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Sixth Grade Reading Lesson


Novel Study Background Information
This lesson plan is a culminating activity after reading the novel Bystander
written by James Preller. Bystander is about a boy; Eric is the new kid in
seventh grade. Griffin wants to be his friend. When you're new in town, it's
hard to know who to hang out withand who to avoid. Griffin seems cool,
confident, and popular. But something isn't right about Griffin. He always
seems to be in the middle of bad things. And if Griffin doesn't like you, you'd
better watch your back. There might be a target on it. As Eric gets drawn
deeper into Griffin's dark world, he begins to see the truth about Griffin:
He's a liar, a bully, a thief. Eric wants to break away, do the right thing. But
in one shocking moment, he goes from being a bystander . . . to the bully's
next victim.

Materials

Laptops/Chromebooks
Smart Board
Laptop Camera
iPad; iMovie app
Class set of Bystander novels

Standards
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.1
Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as
well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through
particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal
opinions or judgments.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.6.3
Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of
episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves
toward a resolution.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY. RL.6.6
Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker
in a text

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Objectives

To develop oral presentation skills


To work cooperatively to collaborate on a related projects
To be able to read between and beyond the lines of text to interpret
multiple perspectives of what is read
Gain a deeper understanding of Bullying
Gain advanced computer skills to produce a multimedia presentation
Use technology to develop multi-facets of writing and reading

Pre-requisites
Students would have completed reading the novel Bystander by James
Preller in class participating in offline and online activities
Students would be familiar with basic computer technology tasks such
as the ones being described in this lesson

Teaching and Learning Activities


Introduction
Lesson plan for 15 students. The students would be put into small groups of
three for Tasks 1 and 2. The final task will be completed in larger groups.
The teacher will:
discuss the students groupings for the first two tasks and the blending
of groups for the third task
discuss the grading criteria and what is expected of each student and
the groups
discuss objectives and goals of the lesson
discuss the roles each of the group members need to decide upon to
allow for a positive collaborative experience
Cooperative Group Roles OR Cooperative Group Learning
To launch the lesson and to engage the students the teacher will use a
computer with a SmartBoard to play Bystander Jeopardy. The students will
be divided into two groups.
The teacher will use the Bystander Jeopardy (Jeopardy Labs) link to show
the questions. Each team will assign a score keeper and a question reader.
The teacher will determine a point value to each question and set the
guidelines for the game.
The teacher will monitor the alternating of
questions being read between the two teams.
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After the game the teacher will lead a whole group discussion to
collaboratively debate:
similarities and differences of physical and personality attributes of
people in general and specifically the characters in the story
what clues are given in a story that tell about the characters
attributes how those attributes relate to some of the themes of the
story (i.e. friendship, bravery, family, bullying, empathy)
how does an author develop a character what techniques are used
to create the character
Students Task 1
The first task involves each group discussing and brainstorming face to face
the main characters of the novel. The group members are to agree on one
to three characters to analyze and describe the characters physical and
personality attributes.
Using the computer the students create a concept map for each of the
characters with the characters name in the middle and the attributes in the
outer strands of the concept map; creating a descriptive analysis of the
character(s). The students are to reveal important and different aspects of
the character(s) and are to include page citations that support the attributes
being described.
Each trio is responsible for deciding on collaborative roles to design and
complete the concept map(s).
Students can use Microsoft Word or CMap tools
Microsoft Word: Click Insert
Click Diagram
Build concept map; adding character attributes

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Students Task 2
In this second task the students are to discuss and brainstorm face to face
some big ideas or themes that emerged from the novel. Themes such as
bravery, friendship, citizenship, bullying, family, empathy, or fear are a few
ideas to consider.
Using the computer the members of the group in this task are to agree on
one to three themes that reflect the overall sense of the story. Each group is
to develop one concept map for each theme similar to the attribute webs
no more than three themes are required one theme is acceptable.
The group is to write the theme in the middle of each web and discuss and
add supportive explanations and page numbers from the text that illustrate
and justify the ideas of the theme.
Students can use Microsoft Word or CMap tools
Microsoft Word: Click Insert on tool bar
Click Diagram
Students Task 3
Students will be working in two groups for the
final task. To begin, each of the small groups of
three will share their character and theme
concept maps with another group of three.
Groups will choose one character and one theme
from their concept maps to create a multimedia presentation using Google
Slides, Prezi or Power Point that describes their understanding of the novels
character and theme.
For example the group could decide on depicting a scene from the story and
represent that scene from their chosen characters perspective based on the
ideas from the concept maps. Since the book is originally written from the
third person viewpoint, students are to predict and illustrate a characters
perspective. Some examples of other character perspectives and scenes are
shown in Figure 1.

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Figure 1
Character
Erics point of view

Griffins point of view

Ketchup Boys point of view

Scene/Theme
Arrival of Griffin at his front door.
Eric is speechless to the friendly
encounter.
Relations of Griffin and local
grocery shoppers. Griffin is the
prime example of a perfect kid.
When Hallenback is running
through the playground. The
hunters are on a war-path.

(Cornish, 2002)
This final task is to be represented in a multimedia format - depicting a
characters perspective of the story and to also reflect a main theme that
emerged. The final project is not restricted to a scene simulation.
Other ideas:
news coverage that depicts the headlines and articles based on the
topic of bullying and other researched facts
journalist interview of a characters perspective of bullying events
research presentation of what the student wanted to learn more about
(i.e. over-coming bullying, empathy, celebrities over-coming hard
times, being different)
Multimedia Examples:
Prezi
Google Slides
PowerPoint
Short movie using Windows Movie Maker
Create a group Blog with Blogspot or Edmodo
Figure 2 represents some age appropriate Internet links for the students to
gain knowledge and background information on bullying for their multimedia
presentation.
Figure 2
Stop Bullying
PBS Kids
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Stomp out Bullying

Conclusion
Each student will present their multimedia presentation to the whole class.
Each student is expected to orally introduce and briefly discuss the character
and theme of the story. In addition, the presentation needs to include a
discussion about the scene, situation or event that is being portrayed in the
presentation.
The presentation is to connect each task according the students knowledge
and interpretation of the story to create and offer their own inferences of the
story.

Assessment and Evaluation


The teacher
presentation.
reflections.

4A
Exceeding
Grade Level
Expectations

Criteria

uses the checklist rubric to evaluate each students


The students use the self-evaluation rubric for individual

3B
Fully Meeting
Grade Level
Expectations

2C
Minimally
Meeting Grade
Level
Expectations
Group Presentation Evaluation

4
Excellent

Content
clear
evidence of
understanding
comprehensio
n of story
accurate
visuals that
add to the
Lindsay Thompson

2.5 C+
Meeting Grade
Level
Expectations

3
Very Good

2.5
Good

2
Average

1 CNot Yet Meeting


Grade Level
Expectations

1
Poor

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understanding
of the
presentation
clear concise
supporting
details of
characters
and themes
concept and
theme are
clear in multimedia
presentation
Presentation
avoided
distracting
mannerisms
clear, concise
and well
articulated
gained full
attention of
the audience
showed
knowledge of
the project
Multimedia
appropriate
choice of
medium
demonstratin
g ability to
synthesize
learning and
understanding
effective use
of technology
to capture the
audience

Self-Evaluation
Group Work Skills
Name: _______________________
Date: ________________________
Criteria
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2.5

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Excellent
I worked
toward the
achievement of
the groups
goals.
I contributed to
the groups
progress.
I self-assessed
and monitored
my own
behavior to stay
on task.
I
communicated
well with group
members.
I listened to
others ideas.
I participated in
adding ideas
with a positive
attitude.
I consistently
reviewed the
criteria of the
final project to
assist the
group.
I participated in
helping to
manage group
work time
effectively.
I knew how to
disagree with
ideas, not
people.
I contributed
well to the
concept maps.
I contributed
technology
skills for the
multimedia
presentation.
Lindsay Thompson

Very Good

Good

Average

Poor

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Lindsay Thompson