You are on page 1of 26

Accounting

Business Info Systems


Business Leadership
Finance

Global Business
Health Care Admin.
Human Resource Mgmt.
Marketing

2011-2012 Student Handbook


Business Administration
Economics

Contents
Purpose of the Handbook .............................................. 2
Department Goals............................................................ 2
Accreditation..................................................................... 2
Faculty................................................................................ 3
Facilities............................................................................. 4
Academic Requirements................................................. 4
Business Administration Major ..................................... 5
Economics Major ............................................................. 5
Double Majors .................................................................. 5
Minor in Economics ......................................................... 10
Concentrations ................................................................. 10
Advising ............................................................................. 11
Course Descriptions ........................................................ 15
Internships ........................................................................ 20
The Roanoke College Innovation Challenge................ 21
Honors in Major Designation ......................................... 22
Independent Study .......................................................... 22
International Study/Internships .................................... 22
Student Assistants ........................................................... 22
Honors and Awards ......................................................... 23
Honorary and Professional Organizations................... 24

2010-2011 Student Handbook


Purpose of the Handbook

Faculty

The Handbook for the Business Administration and Economics Department

The Department of Business Administration and Economics has 18 full-time

is designed to provide the student with general and specific information

faculty members and additional adjunct faculty members. Each faculty member

about the majors, requirements and policies of the Department.

had business experience and/or teaching experience prior to joining the


Department.

The Handbook is not intended to substitute for the Roanoke College


Catalog. It is intended to be a supplement to the Catalog, as well as a
reference source for guidelines and information which Department majors
use frequently.
Each student will be given a copy of the Handbook by the chairperson
upon acceptance into a Department major.

Department Goals
The Department of Business Administration and Economics offers two
degree programs: the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) and the
Bachelor of Arts in Economics (BA). Each of these degrees, as every degree
at Roanoke College, requires the completion of the General Education
Curriculum in the Liberal Arts.
Each of our degree programs has as its fundamental objective the
intellectual, personal, and moral development of the young women and
men who select our programs. In pursuit of this objective, we seek to
graduate persons who are poised, mature, responsible, competent,
knowledgeable, and enterprising. Between the strong and varied teachings
of the Roanoke College General Education Curriculum, and the more
specialized and technical content of our department major programs, we
are confident of achieving our objective. This Handbook provides relevant
details of how we go about doing our job.

Accreditation
The Department of Business Administration and Economics is accredited
by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

Full-time Faculty
Warren Kevin Baker received the B.B.A. from Roanoke College, the MBA from
Radford University, and the Ph.D. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State

Christina McCart received the B.S., MBA, and the Ph.D. from Virginia Polytechnic

University. Prior to joining the Department in 1993, he held several teaching

Institute and State University. Prior to joining the Department in 1990, she worked

positions and worked as a small business manager/owner.

for Dunn and Bradstreet. She has also taught at Radford University. She is
chairperson of the department.

Norma Clifton, C.P.A., received the B.B.A. from Roanoke College and the MBA from
Radford University. Prior to joining the Department in 2001, she held a teaching

Ali A. Nazemi received the B.S. from the University of Illinois, the M.S.E.E., the

position at Virginia Western Community College. She operates her own accounting

M.S.E.M., the MBA, and the Ph.D. from the Florida Institute of Technology. Prior to

practice, specializing in taxation.

joining the Department in 1988, he was employed by Computron Computer


Systems and American Pioneer Asset Management, Inc. He has also taught at

Elisabeth de Velazquez received the B.A. from the University of New Mexico, the

Florida Institute of Continuing Education and Florida Institute of Technology.

M.A.T. from The School for International Training, Brattleboro, Vermont, and the
Ph.D. from the University of Arizona. Prior to joining the Department in 1995, she

Edward Nik-Khah received the B.A. from Rockhurst University, the M.A. and the

held several teaching positions and worked as a small business manager/owner.

Ph.D. from University of Notre Dame. Prior to joining the Department in 2005, he
taught courses at Indiana University, South Bend and the University of Notre

Garry A. Fleming received the B.S., the M.A., and the Ph.D. from the University of

Dame.

Kentucky. Prior to joining the Department in 1987, he held teaching positions at


Emory and Henry College, Stetson University, and Radford University.

Gregory R. Shaff, C.P.A. received the B.B.A. and the M.S. from James Madison
University. He is the founder and owner of Shirts & Other Stuff, Inc.

Pamela S. Galluch received the B.B.A. from University of Kentucky, the M.S. from
Middle Tennessee State University, and the Ph.D. from Clemson University. Prior to

C. Michael Smith received the B.B.A. from Roanoke College, the MBA and the Ph.D.

joining the Department in 2009, she taught courses at Clemson University.

from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining the
Department in 2006, he worked in financial services and also taught courses at

Sharon C. Gibbs, C.P.A. received the B.S. and M.Acct. from Virginia Polytechnic

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Institute and State University. Prior to joining the Department in 2002, she was
employed by Norfolk Southern Corp. She has also taught at Virginia Western

Alice Kassens Uhl received the B.A. from The College of William and Mary and the

Community College.

Ph.D. from North Carolina State University. Prior to joining the Department in 2005,
she held teaching positions at Washington and Lee University, North Carolina

Michelle Hagadorn, C.P.A. received the B.B.A. from Roanoke College and the

State University and UNC-Pembroke.

M.Acct. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining the
Department in 2004, she was employed by Carilion Medical Center.
Bayard Harris received the A.B. from the University of North Carolina and the J.D.
from the University of South Carolina School of Law. He is an attorney and the
President of The Center for Employment Law.
Michael Hutkin received the B.S.E.E. at Drexel University and the MBA at Lynchburg
College. Prior to joining the Department in 2003, he was employed by General
Electric Co.
Julie Lyon received the B.A. from North Carolina State University, the M.A. and the
Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. Prior to joining the Department in 2007, she
taught courses at University of Maryland.

Larry A. Lynch received the B.S. in electrical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and State University, the MBA from Lynchburg College, and the Ph.D. from
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining the Department
in 1978, he worked for Corning Glass Works and Appalachian Power Company.

Adjunct Faculty

Facilities

Michelle Alexander received the B.B.A. at Roanoke College and the MBA

In 1988, the Department of Business Administration and Economics moved

from Troy University. She is CFO at Bank of Botetourt.

from its former location in Miller Hall to the renovated Roanoke County
Courthouse. The Courthouse was originally built in 1912 and was renamed

Shahram Amini received the B.S. and te M.S. in Energy-Systems Engineering

Francis T. West Hall in 1998. It faces Main Street in Salem to the south and

at Sharif University of Technology, the M.S. in Socio-Economic Engineering

joins the rest of the campus to the north. It offers spacious, comfortable

at Institute for Research in Planning & Development, the M.A. in Economics

accommodations for students and staff including a department personal

from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and is currently working

computer laboratory, classrooms, the department and faculty offices, and

on her Ph.D. in Economics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State

small student study/meeting rooms.

University.

Academic Requirements
Admission Procedure

Patricia Eggleston, CPA received the B.B.A. at Roanoke College and the M.Acct
from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University . She is currently a

Admission to any of the Departments majors and/or concentrations

consultant for Eggleston & Eggleston, PC.

requires approval of the Department chairperson. The specific requirements


Gulfem Kutlu received the B.B.A from Marmara University in Istanbul, Turkey,

for each major/concentration are listed in the following sections of the

the MBA from Radford University, and is currently working on her Ph.D. in

handbook. As soon as the requirements are satisfied the student should

Business Administration from Old Dominion University.

meet with the Department chairperson to discuss admission to the program.


NOTE: The information that follows applies to students entering Roanoke

Arnica Mulder received the B.A. at Hogeschool van Utrecht and the MBA and

College fall 2009 and thereafter. Students previously enrolled and transfers

the M.S. in Accounting from Old Dominion University. She is Senior

entering prior to fall 2009 should use the catalog under which they were

Accountant at Luna Innovations, Inc.

accepted.

Darshak Patel received the B.S. and M.A. in Economics at University of Texas

General Academic Requirements

at Arlington, the M.S. in Economics at University of Kentucky, and is

Please refer to the academic catalog for information regarding the general

currently working on his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Kentucky.

academic requirements from Roanoke College.

Deborah Spencer received the B.S. in Economics at Radford University, the

The candidate must have earned a cumulative grade point average of at

M.A. in Economics at University of Notre Dame, and her Ph.D. in Economics

least 2.0 in all academic courses attempted (excluding courses offered and

from University of Notre Dame.

passed on a pass-fail basis). In addition, a cumulative grade point average


of at least a 2.0 must be earned in major courses.
Students must satisfactorily complete the Intellectual Inquiry Curriculum
requirements and the major requirements. Since these may be completed
without reaching the total of 33.50 course units, students must elect courses
from areas of personal interest and/or professional need to fulfill the
remaining work.

Specific Majors
Business Administration
Admission Procedure

include an accounting component. Although students may take Principles of

Admission to the B.B.A. program requires the approval of the department

Economics 321 and 322; and INQ 240 (Statistics 101) is a prerequisite for

chairperson upon completion of Business Administration 215, Economics

Economics 448.

Economics 121 and 122, in either order, the recommended sequence is 121
followed by 122. Note: Mathematics 111 or 112 or 121 is a prerequisite for

121, 122; Mathematics 111(or approved MATH equivalent); and INQ 240
(Statistics 101) with a grade of C or better in each of these five courses; or

Students should review carefully the attached chart of Economics

receive permission from the BUAD Admissions Committee. Students may be

Requirements and Prerequisites. (Students entering Fall 2009 or after, see

admitted to the program before completing the above courses, if their

page 8 of this Handbook. Students enrolled PRIOR to Fall 2009, see page 9

performance is promising.

of this Handbook.)

Students should review carefully the attached chart of B.B.A. Requirements


and Prerequisites. (Students entering Fall 2009 or after, see page 6 of this

Double Majors

Handbook. Students enrolled PRIOR to Fall 2009, see page 7 of this

A student may decide to complete a program with a double major. This

Handbook.)

major could include two from Business Administration and Economics; or


one from Business Administration and Economics and one from outside the

Course Requirements

department.

The degree of Bachelor of Business Administration requires the successful


completion of 13 units in Business Administration and Economics: Business

All requirements for each major must be completed and a maximum of five

Administration 215, 225, 227, 233, 248, 254, 258, 342, 348, and 499;

units may be applicable to both majors, provided that the total number of

Economics 121 and 122; and one business elective: one additional unit in

courses in both majors is no fewer than 17. If the majors are in different

Business Administration or Economics numbered 200-level or above

degree areas (B.A., B.S., B.B.A.), the student must select one degree to be

(excluding internship). Students should complete Business Administration

awarded. If the major is interdisciplinary, the number of units applicable to

215, 225, 258, and Economics 121 and 122 by the end of their sophomore

each major must be approved by the appropriate chairperson.

year. Note that Business Administration 248 and 348 have Mathematics 111
and INQ 240 (Statistics 101) as prerequisites in addition to the Business
Administration 215 prerequisite.

Course Methodology
Several of the courses in the B.B.A. program utilize the case study-group
participation method of instruction. This method simulates actual business
experiences that are likely to be encountered in future business careers and
provides students with practice in exhibiting the public-speaking and
decision-making skills and the poise necessary for such situations.

Economics
Admission Procedure
Admission to the B.A. program in Economics requires the approval of the
department chairperson. An application should be submitted as soon as a
student becomes interested in the major and shows evidence of possessing
the quantitative and analytical skills required to satisfactorily complete this
major.

Course Requirements
Students majoring in Economics are required to complete a minimum of 11
units in Economics, including 121, 122, 232, 321, 322, 448, 461, and four (4)
economics electives at the 200 level or higher. Business Administration 215
and 225 are recommended for those students whose career plans might

Business Administration Checklist


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Compilation of Credits
ENTERING FALL 2009 OR AFTER
Name ___________________________
INQ Sequence

Units

INQ 110

Intellectual Inquiry

INQ 120

Living an Examined Life

INQ 300

Contemporary Issues

(None)
(None)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division


INQ 240

Statistical Reasoning (STAT 101)

INQ 250

Scientific Reasoning I (Lab Science)

MATH 111 Mathematical Models

(None)

(None)

Credit

Business Administration

Units

ECON 121

Microeconomics

(None)

GE

ECON 122

Macroeconomics

(None)

BUAD 215

Accounting Principles I

BUAD 225

Accounting Principles II (BUAD 215)

BUAD 227

Business Law (None)

BUAD 233

Marketing Management (BUAD 215 and ECON 120 or 121)

BUAD 248

Quantitative Methods

BUAD 254

Organizational Behavior

BUAD 258

Information Systems

BUAD 342

Corporate Finance

Operations Management

Units

Credit

(None)

(MATH 111; INQ 240; BUAD 215)

(None)

(ECON 121, 122; BUAD 225, 258)

ECON 121 Microeconomics

BUAD 348

INQ 260

Note: BUAD 342 and BUAD 348 prereqs include declared BUAD major or perm

Social Scientific Reasoning I

BUAD 499

Humanities & Fine Arts Division

Units

INQ 270

Human Heritage I

INQ 271

Human Heritage II

Credit

Business Policy

1
1

Units

Credit

(BUAD 215 and MATH 111 or perm.)

Social Sciences Division

(MATH 111; INQ 240; BUAD 215)

(BUAD 227, 233, 248, 254, 342, 348)

Credit

Note: BUAD 499 prerequisite includes senior major status

Business Elective:

One additional unit in Business Administration or Economics numbered 200-level or above (excluding internship).
Intensive Learning

Units

Credit

IL

Foreign Languages (through 201)

Units

Credit

1.

Electives

2.

1.

3.

2.

3.

4.

.25

5.

.25

6.

7.

Health and Human Performance


HHP 160
HHP - Other

Fitness for Life

Units

Credit

Total Credits

Units

33.50

Credit

Business Administration Checklist


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Compilation of Credits
ENTERING PRIOR TO FALL 2009
Name ___________________________
GST Sequence
GST 101

Writing I

GST 102

Writing II

GST 201

Units

Business Administration

Credit

Units

ECON 121

Microeconomics

(None)

GE

ECON 122

Macroeconomics

(None)

Humanities I (GST 101 and 102)

BUAD 215

Accounting Principles I

GST 202

Humanities II (GST 201)

BUAD 225

Accounting Principles II (BUAD 215)

GST 370

Values & Responsible Life

BUAD 227

Business Law (None)

GST 400

Senior Symposium

BUAD 233

Marketing Management (BUAD 215 and ECON 120 or 121)

BUAD 248

Quantitative Methods

BUAD 254

Organizational Behavior

(None)
(GST 101)

(GST 201 and 202 or Permission)

(GST 201, 202 and 370)

(MATH 111; INQ 240; BUAD 215)

Laboratory Sciences and Math

Units

Lab Science

BUAD 258

Information Systems

(None)

BUAD 342

Corporate Finance

Statistics (STAT 101) (None)

BUAD 348

Operations Management

MATH 111 Mathematical Models


INQ 240

Credit

(None)

(None)

(BUAD 215 and MATH 111 or perm.)

(ECON 121, 122; BUAD 225, 258)

(MATH 111; INQ 240; BUAD 215)

Credit

Note: BUAD 342 and BUAD 348 prereqs include declared BUAD major or perm

Social Sciences

Units

ECON 121 Microeconomics

Choose one (1) from:

POLI 101

Political Science

PSYC 101

Psychology

SOCI 101

Sociology

BUAD 499

Credit

(BUAD 227, 233, 248, 254, 342, 348)

Note: BUAD 499 prerequisite includes senior major status

Business Elective:

(None)

One additional unit in Business Administration or

(None)

Economics numbered 200-level or above

(None)

Other

Intensive Learning and Co-Curricular Learning

Business Policy

(excluding internship).

Units

Credit

IL

Electives

CCLS I

1.

CCLS II

2.

3.

4.

Foreign Languages

Units

Credit

Units

1.

5.

2.

6.

7.

Physical Education

Units

1.

2.

Credit

Total Credits

33.75

Credit

Economics Checklist
Economics
Compilation of Credits
ENTERING FALL 2009 OR AFTER
Name ___________________________
INQ Sequence

Units

INQ 110

Intellectual Inquiry

INQ 120

Living an Examined Life

INQ 300

Contemporary Issues

(None)
(None)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Division


INQ 240

Statistical Reasoning (STAT 101)

INQ 250

Scientific Reasoning I (Lab Science)

MATH 111 or MATH 112 or MATH 121

(None)

Credit

Economics

Units

ECON 121

Microeconomics

(None)

GE

ECON 122

Macroeconomics

(None)

ECON 232

Money & Banking

ECON 321

Inter. Micro

ECON 322

Inter. Macro (ECON 122, 232 , MATH 111 or 112 or 121)

ECON 448

Econometrics (ECON 321 or 322, INQ 240 or perm.)

ECON 461

Economics Seminar (Senior standing in ECON)

Choose four (4) from:

Units

Social Sciences Division

Units

ECON 121 Microeconomics

Credit

Credit

(ECON 121 & 122)

(ECON 121, MATH 111 or 112 or 121)

Credit

1
1

ECON 227

Health Economics (ECON 120 or 121.)

ECON 237

Comparative Economics Systems

ECON 242

Economics of the Public Sector and its Finance

(ECON 120 or 121)

(ECON 121 & 122)

INQ 260

Social Scientific Reasoning I

Humanities & Fine Arts Division

Units

Credit

ECON 247

International Trade & Finance

ECON 257

Comp, Monopoly, & Public Policy (ECON 120 or 121)

ECON 261

Topics in Economics

(ECON 121 & 122)

INQ 270

Human Heritage I

ECON 267

Labor Economics (ECON 120 or 121)

INQ 271

Human Heritage II

ECON 287

Ecological Development Economics (None)

ECON 496 or 495/497 Honors Project (see catalog)

Intensive Learning

Units

Credit

IL

Foreign Languages (through 201)

Units

Credit

1.

Electives

2.

1.

3.

2.

3.

4.

.25

5.

.25

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Health and Human Performance


HHP 160
HHP - Other

Fitness for Life

Units

Credit

Total Credits

Units

33.50

Credit

Economics Checklist
Economics
Compilation of Credits
ENTERING PRIOR TO FALL 2009
Name ___________________________
GST Sequence
GST 101

Writing I

GST 102

Writing II

GST 201

Units

Economics

Credit

Units

ECON 121

Microeconomics

(None)

GE

ECON 122

Macroeconomics

(None)

Humanities I (GST 101 and 102)

ECON 232

Money & Banking

GST 202

Humanities II (GST 201)

ECON 321

Inter. Micro

GST 370

Values & Responsible Life

ECON 322

Inter. Macro (ECON 122, 232 , MATH 111 or 112 or 121)

GST 400

Senior Symposium

ECON 448

Econometrics (ECON 321 or 322, INQ 240 or perm.)

ECON 461

Economics Seminar (Senior standing in ECON)

(None)
(GST 101)

(GST 201 and 202 or Permission)

(GST 201, 202 and 370)

(ECON 121 & 122)

(ECON 121, MATH 111 or 112 or 121)

Laboratory Sciences and Math

Units

Lab Science

ECON 227

Health Economics (ECON 120 or 121.)

ECON 237

Comparative Economics Systems

ECON 242

Economics of the Public Sector and its Finance

MATH 111 or MATH 112 or MATH 121


INQ 240

Statistics (STAT 101) (None)

Choose four (4) from:

Credit

Credit

1
1

(ECON 120 or 121)

(ECON 121 & 122)

Social Sciences

Units

Credit

ECON 247

International Trade & Finance

ECON 257

Comp, Monopoly, & Public Policy (ECON 120 or 121)

(ECON 121 & 122)

ECON 121 Microeconomics

ECON 261

Topics in Economics

Choose one (1) from:

ECON 267

Labor Economics (ECON 120 or 121)

ECON 287

Ecological Development Economics (None)

POLI 101

Political Science

PSYC 101

Psychology

SOCI 101

Sociology

(None)

ECON 496 or 495/497 Honors Project (see catalog)

(None)

(None)

Other

Intensive Learning and Co-Curricular Learning

Units

Credit

IL

Electives

CCLS I

1.

CCLS II

2.

3.

4.

Foreign Languages

Units

Credit

Units

1.

5.

2.

6.

7.

8.

9.

Physical Education

Units

1.

2.

Credit

Total Credits

33.75

Credit

Minor in Economics

Concentrations

The Minor in Economics requires seven (7) units in economics as follows:

General Information

Economics 121, 122, 321, 322, 461 and any other two (2) economics courses

The Department offers concentrations in the areas of Accounting, Business

at the 200 level or higher. NOTE: Mathematics 111 or 112 or 121 is a

Information Systems, Business Leadership, Finance, Global Business, Health

prerequisite for Economics 321 and 322; and INQ 240 (Statistics 101) is a

Care Administration, Human Resource Management and Marketing.

prerequisite for Economics 448.

Approval of the Department chairperson is required for admission to a conUnit

centration. Admission requires an overall grade point average of 2.0 and an

Credit

overall 2.0 grade point average in courses that are prerequisites to concen-

ECON 121 Principles of Microeconomics

ECON 122 Principles of Macroeconomics

Completion of a concentration and its recording on a student's transcript

ECON 321 Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON 121,


MATH 111, 112, or 121)

require a 2.0 grade point average for the concentration courses. (See page

ECON 322 Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECON 122,


232 or perm, and MATH 111 or 112 or 121)

ECON 461 Economics Seminar (Senior standing in


ECON)

Choose two (2) from:

tration courses.

12, 13, and 14 of this Handbook.)

Accounting
The concentration in Accounting is achieved by completion of the following
courses and their prerequisites: Business Administration 315, 325, 335, 345,
415, and 425. At least three of these courses must be taken at Roanoke
College.

ECON 227 Health Economics (ECON 120 or 121)


ECON 232 Money and Banking (ECON 121 & 122)
ECON 237 Comparative Economic Systems (ECON
120 or 121)

Business Information Systems

ECON 242 Economics of the Public Sector and its


Finance (ECON 121 & 122)

completion of the following courses and their prerequisites:

ECON 247
& 122)

selected from Business Administration 416, Computer Science 310 or

A concentration in Business Information Systems is achieved by the


Business Administration 258, 328, 338, 368, and 438; plus one course

International Trade & Finance (ECON 121

Computer Science 340, Computer Science 365, Computer Science 415, or

ECON 257 Competition, Monopoly, & Public Policy


(ECON 120 or 121)

Computer Science 416.

ECON 261 Topics in Economics

Business Leadership

ECON 267 Labor Economics (ECON 120 or 121)

A concentration in Business Leadership is achieved by the completion of the

ECON 287 Ecological Development Economics

following courses and their prerequisites: Business Administration 264*,

ECON 448 Econometrics (Econ 321, 322 or permission and INQ 240 (STAT 101))

364, 374, and 464; plus two courses selected from Business Administration
354, Communications 220 or Communications 317, Philosophy 222, Political
Science 301, Psychology 325 or Sociology 336.
This Business Concentration is open to all majors and the final project has
the potential to be adapted to other disciplines.
*IL 277 Basic Leadership Practices may substitute for Business 264
(students must select from either IL 277 or Business 264 and cannot take
both for credit).

10

Concentrations (cont)

Advising

Finance
Each student who is accepted as a department major will be assigned a faculty

The concentration in Finance is achieved by completion of the following

advisor. It is the responsibility of the student to meet with the faculty advisor prior

courses and their prerequisites: Business Administration 242, 342, 442, and

to registration for each term. The faculty advisor will assist students in planning

Economics 232, and three courses selected from Business Administration

their course schedules. Students should feel free to consult with their advisor, at

142, 315, 322 ( unit repeated), 341, 345, and 416, and Economics 242, 247

any time, about academic matters.

or 252.

Global Business
The concentration in Global Business is achieved by completion of the
following courses and their prerequisites: Business Administration 211, 215,
233, 333; Economics 121, 122, 247; one from Economics 237 and Political
Science 333; one from Political Science 231, 232, Sociology 335, or an
appropriate Business Administration 406 or 416, as approved by the
department chair; one from travel courses given in a foreign language or
appropriate commercial language or culture courses given in a foreign
language.

Health Care Administration


The Health Care Administration concentration is designed primarily for students
interested in Hospital or Health Care Administration. It is likely that most of these
students will pursue (eventually or immediately after graduation) a Masters degree
in Hospital/Health Care Administration. Ultimately, they would be likely to work for
a hospital, health maintenance organization, or public or private medical facility.
The concentration in Health Care Administration is achieved by completion of the
following courses and their prerequisites: Business Administration 215, 254, and
258; Economics 120 or Economics 121 and 122, and Economics 227; Sociology/
Philosophy 223; Sociology 323; and one additional course selected from Business
Administration 354 and 416, Psychology 250, and Sociology 416.

Human Resource Management


The concentration in Human Resource Management is achieved by completion of
the following courses and their prerequisites: Business Administration 244, 254,
and 354, and three courses selected from Business Administration 364 and 416,
Communications 317, Economics 267, Political Science 301, Psychology 250 and
300, and Sociology 336.

Marketing
A concentration in Marketing is achieved by the completion of the following
Courses and their prerequisites: Business Administration 233, 343, and 433, plus
two courses selected from Business Administration 333, 338, 353, and 363 or an
approved marketing internship, independent study, special topics course or
appropriate IL course.

11

Concentrations Checklist
Concentration in Accounting

Unit

BUAD 315 Intermediate Accounting I


BUAD 325 Intermediate Accounting II
BUAD 335 Cost Accounting

(BUAD 315 or Perm.)

(BUAD 225 and 258)

BUAD 345 Income Taxation (BUAD 215 or Perm.)

BUAD 415 Auditing

(BUAD 315)

BUAD 425 Advanced Accounting

Credit

(BUAD 225)

(BUAD 315)

Concentration in Business Information Systems

Unit

BUAD 258 Information Systems (BUAD 215, MATH 111 or Equivalent)

BUAD 328 Application Development in Business (BUAD 258)

BUAD 338 e-Business (BUAD 258)

BUAD 368 Decision Support & Intelligent Systems (BUAD 258, INQ 240)

BUAD 438 Systems Analysis & Design (BUAD 328)

Choose (1) one from the following:

Credit

CPSC 310 Topics in Applied Computing (CPSC 170)


CPSC 340 Database Systems (CPSC 170 & MATH 131)
CPSC 365 Software Engineering & Project Design (CPSC 250)
CPSC 415 Web Programming (CPSC 250)
BUAD 416 Internship
CPSC 416 Internship

Concentration in Business Leadership


BUAD 264 Foundations of Leadership* (BUAD 254, PSYC 250

Unit
or perm.)

BUAD 364 Team Dynamics (BUAD 254 or PSYC 250)

BUAD 374 Conflict Management (BUAD 264)

BUAD 464 Advanced Leadership (BUAD 264 and either 364 or 374)

Choose two (2) from the following 7 courses:

BUAD 354, PHIL 222, POLI 301


Either PSYC 325 or SOCI 336
Either COMM 220 or COMM 317

*IL 277 Basic Leadership Practices may substitute for BUAD 264.

12

Credit

Concentrations Checklist
Concentration in Finance
BUAD 242 Investments

Unit

(ECON 121, 122 and BUAD 225 or Perm.)

BUAD 342 Corporate Finance

(ECON 121, 122 and BUAD 225, 258)

BUAD 442 Advanced Finance

(BUAD 242 and 342, Econ 232 or Perm.)

ECON 232 Money and Banking

(ECON 121 & 122)

Choose any three (3) from:


BUAD 142 Personal Finance

Credit

1
3

(None)

BUAD 315 Intermediate Accounting I

(BUAD 225)

BUAD 322 **Student Managed Fund (1/2 Units)


BUAD 341 Commercial Banking

(ECON 121 and BUAD 225)

(ECON 121 and 122)

BUAD 345 Income Taxation (BUAD 215 or Perm.)


BUAD 416 Internship

(See catalog)

ECON 242

Economics of the Public Sector and its Finance (ECON 121 and 122)

ECON 247

International Trade and Finance (ECON 121 and 122)

ECON 252

The Fed Challenge (ECON 121, ECON 122, and Permission)

** may be repeated
Concentration in Global Business

Unit

(None)

(None)

ECON 121
ECON 122

Microeconomics
Macroeconomics

ECON 247

International Trade & Finance

BUAD 215

Accounting Principles

BUAD 211

Global Management

BUAD 233

Marketing Management

BUAD 333

Global Marketing

(ECON 121 and 122)

1
1

(None)

(None)
(BUAD 125 and ECON 120 or 121)

1
1

(BUAD 233)

Foreign Language through 201 level

Choose one (1) from:

ECON 237

Comparative Economic Systems

POLI 333

Global Political Economy

(ECON 120 or121)

(POLI 231)

Choose one from:

POLI 231

International Politics

POLI 232

International Organizations

SOCI 335

Population & Society

BUAD 406

Independent Study in Global Business (See catalog)

BUAD 416

Internship

(POLI 101 or Perm.)


(Perm.)

(one 200-level SOCI Course or perm.)

(See catalog)

13

Credit

Concentrations Checklist
Concentration in Health Care Administration

Unit

ECON 120

Introduction to Economics

ECON 121

Microeconomics

(None)

ECON 122

Macroeconomics

(None)

ECON 227

Health Economics

(ECON 120 or 121)

SOCI 223

Ethics & Medicine

(SOCI 101 or INQ 260SO or perm.)

SOCI 323

Health, Illness & Healing

BUAD 215

Accounting Principles I

BUAD 258

Information Systems

BUAD 254

Organizational Behavior

Credit

(See catalog) or

and

1
1

(one SOCI 200-level course or perm

1
1

(None)

(BUAD 215 and MATH 111 or Perm.)

1
1

(None)

Choose one (1) from:

BUAD 354

Human Resource Management

PSYC 250

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

BUAD 416

Internship

(BUAD 254 or Perm.)


(PSYC 101)

(See catalog)

Concentration in Human Resource Management


BUAD 254 Organizational Behavior

Unit

Credit

(None)

BUAD 244 Labor Relations (ECON 120 or 121 or 122 or perm.)

BUAD 354 Human Resource Management (BUAD 254 or Perm.)

Choose any three (3) from:

BUAD 364 Team Dynamics (BUAD 254 or PSYC 250)


BUAD 416 Internship

(See catalog)

COMM 317 Professional Communication

(COMM 220, COMM 250 strongly recommended)

ECON 267

Labor Economics (ECON 120 or 121)

POLI 301

Public Administration

PSYC 250

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

PSYC 300

Tests & Measurement

SOCI 336

Work & Occupations

(POLI 102 or Perm.)


(PSYC 101)

(PSYC 200 or Perm.)


(SOCI 101, one 200-level SOCI course)

Concentration in Marketing

Unit

BUAD 233 Marketing Management


BUAD 343 Buyer Behavior

(BUAD 125 and ECON 120 or 121)

(BUAD 233)

BUAD 433 Marketing Research

(BUAD 233, 258, and INQ 240)

Choose any two (2) from:


BUAD 333 Global Marketing

1
1
2

(BUAD 233)

BUAD 338 e-Business (BUAD 258)


BUAD 353 Sales and Sales Management
BUAD 363 Promotion Management

(BUAD 233)

(BUAD 343 or Perm.)

BUAD 416, BUAD 406, special topics, or appropriate IL course

14

Credit

Course Descriptions

Business Administration

142 Personal Finance


This course develops a comprehensive understanding of everyday financial

244 Labor Relations

matters such as banking, credit, home finances, planning, investing, and taxes.

Evolution of unions; organizations and role of labor and management in collective

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

bargaining; labor legislation; contract administration.


(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Economics 120 or 121 or 122 or permission.

210 Entrepreneurship
A survey of issues involved in starting and owning a small business including

248 Quantitative Methods

forms of ownership, acquisition of financing, marketing and operations concepts,

The use of quantitative techniques in decision making for business management.

culminating in the preparation of a simplified business plan.

Substantial PC applications are utilized.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 215.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: INQ 240 (Statistics 101); Mathematics 111; and
Business Administration 215.

211 Introduction to Global Management


An introduction to the organizational, legal, economic, human and cultural aspects

254 Organizational Behavior and Management

of conducting and managing business internationally.

An introductory examination of theoretical principles and practical applications

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

related to managing and leading individuals and groups in the work setting.
(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

215 Accounting Principles I


An introduction to the field of accounting and to the development of a broad

258 Information Systems

understanding and use of accounting information. PC applications are utilized.

This course explores the fundamental concept of information systems in modern

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

organizations. The course provides intensive preparation in the most useful


applications of computers in business.

225 Accounting Principles II

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 215 and either Math 111
or permission.

Continuation of broad understanding of how accounting principles, accounting


practices, and financial data assist decision makers. Topics include corporations,
analysis of accounting information, and managerial accounting, including cost

260 Topics in Business Administration

accounting, planning, and control. PC applications are utilized.

Selected topics involving problems and controversies of a social and political

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 215.

nature.
(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

227 Business Law


An introductory survey of the basic transactional legal principles needed in

264 Foundations of Leadership

business, including a summary of the judicial system, legal organizations,

A broad theoretical and practical overview of leadership concepts and principles.

contracts, torts, administrative regulation, property rights, selected articles of the

Topics will include, but are not limited to traits of effective leaders, ethics, team

Uniform Commercial Code, creditors rights, bankruptcy, and employment laws.

development, leadership theory, strategic leadership and conflict resolution.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

Students will be required to develop and present an original community-based


leadership project proposal. (1)

233 Marketing Management

Prerequisite: Business Administration 254 or Psychology 250 or permission.

Principles, practices, and basic theoretical concepts in the field of marketing.


Special attention will be given to sustainable business activities.

315 Intermediate Accounting I

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Business Administration 215 and either

This course examines the political environment and conceptual foundations, basic

Economics 120 or 121.

mechanics, and fundamental topics of financial reporting.


(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 225.

242 Investments
An introduction to security analysis, principles, and problems of investments for
individuals and firms; management of the securities by risk and purpose of
investors.
(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Business Administration 225, and Economics
121 and 122, or permission.

15

Course Descriptions

Business Administration

322 Student Managed Fund

342 Corporate Finance

The participants in this class will manage a portion of the Colleges general

The principles of asset management, financial structure, and types of securities

endowment fund by actively managing a portfolio under the supervision of a

and their characteristics.

faculty member. The fund will be continuously managed, with the course portion

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

being offered each (and every) semester. Students earn unit per semester. A

Prerequisites: Business Administration 225 and 258, and Economics 121 and 122;

maximum of two units can be earned toward graduation with only one unit

declared Business Administration major or permission.

counting toward the Finance Concentration. Offered on a pass-fail basis ()

343 Buyer Behavior

Prerequisites: Economics 122 and Business Administration 225.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the theories related to buyer

325 Intermediate Accounting II

behavior. Students will learn how to apply these theories in marketing and

Continuation of Business Administration 315.

retailing contexts.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 315 or permission.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 233.

328 Application Development in Business

345 Income Taxation

A comprehensive overview of computer applications development in business

Examination of the present federal tax law and development of the accounting

using application programming and application development tools.

principles and procedures involved in the preparation of tax returns.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 258.

PC applications are utilized.


(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 215 or permission.

333 Global Marketing

348 Production and Operations Management

This course introduces the students to political, cultural, and economic factors

Basic principles and problems of organizing and operating business facilities

influencing the global marketing of goods and services. The students will learn

including functions, process, responsibilities, and techniques. Substantial

about development of international products, pricing strategies, promotion

computer applications.

techniques, and channels of distribution.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: INQ 240 (Statistics 101); Mathematics 111; and

(1) Lecture/Case Study: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 233.

Business Administration 215; declared Business Administration major or


permission.

335 Cost Accounting


The measurement of product cost arising from material procurement and use,

353 Sales and Sales Management

employment of labor services, and overhead factors in job order and process

An in-depth study of the steps associated with the personal selling process as well

settings. Budgeting, standard costs, and other tools for planning and control.

as the techniques required to motivate and manage a high performance sales

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 225 and 258.

force effectively.
(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 233.

338 e-Business
Comprehensive coverage of electronic business and electronic transactions to

354 Human Resource Management

include electronic marketing and retailing, electronic procurement and payment,

The principles of employee selection, job design, performance appraisal,

cyber security, on-line auctions and shops, and web technologies for virtual

compensation, training and development, career management, safety and health,

communities in a global marketplace.

and labor relations.

(1) Lecture: 2 hrs/wk; Lab 1 hr/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 258.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 254 or permission.

341 Commercial Banking

363 Promotion Management

Designed to provide an understanding of bank operations and management, as

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the principles and problems

well as issues and problems at the national and international level.

faced in the area of promotion management. Students will gain understanding

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Economics 121 and 122.

and practice in the development of an advertising campaign; the use of sales


promotion tools; and issues in regulation, ethics, and the cultural impact of those
activities.
(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 343 or permission.

16

Course Descriptions

Business Administration

364 Team Dynamics

425 Advanced Accounting

An examination of the dynamics of team development and teamwork. Topics

A course focusing on the consolidation of financial statements. In addition, a brief

covered in this course will include, but are not limited to group theory, mission and

introduction to international, governmental and nonprofit accounting is covered.

goal development, team development, conflict management, problem solving,

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 315.

and team leadership. Students will be required to demonstrate competency in

433 Marketing Research

team leadership through the development of a class project in team dynamics. (1)
Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 254 or Psychology 250.

A course providing students with the skills needed to define a research situation,
construct the research model, collect and analyze data, generate and test the

368 Decision Support and Intelligent Systems

response or solution, and integrate the steps into a coherent project. (1)

A comprehensive study of managerial decision making and the use of such

Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Business Administration 233, 258, and INQ 240 .

tools as Data Base Management, Decision Support, and Intelligent Systems

438 Systems Analysis and Design

in solving business and management problems. (1)


Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 258 and INQ 240.

A comprehensive overview of the development of information systems in a


business environment.

374 Conflict Management in the Workplace

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Business Administration 258 and permission.

An examination of the nature, consequences and best practice guidelines

442 Advanced Financial Management

for the management and resolution of workplace conflict. Topics covered in


this course will include, but are not limited to power and conflict, sources of

An in-depth analysis of financial theory, principles, and policies used in managing

conflict, types of conflict, harnessing the power of conflict, arbitration and

the firms capital structure.

mediation, communication and guidelines to managing conflict. (1)

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Business Administration 242 and 342, and

Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Business Administration 264

Economics 232, or permission.

395, 396 Henry H. Fowler Public Policy Seminar

464 Advanced Leadership

A seminar taught with a scholar-statesperson that deals with a policy issue

An advanced analysis of leadership topics including an applied experience in

of public significance. (Made possible by the Henry H. Fowler Endowment.

leadership practice. A special emphasis will be placed on the ethics of leadership.

Open to selected students with department permission.)

Students enrolled in this course will be required to propose and execute an actual

(1, 1/2)

community oriented project within the timeframe of the semester.


(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Business Administration 264 and either
Business Administration 364 or 374.

405, 406, 407 Independent Study and Research


A program of intensive study in Business Administration carried out under

495, 496, 497 Honors Project

the direction of a member of the departmental staff. (Enrollment with the

A program of independent study culminating in a paper, artistic creation, or

approval of the department.)

performance. Prerequisite: To qualify for consideration to receive honors in the

(1/2, 1, 1/2)

major, a student in his/her senior year or in the summer prior to the senior year,
must work under the guidance of his/her committee. A written proposal and

415 Auditing

application must be approved by the committee and department. A minimum GPA

A course covering the principles employed in the conduct of a financial

of 3.4 in the major is required. 495 Honors Project is prerequisite for 497 Honors

statement audit.

Project. (, 1 )

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Business Administration 315.

499 Business Policy


The capstone course of the Business Administration curriculum. The students will

416 Internship

use Strategic Management as the framework to integrate and apply the

Work experience in private or public sector, utilizing analytical tools, and

knowledge acquired from all the coursework in the Business Administration major.

including a student project.

The course utilizes lecture, readings, case methodology, simulations, and a major

Prerequisites: Business Administration 258 and permission of the

project of starting a business entity.

department.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Business Administration 227, 233, 248, 254,
342, 348 and senior major status.

17

Course Descriptions

Economics

120 Introduction to Economics

242 Economics of the Public Sector and its Finance

A course introducing the student to contemporary economic discourse, with

An analysis of the relationship between the state and the market, with an

an emphasis on the pricing mechanism, competitive and monopolistic

emphasis on the role of the state in reducing poverty and inequality,

markets, poverty and inequality, national income, and unemployment. (Not

promoting health, safeguarding the environment, addressing corporate

open to anyone majoring in Business Administration or Economics, or

power, and financing these activities through effective taxation.

anyone currently enrolled in or having completed Economics 121 and 122).

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Economics 121 and 122

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

247 International Trade and Finance

121 Principles of Microeconomics

An analysis of the benefits and costs of trade, the impact of trade barriers

An introduction to contemporary economic discourse, with an emphasis on

and controls, the effects of globalization, and the role of money and capital

the pricing mechanism, production, competitive and imperfectly competitive

markets in international commerce.

markets, game theory, poverty and inequality, public economics, and global

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Economics 121 and 122.

trade. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

252 The Fed Challenge


122 Principles of Macroeconomics

This course is an academic competition designed to expand the understanding of the Federal Reserve Systems unique role in the economy and

An introduction to contemporary economics discourse, with an emphasis on

the importance of Federal Open Market Committee decisions.

aggregate concepts and problems such as unemployment, inflation, growth,

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Economics 121 and 122.

and international trade and the role of government in dealing with these
problems.

257 Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

An examination of the role of the state in addressing corporate power. Topics


emphasized include collusion, mergers, technology and intellectual property, and

227 Health Economics

the uses of antitrust law and regulation.

An examination of the production of health and the role of medical services,

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Economics 120 or 121

the determinants of the demand for medical care and the impact of health
insurance, the determinants of the supply of medical services, the role of

261 Topics in Economics

government in promoting health and the financing and delivery of health

Selected topics involving problems and controversies of a social and political

care, and the impact of behavioral factors on health.

nature.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Economics 120 or 121.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

232 Money and Banking

267 Labor Economics

Money, credit, and the banking system with special emphasis on the role of

Analysis of the short- and long-run aspects of the supply and demand for labor,

money as a determinant of economic activity. Attention is also given to

with attention paid to labor market issues including wage inequality, human

international monetary markets.

capital formation, and unemployment.

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Economics 121 and 122

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Economics 120 or 121.

237 Comparative Economic Systems

287 Ecological Development Economics

The ideological, theoretical, and institutional basis for planned and market

The ecological, institutional and technological basis for the human economic

economies with examples drawn from various countries.

system as a subsystem of the larger ecological and social systems, with examples

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Economics 120 or 121.

drawn from various regions of the world.


(1)Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.

18

Course Descriptions

Economics

321 Intermediate Theory: Microeconomics

495, 496, 497 Honors Project

In-depth coverage of contemporary economics discourse, with an emphasis on

A program of independent study culminating in a paper, artistic creation, or

the pricing mechanism, competitive and imperfectly competitive markets, game

performance. Prerequisite: To qualify for consideration to receive honors in the

theory, the distribution of income, and public economics.

major, a student in his/her senior year or in the summer prior to the senior year,

(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Economics 121; Mathematics 111 or 112 or 121.

must work under the guidance of his/her committee. A written proposal and
application must be approved by the committee and department. A minimum GPA

322 Intermediate Theory: Macroeconomics

of 3.4 in the major is required. 495 Honors Project is prerequisite for 497 Honors
Project.

An examination of the measurement, analysis, and control of aggregate

(1/2, 1, 1/2)

economic activity, with particular attention to the roles played by


government in achieving full employment and price stability.
(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Economics 122, 232 or permission;
Mathematics 111 or 112 or 121.

395, 396 Henry H. Fowler Public Policy Seminar


A seminar taught with a scholar- statesperson that deals with a policy issue
of public significance. (Made possible by the Henry H. Fowler Endowment.
Open to selected students with department permission.)
(1, 1/2)

405, 406, 407 Independent Study


A program of intensive study in economics carried out under the direction of
a member of the departmental staff. (Open to majors with the permission of
the department.)
(1/2, 1, 1/2)

416 Internship
Work experience in private or public sector, utilizing analytical tools, and
including a student project. (Admission by permission of department. May
not be counted toward major credit.)
(1)

448 Introduction to Econometrics


An introduction to the statistical methods used in empirical economic
research. The objective of the course is to provide both a working
knowledge of econometric theory and an applied experience through
estimating empirical models using econometric software.
(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Economics 321 or 322 and INQ 240
(Statistics 101); or permission.

461 Economics Seminar


An in-depth investigation of topical issues in economics at the advanced theory
level.
(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Economics or permission.

19

Internships
The purpose of the program is twofold:

Dates and Deadlines

Provide a practical learning experience for students, in which they are able to

The Business Administration and Economics faculty will decide on applications at

utilize skills and knowledge learned in the classroom.

the December departmental meeting (for Spring internships) and at the April

Provide bright and diligent short-term apprentices for sponsoring employers.

departmental meeting (for May, Summer, and Fall internships).

These apprentice-interns must produce work beneficial to the sponsor.


Application forms must be completed and submitted to Dr. Galluch at

Application Procedures

galluch@roanoke.edu by December 1 for Spring internships and by April 1 for all


others.

All students interested in participating in the Business Administration and


Economics Internship Program must complete the application procedures prior to
the appropriate deadlines. It is important to understand that participation in the

Internship Procedures

Internship Program is a privilege that must be earned, not a right to be claimed.

It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the application process by talking

More specifically, all applicants must meet a set of general requirements as well as

with their faculty advisor or the internship director. This should be done during

a specific grade point average (G.P.A.) requirement.

registration for the next semester.

General Requirements

When a faculty member agrees to sponsor an eligible student, the faculty member
or the internship director is responsible for contacting the prospective employer

All applicants will be judged according to the following criteria:

and making the initial arrangements. The final step in these arrangements should
be a meeting, similar to a job interview, between the student and the sponsoring

Academic responsibility and maturity (as evidenced by class

employer. Upon the mutual consent of the student and the employer, the

attendance, academic integrity, class participation, and overall

arrangements for the internship are complete. Students can make their own

attitude).

internship arrangements, with approval from the Department.

Class performance in those areas most closely related to the proposed


internship.

An internship can be a full-time (40 hr/wk) situation during the summer, or a part-

Whether or not adequate time is available, given the applicants course

time situation (8-10 hr/wk) during the normal semester. The minimum is 110 hours.

load, part-time jobs, extracurricular activities, etc.

Summer internships are contingent upon the availability of faculty supervision. All
prospective interns and sponsoring employers should be provided with a copy of

G.P.A. Requirements

the departments Internship Policy Guidelines.

To meet the G.P.A. criterion, a student must have at least a 2.5 average in Business

Requirements

Administration and Economics courses, as well as senior class standing.

While internships must conform to the specific situation, the following

A student may appeal for a waiver of the above requirements in the following three

requirements are to be met, whenever possible.

situations:

Interns must keep a neat, complete, daily journal. The journal is to be reviewed

1. A junior with a superior academic record (3.25 or above G.P.A. in Business

and initialed by the sponsoring faculty member at least once a week in the

Administration and Economics).

summer and approximately every three weeks during a regular semester. If the
internship is conducted out-of-town, the student is responsible for sending the

2. A senior who has maintained a 2.5 G.P.A. in Business Administration and

journal to the faculty sponsor at the appropriate intervals.

Economics over the last three full semesters (with any intervening Summer
Business Administration and Economics courses also counted).

The daily journal should include:

3. A first semester senior applying for a Spring Semester internship who has a
major G.P.A. is below 2.5, but who has a chance of raising that average to 2.5 or
better at the end of Fall Semester. A provisional decision on such an appeal will be

the number of hours worked

a summary of the days activities

a brief explanation of the nature of the work or the project, including


interesting technicalities, problems encountered, and applications of

made at the December departmental meeting using grade averages at that point

course concepts to the work project.

in time. Final approval requires attainment of a 2.5 G.P.A.

Interns may be rotated through several functional areas of the business,


or spend their time in one area.

Work performed by interns should be of a substantive nature, working


with supervisors, intermediate managers, and professionals. Tasks

20

Internships (cont)

The Roanoke College Innovation Challenge

Interns should do in-depth analytical projects that are of benefit to the


employer. Copies of completed reports or analytical work, along with

The Center for Leadership and Entrepreneurial Innovation offers a unique eight

appropriate explanations, may be submitted to the faculty supervisor

week intensive learning (IL) summer internship experience in business research

as part of the internship journal.

called the Innovation Challenge for students interested in product innovation

The sponsoring employer must evaluate the interns performance in a

and entrepreneurship. A total of fifteen top students are recruited to participate

letter sent to the faculty supervisor upon completion of the internship.

from Roanoke College and other top national academic institutions. The fifteen

All internships are to be graded on a pass-fail basis.

participants are divided into teams of five and given the task to develop a
comprehensive business plan for a new product innovation. The students
research the patent/intellectual property process, organizational structure,

IL 477Intensive Learning Internship

production, marketing, financial aspects, funding, and possible exit strategies. The

An internship may be used to fulfill the Intensive Learning requirement if the

projects incorporate the knowledge base of many different academic disciplines;

project:

therefore, students with divergent backgrounds and experiences are encouraged


Is a clearly focused, well-defined analytical study or research project of

to apply. In addition, students who participate in the program receive the

benefit to the sponsoring organization and limited in scope and

following benefits: (a) IL or internship credit, (b) paid stipend, (c) free room and

breadth.

board, (d) exposure to leading speakers in a variety of different industries, (e) cash

Can reach conclusion within the proposed time frame.

prizes for best team ideas (f) the possibility of equity ownership in successful

Provides opportunity for significant interaction with a faculty mentor.

start-ups and (g) the possibility of employment opportunities with successful


start-ups.

This faculty member will meet with the intern regularly and closely monitor progress on the project.

Is the students sole academic pursuit during the period of study.

Results in the production of a paper, report, or other product.

Is taken as IL 477 Internship, and graded on a traditional A-F scale.

The qualifications for candidates to this program include: (a) status as a rising
senior or graduate, (b) G.P.A. 3.0 or higher, (c) a high degree of motivation and
work ethic, (d) the ability to work well in teams, (e) strong computer skills and (f)
an entrepreneurial spirit. Applications are to be submitted by February 1st to be
considered for this program. Competition for acceptance in this internship is keen.
All interested candidates need to apply by sending a cover letter and resume via
e-mail to the program director, Mike Smith at cmsmith@roanoke.edu.

21

Honors in Major Designation

extend their knowledge in an area of Business or Economics in which they have


particular interest.

In conjunction with earning either the Bachelor of Business Administration or the


B.A .in Economics, a qualifying student may earn the Honors in Major Designation.

Because an Independent Study is designed to be a flexible, yet intensive learning

This designation, which appears on both the college transcript and the diploma, is

experience, it requires significant commitment on the part of both the student and

a program of independent study, culminating in a paper presented at an Honors

the sponsoring faculty member. The following guidelines have consequently been

Forum. At the discretion of the department chair and Honors Committee, the hon-

established to clarify the requirements for successful completion of an

ors project may be completed in one term, in which case the student is enrolled in

Independent Study.

BUAD 496 (1 unit), or over the course of two terms by enrolling in BUAD 495 (1/2
unit) and BUAD 497 (1/2 unit), consecutively.

While either the student or faculty member may take the initiative in the design of
the Independent Study, the student is responsible for developing a written

Qualifying students contemplating graduate school are encouraged to seriously

proposal of 2-3 pages. The written proposal is to include:

consider earning the Honors in Major designation.


To qualify for the designation, a minimum G.P.A. of 3.4 in the major is required. An
interested student should complete the following steps:

Meet with your academic advisor to determine if you qualify for the
honors project.

and a preliminary bibliography.

professor and/or department chairperson with student agreement) by the end of


the semester preceding the independent study.

Committee.

Evaluation of the Independent Study will be the primary responsibility of the

Submit a written proposal to your committee. If the project is approved

sponsoring professor. However, a second faculty member chosen by the student

by the committee and the department chair, permission to enroll in

(subject to the approval of the sponsoring professor) will be asked to review the

honors work for the following term will be forwarded to the Associate

project and to provide the sponsoring professor with a suggested grade. A final

Dean.

grade will be at the discretion of the sponsoring professor.

Enroll in BUAD 496 for the term in which you wish to complete the
project, if a one-term project is desired, or in BUAD 495/497, in

International Study and Internship Opportunities

consecutive terms, if a two-term project is desired.

Opportunities for international study abound, either through participation in one of

Upon completion of the project, submit the appropriate number of

several international exchange programs in which Roanoke College participates,

copies of your paper to the Honors Committee for approval. Evaluation

or by enrolling in a May travel course offered by Roanoke College faculty. Contact

of your work is based on both your paper and an oral examination. A

our Office of International Programs, located in the Administration Building, for

grade of A- or better on the project, as well as a minimum GPA of 3.4

further information. International internships are also available for qualified rising

in your major at the time of graduation, is required to receive the

juniors and seniors, primarily through the Commonwealth of Virginias

Honors in Major designation.

an outline of the study;

chairperson (either as initially submitted or as modified by the sponsoring

In consultation with the major professor, select at least two additional


come from any academic department. This faculty team is your Honors

the importance of the study;

The proposal must be approved by the sponsoring professor and the department

faculty to serve on the committee. These two faculty members may

weeks prior to the end of the semester preceding the Independent Study.

professor must be in the field of study of the project.

the research question(s) and/or hypothesis(es) to be investigated;

The proposal must be submitted to the sponsoring faculty member at least three

Select a Business Administration or Economics faculty member, whichever is applicable, to be the major professor on the project. The major

International Internship Program. Many of these internships require a working

After your project has received final approval by the Honors Committee,

knowledge of an appropriate foreign language.

present the project at a forum held specifically for honors projects


presentations.

Student Assistants
The Business Administration and Economics Department hires a limited number

BUAD 496 or BUAD 495/497 may be used as an elective within your major. See

of students to assist the professors in test grading, preparation of assignments,

the Academic Catalog for further details.

record keeping, data collection for research, and other tasks. They have proven to

Independent Study

be very helpful in many ways to faculty members, and the experience is quite

It is the policy of the Department of Business Administration and Economics at

es/disciplines within the department, and general administrative procedures.

beneficial for the students as they learn a lot about the department, various cours-

Roanoke College to encourage upper-level students with exceptional potential to


pursue an Independent Study. [Note: Such students have frequently completed (or

Students interested in serving as student assistants should contact the

will complete) all of their required Business courses by the end of the first

department chairperson for further information.

semester of their senior year. They may also be participating or have participated
in the Honors Program.] An Independent Study is an opportunity for students to

22

Honors and Awards


Alpha Kappa Psi Key and Certificate

William A. Sandridge Award

This award recognizes and rewards the scholastic achievement of a student of the

This prize is given annually in honor of Dr. William A. Sandridge and is made

senior class in the Department of Business Administration and Economics. The

possible by the faculty of the Business Administration and Economics Department.

Award goes to the student with the highest overall G.P.A.

The recipient is selected by the department faculty from those graduating seniors
who have demonstrated outstanding leadership qualities both within the

Financial Executives International Award

department and in the campus community. The recipient is honored by having his
or her name inscribed on the William A. Sandridge Plaque.

An award given by Financial Executives International to students who are


recognized as outstanding students in finance and accounting. The recipients are
selected by the Business Administration and Economics Department faculty.

Outstanding Student Awards


Awards are presented annually to seniors in Business Administration and

Lowry Scholarship in Economics

Economics who have excelled in their fields. Also, awards are presented annually

This endowed scholarship will be awarded annually to one outstanding rising

to seniors who have excelled in the concentrations of Accounting, Business

senior in Economics. The recipient will be chosen by the Economics faculty each

Information Systems, Business Leadership, Finance, Global Business, Health Care

spring semester for the following academic year.

Administration, Human Resources Management, and Marketing.

Richard deOlazarra Award


This award was established to honor Richard deOlazarra who taught Marketing for
30 years. The prize will be awarded annually to an outstanding and deserving
rising senior in the marketing concentration.

Senior Scholar
Annually, the department may recommend to the Dean as Senior Scholar a
student whose work in each of our majors has been most exemplary. In order to
be considered, students must have at least a 3.2 cumulative grade point average
and must have completed at least 25 units of credit, of which a minimum of 17
units have been earned at Roanoke College. Eligibility is determined from among
currently enrolled students on the basis of their academic records as of the end of
the fall term. Senior Scholars are recognized at the annual convocation on Family
Weekend and receive a certificate at the Spring Honors Convocation.

Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants


Award of Achievement
Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants' Award of Achievement is awarded
annually to an outstanding student in accounting.

Wall Street Journal Award


The Wall Street Journal Award is presented annually to an outstanding
graduating transfer student (20 units or less earned at Roanoke College) in
Business Administration or Economics. The recipient receives a years
subscription to the Wall Street Journal, the Wall Street Journal Medal, and will
be honored by having his or her name inscribed on the Wall Street Journal
Plaque.

23

Honorary and Professional Organizations


Delta Mu Delta
This national honor society in Business Administration recognizes superior
academic achievements of majors in business and management programs.
The student must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.25 and be
in the top 20% of his or her class.

Omicron Delta Epsilon


This national honorary Economics society is open to Economics majors with
excellent academic standing. The student must have an overall grade point
average of at least 3.0 and at least a 3.0 grade point average in four or more
Economics courses.

Alpha Kappa Psi


A nationally recognized professional business fraternity, the Nu Tau Chapter
of Roanoke College was founded in 1991. Membership to Alpha Kappa Psi is
available to students majoring in Business Administration and Economics.
The organization holds weekly meetings, consisting of business oriented
speakers, social gatherings, and tours of local businesses. This organization
creates great networks between students and local businesses.

Society for Human Resource Management


The primary purpose of the Roanoke College student chapter of the Society
of Human Resource Management is to assist in the training of future Human
Resource Managers. The chapter does this through guest speakers, service
projects and organizational meetings. The club welcomes anyone, who is
interested in building effective human relations within an organization and is
attending at Roanoke College or one of the neighboring colleges. The chapter
was chartered in 1997 under the sponsorship of the local professional group,
i.e. the Roanoke Valley Chapter of the Society of Human Resource Management.

24

Business Administration & Economics Department


221 College Lane Salem, Virginia 24153
540-375-2500
2009 Roanoke College. All rights reserved. Roanoke College and Elderscholar are service marks of Roanoke College,
and Classic for Tomorrow is a service mark of Roanoke College registered in the US Patent and Trademark Office.