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Jeff Goodman's Library of Classical Guitar Music

The J. S. Bach collection

Bourrée in E Minor
from the Lute Suite #1 in E minor BWV 996

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH
arranged for solo guitar
by Jeffrey Goodman
with supplemental study notes
and
musical phrasing frames

Shelter of Clear Light Publishing
www.ShelterofClearLight.com

Goodman     2 3    3 5  7 2  1 1   3    4 1  1   12   4 1    3  3     1 4 2 3   1  3 1      1   2   4 3 2 BII  4    1   2 BII  1  4 1    2      3  Copyright © 2009  3  1   2  4     2  3  2  1  2  4 1  2 3   1   1  1 1 1      4  BII   4  2 1  1 3  2    2    3  3 1    1  4  2   1        2 2 1     10 12  2    3 BII JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH   3 2   .Bourrée from Lute Suite # 1 BWV 996 arranged for solo guitar by J.

3 14  1    3 4   4 2  16  2  V VII  3   1 20  24    3   1 3 0  2  1 0   2  2  1 1 2   3   1 4 3  1 4  3    1  3 1 2    1     BVII  4   1   2   BII  3  1 1 %BII 1    4 II 0 2  1   1  3    2  1   2  1    1   1   0  3  1  4 2 IV 2 4    1 3   2    23   3  18  3   1  22 3 1 2 3  1      1 1  1   4 1     $BIV  BIII 4 1 1  3   1 1      4  3 0   4   1   .

Once you have done this you may notice that frames a and c are identical. Play each frame as if it were a miniature piece of music. There are many ways to use the frames: a. This is the first section of the music up to the repeat signs. 7. Letting your intuition guide you. . A thoughtful and organized strategy applied to each piece of music you learn greatly benefits your mastery and progress as you play guitar. In this piece I have made the frames p. b. 3. Practice every frame until you are familiar with their full musical and technical contents. Be fully flexible and inventive in your approach to using phrasing frames. with each frame having a boxed letter to identify it. This is in order to focus on the lively counterpoint between the bass and treble lines. being sure to pause at the end of the frame before either repeating it or going on to the next frame. 5. I strongly recommend the recordings of Julian Bream. r and s just two quarter beats in length.listen to it and follow the score as the guitarist plays. Some may be too short. If you have a recording of the music . If you decide that you want to memorize the music your work on the musical phrasing frames will greatly support your memorizing.4 Study notes for the player: Here are a few suggestions for learning the Bach Bourrée: 1. Once you have sorted this out technically you can join them into larger frames. First sight read through the whole piece enough times to familiarize yourself with the musical and technical content of the piece. And also that frames b and d are almost the same. f. 4. Andres Segovia and John Williams. q. c. In this way you can devote more of your time to the harder frames and expend shorter efforts on the frames you can easily play . go back and forth between the standard notation and the musical phrasing frames. After playing the Bourrée a number of times. d. 6. you will be ready to begin to work in greater detail. Look at the Musical Phrasing Frames presented on the following pages. There are many fine recordings. Once you have gone through the whole piece you can select those frames that are most challenging and then focus your attention on mastering them. Just redraw the borders as you see fit. The music is divided into a series of small frames. Begin by isolating the first four frames lettered a-d. 2. e. Extend them by joining several together. Study how Bach introduces very minor variations at the end of those two frames. Some may be too long.

S. Bach Bourrée with musical phrasing frames a   1  3    2 1  BII 1   4   1 c  1   1 4   4  1    3 2 1   2  1   2  4  2 1 3  1 3 1 3 6     2   2  3  3  3     3 b BII BII 2  1    4   1  1  2   4  1     3   2  d BII  1  4   4  1  2  2 1  e    2  3  5 f  1  4   2   3 1   3 1  4 h     2 1  2  3  g  3  1 2  3   12    2  2   1  3  1  4  2  .J.

6 i  3  2  1    3  2 3  4 4   3  3    1    2  1 m   3    1  1     1  4    1 2 1  2  BVII VII 1 V 1 IV  3 0  2 1 1  II   4 0 4  2   2  1  1   1    3  0  3   s $BIV  BII  1    1  1  0  3 3  1  1    n p o 4  3   2 3  2  2  4  2   3  4  1  4  1 0   2 1  1 l  3  1 k j BIII q 4 r 2 1   1      1  2  1 3 3  t %BII 4  1  1 2    4  1  3 1  3  1  1   .