You are on page 1of 6

Daily Learning Plan

:
Day
1

Essential
Question
What gets
taught in
high school
history
classrooms
and why?

Standards

Content

Materials

Activities

Students will
learn about
MexicanAmerican
Studies in
Tuscon, AZ.
They will
learn about
a brief
history of
the classes
and the
students’
experiences
in these
classes.

Precious
Knowledge,
worksheet
with
questions

Opening (10
min.): Students
will create two
circles with the
same number
of students in
each circle and
with circle
located inside
of the other
circle. A
student in the
interior circle
will talk with a
student in the
exterior circle
for 1 minute,
and when
prompted by
the teacher, the
interior circle
will rotate
clockwise which
will give the
students an
opportunity to
speak with
someone new.
Students will
discuss the
question
prompted by
the teacher.
Watch the film
Precious
Knowledge
from 0:00 to
21:00. Students
will be given
discussion
questions prior
to watching the
movie segment
and will be
encouraged to
answer the
questions as
they watch.
Questions: 1.
How did taking

2

What role do
students
have in
shaping their
classrooms
and schools?

Students will
first learn
about
politicians’
roles in
shaping
school
curricula and
how
students in
Tuscon
advocated
for their
ethnic
studies
classes.
Students will
also learn
about the
current state
of ethnic
studies at
large in the
US.

Precious
Knowledge,
article,
worksheet

Chicano studies
classes change
these students’
relationships
with school? 2.
How are these
classes
different from
typical history
classes? What
were the main
messages of
these classes?
3. How did
offering ethnic
studies classes
affect student
performance
and the
graduation
rate? Students
will then
discuss the
worksheet
questions in
pairs and we
will conclude in
a whole group
discussion.
Students will
watch
segments of
Precious
Knowledge
(28:00-36:00
and 51:25-5426) and will
write down
answers to
questions with
a partner (20
min).
Questions: 1.
What did Tom
Horne and
other
politicians think
about and
decide to do
with these
classes? 2. How
did the
students
respond to the
passing of the

3

What gets
taught in
high school
history
classrooms
and why?

Students will
learn about
the history
of African
American
History
classes in
Phil. and
students will
start begin
to work on
assessment.

Powerpoint,
Precious
Knowledge

Bill 2281? 3.
What role do
students have
in shaping what
is taught in
schools? Then
students will
read article
(see Appendix
1) about the
current state of
ethnic studies
in the US with a
small group and
answer reading
comprehension
questions (20
minutes).
Students will
then journal in
response to
classroom
prompts (10
min).
Watch PBS clip
about history of
African Am.
History classes.
Students will
work in groups
of 3 to write
answers to
discussion
questions (20
min).
Questions: 1.
Are the people
in this movie in
favor of Black
History Month?
Why or why
not? 2.
Describe the
1967 protests.
What were they
protesting?
3. Why do the
people in this
video say that
teaching
African
American
History classes
in Philadelphia
is important?

4

What role do
students
have in
shaping their
classrooms
and schools?

Students will
continue
and finish
their final
projects.

Construction
paper,
pencils,
paper,
laptops if
available

5

What role do
students
have in
shaping their
classrooms
and schools?

Students will
present their
projects and
collaborative
ly develop
community
guidelines
for class.

Chart Paper,
laptop,
powerpoint

Then, I will go
over
expectations
and rubric for
assessment
and students
will start to
work on final
projects.
Students will
continue and
finish their final
projects (50
min). Students
will be
reminded of the
rubric and
purpose of this
project.
Students will
present their
final projects
(30 min) and
students will
collaboratively
develop
community
guidelines for
our class (20
min). Students
will be
reminded that
they have an
active role in
shaping our
learning
environment
and our larger
school
environment
and that they
need to create
meaningful
guidelines to
establish a
respectful
space.

Appendix 1:
How One Law Banning Ethnic Studies Led to Its Rise
Summary: Legislators in Arizona decided to prohibit a culturally relevant
course, so teachers pushed back and started a nationwide movement. Since
then, ethnic studies classes have been created in various schools and
districts and are even graduation requirements in some places.
The story of how Mexican American studies flourished begins in 2010, with
Arizona House Bill 2281. A group of Republican legislators in the state
designed the legislation specifically to ban the course—or more specifically,
to ban the Mexican American studies class taught in the Tucson Unified
School District, which attracted mostly Latino students. The legislators
sought to implement the ban while leaving similar classes geared around
Asian, black, and Native American cultures untouched.
The then state-superindendent of public instruction, Tom Horne, and his
replacement, John Huppenthal, tried with puzzling ferocity to squelch
Mexican American studies. The bill designed to eradicate the course said the
program taught Latino students to hate other races and that they’d been
historically subjugated and mistreated by the government, and that it even
encouraged sedition. “When I came into a classroom, they were portraying
Ben Franklin as a racist,“ said Huppenthal. “They got a poster of Che
Guevara.” In the spring of 2010, the majority-Republican legislature signed
HB 2281 into law.
Seeing the protests in the news, Jose Lara, a Los Angeles social-studies
teacher at Santee Education Complex High School, wondered why his district
didn’t have its own Mexican American Studies course. “What are we doing in
our classrooms [to help]?” Lara thought. “What type of awareness are we
bringing?”
Lara had begun implementing an ethnic-studies course in his district. Then
the district made it mandatory to graduate.
“It was an idea whose time had come,“ Lara says. “The ban in Arizona lit a
fire for everyone here to think, ‘Hey, we should be doing something about
this.’”
Within a year, Lara had spoken with leaders in San Diego, San Bernardino,
San Francisco, and Ventura counties who wanted ethnic studies in their
schools. The reaction in California couldn’t have been more different from

Arizona’s. When the school board held a meeting to discuss implementation
and Lara had no money to bus students to it, “teachers started reaching into
their pockets and soliciting online donations. We heard from people all across
the country—teachers, parents, professors saying, ‘Here's $25. And I wish I
could be there.’” Lara told The Los Angeles Times, “It's been pretty
amazing.”
Lara says five California school districts now require an ethnic-studies class,
and 11 others offer it as an elective. There’s even a law proposed that would
compel all California high schools to offer some form of ethnic studies.
This year, the National Education Association awarded Lara the 2015 Social
Justice Activist Award, largely for his work in spreading ethnic studies in
California. Every school in San Francisco now offers ethnic studies.
Adapted from: http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/07/howone-law-banning-ethnic-studies-led-to-rise/398885/#article-comments