. strathmore.org.
LAST CHANCE
through may 29
RIFAR EL CORAZÓN / HEARTSTRINGS.
Teatro de la Luna at Gunston Arts Center.
703-548-3092. teatrodelaluna.org.
STEVE SZABO: THE EASTERN SHORE
AND OTHER IMAGES. Arts/Harmony Hall
Regional Center. 301-203-6070. pgparks.com.
THE BEST OF FRIENDS. Washington
Stage Guild at Undercroft Theatre.
240-582-0050. stageguild.org.
through may 30
AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS.
Round House Theatre Bethesda. 240-
644-1100. roundhousetheatre.org.
JERAMIE BELLMAY: PERCEPTION ALTAR.
The Fridge DC. 202-664-4151. thefridgedc.com.
through may 31
THE SACRED MADE REAL: SPANISH
PAINTING AND SCULPTURE, 1600-
1700. National Gallery of Art. nga.gov.
LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
may 28 - may 29
A PRARIE HOME COMPANION WITH
GARRISON KEILLOR. The Filene Center
at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing
Arts. 703-255-1868. wolftrap.org.
ONE NIGHT ONLY
friday, may 28
FOLK & BLUES SERIES: CAROLINA
CHOCOLATE DROPS. Montpelier Arts
Center. 301-377-7800. pgparks.com.
wednesday, june 2
MENDELSSOHN'S ELIJAH. St. Paul's
Lutheran Church. 703-237-2499. choralis.org.
thursday, june 3
BEATLES, WINGS, AND SIX-STRING:
AN EVENING OF ACOUSTIC GUITAR.
Smithsonian Resident Associate Program
at Baird Auditorium, Smithsonian National
Musuem of Natural History. 202-633-3030.
residentassociates.org.
ONGOING
MIKVEH. Theater J at Washington DC
Jewish Community Center. 800-494-8497.
washingtondcjcc.org.
DUKE ELLINGTON'S SOPHISTICATED
LADIES. Arena Stage at Lincoln Theatre.
202-488-3300. arenastage.org.
MIDDLE EAST FESTIVAL: VOICE OF
THE WOMAN. Theater J at Washington
DC Jewish Community Center. 800-494-
8497. washingtondcjcc.org.
AMERICAN BUFFALO. The Studio
Theatre. 202-332-3300. studiotheatre.org.
GRUESOME PLAYGROUND INJURIES.
Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company. 202-
393-3939. woollymammoth.net.
SACRED WATERS: PHOTOGRAPHY BY
JOHN STANMEYER. National Geographic.
events.nationalgeographic.com.
TREADWELL: BRIGHT AND DARK. The
American Century Theater at Theatre on the
Run. 703-998-4555. americancentury.org.
MIXED MEDIA PAINTINGS BY KAREN
HUBACHER AND BY TORY COWLES.
Gallery plan b. 202-234-2711. galleryplanb.com.
STEVENS JAY CARTER: COLLECT-
ING COLORS AND TEXTURES. Caos
on F. caosonf.com.
FROM IMPRESSIONISM TO MODERNISM:
THE CHESTER DALE COLLECTION.
National Gallery of Art. nga.gov.
HENDRICK AVERCAMP: THE LITTLE
ICE AGE. National Gallery of Art. nga.gov.
HISTORY ON FOOT: ELIZABETH KECKLY.
Ford's Theatre. 202-347-4833. fordstheatre.org.
BEAT MEMORIES: THE PHOTO-
GRAPHS OF ALLEN GINSBERG.
National Gallery of Art. nga.gov.
DESIGN FOR THE OTHER 90%.
National Geographic Museum. 202-857-
7588. events.nationalgeographic.com.
ART BY THE YARD: WOMEN DESIGN
MID-CENTURY BRITAIN. The Textile
Museum. 202 667 0441. textilemuseum.org.
RARE: PORTRAITS OF AMERICA'S
ENDANGERED SPECIES. National
Geographic. events.nationalgeographic.com.
GERMAN MASTER DRAWINGS FROM
THE WOLFGANG RATJEN COLLECTION,
1580-1900. National Gallery of Art. nga.gov.
IN THE TOWER: MARK ROTHKO.
National Gallery of Art. nga.gov.
AMERICAN MODERNISM: THE SHEIN
COLLECTION. National Gallery of Art.
nga.gov.
THE ART OF LIVING: TEXTILE FUR-
NISHINGS FROM THE PERMANENT
COLLECTION. The Textile Museum. 202-
667-0441. textilemuseum.org.
HISTORY ON FOOT: DETECTIVE MCDE-
VITT. Ford's Theatre. 202-347-4833. fords.org.
FREE
may 29 - may 30
GALLERY TALK: IN MEMORY OF SAN-
DRO BOTTICELLI (1446-1510). National
Gallery of Art. nga.gov.
36 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
THE GUIDE TO ARTS & CULTURE
HOT HITS AND
HIDDEN JEWELS
HAMLET
Through June 4
Washington National Opera
The John F. Kennedy Center for
the Performing Arts
800-US-OPERA
dc-opera.org
Ambroise Thomas' musically and
dramatically virtuosic adaptation of
the classic story follows Hamlet in his
pursuit to avenge his father's murder. Known for Ophelia's hauntingly beautiful mad
scene, 'Et maintenant ecoutez ma chanson,' this dazzling production brings
Shakespeare's famous play to life.
JAZZ IN THE GARDEN: LESLIE SUMMEY
Friday, May 28
National Gallery of Art
nga.gov
The Jazz in the Garden concert series, the
National Gallery of Art's beloved summer
tradition, begins its 10th season featuring
bebop music with female jazz vocalist
Leslie Summey. The improvisational
nature of jazz and the bebop style that was
popular in the 1950s complements the
current Beat Memories exhibition.
SWINGTIME! THE FABULOUS FORTIES
May 29 - June 12
The In Series
Atlas Performing Arts Center
202-204-7763
inseries.org
As the 1940s twirl and explode around them, six diverse
characters united by music and friendship swing into
new identities. Evolving together or growing apart, they
watch and sing as the world swings from depression to
the brink of destruction and back again into a strange
new prosperity.
JOHN WATERS: AN UNCONVENTIONAL
SELF-PORTRAIT
Wednesday, June 2
Smithsonian Resident Associate Program
Smithsonian S. Dillon Ripley Center
202-633-3030
residentassociates.org
John Waters, American filmmaker, actor, and artist, takes
an irreverent and intimate look at the influences on his life
and work in a conversation with Washington Post Style
editor, Ned Martel.
The Guide to Arts & Culture is supplied by CulturalCapital.com, a program of the Cultural Alliance of
Greater Washington. HAMLET: Photo by Karin Cooper for WNO; JAZZ IN THE GARDEN: Photo supplied
by National Gallery of Art; SWINGTIME: Vince Borrelli as Van Leonardo and W. Ellington Felton as Joe
Stuckey, photo supplied by In Series; JOHN WATERS: Photo by Greg Gorman.
‘Sycamore Trees’ is
candid, compassionate
By PATRICK FOLLIARD
Four years ago on his 50th birth-
day, gay composer Ricky Ian Gordon
won an Obie Award for his song
cycle, “Orpheus and Euridice.” On
that very same day, he also learned
that he’d received a $100,000 com-
mission from Signature Theatre to
compose a new musical as part of
the Arlington company’s “American
Musical Voices Project.” The result of
Gordon being selected by Signature
is “Sycamore Trees,” an almost
entirely autobiographical piece
chronicling his family’s story from the
mid-1940s through the 1990s.
Initially, Gordon thought he’d sat-
isfy his sizable commission by col-
laborating with an established lyri-
cist and a playwright on a new musi-
cal work. When that didn’t pan out,
Gordon sensed the universe was
telling him something: “Do the fami-
ly piece!” Certainly the material was
there: His mother was a Borsht Belt
singer and his father a macho World
War II veteran. He and his three
older sisters, Gordon attests, were
the result of their parents’ outsized
passion. And while the postwar
Jewish family’s climb from the Bronx
to suburban Long Island wasn’t
unusual, their rancorous battles and
hardcore addiction issues were.
Gordon first began work on the
libretto and score that would
become “Sycamore Trees” in the
1980s. “When I started, I had a
story about my family but not self,”
he explains. “I first had to live, bot-
tom out, lose a lover to AIDS, and
get clean. Only after putting my
world back together did telling my
story make sense to me. ”
In a Signature press release,
“Sycamore Trees’” director Tina
Landau says, “The whole piece feels
like a poem — some haunting com-
bination of memory, music, and
dream.” But it’s also sharp, biting and
very funny with an eclectic, melodic
score. This world premiere produc-
tion features a talented cast of
Broadway vets including Judy Kuhn,
Mac Kudisch, Matthew Risch, and
Diane Sutherland. Tony Yazbeck
plays Andrew, the Gordon character.
About midpoint in the musical’s
development, Andrew had a poem,
essentially a paean to his father’s
laud worthy penis. Ultimately, the
passage was cut. (“There’s only so
much you can ask from an audi-
ence,” Gordon notes wryly,
“Especially when you tell them that
they’re seeing a musical.”)
But another scene recounting
young Andrew’s disastrous sexual
experimentation with another boy
remains intact. Many changes and
edits were made throughout the evo-
lution of “Sycamore Trees,” and none
of them came easily, says Gordon.
When it’s your own story, it’s espe-
cially difficult to leave something out.
At just 16, Gordon entered
Carnegie Mellon University. In his
freshman year, he realized he was
meant to be a composer. For him, it
was “like walking into the light.” Today,
Gordon’s advice to aspiring com-
posers is to listen to all the music they
possibly can. Writing for theater
demands that they call upon all that
they know to make every moment as
authentic as possible. To do that, it’s
necessary to have a broad musical
vocabulary at your fingertips. Most
young composers have yet to
acquire that. With him it was different.
“I feel compelled to write musicals
that are both emotionally and psy-
chologically like the foreign films that
I grew up loving. That’s my aesthet-
ic,” adds Gordon whose other works
include the opera “The Grapes of
Wrath” and the musicals “Dream
True” and “My Life with Albertine.”
“I like to bring the close-up to
the stage. There’s intimacy even
in my more epic work.”
“Sycamore Trees” is a love let-
ter to Gordon’s family. And while
he exposes himself and his kin,
warts and all, his candid obser-
vations are exceedingly compas-
sionate and beautifully rendered.
THEATERAGENDA
Gay composer RICKY IAN GORDON created an honest portrait of his
unique family.
Photo courtesy of Gordon
‘Sycamore Trees’
Through June 13
Signature Theatre
4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington
703-573-SEAT
signature-theatre.org
Gay composer’s love letter to family
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 37
Alpha Drugs poised
to sponsor venture
By DAVID HOFFMAN
Special to Washington Blade
A primary care medical clinic
specializing in serving HIV/AIDS
patients will soon open its doors,
according to its medical director.
Dr. Milton Mills, an HIV/AIDS
doctor currently practicing outpa-
tient clinic-based medicine in
Northern Virginia, said the new
clinic might be based in the relo-
cated D.C. Center for the LGBT
Community.
The Center, which is seeking a
new home before its displacement
next month from 1840 14th St.,
N.W., due to a redevelopment
project, has appealed for city
assistance. It’s unclear where the
Center will relocate.
Mills said the new clinic, spon-
sored by Alpha Drugs & Medical
Supplies, is looking for space
now so it can open to the public
as soon as possible.
Plans for the new clinic were
revealed last week during an
Alpha Drugs HIV/AIDS patient
“survival forum” at the Hotel
Palomar in D.C. No additional
information regarding the clinic,
such as its staff size or whether it
was intended to compete with the
specialty HIV/AIDS care that
Whitman-Walker Clinic offers,
was offered during the event.
Mills, a Stanford University
School of Medicine graduate who
works as a critical care physician
at Fairfax Hospital, made an off-
hand reference to the new clinic
while speaking on the role of
nutrition in the treatment of HIV.
During his presentation, Mills
emphasized the link between
nutrition and health. He also
stressed the importance of
“dietary intervention” to treat and
cure seriously ill patients.
“Medical research shows con-
clusively that a plant-based diet
reduces chronic disease risk,”
Mills said. “I find that when peo-
ple are ill, they are very open to
adopting such practices as a
vegetarian diet when that will
improve their health.”
Mills told a group of about 40
people that he’s “very in your
face about what’s good for you,”
but his “goal is not to make you
all vegetarians.”
“In fact,” he said, “I used to be
the biggest meat-eater in my
family, and I thought I couldn’t
live without it.”
Mills said he changed his eat-
ing habits more than 20 years
ago, moving from a vegetarian
diet to being “95 percent vegan,
only occasionally eating some-
thing with egg whites in it.” He
noted that his dietary changes,
despite some initial difficulties,
yielded better health.
“Like alcohol or cocaine, meat
eating is an addiction,” he said.
“And if you don’t believe me, just
try taking a piece of chicken out of
someone’s hand. They will hurt
you worse than a crack addict.”
To successfully adopt a vege-
tarian diet, Mills said it’s impor-
tant to “divest food of its emo-
tional meanings.”
“We often think of food in emo-
tional terms,” he said. “For exam-
ple, food reminds us of
Thanksgiving at grandmother’s
house. But we need to divest food
of these feelings, and not see food
in its romantic terms, because food
is just chemicals in our body.”
Mills shared reams of data
during his presentation, which
noted the costs associated with
HIV patients who choose to con-
tinue eating meat.
“Many antiretroviral drugs
used to treat HIV stress the
body,” he said. “For example,
[there is] liver stress and some
raise your cholesterol levels and
contribute to heart disease.”
He said to offset that stress —
“and so that these medications
don’t have a negative as well as
positive effect” — dietary
changes are helpful.
“AIDS has gone from being
inexorably fatal so that now HIV
on therapy taken as prescribed
has become basically a chronic
disease with a normal lifespan,”
Mills said.
He noted this means that an
HIV/AIDS patient’s major health
risks now often come from other
causes, such as Hepatitis B and
C, diabetes, heart and kidney
diseases, and diet is key to fight-
ing these potential problems.
38 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
SOCIALAGENDA
Dr. Milton Mills said a new primary care medical clinic specializing in
HIV/AIDS care will soon open its doors.
Photo courtesy of pcrm.org
New HIV/AIDS clinic planned for D.C.
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 39
40 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
washington, dc
30 DEGREES
1639 R St., NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-462-6569
cobaltdc.com
In Dupont Circle area; popular with men
but check schedule for other events.
1409 PLAYBILL CAFÉ
1409 14th St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
202-265-3055
Logan Circle area restaurant and bar
(Dupont Circle Metro) popular with the
theater crowd and featuring open-mike
nights, karaoke and other special events.
ACADEMY
OF WASHINGTON
thewashingtonacademy.com
Longtime organizers of drag events in the
city; most events held at Ziegfeld’s. See
web site for full list of upcoming events.
ANNIE’S PARAMOUNT
STEAK HOUSE
1609 17th St., NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-232-0395
In Dupont Circle area; popular longtime
restaurant and steakhouse with recently
renovated Upstairs Lounge.
APEX
1415 22nd St., NW
Washington, DC 20037
202-296-0505
apex-dc.com
In Dupont Circle area; popular with
men, but check schedule regularly for
other events.
BACHELOR’S MILL
1104 8th St., SE
Washington, DC 20003
202-544-1931
Longtime bar popular with African-
American men in Capitol Hill area.
BANANA CAFÉ
500 8th St., SE
Washington, DC 20003
202-543-5906
bananacafedc.com
Popular Capitol Hill area restaurant and
bar (Eastern Market Metro) for both men
and women. Features Cuban, Mexican
and Puerto Rican cuisine.
BLOWOFF
815 V St., NW
Washington, DC 20001
blowoff.us
Created by musicians Bob Mould and
Richard Morel, Blowoff is an occasional
dance event popular with men. Events are
held in clubs around the country; D.C.’s
Blowoff parties are held at the 9:30 club
in the popular U Street corridor.
B.O.I.
PRODUCTIONS
boimarketing.com//community.html
Organizes regular women’s events
around town. Check web site for updated
information.
COBALT
1639 R St., NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-462-6569
cobaltdc.com
In Dupont Circle area; part of complex
of LGBT businesses at this address,
including Level One restaurant on
street level and 30 Degrees bar.
CREW CLUB
1321 14th St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
202-319-1333
crewclub.net
Men’s 24-hour gym in Logan Circle area,
featuring steam rooms, lounges,
private dressing rooms and more.
DC EAGLE
639 New York Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-347-6025
dceagle.com
The popular Levi/leather bar’s origins
date to the 1960s. Features billiards,
regular tournaments and other special
events. Located near the convention
center, two blocks north of Gallery
Place Metro.
DELTA ELITE
3734 10th St. NE
Washington, DC 20017
202-546-5979
thedeltaelite.com
Longtime bar popular with African-
American men in Brookland
neighborhood; hosts regular ladies night.
Check web site for special events.
DIK BAR
1637 17th St., NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-328-0100
dupontitaliankitchen.com
In Dupont Circle area, above
Dupont Italian Kitchen.
DUPLEX DINER
2004 18th St., NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-265-9599
duplexdiner.com
Popular restaurant and bar in the
Adams Morgan area; happy hour
specials and many other special events.
See web site for updated schedule.
EFN LOUNGE/
MOTLEY BAR
1318 9th St., NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-341-8281 • 202-642-4537
efnlounge.com • motleybar.com
twitter.com/EFN_Lounge
Funky, edgy neighborhood lounge in
Logan Circle with special events galore.
Popular with men and women; features
dancing, videos. Check web site for
event schedule.
FAB LOUNGE
1805 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-797-1122
thefablounge.com
In Dupont Circle area; popular with men
but hosts regular women’s events.
FIREPLACE
2161 P St., NW
Washington, DC 20037
202-293-1293
In Dupont Circle area; neighborhood bar
popular with men.
GREEN LANTERN
1335 Green Court, NW
Washington, DC 20005
greenlanterndc.com
twitter.com/greenlanterndc
Friendly bar for men hosts regular happy
hours and special events, including
karaoke and shirtless drink special
nights. Check web site for details.
McPherson Square Metro.
JR.’S
1519 17th St., NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-328-0090
jrswdc.com
Longtime friendly Dupont Circle area
bar popular with men; videos, regular
special events.
LACE
2214 Rhode Island Ave., NE
Washington, DC 20018
202-832-3888
lacedc.com
Every night is ladies night at Lace;
features regular special events for women
in Brookland neighborhood. Check web
site for details on happy hour specials.
LARRY’S LOUNGE
1836 18th St., NW
Washington, DC 20009
202-483-1483
Dupont Circle area bar and restaurant
popular with both men and women.
MIXTAPE
Different locations
mixtapedc.com
twitter.com/MIXTAPEdc
Alternative dance party for queer men and
women featuring electro, alt-pop, indie
rock, house, disco and New Wave. Check
web site for 2010 schedule of events.
MOVA
1435 P St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
202-797-9730
halodc.com
Trendy Logan Circle bar and lounge
popular with men features regular happy
hour and other specials. Formerly known
as Halo, MOVA re-launched in early
2010 as a environmentally friendly bar
with an emphasis on community service.
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
900 U St., NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-332-6355
nelliessportsbar.com
Sports bar featuring poker events, drag
bingo, trivia contests and other specials.
Popular bar with massive outdoor deck
and plenty of TVs for watching sports.
OMEGA
2122 P St., NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-223-4917
omegadc.com
Dupont Circle area bar and club popular
with men featuring dancing, drag and
other special events.
PHASE 1
525 8th St., SE
Washington, DC 20003
phase1dc.com
twitter.com/phase1dc
The Phase opened in 1970 and remains
a popular lesbian bar and club. Features
regular special events, including Jell-O
wrestling, 80s theme nights and more.
Check web site for details.
REMINGTONS
639 Pennsylvania Ave., SE
Washington, DC 20003
202-543-3113
remingtonswdc.com
twitter.com/remingtonsWDC
Popular country/Western nightclub in Capitol
Hill neighborhood with more than 6,000
square feet of space for dancing and billiards.
One half block west of Eastern Market Metro.
TOWN DANCEBOUTIQUE
2009 8th St., NW
Washington, DC 20001
202-234-TOWN
towndc.com
Dance club and bar popular with men
and women, features regular drag per-
formances. U Street Metro.
ULTRABAR
911 F St., NW
Washington, DC 20004
ultrabardc.com
twitter.com/UltraBar
Large dance club with gay-friendly
events and vibe located downtown near
Metro Center.
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
1824 Half St., SW
Washington, DC 20024
202-863-0670
secretsdc.com
Featuring all-nude male dancers Wednesdays-
Sundays, drag performances, large dance floor
and many regular special events, contests and
more. Large parking lot available; located in
Buzzard’s Point warehouse district.
LGBTNIGHTLIFEGUIDE
baltimore
1722
1722 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
Multi-level after-hours dance club attracts
a mixed crowd but remains gay-friendly.
BALTIMORE EAGLE
2002 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218
410-82-EAGLE
Longtime Levi/leather bar not far
from Mount Vernon offers friendly bar,
billiards, outdoor patio, videos and a
full store for your leather needs.
Mostly men, but welcoming to women.
CLUB PHOENIX
1 W. Biddle St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-837-3906
Mount Vernon-area downstairs bar
attracts men and women; friendly service.
DRINKERY
205 W. Read St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-225-3100
Another of Baltimore’s friendly neighbor-
hood bars in Mount Vernon featuring
billiards, jukebox and welcoming service.
GALLERY
1735 Maryland Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-539-6965
Longtime bar and restaurant popular
with African-American clientele.
GRAND CENTRAL
1001 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-752-7133
centralstationpub.com
Large entertainment complex featuring
friendly pub, lesbian bar Sappho’s upstairs
and a dance club on the first floor.
HIPPO
1 W. Eager St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-547-0069
clubhippo.com
Large club popular with men and
women featuring billiards, top
DJs/dancing, karaoke, videos and
more. Opened in 1972, Hippo’s motto
is “where everyone is welcome.”
JAY’S ON READ
225 W. Read St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-225-0188
Piano bar attracts a mostly male
crowd, though welcoming to women
and straight patrons.
LEON’S/
TYSON PLACE
870 Park Ave.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-539-4993
leonsbaltimore.tripod.com
In business for more than 50 years,
Leon’s is the oldest gay bar in
Baltimore and among the oldest in
the country. Friendly bar with jukebox
gets especially busy on Sunday nights.
Tyson Place is a restaurant bar
located behind Leon’s with a
separate entrance.
PORT IN A STORM
4330 E. Lombard St.
Baltimore, MD 21224
410-534-0014
Friendly neighborhood lesbian bar gets
especially popular when the Ravens
play. Features billiards, music and more.
QUEST
3607 Fleet St.
Baltimore, MD 21224
410-563-2617
Neighborhood bar in Highlandtown
area is popular with men and women
and offers billiards.
SAPPHOS
1001 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-752-7133
centralstationpub.com
Part of the Grand Central complex,
Sappho’s attracts a lesbian crowd
and offers comfy couches, outdoor
patio and more in its second
floor location.
northern va
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
555 23rd St. South
Arlington, VA 22202
703-685-0555
Freddie Lutz’s Virginia establishment
includes a restaurant and friendly bar,
regular specials and is popular with
men and women. Crystal City Metro.
laurel, md
PW’S
9855 N. Washington Blvd.
Laurel, MD 20723
301-498-8202
pwssportsbar.com
Restaurant and bar is popular with gay
and lesbian sports fans and is known
for its superb burgers.
Washington Blade photo by Michael Key
LACE
Memorial Day isn’t just
for beach and picnics
By TYRONE FORD
Special to Washington Blade
With the effort to repeal “Don’t
Ask, Don’t Tell” dominating head-
lines this week, it’s important to
remember that Memorial Day
Weekend isn’t just for beach trips
and barbeques — it’s a time to
honor those who have died serving
our country. There are events all
over the area that honor our veter-
ans, from here in D.C., to other near-
by destinations for those escaping
the District for the long weekend.
Here are a few suggestions.
Washington, D.C.
Sunset Celebration at Mount
Vernon: May 28-30, 6-9 p.m.
Enjoy evening tours of the man-
sion, 18th century music, dancing,
games and wagon rides. Adults,
$18; children 6-11, $12; and chil-
dren under 5 are admitted free.
Wolf Trap Farm Park: Sunday,
May 30, 8 p.m., Summer Blast Off!
“The President’s Own.” The park for
performing arts kicks off the sum-
mer season with a free perform-
ance by the U.S. Marine Band fol-
lowed by fireworks. The Filene
Center gates open at 6:30 p.m.
Arrive early because the park clos-
es once capacity is reached.
National Memorial Day
Parade: Monday, May 31, begin-
ning at 2 p.m. The parade of march-
ing bands and veterans units from
all 50 states steps off at the corner
of Constitution Avenue and 7th
Street, N.W., and proceeds along
Constitution Avenue, past the White
House, ending at 17th Street.
World War II Memorial:
Monday, May 31, 9 a.m. The
National Park Service and the
Friends of the National World War II
Memorial will sponsor a wreath-lay-
ing ceremony in honor of our veter-
ans. The theme for the commemo-
ration is “Honoring our Fallen
Warriors.” Many surviving WWII vet-
erans will be in attendance.
Philadelphia
Throughout Memorial Day
weekend, Old City’s National
Constitution Center, 325 Arch
St., will offer multiple family-
friendly activities. In addition to
the center’s “The Story of We
the People” standard exhibit,
visitors can enjoy “Memorials:
How a Nation Remembers.”
This interactive program lasts 20
minutes and presents informa-
tion on monuments and memori-
als throughout the nation.
Saturday, Sunday and Monday at
10 a.m., 12 p.m. and 2 p.m.
Other activities include the cele-
bration of the Pennsylvania
Liberty Tree dedication, marking
a one-year anniversary.
Monday, May 31, 9:45 a.m. is
the Port Richmond Memorial
Day Parade. Port Richmond is the
only Philadelphia community still
able to sponsor and support a
Memorial Day parade to honor
those who gave their lives in serv-
ice. The parade is funded with
donations raised from community
members and business leaders.
Monday, May 31, 3 p.m.
Memorial Day Commemoration
at the Valley Forge National
Historical Park Visitor Center,
1400 North Outerline Dr., King of
Prussia. Valley Forge is best known
as George Washington’s winter
campsite. On Memorial Day, the
park’s staff honors America’s fallen
heroes in a commemoration ceremo-
ny. Participate in a national moment of
silence with others at the park’s visitor
center and view a military salute. You
can also picnic at the park and learn
about the area’s place in history dur-
ing the Revolutionary War.
New York City
Since 1984, New York City has
held Fleet Week to honor the U.S.
Navy and Marine Corps. The
week features extensive military
demonstrations, as well as the
opportunity for the public to tour
some of the visiting ships. The
Memorial Day commemoration is
a highlight of the week’s festivities,
featuring a performance of “Taps”
and a military aircraft fly over in
honor of those who lost their lives
in service to the United States.
All events are free, unless
they are held at the USS
Intrepid Sea, Air and Space
Museum, Pier 86 at 12th
Avenue and 46th Street, which
means you’ll need to buy tickets
to enter the museum (though
admission to the Intrepid is free
for active and retired military). All
events are held in Manhattan,
unless otherwise indicated. Visit
www.intrepidmuseum.org for the
full list of Memorial Day activities.
SOCIALAGENDA
Commemorate Memorial Day on Monday with a wreath laying ceremony
at the National World War II Memorial in D.C.
Photo courtesy of National Park Service
Remembering the fallen
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 41
PW’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL
PW’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL
Twice voted Maryland’s Best Gay Bar
(Baltimore Outland News, Maryland R-Group)
Top Ten List Area’s Best Burgers
(WTOP Listeners Poll)
Sundays
• Happy Hour All Night
• Games on the Big Screen
Mondays
• Buzztime Trivia contest and
50 Cents Off Bottles and Drafts
• Games on the Big Screen
Tuesdays
• Happy Hour All Night
Wednesdays
• Free Pool, 50 Cents Off Bottles and Drafts
Thursdays
• Karaoke in the Show Lounge
Fridays
• Alternating Weeks, 1st and 3rd DJ,
2nd and 4th Drag Show
Saturdays
• Karaoke
• Drag Bingo 3rd Sat. of Every Month
A short drive from DC, Baltimore and Annapolis.
Come see what you’ve been missing!
9855 Washington Blvd. N • Laurel, MD 20723
301-498-4840 • www.pwssportsbar.com
We Offer
a Full Menu
FREE POOL
EVERY WEDNESDAY
PW’s now has BUZZTIME ELECTRONIC TRIVIA and
BUZZTIME Texas Holdem. Interactive electronic trivia,
players can compete against other players or teams
and be ranked against other players nationwide.
42 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010 may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 43
Come and see
what you’ve been
missing 24/7
NOONTIME SPECIAL!!!
MONDAY - FRIDAY:
1/2 PRICE ROOMS 10 - 2PM
1/2 PRICE TUESDAYS
8AM - 12 Midnight
All Rooms & Lockers 1/2 Price
FRIDAY/SATURDAY/SUNDAY
Late Night Steams • Afternoon Workouts
Goodlooking Guys • Hot Showers • Videos
Big Steamroom • Sauna
Gym & Cardio • Lounges
Friendly Staff • Very Clean Facilities
Private Rooms & Lockers
Must have valid I.D.
www.inspot.org
All STD/HIV testing Information
42 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010 may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 43
Come and see
what you’ve been
missing 24/7
NOONTIME SPECIAL!!!
MONDAY - FRIDAY:
1/2 PRICE ROOMS 10 - 2PM
1/2 PRICE TUESDAYS
8AM - 12 Midnight
All Rooms & Lockers 1/2 Price
FRIDAY/SATURDAY/SUNDAY
Late Night Steams • Afternoon Workouts
Goodlooking Guys • Hot Showers • Videos
Big Steamroom • Sauna
Gym & Cardio • Lounges
Friendly Staff • Very Clean Facilities
Private Rooms & Lockers
Must have valid I.D.
www.inspot.org
All STD/HIV testing Information
WHEN QUALITY COUNTS Male/TV/TS, 202-
487-3660, www.tops69.com
SENSUOUS BOD 2 BOD Friendly, creative, erot-
ic massage…Your willing body, for a toe curling
experience! Chad (202) 329-7097
THAI-AMERICAN – NUDE BODY MASSAGE, 27
yrs., 5'8", 150 lbs., friendly, handsome, smooth,
nice body. In (Alexandria VA)/out 10AM - 10PM
Call Robert (703) 655-2130
LIBERATE YOUR LIBIDO-destress now! I’M ERIC
Nationally Certified, Irish-Italian, Former-US Navy,
Swimmer, Gymnast offering exceptional deep tis-
sue / bodywork for IN SHAPE GENTLEMEN.
Private Studio (Shower, Metro 2.5 blks, Prkg). Call
(202) 544-7905, cell (202) 321-8439. In Calls only.
BOYISH CUTE LATINO 19 yo very smooth slen-
der bottom. ALSO: MICHELANGELO BODY + Ivy
League brain, 6'2 195# 46ch 34w, toned tanned
smooth. In/outcalls. (571) 255-0584
ENASARIS 5 11" 155lbs 30yo 9X6 Versatile Top
202.271.0440
GREAT MASSEUR in DC. 24/7 to make appts.
6.0 tall 180 lbs. mix latin.
Call me at (202) 413-5952 CESAR
BODYWORK
Stressed Out? Relax your body, mind and spirit
with strong,skilled & caring hands.
Give it a try! No calls after 10 PM! Call Manuel at
202-251-1652, Bodywork202@hotmail.com
"SATISFACTION GUARANTEED"
BLONDE GI 6’0”, 165LBS Good looking, athlet-
ic, well-endowed. Sensual Massage & More. Eli
(703) 599-2668.
BEAR HUNTING Strong sensual paws for your
willing body. Tom (202) 289-7367.
EROTIC SWEDISH MASSAGE - healthy clean cut
guy, 6'1", 160lbs, Dupont Circle, massage table, noon
to 1:00 a.m., indulge your body. Bill 202-728-0238
24 YEAR OLD mixed therapeutic massuer, incalls
with table Capitol Hill. Trained experienced, also
offer homecleaning. twobyrdsoneboy@yahoo.com
615.707.2703. Outcalls also, try me today!
ADULT
Meet HOT Local Guys!
Call 202-216-0011 or
703-538-1700 or 410-653-6900
or 301-591-0330
Use ad Code 7777. 18+
exotic
44 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
FLORIDA BOY muscle body extra large
endowment. Scott (202) 491-5022
MALE MASSAGE by 31 yo, 5’ 9”, 170 lbs, Hot
Latino with a special touch. Offering full body
release in a private atmosphere. In/out.
Parking Available, hotels welcome, Silver
Spring/DC area, 24/7. 240-462-8669
ALL-AMERICAN BOY 24y/o, 5'9, 138lbs, 29w.
Very cute & clean-cut, w/a smooth lean build.
Affectionate & versatile, loves older guys.
HotDCkid@gmail.com 202-365-9065
MASSAGE SILVER SPRING Spanish/Irish,
160 lbs, 5'10" great shape, beach tan, strong
soothing hands. Full-body erotic experience,
masculine energy. Stress release. Comfortable
studio, private home. $70/hr. Days/evenings,
metro. BRUNO (301) 580-2716.
washingtonblade.com
Contact
Lynne Brown at
lbrown@washblade.com
Want to have
washington blade
delivered
to you?
EMPLOYMENT
THE START OF A GREAT CAREERGet on the road
to a truly rewarding and satisfying work experience!
The Share Group, Inc.’s convenient location can offer
an excellent opportunity for career advancement. Earn
up to $20.00/hr by joining our fundraising team. We
have daylight, evening, and weekend shifts available. If
you have the ambition and are looking to launch your
new career, call (202)315-5309 for more information.
MASSAGE
PROFESSIONAL MASSAGE THERAPIST offer-
ing best deep tissue massage available.
Stretching, Swedish & Sports massage. Dupont,
Special 1st time rates. Marcio (202) 271-9440.
www.MarcioMassage.com
ONLY $55 PER HOUR SPRING INTO WELLNESS
with body work to heal your winter aches & pains.
Relaxing & rejuvinating, Swedish, deep tissue &
pressure point techinques. Adams Morgan /
Dupont RON 202-641-1078
INDULGE YOURSELF WITH RELAXING, deep tis-
sue massage. Feel the stress leave your body. CMT
with 15 years experience. Located in Logan/Dupont
Circle. www.DCMassageTherapist.com. Visa, MC.
David (202) 213-9646 Lic#MT410
N.ARLINGTON CMT - Enjoy your massage in a pri-
vate, in-home studio. Great location. Clean, quiet,
discreet. mymassagebygary.com - 301-704-1158
GREAT TOUCH! Full sensual body massage by
Latin Male. Swedish, deep tissue. Relieve stress!
Parking available. In/out. 703-401-9093.
EXPERIENCED, ATHLETIC, FRIENDLY, Certified
Masseur offering excellent therapeutic massage.
Trained in Deep Tissue, Swedish & Sports, near
15th St. NW in Logan www.massagem4m.com/Dale
or call 202 669 1643.
ITALIAN JOCK Give full body massage. Masculine,
muscular, VGL masseur, offers, full-body, Swedish,
sports, deep tissue massage on a table, including
stretching, shower available. See my photos on
www.massagem4m.com/jockguy. Located down-
town, parking available. Brian 312-961-7724.
ASIAN MALE MASSAGE Swedish, Deep Tissue,
Sports, Shiatsu, Stretching Techniques. Intuitive,
Therapeutic. Glebe Rd/395. $70/hr; $90/1.5 hrs.
Dant65@hotmail.com. (202) 425-5105.
PROFESSIONAL MALE MASSAGE THERAPIST
Reduce stress, increase flexibility and prevent
injuries. Swedish, Deep Tissue, Sports, Stretching.
Call Trace 202-246-0724. VISA/MC LIC#MT375
THE MAGIC TOUCH: Swedish, Massage or Deep
Tissue. Appts 202-486-6183, Low Rates, 24/7.
THERAPEUTIC & RELAXING TOUCH to give your
body/mind time to escape from all of life's stresses.
Professional/Therapeutic only. Alan 202 271-7276
http://alanmassage.com/
WEDDINGS & SERVICES
RC priest, American Catholic affiliation, licensed DC
marriage officiant. Many years experience working
with gay & straight couples in secular & religious
services. No venue too small. Let me help you make
your special day simple, elegant, memorable. Call Ed
(202) 445-0366, ed.ingebretsen@gmail.com.
MUSICAL
ENTERTAINMENT
FIRST CLASS MUSIC for any occasion. Piano-
Accordion-Combo. References, recordings available.
www.howardlfeinstein.com. khfeinstein@verizon.net
or call 301-564-9482.
PHOTOGRAPHY
STEVE O’TOOLE PHOTOGRAPHY Fine Art
Photographer for portraits, weddings & dating
photos for the internet. Call (703) 532-3031.
www.steveotoolephotography.com
LIMOUSINES / DRIVERS
KASPERS LIVERY SERVICE Since 1987 Gay Owned
Luxury Sedan or Stretch Limousine 24 HR Reservations
(202) 554-2471 or (800) 455-2471.www.KasperLivery.com
BODY AND SOUL
FULL BODY WAXING for Men & Women at Qi
Spa-3106 M St, NW www.qispadc.com.
Please call (202) 333-6345 for waxing, mas-
sage, skincare...
VACATION RENTALS
COUNSELING
LGBTQ AFFIRMING THERAPY at Dupont Metro.
Individuals, couples, families, adolescents. Over 15
years serving the community. Mike Giordano, LICSW.
202/460-6384, mike.giordano.msw@gmail.com,
www.WhatIHearYouSaying.com
COUNSELING FOR GAY MEN. Individual/couple
counseling with volunteer peer counselor. Gay
Men's Counseling Community. 202-265-6495. gay-
menscounseling.org. No fees, donation requested.
INDIVIDUAL THERAPY FOR the gay & lesbian com-
munity. Relationships, grief, anxiety, transitions, careers.
Jonathan Kirkendal (202) 550-3589. www.dclpc.com.
LEGAL SERVICES
FULL SERVICE LAW FIRM Representing the
GLBT community for over 25 years. Family adop-
tions, estate planning, real estate, immigration,
employment. (301) 891-2200. Silber, Perlman,
Sigman & Tilev, P.A. & Kirstin Gulling, Of Counsel.
www.SP-Law.com
EMPLOYMENT LAW ATTORNEY - Wrongful
Discharge, Sexual Harrassment, Contract Review,
Whitleblowers. The Law Office of Carl Roller
(202) 531-2777, www.carlroller.com
AUTOS
FAST CASH!!! Wanted Cars & Trucks. Don’t
throw your money away, call me! I will buy your
vehicle. Call Marty Salins, at Auto Plaza, in
Rockville, (301) 340-1390.
BUY/USED BOOKS
ALL GAY THEMES. G BOOKS. 1520 U St, NW.
202-986-9697 Brandonchan99@msn.com. 4pm-
10pm. P.S. our lubes, DVDs & gear cheaper than online.
PETS & SUPPLIES
ADOPT AN ADORABLE PUPPY OR DOGAll-breed,
non-profit rescue. 100% volunteer run. Donations
welcome & needed. www.aforeverhome.org.
MOVING
JOHN HENRY MOVERS Since 1990, the area's
favorite gay owned crew. Expert packing, pianos.
Experienced, equipped & punctual as hell.
Cheapskates love us! 703-597-5561
GULLIVER’S MOVERS - Swift & gentle reloca-
tion's. Packing, pianos, antiques. Local & long dis-
tance 202-483-9579 www.gulliversmovers.com
CLEANING
TOO NEAT GUYS INC. Residential & commercial
cleaning in DC & Northern VA. Over 12 years
experience, gay owned, licensed, bonded &
insured (703) 622-5983.
A CLEANING SERVICE invites you to relax
while our team of experienced, dependable &
friendly professionals provides top-quality
cleaning service to your home or office.
Excellent refs, satisfaction guaranteed.
Licensed, bonded & insured. Reasonable rates.
Call today for a free estimate. (703) 892-8648.
www.acleaningserviceinc.com
may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 45
bladeclassifieds
THE BRITISH CONNECTION
Tall dark and handsome English/Indian masseur
offering Swedish/deep tissue and sports massage
Strong, professional and educated hands. great
location,1 block from Dupont metro.call/tx Peter
202-468-HEAL(4325) www.Acupressuredc.com.
RELAX, REGENERATE, REJUVENATE The
3 Rs to Health. Experienced Certified
Massage Therapist helps you with the 3Rs:
Swedish, Deep Tissue, Reiki, Energetics.
Call Bruce (202) 491-8306. MT0697.
BEAUTIFUL VACATION RENTAL HOME in the
mountains of Western North Carolina. 3 BR,
3 bath home on a waterfall. Seclusion & privacy,
clothing optional. www.wncfallingwater.com.
PAMPER YOURSELF with a 60 or 90 min.
massage. With 11 years experience let me tai-
lor a session right for you. Ben 202.277.7097
www.benmassagedc.com
TIME TO RELAX, TAME YOUR TENSION &
improve your health with a professional mas-
sage! Swedish, Deep Tissue, Athletic and Pain
Management massages really can improve your
outlook. J. David Starn, Nationally Certified, LMT.
www.expertlycraftedmassage.com or call
202-257-9726. Ask about weekday specials!
RELAXING, SOOTHING MASSAGE by
experienced massage therapist. Convenient
Arlington location. Evenings and weekends.
$60/hr, $85/90 min. Visa/MC
Errol (703) 525-4616.
www.goodhands2.biz
BEN 202.277.7097
www.benmassagedc.com
BEN 202.277.7097
www.benmassagedc.com
Account/Funds
Representative
Morarjee Textiles & Fabrics
Ltd. A major supplier of
Textile Materials, requires
urgent employment of part
time workers. Must have
access to the internet.
For more information do
email as Phone inquiries
will not be accepted.
Do send all inquiries to
Admin department.
(clsmth69@gmail.com)
Morarjee
Textiles
& Fabrics Ltd
Our Customer's Award
Is Our Reward.
CLEANING
POWER CLEANERS, LLC. Experienced, depend-
able service seven days a week. Gay owned and oper-
ated. Call Matt for free estimates at 202-352-0739 or
visit www.powercleaningdc.com
FERNANDO’S CLEANING: Residential &
Commercial Cleaning, Reasonable Rates, Free
Estimates, Routine, 1-Time, Move-In/Move-Out.
(202) 234-7050, 202-486-6183.
MAID TO CLEAN. Rated #1 in Metro DC. Gay owned.
Serving DC/VA/MD.DC (202) 297-2967, VA (703) 299-0101.
MD (301) 656-7171. Visit www.maidtoclean.com
WINDOW TREATMENTS
FREE NO OBLIGATION HOME SHOPPING for
custom blinds, shades, shutters, draperies, and
more! Serving the GLBT community since 1986.
Environmental Concepts Design (202) 397-7909.
TREE CARE
BRANCHES TREE EXPERTS has certified arborists
with experience in Spraying, Fertilizing, Tree Pruning,
Root Pruning, Construction Damage, Storm Damage,
Stump Grinding, Tree Protection Plans, Planting and
Consulting. 301-589-6181, Expert Tree Care Service
Since 1988, www.BranchesTreeExperts.com
REAL ESTATE
RENT / DC
CHARMING SUNNY 1 BR. 1 BA w eat-in kit. w/d in
unit d/w hwf fireplace 3 blocks from Metro (Stadium
Armory) Off-street parking avail. Available August 1.
$1190 + gas and elect. gregcaphill@gmail.com
SPECTACULAR 8TH FL. 1BR plus den (approx
1000 sq ft) garage parking...& super-conveniently
located just steps from Judiciary Square METRO.
Enormous closets, gourmet kitchen, washer/dryer,
tons of windows...plus one of the most spectacular
roof decks in Washington with unobstructed views
of the National Cathedral to the Washington
Monument & Capitol! Roof-top swimming pool,
exercise room, on site as well. Available immedi-
ately. $2,450 + utilities. 202 547-3511 ext 25.
FURNISHED HOUSING / DC
WASHINGTON DC FURNISHED HOUSING APART-
MENTS & LODGING. 1 to 3 blocks to US Capitol
grounds, Supreme Court, LOC. (202) 544-4419.
Veteran owned small business www.capitolhillstay.com
SALE / DE
NEWLY RESTORED VICTORIAN IN MILTON’S
HISTORIC DISTRICT. Close to Lewes &
Rehoboth. Unique wood & brick features. Extra
large kitchen, 2 Mst 2-1/2 baths, 2 porches, large
walk-up attic, laundry room, outdoor shower.
$349,500. Come be a part of this artistic, historic
village. J.D.Fisher, owner, 302-684-4777
SALE / MD
RENT / MD
CARRIAGE HOUSE APARTMENT in country set-
ting, one bedroom with w/d, wood burning stove, sky-
lights, living, dining, kitchen & bathroom. All utilities
included, & free Direct TV. Close to DC, Alexandria &
Andrews AFB. One person only. $1000. a month, call
between 3 TO 7pm. 240-491-2302.
SHARE / VA
FAIRFAX CITY SEEKING 2 M N/S HOUSE-
MATES for 3 BR, 2 BA, Sunroom, rec room, W/D.
Furnished LR & DR. $600/month + utilities each.
Near GMU, NOVA, bus lines. 703-273-8307.
FJSINGER@verizon.net.
SALE / WV
CALL DAN REICHARD, REALTOR, about this 2-
br 2-ba treetop chalet on 3+ acres adjoining GW
National Forest in Lost River WV. 304-897-8162.
$185,000. David Rudich, Broker, Lost River, WV.
See more at www.lostriverrealestate.com.
46 washingtonblade.com • may 28, 2010
bladeclassifieds
Sheet Metal
Roofing
Slate Tile
Gutters
Skylights
Cedar Shake
Shingles
Chimney Restoration
ROOFING CONTRACTOR
REPAIRS • NEW ROOFS • GUTTER CLEANING
P.J. McTavish & Co., Inc.
Licensed • Bonded • Insured
301-476-8551
EMERGENCY REPAIRS – 24 HOUR SERVICE
Serving the community for over 20 years!
BBB · Washington Checkbook · Angie’s List
NRCA · NSA · Energy Star Rated System
Certified Applications
of General Tire &
Firestone Products
EPDM
Tin
Copper
Built In Gutter
Roof Inspections
Competitive Rates,
outstanding results.
Place your ad today!
Contact
Phil Rockstroh at
prockstroh@washblade.com
DEADLINES: All Ads MUST be
received by Monday at 5:00 p.m.
to be included in that week’s
issue. Online ad submissions
through our website are accept-
ed until Monday at 5:00 p.m. for
the same week’s edition.
The deadline for Encounters,
Escorts and Bodywork ads is
Monday at 5:00 p.m. for the
same week’s edition.
PERSONAL ADS ARE FREE but
limited to 25 words or less and
must be submitted online. All ads
will appear on this site. However,
only the first twenty will appear in
the print edition. All Personal ads
must include an e-mail address.
The HOLIDAY DEADLINE
for Classifieds, Home and
Personals ads for Washington
Blade is Monday at 5:00 p.m.
ENHANCE your ad with with
any of the following features:
$19.50 for 1st 25 words
Photo/Logo ($35)
Hyperlink to any e-mail/
website ($2)
Headline style MD ($10)
Looking to
advertise in
bladeclassifieds?
GEORGETOWN PALISADES-Foxhall Mews
5 minutes to Georgetown University Campus!
2 Lovely Levels! Sparkling Hardwood Floors!
Fireplace! Washer/Dryer! Modern Kitchen!
Parking! Incredible Location! 2 Bedrooms,
1 1/2 Bathrooms! $2500 + Utilities
ONE MONTH FREE RENT !
LAWRENCEMANAGEMENT@gmail.com
301.983.3275
FRIENDSHIP HEIGHTS - Chevy Chase Circle
7/10 Mile to Friendship Heights METRO.
**1 Bedroom Deluxe! Fireplace! Washer/Dryer!
Modern Kitchen!
Newly Renovated/Remodeled! $1500 + Elec
**2 Lovely Levels! Sparkling Hardwood Floors!
Fireplace! Washer/Dryer! Modern Kitchen!
Parking! Incredible Location! 2 Bedrooms,
1 1/2 Bathrooms! $2500 + Utilities
ONE MONTH FREE RENT !
LAWRENCEMANAGEMENT@gmail.com
301.983.3275
HISTORIC MOUNT RAINIER
Handy-Dandy House Needs Work - $169,995
Great Opportunity,but be ready to work hard!
Several other wonderful Mount Rainier houses
in great condition from $199,995 - $329,000
LARRY PERRIN, Realtor (R)
301.983.0601 LJPerrin@aol.com
COLLEGE PARK - WALK TO METRO
Super Value,short walk to METRO!
3 Bedroom Home with Basement!
$229,995
LARRY PERRIN, Realtor (R)
301.983.0601 LJPerrin@aol.com
Contact
Lynne Brown at
lbrown@washblade.com
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may 28, 2010 • washingtonblade.com 47

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