You are on page 1of 53

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

Date Printed: 8-16-16

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, 2015

Printed By: Dario Workman

Monday, August 31, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - Words in Context; Inference; Summary
Teacher: Greco
Subject: ELA 7
Date: Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Key Vocabulary Terms


Words in Context, Inference, Summary

Essential Questions
What WISMPQP?
How can I make smart inferences?
What does the summary strategy look like?

Objective Standard
I can use reading strategies to help me understand words I
don't know, make inferences, and summarize.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Hand out the Cornell Notes with Essential Questions. Instruct
students to add one more question they have about the day's
topic to their notes, and to listen for that information as they
go through the lesson.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Display the PowerPoint lesson explaining the three WISMPQP strategies they will be learning about: Words in Context,
Inference, and Summary.
Explain that they will be talking notes in their Cornell Notes as they go through the presentation, adding information as they
discover the answers to the essential questions. As you go through the PowerPoint, model the note-taking, thinking aloud to
demonstrate how to take notes. For example, say "I noticed that this slide just gave me information about one of my essential
questions. I'm going to add that information to my notes next to that question."
Guided Practice (We do):
Continue through the power point, prompting students to add to their notes. Afterward, conduct a "Partner on Task" check:
say, "Look at your partner's notes to make sure they are taking good notes. Do they have enough information? Does it make
sense? Tell them what they need to do, or share your notes with them."
Independent Practice (You do):
Inform students that will be taking notes on their own, and that you will be collecting them at the end of the day to review
them. Continue with the power point, periodically giving students time to respond in their Cornell notes.
Before-Break Check-In
Ask students to highlight or *star KEY POINTS in their notes.
Direct Instruction or Review
Conduct a shared reading of the article "Treasures, Back Together"
Secrets of the Sahara:
Ask students to circle the words "depictions" (P1), "enormous" (P1), "shattered" (P1&4), "fissures" (P2), "rubble" (P4&5)
Model with a think-aloud how to look around for clues in the text that might help the reader figure out what it means. Say, "If I
look at the word 'depiction' in paragraph 1, I see that it is a word used to indicate a thing. That's a noun. I know from the
sentence that a depiction is something people see, and that ancient gods and creatures are part of what they see. If I think
about what words I know that sound a little like this word, I might think of "picture". So maybe a "depiction" is a picture of
something.
Ask students to work with their elbow partner to find clues to help them define the other words. Remind them to try to use
clues to figure it out on their own first before checking the glossary on the back page.
Ask students to make an inference: say, "Re-read the paragraph 4. What inference can we make about how Oppenheim felt
about the sculptures. How do you know?"
Say, "Now re-read paragraph 6. What inference can we make about the amount of rubble there must have been? How can
we tell?
Guide students in chunking the text: Chunk 1: Paragraph 1-3; Chunk 2: Paragraphs 4-5, Chunk 3: Paragraphs 6-7.
Model writing a summary of Chunk 1 for students. Direct them to write summaries for the remaining chunks.
Guided Practice
Embedded in the activity above.
Independent Practice
Embedded in the activity above.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Ask students to read the vocabulary words from the article and their definitions and work with a partner to use each word in a
sentence.
Closure Activity:
Ask students to review their notes and summarize the information.

Homework:

1 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RI.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RI.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a
specific word choice on meaning and tone.
SL.7.1 - Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - Words in Context; Inference; Summary
Teacher: GRECO; WORKMAN; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:

Key Vocabulary Terms


Words in Context, Inference, Summary

Essential Questions
What WISMPQP?
How can I make smart inferences?
What does the summary strategy look like?

Objective Standard
I can use reading strategies to help me understand words I
don't know, make inferences, and summarize.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Hand out the Cornell Notes with Essential Questions. Instruct
students to add one more question they have about the day's
topic to their notes, and to listen for that information as they
go through the lesson.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Display the PowerPoint lesson explaining the three WISMPQP strategies they will be learning about: Words in Context,
Inference, and Summary.
Explain that they will be talking notes in their Cornell Notes as they go through the presentation, adding information as they
discover the answers to the essential questions. As you go through the PowerPoint, model the note-taking, thinking aloud to
demonstrate how to take notes. For example, say "I noticed that this slide just gave me information about one of my essential
questions. I'm going to add that information to my notes next to that question."
Guided Practice (We do):
Continue through the power point, prompting students to add to their notes. Afterward, conduct a "Partner on Task" check:
say, "Look at your partner's notes to make sure they are taking good notes. Do they have enough information? Does it make
sense? Tell them what they need to do, or share your notes with them."
Independent Practice (You do):
Inform students that will be taking notes on their own, and that you will be collecting them at the end of the day to review
them. Continue with the power point, periodically giving students time to respond in their Cornell notes.
Before-Break Check-In
Ask students to highlight or *star KEY POINTS in their notes.
Direct Instruction or Review
Conduct a shared reading of the article ("Secrets of the Sahara Uncovered" for Regular classes, "Treasures, Back Together"
for Accelerated.)
Secrets of the Sahara:
Ask students to circle the words "remote" (P1) "determined" (P4) "sufficient" (P5) "adorned" (P9) and "interred" (P9)
Model with a think-aloud how to look around for clues in the text that might help the reader figure out what it means. Say, "If I
look at the word 'remote' in paragraph 1, I see that it is a word used to describe a region of the Sahara desert. That makes it
an adjective. If I think of the desert, I know that it is hot, dry, and there are few people living there. To figure out which
meaning is most likely to be correct, I'm going to think about other ways I've seen the word 'remote' used. A remote control
lets me change the channels on my TV from far away. How could this relate to an area in the desert? Maybe the area is far
away from where people live. Maybe "remote" means "far."
Ask students to work with their elbow partner to find clues to help them define the other words.
Ask students to re-read the paragraph that says "The Kiffian bones were found in tight bundles. They looked as if they had
been wrapped or slipped inside an encasement of some sort at the time of their burial."
Ask students to make an inference. What can we guess about how these people buried their dead? Did they bury their whole
bodies intact? How can you tell?
Then ask: What can you infer happened to the landscape between the time the Kiffians lived there to when the Tenerians
lived there? How can you tell?
Guide students in chunking the text: Chunk 1: Paragraph 1-4; Chunk 2: Paragraphs 5-6, Chunk 3: Paragraphs 7-9, Chunk 4:
Paragraphs 1-12.
Model writing a summary of Chunk 1 for students. Direct them to write summaries for the remaining chunks.
Guided Practice
Embedded in the activity above.
Independent Practice
Embedded in the activity above.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice

2 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Ask students to read the vocabulary words from the article and their definitions and work with a partner to use each word in a
sentence.
Closure Activity:
Ask students to review their notes and summarize the information.

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RI.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a
specific word choice on meaning and tone.
RI.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
SL.7.1 - Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - Main Idea, Purpose, Question; Prediction
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date: Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Key Vocabulary Terms


Main Idea; Purpose; Question; Prediction
Essential Questions
What are reading strategies?
What is WISMPQP?
What does identifying Main Idea look like?
What does identifying the Purpose look like?
How can I ask Questions and make Predictions to help me
think deeply about what I'm reading?

Objective Standard
I can use reading strategies to help me understand the main
idea and purpose of a text; and I can generate questions
about the text.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Prompt students to take out the Cornell Notes with Essential
Questions from the previous day's lesson. Instruct students to
review their notes and add one more question they have
about the day's topic to their notes, and to listen for that
information as they go through the lesson.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Display the PowerPoint lesson explaining the four WISMPQP strategies they will be learning about: Main Idea, Purpose,
Question; Prediction.
Explain that they will be talking notes in their Cornell Notes as they go through the presentation, adding information as they
discover the answers to the essential questions. As you go through the PowerPoint, model the note-taking, thinking aloud to
demonstrate how to take notes. For example, say "I noticed that this slide just gave me information about one of my essential
questions. I'm going to add that information to my notes next to that question."
Guided Practice (We do):
Continue through the power point, prompting students to add to their notes. Afterward, conduct a "Partner on Task" check:
say, "Look at your partner's notes to make sure they are taking good notes. Do they have enough information? Does it make
sense? Tell them what they need to do, or share your notes with them."
Independent Practice (You do):
Inform students that will be taking notes on their own, and that you will be collecting them at the end of the day to review
them. Continue with the power point, periodically giving students time to respond in their Cornell notes.
Before-Break Check-In
Ask students to highlight or *star KEY POINTS in their notes.
Direct Instruction or Review
Explain to students that they will be applying what they learned about reading strategies to a text. Tell students they will be
reading a short article about astronauts in space and hand out the Achieve3000 article "A Year On the ISS". Tell them they
will be reading the article over several times and annotating the text for different reading strategies.
Guided Practice
Ask students to discuss with their partner questions they have about space travel. Select a few to write down in the space
above the article.
Ask students to share out their questions with their group/team.
Next, conduct a shared reading of the article as a class. After reading it once, ask students to identify the Main Idea: what is
the big idea that all of the other ideas in the article "fit" into? Guide the discussion to help students identify the Main Idea
(NASA Scientists are sending two astronauts into space for a year to find out what effect it will have on them.)
Ask students to re-read the article, highlighting or underlining the parts where they find the Main Idea. Ask students to share
out. Guide discussion about which parts contain the Main Idea.
Next, direct students to look closely at paragraph 4 "During previous lengthy periods of weightlessness, scientists observed a
number of physical effects. The most common included weakened bones and muscles, impaired vision, and a compromised

3 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

immune system." Ask "what was the author's purpose in writing 'The most common included weakened bones and muscles,
impaired vision, and a compromised immune system.'?" Ask students to turn and talk, then write their thoughts.
Ask students to re-read paragraphs 7 through 11 and count how many times the article mentions that the mission is a very
long one. Ask "What was the author's purpose in mentioning it so many times? Why does the author include the quote
'Imagine... you had to stay in your office for a year and not go outside, right? Kind of a challenge.'?"
Using clues from the article, ask students to make a prediction about what they think scientists will find out about what
happens to people after a year in space.
Independent Practice
Embedded in the Guided Practice above.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Ask students to read the vocabulary words from the article and their definitions and work with a partner to use each word in a
sentence.
Closure Activity:
Ask students to review their notes and summarize the information.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RI.7.2 - Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RI.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
SL.7.1c - Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others' questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back
on topic as needed.
SL.7.1 - Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In
Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during
the second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they
will create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their
position without making personal attacks or insults.
Guided Practice

4 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.
Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.

Thursday, September 3, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Students will be taking their SRI Test one half of the Block, and following the lesson plans below for the second half.
This activity will give teachers an idea of their student's reading abilities; fluency, vocabulary, inflection, and comprehension.
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
Oral, Inflection, tempo, volume, pitch.

Objective Standard
I can read a text orally with inflection, paying attention to
tempo, volume, and pitch.

Essential Questions
How can I use inflection to show the meaning of a text I am
reading orally?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Show images of characters of various ages, genders, and
cultural backgrounds. Ask students to imagine what their
voices sound like. As them to write it down.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that oral reading is a special skill that takes practice and effort. Explain that they will be practicing using
inflection to read out loud. When a reader uses inflection well, the text is easier to understand, stories can come alive, and it
is easier to picture the speaker.
Go over the "rules" of reading out loud:
1. Take your time. Reading faster does not make you a better reader. Read so that the meaning is clear.
2. Commas indicate a PAUSE. When you see a comma, pause or take a breath.
3. A Period indicates a hard noticeable stop. When you see a period, stop and wait 2-3 seconds.
4. If you come across a word you don't know, take your time and read it one part at a time, sounding it out.
5. No Backseat Reading! If someone is reading and doesn't know a word, do not butt in and say it. Let them discover it.
Explain to students that inflection has different qualities, like tempo (speed), pitch (high or low tone), and volume (loud or
quiet).
Explain how pitch is used to show the meaning of a sentence. Explain that people's voices naturally drop a little at the end of
a sentence. This is a subtle and subconscious way we can tell when someone is finished with their idea.
Demonstrate how people's voices naturally lift a little when asking a question. "You are reading that book." sounds different
than "You are reading that book?"
Remind students to show meaning by using pitch: if they see a period, their voice should drop at the end. If they see a
question mark, their voice should lift at the end.
Model reading with a text of your choice. You can also share examples of recordings of professionals or writers who use
inflection.
Guided Practice (We do):
Ask students to read for 1 minute from a story of your choice. Narratives work well. Use a timer to manage time. Let the
student finish the sentence they are reading after the timer goes off.
Independent Practice (You do):
Ask students to read for 1 minute. Use a timer to manage time. Let the student finish the sentence they are reading after the
timer goes off.
Before-Break Check-In
NONE/SRI
Direct Instruction or Review
NONE
Guided Practice

5 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

NONE
Independent Practice
NONE
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
NONE
Closure Activity:
Ask students to summarize what they learned that day.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SL.7.1b - Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.

Friday, September 4, 2015

CCSD - MS/HS Holidays and PD - New Calendar Item


Monday, September 7, 2015

CCSD - MS/HS Holidays and PD - Labor Day - No School


Tuesday, September 8, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
Unpacking

Objective Standard
I can unpack Unit 1 to understand the skills and knowledge I
will need to compete the first Embedded Assessment.

Essential Questions
How do authors use narrative elements to create a story?
What are the elements of effective revision?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Distribute SpringBoard TextBooks. Have students preview the
text book.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that the day's lesson will focus on understanding the concepts and skills, along with the materials and
activities, that will be used in Unit 1 to prepare them for the first Embedded Assessment. They will be exploring, reading,
thinking about and discussing the major concepts that will be explored in Unit 1.
Guided Practice (We do):
Guide students in unpacking the Unit: Have students look at the photograph on pg. 1 of SB book and respond to the visual
prompt (Think-Pair-Share). Ask students to read the goals , academic vocabulary, and literary terms for the unit and mark any
words that unfamiliar to them. Ask students to add these to the word wall, along with definitions. Direct students to look at the
Table of Contents on pages 2-3, and find a "Wow!" activity (something that looks interesting, and a "Woah!" activity
(something that looks challenging.) Turn and talk, share out.
Direct students to SB page 4. Have students do a "think -pair-share" to respond to the essential questions.
Independent Practice (You do):
NONE: Independent practice will happen in the second half of the block.
Before-Break Check-In
Explain to students that they will be unpacking the Embedded Assessment after the break. Ask, "what have you learned
about this unit so far?"
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out the Embedded Assessment (EA) "A+" Unpacking worksheet.
Model for students how to unpack the Embedded Assessment on Page 126 using the organizer.
Write the title of the EA on the worksheet. Look through the "Exemplary" column and record the main action verb, the (direct
object) noun it connects to, the "A+" adverb, and what activities in the unit will help them be able to do this.
Teacher will complete all of the bullets for "Ideas" along with the students, modeling Their thinking.
Guided Practice
Direct students to work with a partner to complete the bullets for "Structure" on their unpacking sheet.
Independent Practice
Students work independently to complete the bullets for "Use of Language."

6 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Vocabulary or Grammar Practice


NONE- embedded in above activity
Closure Activity:
Student reflect on the essential questions: Think-Pair-Share
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.1 - Previewing the Unit [L.7.6]
SB 1.2 - Exploring the Concept of Choice [RI.7.6, W.7.10]

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:

Key Vocabulary Terms


Biography

Essential Questions
How can I paraphrase a quote or idea?
What are the choices I make about what I read and how I
write?

Objective Standard
I can
Paraphrase and analyze quotes related to choices.
Warm-Up/Introduction
SB Act. 1.2
Direct students to brainstorm and record phrases about
choices and synonyms for choice. Consider adding these
terms to the Word Wall. Have students record their choice
terms on index cards. Depending on student need, consider
having students conduct a word sort or a linear array by
connotation.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Ask students to create a section in their Reader/Writer Notebooks for independent reading. Activate prior knowledge by
asking them to reflect on their successful experiences with choosing a text to read independently. Students should consider
the content and manageability of their independent reading selections.
Guided Practice (We do):
Model for students with a think-aloud how to respond to questions 1-4 about choices they make in reading material.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students answer the questions 1-4 about their reading choices. Conduct a think-pair share or discussion circle in groups to
have students share their responses.
Direct students to reflect on their writing experience and writing process knowledge. Ask them to set one or more writing
goals, including goals related to writing genres and the writing process.
Before-Break Check-In
(TEACHER'S NOTE: The second half of the lesson guides students in selecting independent reading material, as is directed
in the SpringBoard activity. You may also choose to preview and discuss a class novel that you will be reading with your
classes.)
Direct Instruction or Review
Help students prepare for independent reading, including selecting appropriate materials to read. Guide students in
previewing texts, analyzing the visuals and text on both the front and back covers. You may want to discuss the genres of
biography, autobiography, and memoir and their relationship to personal narratives.
Guided Practice
Students should independently read the start of the text, considering content and manageability. Guide students in choosing
an appropriate text and creating an Independent Reading Plan that they will revisit throughout the unit. (10-15 mins)
Direct students to reflect on their writing experience and writing process knowledge. Ask them to set one or more writing
goals, including goals related to writing genres and the writing process.
Independent Practice
Last, students should synthesize the activity by using their thinking about choices to prepare a portfolio cover. Consider
requiring students to include something to represent the following:
words, phrases, and images to represent the word choice
their favorite quote from the list
their favorite choices as readers and writers
Students portfolio covers should represent their understanding of the concept of choice as well as their roles as writers.

7 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Vocabulary or Grammar Practice


Embedded in the above activity
Closure Activity:
Students reflect on their role as readers and writers: How do my choices as a reader effect me? How do my choices as a
writer effect others?
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.3 - Choices and Consequences: Paired Poetry [RL.7.1, RL.7.2]

Thursday, September 10, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz.

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In
Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during
the second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they
will create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their
position without making personal attacks or insults.
Guided Practice
As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.
Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

8 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and
other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RI.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.

Friday, September 11, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
imagery
figurative language
literal
denotation
connotation

Essential Questions
How do imagery and figurative language add to poetry?
How do two poems explore a similar theme?

Objective Standard
I can identify an author's purpose in using figurative language
and imagery; I can compare two poems for a common theme.

Warm-Up/Introduction
To activate students prior knowledge, ask them to think
about the phrase fork in the road. Activating prior knowledge
provides students with an opportunity to think about what they
already know about a concept, which prepares them to build
on their previous learning. Creating the web organizer about
choices in the Reader/Writer Notebook will allow students to
revisit and revise the web as they continue to brainstorm
choices throughout the unit. Students will return to this My
Choices web later in the unit.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Teacher will guide students through a lesson on figurative language and sensory details. Students take Cornell Notes on their
own. (Scaffolding: students write these questions on their notes before the lesson and use them to guide their note-taking: 1.
What is figurative language? 2. How are figurative and literal meanings different? 3. What are some examples of figurative vs
literal meanings? 4. How do sensory imagery details improve writing?
Guided Practice (We do):
Teacher guides whole-group analysis of the poem "Fire and Ice" by Robert Frost.
As students to identify the metaphors in the poem, then paraphrase.
Independent Practice (You do):
Paraphrase the message of the poem Fire and Ice. Conduct a Think-Pair Share. Student write their interpretation, share with
a partner and share out with the class.
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Conduct a close, guided reading of both poems for the purpose of thinking about choices and consequences presented in
these texts. Begin by having students preview each poems structure (stanzas), use of conventions, and rhyme pattern prior
to a close reading of the text. Conduct two readings of each poem. Students should mark unfamiliar words during the first
read. For the second read, guide students to stop and paraphrase difficult parts of the stanzas, focusing on the sentence.
Guided Practice
Use The Road Not Taken and Choices to explore connotation and denotation. Focus especially on such diction as road,
sigh, and job from Choices.
Use the following to help guide student's thinking during the activity debrief:
Key Ideas and Details: Students summaries will vary. The poems meaning is developed across the stanzas by posing a
choice (Stanza 1), considering which choice to make (Stanza 2), making a choice and recognizing that once made the other
option would be unlikely ever to be pursued (Stanza 3), and reflecting on the future, which results from the choices we make
throughout life (Stanza 4).
Key Ideas and Details The word job rather than occupation, employment, or even work carries with it the sense of a duty
or chore.
Key Ideas and Details The sentence structure of the stanzas in Choices is called out to help students understand the
sense of the poem. Explore the sentence structure of Giovannis poetic stanzas to help students understand the conditional
sense of the poems assertions.
1. If I cant do what I want, I shouldnt do what I dont want.
2. If I cant have what I want, I should be happy with what Ive got.

9 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

3. Since I cant go where I want, I should go where life points me.


4. When I cant express what Im feeling, I should feel what I can express
Independent Practice
Guide students in comparing and contrasting the paired poems using the graphic organizer. Last, have students think about
the concept of consequences by webbing.
SSR (Silent Sustained Reading) or Class Reading - 30 minutes
Class novels or individual reading choices.
Closure Activity:
Turn and talk:
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.3 - Choices and Consequences: Paired Poetry [RL.7.1, RL.7.2]
RI.7.9 - Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing
different interpretations of facts.

Monday, September 14, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
imagery
figurative language
literal
denotation
connotation

Essential Questions
How do imagery and figurative language add to poetry?
How do two poems explore a similar theme?

Objective Standard
I can identify an author's purpose in using figurative language
and imagery; I can compare two poems for a common theme.

Warm-Up/Introduction
To activate students prior knowledge, ask them to think
about the phrase fork in the road. Activating prior knowledge
provides students with an opportunity to think about what they
already know about a concept, which prepares them to build
on their previous learning. Creating the web organizer about
choices in the Reader/Writer Notebook will allow students to
revisit and revise the web as they continue to brainstorm
choices throughout the unit. Students will return to this My
Choices web later in the unit.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Teacher will guide students through a lesson on figurative language and sensory details. Students take Cornell Notes on their
own. (Scaffolding: students write these questions on their notes before the lesson and use them to guide their note-taking: 1.
What is figurative language? 2. How are figurative and literal meanings different? 3. What are some examples of figurative vs
literal meanings? 4. How do sensory imagery details improve writing?
Guided Practice (We do):
Teacher guides whole-group analysis of the poem "Fire and Ice" by Robert Frost.
As students to identify the metaphors in the poem, then paraphrase.
Independent Practice (You do):
Paraphrase the message of the poem Fire and Ice. Conduct a Think-Pair Share. Student write their interpretation, share with
a partner and share out with the class.
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Conduct a close, guided reading of both poems for the purpose of thinking about choices and consequences presented in
these texts. Begin by having students preview each poems structure (stanzas), use of conventions, and rhyme pattern prior
to a close reading of the text. Conduct two readings of each poem. Students should mark unfamiliar words during the first
read. For the second read, guide students to stop and paraphrase difficult parts of the stanzas, focusing on the sentence.
Guided Practice
Use The Road Not Taken and Choices to explore connotation and denotation. Focus especially on such diction as road,
sigh, and job from Choices.
Use the following to help guide student's thinking during the activity debrief:
Key Ideas and Details: Students summaries will vary. The poems meaning is developed across the stanzas by posing a
choice (Stanza 1), considering which choice to make (Stanza 2), making a choice and recognizing that once made the other

10 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

option would be unlikely ever to be pursued (Stanza 3), and reflecting on the future, which results from the choices we make
throughout life (Stanza 4).
Key Ideas and Details The word job rather than occupation, employment, or even work carries with it the sense of a duty or
chore.
Key Ideas and Details The sentence structure of the stanzas in Choices is called out to help students understand the
sense of the poem. Explore the sentence structure of Giovannis poetic stanzas to help students understand the conditional
sense of the poems assertions.
1. If I cant do what I want, I shouldnt do what I dont want.
2. If I cant have what I want, I should be happy with what Ive got.
3. Since I cant go where I want, I should go where life points me.
4. When I cant express what Im feeling, I should feel what I can express
Independent Practice
Guide students in comparing and contrasting the paired poems using the graphic organizer. Last, have students think about
the concept of consequences by webbing.
SSR (Silent Sustained Reading) or Class Reading - 30 minutes
Class novels or individual reading choices.
Closure Activity:
Turn and talk:
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.3 - Choices and Consequences: Paired Poetry [RL.7.1, RL.7.2]
RI.7.9 - Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing
different interpretations of facts.

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
incident
response
reflection
personal narrative

Essential Questions
What is the difference between a personal narrative and a
narrative short story?
How can I write a reflection about a incident in my life?

Objective Standard
I can identify an incident, response, and reflection in a
personal narrative; I can write a reflection about an incident in
my life.
Warm-Up/Introduction
To activate prior knowledge, ask students to respond to the
questions in the Exploring Personal Narratives graphic
organizer. Have students share with a partner before sharing
with the whole class in a think-pair-share.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Discuss narrative elements as students take notes. Explain the terminology of incident, response, and reflection that
characterizes and differentiates a personal narrative from a narrative short story. Explain to students that this also describes
the organization of a personal narrative with reflection. Add these terms to the Word Wall. Guide students in creating a
definition of a personal narrative. Introduce the strategy of metacognitive markersspecific symbols used to reflect thinking
during reading and used after reading to find evidence more easily.
Guided Practice (We do):
Read the text in either a shared reading or a form of oral reading like jump-in reading (someone reads aloud to an end
punctuation mark, and then someone else jumps in and continues to read). Chunk the reading and interact with the text,
stopping briefly for each chunk to remind students to use their metacognitive markers.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students read the excerpt "Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes" and annotate the text for beginning, middle, and end, writing a
summary of each chunk. Then ask students to identify the incident, response, and reflection.
Before-Break Check-In
How does the main character's perspective change from the beginning of the story to the end?
Direct Instruction or Review

11 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

In looking at students written responses and listening to their collaborative group discussions, check that they were able to
identify the incident, the response, and the reflection, as this is the same outline they will be using in writing Embedded
Assessment 1.
Guided Practice
Guide students in thinking about their choices, and have them add new ideas the to their writing topic brainstorming organizer
(word web).
Independent Practice
Students select an incident to do a 10-minute quickwrite about.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.4 - Exploring the Personal Narrative [RL.7.2, W.7.3, W.7.3a]

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
Summarize
Words in Context
Incident
Response
Reflection

Objective Standard
I can analyze a personal narrative for an incident, response
and reflection.

Warm-Up/Introduction
Quickwrite: Recall an early memory from childhood that
stands out to you. Think about stories that your family has
Essential Questions
shared about you growing up. For example, what were some
How can analyzing a personal narrative help me write my own
milestones (your first toy, bike, or game) or a significant
personal narrative for the Embedded Assessment?
celebration or family event? Write freely to explore your
memory while thinking about any choices you made.
What features of a personal narrative are most important to
Turn and talk: share a summary of your memory with your
include?
elbow partner.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Conduct a shared reading of this excerpt from Zora Neale Hurstons autobiography, Dust Tracks on the Road. The excerpt is
a humorous personal narrative of a childhood incident in which Hurston tells how she finally learned to walk to avoid an
encounter with a ravenous sow. Ask students to circle unfamiliar words as you read (Words in Context), and write any
questions about the story (Questioning the Text)
Ask students "What questions do you have about the events in this personal narrative?" and "Are there any unfamiliar words
in this text?" Guide students in pulling meaning from the text by using the reading strategies, and offer background
knowledge as needed.
Ask students to chunk the text as follows: Chunk 1= Paragraphs 1-2; Chunk 2= Paragraphs 3-5; Chunk 3= Paragraph 6.
Guided Practice (We do):
Summarize the first chunk of the text with students. Students should follow along in their books. Ask students to work with an
elbow partner to summarize the second chunk.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students write a summary for the third chunk.
Before-Break Check-In
Comprehension check: How did the WISMPQP strategies Words in Context, Questioning, and Summary help us understand
the narrative?
Direct Instruction or Review
Review your summaries of the narrative. Review the terms "Incident" "Response" and "Reflection" from Act. 1.5. Ask
students to think about the narrative in terms of "incident" "response" and "reflection" Explain that they will be annotating the
text as directed: Underline the incident, highlight the narrator's response, and put brackets around the reflection.
Consider pre-marking the story "Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes" with these annotations to model it for the students.

12 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Guided Practice
Students work in pairs or groups to annotate the text for incident, response, and reflection.
Independent Practice
Check for understanding: Quickwrite a response to the essential questions in journals.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Verb Tenses: Review the verb tenses with students on page 20, and have them look at the writing they have done so far in
this unit to check their verb use. Have them revise as needed to use correct tenses and to avoid passive voice. Assign extra
verb tense practice worksheet for homework.
Closure Activity:
Revisit the essential questions. Think-pair share- With a partner, write an answer to the two essential questions. Share out to
group. Discuss as a class.
Homework: Verb tense practice.

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.5 - Analyzing Incident, Response, and Reflection [RI.7.3, RI.7.5]

Thursday, September 17, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz.

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In
Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during
the second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they
will create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their
position without making personal attacks or insults.
Guided Practice
As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.
Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice

13 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

None- quiz debrief.


Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and
other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RI.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.

Friday, September 18, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
characterization
imagery (review)
figurative language (review)
Essential Questions
How does an author use characterization to show us the
character?
How do imagery and figurative language add depth to a
narrative?

Objective Standard
I can analyze a personal narrative for literary devices and
style.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Quickwrite: What choices do you make at school?
Brainstorm the types of choices you make at school and the
types of consequences you can face as a result of your
choices.
Think-Pair-Share activity

Direct Instruction (I do):


Conduct a lesson on Characterization (PowerPoint presentation is available) to explain how an author uses action, speech,
and description to show us characters. Review the literary devices "imagery" and "figurative Language."
Guided Practice (We do):
Conduct an initial reading of the short story "Bad Boy" as a class. Model for students how to identify examples of imagery,
figurative language, and characterization in paragraphs 1-7.
Independent Practice (You do):
Conduct a jigsaw activity: have students count off to four. Ask students to annotate paragraphs 8-23 in the following manner:
1. Annotate for Sensory Detail
2. Annotate for Figurative Language
3. Annotate for Characterization
4. Annotate for incident and response.
Before-Break Check-In
Explain to students that they will be sharing out their text annotations with their group, and are responsible for their part of the
information.
Direct Instruction or Review
Class reading of novel: Before reading give students a purpose for reading. Examples;
"As we read, pay attention to how the author builds the main character through words, actions and descriptions."
"As we read, think about the mood of the story. What is the mood and how does the author help show it?"
"As we read, pay attention to the level of tension in the story. How does this help us identify what stage of the plot we are in?"
"As we read, pay attention to the themes you see come up. What UNIVERSAL questions is this story asking us to think
about?"
Guided Practice
Class reading of novel.
Class discussion of the essential question set in the purpose, above.
Independent Practice
Students may journal independently to reflect on the purpose set before reading.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Debrief and grade verb tense homework from Wednesday as a class. Collect work.
Closure Activity:

14 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Turn and talk: review with your elbow partner the three literary devices from today: imagery, figurative language, and
characterization.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.6 - Analyzing Language [RI.7.1, RI.7.3, W.7.3, W.7.3a]

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Monday, September 21, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date: This will vary per teacher
Teacher will spend one period in the LIBRARY and the other period facilitating the lesson below:
Key Vocabulary Terms
characterization
plot
conflict
setting

Essential Questions
What essential information do I need to notate to understand
these narrative devices?

Objective Standard
I can take effective notes on narrative devices.

Warm-Up/Introduction

Activate prior knowledge by asking students to review


the Cornell Notes for the topic, and adding 1 or more
additional questions to the notes.

Direct Instruction (I do):

Teacher will share the Literary Device PowerPoint on Setting, Character, Conflict, and Plot. Explain that they
will be talking notes in their Cornell Notes as they go through the presentation, adding information as they
discover the answers to the essential questions. As you go through the PowerPoint, model the note-taking,
thinking aloud to demonstrate how to take notes. For example, say "I noticed that this slide just gave me
information about one of my essential questions. I'm going to add that information to my notes next to that
question."
Guided Practice (We do):

Model for students through a think-aloud how to add notes in answer to the essential questions.
Independent Practice (You do):

Students continue to take Cornell notes on the Setting, Character, Conflict, and Plot Powerpoint.
Before-Break Check-In
Let students use their notes to answer the quick pop quiz on Setting, Character, Conflict, and Plot.
Direct Instruction or Review
LIBRARY
Guided Practice
LIBRARY
Independent Practice
LIBRARY
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
LIBRARY
Closure Activity:
LIBRARY
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SL.7.2 - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas
clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

15 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
characterization
plot
conflict
setting

Essential Questions
What essential information do I need to notate to understand
these narrative devices?

Objective Standard
I can take effective notes on narrative devices.

Warm-Up/Introduction

Activate prior knowledge by asking students to review


the Cornell Notes for the topic, and adding 1 or more
additional questions to the notes.

Direct Instruction (I do):

Teacher will share the Literary Device PowerPoint on Setting, Character, Conflict, and Plot. Explain that they
will be talking notes in their Cornell Notes as they go through the presentation, adding information as they
discover the answers to the essential questions. As you go through the PowerPoint, model the note-taking,
thinking aloud to demonstrate how to take notes. For example, say "I noticed that this slide just gave me
information about one of my essential questions. I'm going to add that information to my notes next to that
question."
Guided Practice (We do):

Model for students through a think-aloud how to add notes in answer to the essential questions.
Independent Practice (You do):

Students continue to take Cornell notes on the Setting, Character, Conflict, and Plot Powerpoint.
Before-Break Check-In
Let students use their notes to answer the quick pop quiz on Setting, Character, Conflict, and Plot.
Direct Instruction or Review
Ask students to return to Act. 1.6 in Springboard. Review the objectives for that activity and ask student to find their
annotations for the literary devices "imagery, figurative language, and charcterization" from the previous lesson. Sort students
into their "expert" groups by number using Four Corners: send each number to one corner of the room. Ask student to
compare annotations in their expert groups and adjust their notes as their understanding changes. Ask students to turn and
talk to review the process for the jigsaw activity.
Guided Practice
Ask students to return to their team and share out their text annotations with their group. Students listening should add these
annotations to their text as each speaker presents.
Independent Practice
Say, "Now that you have practiced analyzing a text for these literary devices, show your understanding by annotating
paragraphs 1-14 on pages 24-25 for imagery, figurative language, and characterization on your own." You may choose to let
students know if you plan to grade this activity. As students work, circulate around the room to check for understanding.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Debrief and grade verb tense homework from Wednesday as a class. Collect work.
Closure Activity
321 exit ticket- 3 things you learned this week, 2 things you found interesting, 1 question you have about the week's lessons.
While students are doing this, pass out progress reports. Hold individual conferences with students who need grade
improvement.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.6 - Analyzing Language [RI.7.1, RI.7.3, W.7.3, W.7.3a]

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW; PARKER.
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Teachers will spend the first or last 3 periods of the day, depending, in the CCL activity. Teachers must determine their own activities to do with students that day,
since they will have a substitute for half of their classes.

16 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

Key Vocabulary Terms

Objective Standard
I can

Essential Questions

Warm-Up/Introduction

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Direct Instruction (I do):


Guided Practice (We do):
Independent Practice (You do):
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review

Guided Practice

Independent Practice

Vocabulary or Grammar Practice

Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date: This will vary per teacher
Teacher will spend one period in the LIBRARY and the other period facilitating the lesson below:
Key Vocabulary Terms
Embedded Assessment

Essential Questions
What essential information do I need to notate to understand
these narrative devices?

Objective Standard
I can analyze the activities I have completed to explain how
they have prepared me for the Embedded Assessment.
Warm-Up/Introduction

Ask students to take out their "A+ Checklist" for


unpacking the Embedded Assessment and review
the skills/knowledge needed for the task.

Direct Instruction (I do):

Explain to students that they will be reviewing their "A+ Checklist" for the Embedded Assessment to
determine their progress. Model for students how to go one by one down the checklist to self-assess their
understanding. Explain that a check in the red box indicates a concept or skill they know very poorly, a check
in the yellow box, indicates that it is a familiar concept or skill, but the student still has questions or
misunderstandings, and a check in the green box indicates a concept or skill they feel they have mastered
for the Embedded Assessment.
Guide students in self-assessing their progress, putting a check n the box that indicates their understanding
for each concept or skill.
Guided Practice (We do):

17 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Have the list of the concepts or skills for the Embedded Assessment pre-printed on single sheets of paper
that you display along the walls of your classroom. Give each group a small stack of three different colored
post-it notes or small slips of paper. Assign a progress level to each color ( Example: Red or pink might be "I
don't Understand this," Yellow or orange might be "I am starting to get this," and green or blue might be "I
know this or could teach it.") Ask students to walk around the classroom and tape or stick their colored paper
to each "Skill" or "Concept" according to their mastery level. Students sit doen after they have evaluated
themselves for each skill.
As a class, discuss the overall trends for each skill. Ask students to determine which skills the class seems
to have mastered, which need more support, and which need re-teaching.
Independent Practice (You do):

Guide students in working with a partner to identify which activities they have done so far in Springboard that
teach a concept or skill that is on their "A+ Checklist", and notate the activity number next to the concept or
skill.
Before-Break Check-In
Ask students to write an independent goal for getting all of their skills and concepts "into the green" so they can complete the
Embedded Assessment.
Direct Instruction or Review
LIBRARY
Guided Practice
LIBRARY
Independent Practice
LIBRARY
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
LIBRARY
Closure Activity:
LIBRARY
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
Claim
Reasons
Evidence

Essential Questions
How do I write a persuasive essay?

Objective Standard
I can write a persuasive paragraph using the C.R.E.W.
strategy.
Warm-Up/Introduction
As directed by administration: write 10 minutes about
"Respect - What does it mean to you?"

Direct Instruction (I do):


Connect the lesson to previous learning: Ask students to recall what they remember about writing an argument using
C.R.E.W.
Review the elements of CREW. Share will students the sample article and sample text (See Argument Example A Below)
Conduct a shared reading of the article.
Guided Practice (We do):
Ask students to work with their elbow partner to identify these elements of the essay:
Claim
Reasons
Evidence
Warrant
Introduction Section
Body Section
Conclusion
Hook
Background Info
Independent Practice (You do):
Direct students to go back to their notes on C.R.E.W. (Cornell Notes). Review the notes and add new information.
Before-Break Check-In

18 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Share out new understanding about writing an argument.


Direct Instruction or Review
Share with students the second article. Conduct a class reading of the article and review the writing prompt.
Guided Practice
Independent Practice
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
- Writing Workshop #4: Personal Narrative

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
characterization
imagery (review)
figurative language (review)
Essential Questions
How does an author use characterization to show us the
character?
How do imagery and figurative language add depth to a
narrative?

Objective Standard
I can analyze a personal narrative for literary devices and
style.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Quickwrite: What choices do you make at school?
Brainstorm the types of choices you make at school and the
types of consequences you can face as a result of your
choices.
Think-Pair-Share activity

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be reviewing their "A+ Checklist" for the Embedded Assessment to determine their progress.
Model for students how to go one by one down the checklist to self-assess their understanding. Explain that a check in the
red box indicates a concept or skill they know very poorly, a check in the yellow box, indicates that it is a familiar concept or
skill, but the student still has questions or misunderstandings, and a check in the green box indicates a concept or skill they
feel they have mastered for the Embedded Assessment.
Guide students in self-assessing their progress, putting a check n the box that indicates their understanding for each concept
or skill.
Guided Practice (We do):
Have the list of the concepts or skills for the Embedded Assessment pre-printed on single sheets of paper that you display
along the walls of your classroom. Give each group a small stack of three different colored post-it notes or small slips of
paper. Assign a progress level to each color ( Example: Red or pink might be "I don't Understand this," Yellow or orange
might be "I am starting to get this," and green or blue might be "I know this or could teach it.") Ask students to walk around
the classroom and tape or stick their colored paper to each "Skill" or "Concept" according to their mastery level. Students sit
doen after they have evaluated themselves for each skill.
As a class, discuss the overall trends for each skill. Ask students to determine which skills the class seems to have mastered,
which need more support, and which need re-teaching.
Independent Practice (You do):
Guide students in working with a partner to identify which activities they have done so far in Springboard that teach a concept
or skill that is on their "A+ Checklist", and notate the activity number next to the concept or skill.
Before-Break Check-In
Ask students to write an independent goal for getting all of their skills and concepts "into the green" so they can complete the
Embedded Assessment.
Direct Instruction or Review
Ask students to return to Act. 1.6 in Springboard. Review the objectives for that activity and ask student to find their
annotations for the literary devices "imagery, figurative language, and charcterization" from the previous lesson. Sort students
into their "expert" groups by number using Four Corners: send each number to one corner of the room. Ask student to
compare annotations in their expert groups and adjust their notes as their understanding changes. Ask students to turn and
talk to review the process for the jigsaw activity.
Guided Practice

19 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Ask students to return to their team and share out their text annotations with their group. Students listening should add these
annotations to their text as each speaker presents.
Independent Practice
Say, "Now that you have practiced analyzing a text for these literary devices, show your understanding by annotating
paragraphs 1-14 on pages 24-25 for imagery, figurative language, and characterization on your own." You may choose to let
students know if you plan to grade this activity. As students work, circulalte around the room to check for understanding.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Debrief and grade verb tense homework from Wednesday as a class. Collect work.
Closure Activity:
Turn and talk: review with your elbow partner the three literary devices from today: imagery, figurative language, and
characterization.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.6 - Analyzing Language [RI.7.1, RI.7.3, W.7.3, W.7.3a]

Thursday, September 24, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
pre-writing
organization
drafting
personal narrative

Objective Standard
I can write about a personal experience in my life using the
writing process.

Essential Questions
Ho can I use pre-writing and drafting to find ideas and
organize them in writing?

Warm-Up/Introduction
As directed by administration: students will write an acrostic
poem using their name. Explain what an acrostic poem is and
share an example. (10 minutes)

Direct Instruction (I do):


Clarify and discuss the roles of the members of a writing group. Place students in groups of three (if threes arent possible,
add another listener to the group), rotating responsibilities. Review the strategy of sharing and responding; locate this on
the Writing as a Process chart (Activity 1.2) on pg. 28.
Ask students how they plan to draft when writing. Refer to the Writing as a Process chart from Activity 1.2 as they share their
ideas.
Model for students how to use pre-writing strategies like bubble maps, word webs, lists, and other organizers to generate
topics and details for their writing.
Model for students how to write a draft so that they have room for revision notes:
*skip lines
Do not write outside of the red margin lines on the left and right sides of the paper. Explain to students how this space will
give them room to make notes for revision.
Guided Practice (We do):
Review the writing prompt on pg. 29. Guide students in marking the text using the steps outlined in the student book.
Write a multi-paragraph narrative about an incident on your choices graphic organizer. Include information about the choice
you made and the consequences of your action. Be sure to:
Include the elements of incident, response, and reflection.
Use transitions to connect ideas for your reader.
Include insights about the effects and consequences of the choice.
Independent Practice (You do):
Provide students with a designated amount of time to plan, draft, and revise their text. Have students divide up the total
amount of time into the three steps of the writing process outlined in Pace Yourself based on prior experience and the total
time youve provided.
Revisit prior work by examining the graphic organizer created earlier and the portfolio cover in order to select a topic for the
draft. Each student should create a plan with a self-chosen pre-writing strategy. While following the writing plan, students
should draft their narrative in response to the writing prompt.
Before-Break Check-In

20 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Have students discuss their understanding of coherence and how transitions help to create coherence within and between
paragraphs.
Direct Instruction or Review
After students complete their drafts, have the writing groups provide feedback for each draft. Once all members of the group
have received feedback, each person should record how he or she would improve this draft in a revision plan.
Guided Practice
Students return to their drafts and make revisions.
Independent Practice
Ask students to respond to the Check Your Understanding questions.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Add misspelled words the writing group has identified to students personal spelling lists that they have created as part of
their Reader/Writer Notebooks.
Closure Activity:
Ask students to answer the "check your understanding" questions:
1. Describe how to respond to a writing prompt.
2. Explain how a writing group can help you improve your writing.

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.7 - Timed Writing: Choosing a Topic and Drafting a Personal Narrative [W.7.3, W.7.3a, SL.7.1, SL.7.1a]

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz.

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In
Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during
the second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they
will create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their
position without making personal attacks or insults.
Guided Practice
As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.

21 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and
other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RI.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
pre-writing
organization
drafting
personal narrative

Objective Standard
I can write about a personal experience in my life using the
writing process.

Essential Questions
Ho can I use pre-writing and drafting to find ideas and
organize them in writing?

Warm-Up/Introduction
As directed by administration: students will write an acrostic
poem using their name. Explain what an acrostic poem is and
share an example. (10 minutes)

Direct Instruction (I do):


Clarify and discuss the roles of the members of a writing group. Place students in groups of three (if threes arent possible,
add another listener to the group), rotating responsibilities. Review the strategy of sharing and responding; locate this on
the Writing as a Process chart (Activity 1.2) on pg. 28.
Ask students how they plan to draft when writing. Refer to the Writing as a Process chart from Activity 1.2 as they share their
ideas.
Model for students how to use pre-writing strategies like bubble maps, word webs, lists, and other organizers to generate
topics and details for their writing.
Model for students how to write a draft so that they have room for revision notes:
*skip lines
Do not write outside of the red margin lines on the left and right sides of the paper. Explain to students how this space will
give them room to make notes for revision.
Guided Practice (We do):
Review the writing prompt on pg. 29. Guide students in marking the text using the steps outlined in the student book.
Write a multi-paragraph narrative about an incident on your choices graphic organizer. Include information about the choice
you made and the consequences of your action. Be sure to:
Include the elements of incident, response, and reflection.
Use transitions to connect ideas for your reader.
Include insights about the effects and consequences of the choice.
Independent Practice (You do):
Provide students with a designated amount of time to plan, draft, and revise their text. Have students divide up the total
amount of time into the three steps of the writing process outlined in Pace Yourself based on prior experience and the total
time youve provided.
Revisit prior work by examining the graphic organizer created earlier and the portfolio cover in order to select a topic for the
draft. Each student should create a plan with a self-chosen pre-writing strategy. While following the writing plan, students
should draft their narrative in response to the writing prompt.
Before-Break Check-In

22 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Have students discuss their understanding of coherence and how transitions help to create coherence within and between
paragraphs.
Direct Instruction or Review
After students complete their drafts, have the writing groups provide feedback for each draft. Once all members of the group
have received feedback, each person should record how he or she would improve this draft in a revision plan.
Guided Practice
Students return to their drafts and make revisions.
Independent Practice
Ask students to respond to the Check Your Understanding questions.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Add misspelled words the writing group has identified to students personal spelling lists that they have created as part of
their Reader/Writer Notebooks.
Closure Activity:
Ask students to answer the "check your understanding" questions:
1. Describe how to respond to a writing prompt.
2. Explain how a writing group can help you improve your writing.

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.7 - Timed Writing: Choosing a Topic and Drafting a Personal Narrative [W.7.3, W.7.3a, SL.7.1, SL.7.1a]

Friday, September 25, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:

Key Vocabulary Terms


Hook
Lead
Revision

Essential Questions
What type of hook would improve my personal narrative?

Objective Standard
I can
Analyze effectiveness of narrative openings.
Revise an initial narrative opening.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Quickwrite response:
Read this quotation about revision: If a teacher told me to
revise, I thought that meant my writing was a broken-down
car that needed to go to the repair shop. I felt insulted. I didnt
realize the teacher was saying, Make it shine. Its worth it.
Now I see revision as a beautiful word of hope. Its a new
vision of something. It means you dont have to be perfect the
first time. What a relief!Naomi Shihab Nye
Summarize what Naomi Shihab Nye means about revision.
What does this quote make you think about writing and
revision?

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students they will be revising the personal narrative they drafted during the timed writing activity. This narrative will
become the text for Embedded Assessment 1. Some students may want to change topics and draft a new narrative (as
homework). Encourage those students to get feedback from a writing group to help improve their new narratives.
Discuss the types of leads or hooks provided in the graphic organizer. You may also choose to show examples of hooks
from other novels to show how different writers engage the reader.
Guided Practice (We do):
Have students apply their knowledge of hooking the reader by rereading the openings of narratives from this unit. Working
with the graphic organizer, students should work with an elbow partner to identify the type of lead and then evaluate its
effectiveness as a hook. You may choose to debrief this activity by jigsawing the story openings, then having students sort
themselves using "Three Corners" according to the type of opening : "Dialogue" "Action" "Reaction"
Independent Practice (You do):

23 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Students should revisit their previously drafted narratives and revise the lead. Teacher circulates and assists, prompts, and
guides students in creating an interesting hook for their narrative. Check the work of struggling students to see where they
had difficulty. Could they identify the hooks, but not apply them? Provide additional opportunities to revise other text openers.
Before-Break Check-In
students reflect on the type of hook they chose and explain how it improved their text.
Direct Instruction or Review
Class reading of novel: Before reading give students a purpose for reading. Examples;
"As we read, pay attention to how the author builds the main character through words, actions and descriptions."
"As we read, think about the mood of the story. What is the mood and how does the author help show it?"
"As we read, pay attention to the level of tension in the story. How does this help us identify what stage of the plot we are in?"
"As we read, pay attention to the themes you see come up. What UNIVERSAL questions is this story asking us to think
about?"
Guided Practice
Class reading of novel.
Class discussion of the essential question set in the purpose, above.
Independent Practice
Students may journal independently to reflect on the purpose set before reading. Ask students to Turn and Talk to share their
reflection on the story.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Add any new vocabulary terms encountered during the reading to the Word Wall.
Closure Activity:
Weekly Student/Teacher Surveys: students complete surveys to answer questions on their process, personal effort,
understanding, effort, and goals; then reflect on questions regarding the teacher's instruction.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.8 - Once Upon a Time: Revising the Beginning [RI.7.5, W.7.5]

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:

Key Vocabulary Terms


Hook
Lead
Revision

Essential Questions
What type of hook would improve my personal narrative?

Objective Standard
I can
Analyze effectiveness of narrative openings.
Revise an initial narrative opening.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Quickwrite response:
Read this quotation about revision: If a teacher told me to
revise, I thought that meant my writing was a broken-down
car that needed to go to the repair shop. I felt insulted. I didnt
realize the teacher was saying, Make it shine. Its worth it.
Now I see revision as a beautiful word of hope. Its a new
vision of something. It means you dont have to be perfect the
first time. What a relief!Naomi Shihab Nye
Summarize what Naomi Shihab Nye means about revision.
What does this quote make you think about writing and
revision?

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students they will be revising the personal narrative they drafted during the timed writing activity. This narrative will
become the text for Embedded Assessment 1. Some students may want to change topics and draft a new narrative (as
homework). Encourage those students to get feedback from a writing group to help improve their new narratives.
Discuss the types of leads or hooks provided in the graphic organizer. You may also choose to show examples of hooks
from other novels to show how different writers engage the reader.
Guided Practice (We do):
Have students apply their knowledge of hooking the reader by rereading the openings of narratives from this unit. Working
with the graphic organizer, students should work with an elbow partner to identify the type of lead and then evaluate its
effectiveness as a hook. You may choose to debrief this activity by jigsawing the story openings, then having students sort

24 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

themselves using "Three Corners" according to the type of opening : "Dialogue" "Action" "Reaction"
Independent Practice (You do):
Students should revisit their previously drafted narratives and revise the lead. Teacher circulates and assists, prompts, and
guides students in creating an interesting hook for their narrative. Check the work of struggling students to see where they
had difficulty. Could they identify the hooks, but not apply them? Provide additional opportunities to revise other text openers.
Before-Break Check-In
students reflect on the type of hook they chose and explain how it improved their text.
Direct Instruction or Review
Class reading of novel: Before reading give students a purpose for reading. Examples;
"As we read, pay attention to how the author builds the main character through words, actions and descriptions."
"As we read, think about the mood of the story. What is the mood and how does the author help show it?"
"As we read, pay attention to the level of tension in the story. How does this help us identify what stage of the plot we are in?"
"As we read, pay attention to the themes you see come up. What UNIVERSAL questions is this story asking us to think
about?"
Guided Practice
Class reading of novel.
Class discussion of the essential question set in the purpose, above.
Independent Practice
Students may journal independently to reflect on the purpose set before reading. Ask students to Turn and Talk to share their
reflection on the story.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Add any new vocabulary terms encountered during the reading to the Word Wall.
Closure Activity:
Weekly Student/Teacher Surveys: students complete surveys to answer questions on their process, personal effort,
understanding, effort, and goals; then reflect on questions regarding the teacher's instruction.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.8 - Once Upon a Time: Revising the Beginning [RI.7.5, W.7.5]

Monday, September 28, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:

Key Vocabulary Terms


implicit
explicit

Objective Standard
I can:
Identify effective use of sensory and figurative language.
Revise a narrative draft by adding descriptive language.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Activate prior knowledge:

Essential Questions
How do writers revise the middle of their narratives?

Respond to this quote.


Teachers often use the phrase show, dont tell to encourage
students to use sensory details in their descriptions.
Dramatist, short story writer, and novelist Anton Chekhov
suggests, Dont tell me the moon is shining; show me the
glint of light on broken glass.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Conduct a shared reading of the text, "why Couldn't I have been Named Ashley?". Have students mark sensory details while
reading.
Guided Practice (We do):
Have students reread the speakers reflection in paragraph 8. What did she learn from the experience? How can you tell?
The reflection in this essay is implicit rather than explicit. Ask students to articulate how the last paragraph reflects a new
understanding or is different from the speakers original reaction. Guide students to Key Ideas and Details: Sample words
and phrases that create visual images are His chubby face started turning red, Peals of laughter, Laughs . . . exploded
like . . . nitroglycerin. Explain that the speaker moves from embarrassed and ashamed because her name is unusual to
astonished and proud once she finds out what her name means and has a sense of its significance.

25 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Independent Practice (You do):


Using the graphic organizer, have students paraphrase the incident, response, and reflection. Have them provide textual
evidence to support each description.Complete in partners
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Move to examining pictures as a way to allow students to practice using language that shows. Examine the examples in the
graphic organizer. Discuss the difference between a literal observation and a figurative description. Tie the discussion to the
idea of show, dont tell; the literal description just tells, whereas adding figurative language shows the reader.
Picture 1: Examine a photograph as a whole class. Co-construct a literal description of the photograph, and then revise by
adding figurative language.
Guided Practice
Picture 2: Provide different photographs to groups of students. Students should work together to compose a literal and a
figurative description. Smal/ group
Independent Practice
Picture 1: Examine a photograph as a whole class. Co-construct a literal description of the photograph, and then revise by
adding figurative language.
Discuss how adding figurative language is related to the looping strategy. Students should revise the middle of a previously
written draft by adding sensory details and figurative language.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Discuss the use of coordinate adjectives and how to punctuate sentences using them. Check that students are applying the
information in the Language and Writers Craft feature as they revise their narrative drafts.
Closure Activity:
How did the looping strategies and imagery strategies help me revise the middle of my narrative?
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.10 - Tie It Together: Revising the Ending [RI.7.5, W.7.3e, W.7.5]
SB 1.9 - Can you Sense It? Revising the Middle [RI.7.1]

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:

Key Vocabulary Terms


implicit
explicit

Objective Standard
I can:
Identify effective use of sensory and figurative language.
Revise a narrative draft by adding descriptive language.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Activate prior knowledge:

Essential Questions
How do writers revise the middle of their narratives?

Respond to this quote.


Teachers often use the phrase show, dont tell to encourage
students to use sensory details in their descriptions.
Dramatist, short story writer, and novelist Anton Chekhov
suggests, Dont tell me the moon is shining; show me the
glint of light on broken glass.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Conduct a shared reading of the text, "why Couldn't I have been Named Ashley?". Have students mark sensory details while
reading.
Guided Practice (We do):
Have students reread the speakers reflection in paragraph 8. What did she learn from the experience? How can you tell?
The reflection in this essay is implicit rather than explicit. Ask students to articulate how the last paragraph reflects a new
understanding or is different from the speakers original reaction. Guide students to Key Ideas and Details: Sample words
and phrases that create visual images are His chubby face started turning red, Peals of laughter, Laughs . . . exploded
like . . . nitroglycerin. Explain that the speaker moves from embarrassed and ashamed because her name is unusual to
astonished and proud once she finds out what her name means and has a sense of its significance.
Independent Practice (You do):

26 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Using the graphic organizer, have students paraphrase the incident, response, and reflection. Have them provide textual
evidence to support each description.
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Move to examining pictures as a way to allow students to practice using language that shows. Examine the examples in the
graphic organizer. Discuss the difference between a literal observation and a figurative description. Tie the discussion to the
idea of show, dont tell; the literal description just tells, whereas adding figurative language shows the reader.
Picture 1: Examine a photograph as a whole class. Co-construct a literal description of the photograph, and then revise by
adding figurative language.
Guided Practice
Picture 2: Provide different photographs to groups of students. Students should work together to compose a literal and a
figurative description.
Independent Practice
Picture 1: Examine a photograph as a whole class. Co-construct a literal description of the photograph, and then revise by
adding figurative language.
Discuss how adding figurative language is related to the looping strategy. Students should revise the middle of a previously
written draft by adding sensory details and figurative language.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Discuss the use of coordinate adjectives and how to punctuate sentences using them. Check that students are applying the
information in the Language and Writers Craft feature as they revise their narrative drafts.
Closure Activity
321 exit ticket- 3 things you learned this week, 2 things you found interesting, 1 question you have about the week's lessons.
While students are doing this, pass out progress reports. Hold individual conferences with students who need grade
improvement.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.10 - Tie It Together: Revising the Ending [RI.7.5, W.7.3e, W.7.5]
SB 1.9 - Can you Sense It? Revising the Middle [RI.7.1]

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - EA #1 - Revising a Personal Narrative About Choice
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Objective Standard
I can:
Key Vocabulary Terms
revision
editing

Essential Questions
How do I revise the ending of my narrative?

Analyze and evaluate narrative endings.


Apply an understanding of the purpose of the ending by
revising a narrative ending.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Activate prior knowledge by asking students to think about
what they enjoy in a narrative ending.
Quickwrite:
Read this quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Great is
the art of beginning, but greater is the art of ending. What
makes a great ending to a narrative?
Conduct a Think-Pair-Share

Direct Instruction (I do):


Have students reread the endings of the texts listed in the graphic organizer. Ask them to summarize and analyze the
authors purpose in each ending.
Conduct a Think-Pair-Share or Group Pow-Wow to discuss collaboratively.
Guided Practice (We do):
Have students revise their narratives to create a reflective ending. In looking at students revised drafts, check that they were
able to reflect on the incident, tying together their personal narrative with a reflective ending.
In writing groups, students should share their revisions, explaining how they improved the ending. The listener and reader
should provide additional feedback. Students should create a revision plan after meeting with the writing group.

27 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

If students struggle with creating a reflective ending, have them select their favorite ending from the texts reread in this
activity. Use the structure of the ending as a mentor text. Also consider co-constructing a reflective ending as a small group or
with the whole class.
Independent Practice (You do):
Checking and Editing: Remind students of the information on the Word Wall and their individual spelling lists as they check
and edit.
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Checking and Editing: Remind students of the information on the Word Wall and their individual spelling lists as they check
and edit.
Guided Practice
STudents work in writing groups to revise and edit their narratives.
Independent Practice
Students work independently to make the revisions and edits suggested in their writing groups.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Embedded in Guided Practice
Closure Activity:
Have students think of an appropriate title. They might try to find a word or phrase that captures the narratives major idea
and can be modified into a title.
Homework: Reflection This first reflection opportunity becomes an on-going part of a students portfolio collection. Over time, these reflections can be used to
assess students metacognitive self-evaluative skills. At first, you will find that students may not have much to say, but as the year progresses and as they complete
these reflections that emphasize cognitive skill building, they should build a repertoire of self-assessment tools.

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
EA #1 - Revising a Personal Narrative About Choice [W.7.3a, W.7.3b, W.7.3d, W.7.3e, L.7.1a]
SB 1.10 - Tie It Together: Revising the Ending [RI.7.5, W.7.3e, W.7.5]

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
Claim
Reasons
Evidence

Essential Questions
How do I write a persuasive essay?

Objective Standard
I can write a persuasive paragraph using the C.R.E.W.
strategy.
Warm-Up/Introduction
As directed by administration: write 10 minutes about
"Respect - What does it mean to you?"
Introduce KWL chart for Writing a CREW paragraph. Ask
students to complete the "K" and "W" section: what do I
KNOW/What do I WANT to know?

Direct Instruction (I do):


Connect the lesson to previous learning: Ask students to recall what they remember about writing an argument using
C.R.E.W.
Review the elements of CREW. Share will students the sample article and sample text (See Argument Example A Below)
Conduct a shared reading of the article.
Guided Practice (We do):
Ask students to work with their elbow partner to identify these elements of the essay:
Claim
Reasons
Evidence
Warrant
Introduction Section
Body Section
Conclusion
Hook
Background Info
Independent Practice (You do):

28 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Direct students to go back to their notes on C.R.E.W. (Cornell Notes). Review the notes and add new information.
Before-Break Check-In
Share out new understanding about writing an argument.
Direct Instruction or Review
Discuss the term "Stereotype". Ask students to create a word-web or bubble map of stereotypes they are aware of OR ask
students to think about a time they were stereotyped because of their age, race, ethnicity, religion, neighborhood, or other
aspect of their identity.
Share with students the second article (an interview with violin musicians Black Violin". Conduct a class reading of the article
and review the writing prompt, "Is it important for people to challenge stereotypes?"
Guided Practice
Guide students in creating a CLAIM to respond to the writing prompt. EXAMPLES:
"Stereotypes unfairly box people in. Everyone should challenge stereotypes."
"Everyone is an individual. This is why we all must work to challenge stereotypes."
OR
"Stereotyping is not a major problem in our society."
Guide students in identifying three reasons why it is or is not important to challenge stereotypes.
Guide students in pulling textual evidence from the interview to support their claims.
Independent Practice
Students write an argumentative paragraph on their own to respond to the prompt.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Using Quotation marks: review with students how to use quotation marks when quoting from a text.
Closure Activity:
Review KWL chart: complete the "Learned" column.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
- Writing Workshop #4: Personal Narrative

Thursday, October 1, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz.

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In
Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during
the second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review

29 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they
will create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their
position without making personal attacks or insults.
Guided Practice
As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.
Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and
other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RI.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz.

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In
Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during
the second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they
will create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their
position without making personal attacks or insults.

30 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Guided Practice
As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.
Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and
other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RI.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.

Friday, October 2, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - EA #1 - Revising a Personal Narrative About Choice
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Objective Standard
I can:
Key Vocabulary Terms
revision
editing

Essential Questions
How do I revise the ending of my narrative?

Analyze and evaluate narrative endings.


Apply an understanding of the purpose of the ending by
revising a narrative ending.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Activate prior knowledge by asking students to think about
what they enjoy in a narrative ending.
Quickwrite:
Read this quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: Great is
the art of beginning, but greater is the art of ending. What
makes a great ending to a narrative?
Conduct a Think-Pair-Share

Direct Instruction (I do):


Have students reread the endings of the texts listed in the graphic organizer. Ask them to summarize and analyze the
authors purpose in each ending.
Conduct a Think-Pair-Share or Group Pow-Wow to discuss collaboratively.
Guided Practice (We do):
Have students revise their narratives to create a reflective ending. In looking at students revised drafts, check that they were
able to reflect on the incident, tying together their personal narrative with a reflective ending.
In writing groups, students should share their revisions, explaining how they improved the ending. The listener and reader
should provide additional feedback. Students should create a revision plan after meeting with the writing group.
If students struggle with creating a reflective ending, have them select their favorite ending from the texts reread in this
activity. Use the structure of the ending as a mentor text. Also consider co-constructing a reflective ending as a small group or
with the whole class.
Independent Practice (You do):
Checking and Editing: Remind students of the information on the Word Wall and their individual spelling lists as they check
and edit.

31 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Checking and Editing: Remind students of the information on the Word Wall and their individual spelling lists as they check
and edit.
Guided Practice
STudents work in writing groups to revise and edit their narratives.
Independent Practice
Students work independently to make the revisions and edits suggested in their writing groups.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Embedded in Guided Practice
Closure Activity:
Have students think of an appropriate title. They might try to find a word or phrase that captures the narratives major idea
and can be modified into a title.
Homework: Reflection This first reflection opportunity becomes an on-going part of a students portfolio collection. Over time, these reflections can be used to
assess students metacognitive self-evaluative skills. At first, you will find that students may not have much to say, but as the year progresses and as they complete
these reflections that emphasize cognitive skill building, they should build a repertoire of self-assessment tools.

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
EA #1 - Revising a Personal Narrative About Choice [W.7.3a, W.7.3b, W.7.3d, W.7.3e, L.7.1a]
SB 1.10 - Tie It Together: Revising the Ending [RI.7.5, W.7.3e, W.7.5]

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GRECO; WORKMAN; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms

Objective Standard
I can write an argumentative essay.

Essential Questions
How do I write an argument?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Students copy the daily T.A.S.K. in their notebooks.
Teacher will Pass out the Writing Pre-Assessment activity.

Direct Instruction (I do):


NONE- Pre-Assessment
Guided Practice (We do):
Teacher will pass out the articles and play the video clip for the Writing Pre-Assessment activity.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students work independently to complete the Writing Pre-Assessment activity.
Before-Break Check-In
Notify students that the bell for break will be ringing.
Direct Instruction or Review
Review the instructions for the assessment. Remind students that they have the rest of the class period to finish the
assessment draft, including revisions and editing.
Provide a silent activity (read a book or class novel or complete other work silently) if the student finishes early.
Guided Practice
Students complete the Writing Pre-Assessment Activity.
Independent Practice
Students complete the Writing Pre-Assessment Activity.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Students complete the Writing Pre-Assessment Activity.
Closure Activity:
Students turn in the writing pre-assessment activity.

Homework:

32 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.

Monday, October 5, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW; PARKER
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
For the Writing Pre-Assessment, teachers will be in the computer lab for 1/2 of the block, depending on the lab schedule. The other half, teachers will facilitate an
activity of their choice.
Key Vocabulary Terms

Objective Standard
I can

Essential Questions

Warm-Up/Introduction

Direct Instruction (I do):


*Teacher's choice
Guided Practice (We do):
Independent Practice (You do):
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Pre-Writing Assessment in the Computer Lab.

Guided Practice
Pre-Writing Assessment in the Computer Lab.
Independent Practice
Pre-Writing Assessment in the Computer Lab.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Pre-Writing Assessment in the Computer Lab.
Closure Activity:
Pre-Writing Assessment in the Computer Lab.

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - - Writing Workshop #4: Personal Narrative
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
SpringBoard Writers Workshop 4: Writing a Short Story Activity 1
Key Vocabulary Terms
Narrative
Plot
Conflict

Objective Standard
I can identify the elements that make a good short story.

Warm-Up/Introduction
Essential Questions
What elements make a GOOD short story?

33 of 53

Activate prior knowledge by asking students to


think-pair-share on the topic of good short stories.
They can consider both stories they liked

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

and reasons they enjoyed them


Direct Instruction (I do):

Brainstorm with students a list of elements common to all great short stories. As a class, streamline the list,
creating a Writers Checklist of the elements of a good short story. Copy or post the list for students to
consult. Be sure to include the elements of a short story listed in the Learning Targets. Review internal and
external conflict, and discuss the conflicts in the story Review first-person point of view, and then ask
students to scan the story to find a passage that reveals Chriss character. Ask students to mark the text by
underlining or highlighting Chriss thoughts and feelings. Facilitate a discussion of Pfeffers choice to use
first-person point of view and how the story would be different if she had used third person.
Guided Practice (We do):

Lead a shared reading of A Hundred Bucks of Happy. If students have not yet read this story, ask them to
keep the elements of a good short story in mind as they read along. Students can mark the text by putting a
checkmark in the margin when they notice an element of a good short story. You might split up this task by
assigning specific elements to small groups and having them search for only those elements. As you read
through the story, you might note the variety of sentences that Pfeffer uses for varying effects. The longer,
more complex sentences give a sense of rushed, conversational speech, while key points are emphasized
by brief, simple sentences: for example, It was a hundred-dollar bill. Ask students to share where they
found the elements of a good short story in Pfeffers story. Use this as an opportunity to continue to check for
understanding. Work with students to diagram the plot using the Plot graphic organizer , providing support
as needed.
Independent Practice (You do):

Students annotate the text as they read. Students add relevant details to the Plot Diagram organizer.
Before-Break Check-In
Revisit essential question: turn and talk.
Direct Instruction or Review
Facilitate a discussion of characterization in the story and have students use the graphic organizer to take notes. Ask
students to evaluate how realistically PReffer captures the voice of a teenager, giving evidence from the text to support their
claims. Ask students to identify the setting and to circle words and phrases, including sensory details, that make the setting
believable. Have a pair of volunteers read aloud the first dialogue between Tommy and Margie. Ask pairs to identify how the
author uses dialogue to reveal character traits and to advance the plot.
Guided Practice

Have students scan the story with an elbow partner to find examples of figurative language.
Ask them to discuss the effect of the examples they find on the authors style.
Independent Practice
In journals, ask students to reflect and write: review your analysis of the short story and discuss what aspects of this

story you might be able to incorporate into your own story. Are there elements of the plot, characterization, setting,
or language that you want to be sure to include in a story you write.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Embedded in the above activity
Closure Activity:
Revisit the essential question: write a response as a ticket out the door.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
W.7.3 - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event
sequences.
W.7.3a - Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that
unfolds naturally and logically.
- Writing Workshop #4: Personal Narrative

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - SB Writing Workshop Activity 2
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
SpringBoard Writers Workshop 4: Writing a Short Story Activity 2
Key Vocabulary Terms
Narrative
Plot
Conflict

34 of 53

Objective Standard
I can work with my classmates to create a short story.

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

Essential Questions
How can I create a compelling CONFLICT?

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Warm-Up/Introduction
Activate prior knowledge by having students Quickwrite in
their journals to think about the quote: "When something goes
wrong in your life, just yell "Plot Twist!" and move on."

Direct Instruction (I do):

Tell students they will begin writing a class-constructed short story. Refer to the previous day's activity where
they read "A Hundred Bucks of Happy" about a boy named Chris who finds $100 and has to make a choice
about how to spend it.
Challenge students to imagine that when Chris takes the hundred dollar bill back to the corner of Maple and
Grove streets, there is a poster on the telephone pole with the phone number of the person who lost the
money. Discuss the internal conflicts Chris might face.
(Consider using the Instructional Power-Point for this activity as you guide students through the lesson.)
Guided Practice (We do):

With the class, brainstorm who might have lost the money and how Chris might interact with this person Use
the plot diagram to sketch out a plot, letting students know that the plan might change as they develop the
story. Emphasize tat published authors often say that their stories take a different direction than they had
originally expected. So that students will have more familiarity with the setting they are going to write about,
ask them to choose an intersection close to your school that will be familiar. Once the class agrees on a
setting, have them visualize it and think-pair-share their notes on sensory details for the setting.
Independent Practice (You do):

***This component will be addressed in the next day's activity, when students will work independently to
create a short story.
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Review how authors show us about character through Characterization: actions, words, thoughts, what other characters say
about them, direct descriptions...
Guided Practice

Have the class create a character for Chris to encounter. It does not have to be the person who lost the
money. Tell students that the character can be based on a real person or can be invented. Replicate the
graphic organizer that students used to take notes about Chris and take notes about the new character.
In pairs, have students role play a dialogue to further the action of the story. Allow volunteers to present;
then, work with the class to draft a written dialogue as part of the rising action of the class-constructed story.
They should work characterization into the dialogue as Pfeffer does. With student input, continue rewriting
the story, following the plot diagram to the climax. With input from the class, draft an opening for the ending
of the story, using first-person point of view. Begin with Chris approaching the corner and spotting the poster,
asking students to select which of their brainstormed sensory details you should include to describe the
setting in your exposition. view the examples of figurative language in the sample story, and ask students to
help you revise your story by adding figurative language for stylistic effect.
Reread the five paragraphs of Pfeffers story beginning with, Things hadnt always been like this, and ask
the class to identify the tone. Have them underline evidence for support. Now revisit your draft, looking for
passages in which your word choice could more effectively convey a distinct one. With guidance from the
class, revise the passage(s).
Independent Practice
***This component will be addressed in the next day's activity, when students will work independently to create a short story.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice

Using the Language and Writers craft activity as a reference, practice using four sentence typessimple,
compound, complex, and compound- complex. The students have already been shown examples of these
sentences, including how Pfeffer uses them, in A Hundred Bucks of Happy. The class can work together to
combine sentences in order to create the lengthier sentence types, because they most likely were not used
in the initial draft. Be sure to note how different kinds of sentences can create different effects.
Closure Activity: Journal response: "What do I need to remember to include when writing my own short story?"
Revisit the essential question: write a response as a ticket out the door.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
- Writing Workshop #4: Personal Narrative
W.7.3 - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event
sequences.

35 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Thursday, October 8, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - SB Writing Workshop 4: Activity 3
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
tension
climax
plot
dialogue

Objective Standard
I can write a short story with a partner that uses essential
elements of a good narrative.
Warm-Up/Introduction

Essential Questions
How do writers develop the conflict in a compelling way?

Begin by creating a web and asking the class to


brainstorm how they could give a twist to the classconstructed story. For example, they might rewrite the
story from a different point of view, they might change
the setting, they might use different characters, and
so on

Direct Instruction (I do):

Guided Practice (We do):


In pairs, students should follow the prewriting process that you modeled. They should take notes on plot, point of view, characterization, and sensory
details to describe setting.
As partners move into drafting
a short story, monitor students and provide support as needed. If they are writing by hand, you might encourage them to write on every other line to
accommodate the recursive nature of drafting and revision.
Have partners draft an opening, encouraging them to experiment with various ways of beginning their stories.

Independent Practice (You do):


***This component will be addressed later on in the workshop in Activity 4
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Guided Practice
Combine pairs into larger groups to create writing groups for sharing and responding. Have pairs read their openings to their writing groups, soliciting
feedback and marking their draft and taking notes of student feedback to use later.
Partners should now draft the rising action and climax. Writing groups should then meet for sharing and responding.
Next, partners should craft the resolution of their story, aiming for a conclusion that is a natural result of the events that precede it. After partners
write the resolution for their stories, have writing groups meet once again for sharing and responding.
Pairs now should revise their stories by adding sensory details, dialogue, and figurative language
to create a specific tone. You might want to refer back to Pfeffers story to provide examples of ways to integrate dialogue.
Have writing groups use the elements of a good story listed in Activity 1 to provide feedback. Pairs should use their notes and this feedback to revise
their short stories.

Independent Practice
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
- Writing Workshop #4: Personal Narrative
W.7.3 - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event
sequences.

36 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Friday, October 9, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - Unpacking the 2nd Embedded Assessment for Unit 1
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
genre
denotation
connotation
stanza
Essential Questions
What will I need to know to be able to create an illustrated
myth?

Objective Standard
I can preview the activities that will prepare me for the next
Embedded Assessment.
Warm-Up/Introduction

Direct students to read the information and complete


the QHT on pg. 43 in SpringBoard

Direct Instruction (I do):

Explain to students that they will be looking closely at the activities in the second half of Unit 1 to understand
what skills and knowledge they will need to be able to create an original myth.
Ask students to think pair-share to answer question 2. on page 44.
Ask students to think-pair-share to answer question 3 & 4. on pg. 44
Pass out the "A+ Unpacking" handout to students and review how to analyze the EA rubric to unpack the
unit.
Model how to use the graphic organizer; identify the main verb for each criteria in "Ideas" in the rubric, then
identify its noun object. Notate any "A+" adverbs or adjectives that describe how or what kind.
Guided Practice (We do):
Ask students to work in pairs to complete unpacking for "Structure" in their A+ organizer.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students work independently to finish unpacking the criteria for "Use of Language" in their A+ organizer.
Ask students to self-asses their knowledge using the "red/yellow/green" colors. Ask them to write the day's date in the
colored box that represents their understanding of that skill or knowledge.
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Class reading of novel: Before reading give students a purpose for reading. Examples;
"As we read, pay attention to how the author builds the main character through words, actions and descriptions."
"As we read, think about the mood of the story. What is the mood and how does the author help show it?"
"As we read, pay attention to the level of tension in the story. How does this help us identify what stage of the plot we are in?"
"As we read, pay attention to the themes you see come up. What UNIVERSAL questions is this story asking us to think
about?"
Guided Practice
Class reading of novel.
Class discussion of the essential question set in the purpose, above.
Independent Practice
Students may journal independently to reflect on the purpose set before reading. Ask students to Turn and Talk to share their
reflection on the story.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.11 - Previewing Embedded Assessment 2: Expanding Narrative Writing [L.7.6]

Monday, October 12, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - Unpacking the 2nd Embedded Assessment for Unit 1
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:

37 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

Key Vocabulary Terms


folklore
myth
mythology
Essential Questions
What will I need to know to be able to create an illustrated
myth?

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Objective Standard
I can preview the activities that will prepare me for the next
Embedded Assessment.
Warm-Up/Introduction

Direct students to read the information and complete


the QHT on pg. 43 in SpringBoard

Direct Instruction (I do):

Explain to students that they will be looking closely at the activities in the second half of Unit 1 to understand
what skills and knowledge they will need to be able to create an original myth.
Ask students to think pair-share to answer question 2. on page 44.
Ask students to think-pair-share to answer question 3 & 4. on pg. 44
Pass out the "A+ Unpacking" handout to students and review how to analyze the EA rubric to unpack the
unit.
Model how to use the graphic organizer; identify the main verb for each criteria in "Ideas" in the rubric, then
identify its noun object. Notate any "A+" adverbs or adjectives that describe how or what kind.
Guided Practice (We do):
Ask students to work in pairs to complete unpacking for "Structure" in their A+ organizer.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students work independently to finish unpacking the criteria for "Use of Language" in their A+ organizer.
Ask students to self-asses their knowledge using the "red/yellow/green" colors. Ask them to write the day's date in the
colored box that represents their understanding of that skill or knowledge.
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Guided Practice
Independent Practice
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.11 - Previewing Embedded Assessment 2: Expanding Narrative Writing [L.7.6]

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms

Essential Questions

Objective Standard
I can
Warm-Up/Introduction

Direct Instruction (I do):


Guided Practice (We do):
Independent Practice (You do):
Before-Break Check-In

38 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Direct Instruction or Review


Guided Practice
Independent Practice
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.13 - Flight to Freedom [RL.7.1, RL.7.2]

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - SB 1.11 - Previewing Embedded Assessment 2: Expanding Narrative Writing
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
Plot
Character
Conflict
Theme
Setting

Objective Standard
I can: identify key elements of conflict and climax; i can
analyze how a character is developed through words and
actions.

Warm-Up/Introduction
Activate prior knowledge:
Introduce Phaethon by telling students that it is a story about
a father and a son, the choices they make, and the
Essential Questions
consequences of those choices. It is also a model of good
How do myths use character, conflict, and setting to support a storytelling.
theme or lesson?

Activate prior knowledge by asking students what they know


about the Greek god Apollo and other Greek gods and
goddesses.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Chunk the text as shown, discussing as you read. You will want to vary the reading strategies for this close reading. Consider
asking students to read the dialogue in character for chunks 1 and 2. This will encourage a closer look at the dialogue and its
purpose in this dramatic opening that sets the plot in motion.
You may want to do a shared reading of some chunks of this text, or have students read independently or with a peer.
Guided Practice (We do):
Ask students to mark the text and respond to the Key Ideas and Details questions.
Key Ideas and Details Phaethon
is embarrassed that he has never visited his father, while Epaphus has visited Zeus at Mount Olympus.
Key Ideas and Details Phaethon can choose to admit the true nature of his relationship with his father to Epaphus or to continue
elaborating his lies.
Key Ideas and Details If Phaethon admits that he does not have a relationship with his father, Epaphus might be sympathetic;
they might become close friends. If he persists in his lies, he may be discovered or get himself in trouble.

Independent Practice (You do):

39 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Students complete a plot diagram for the story independently. (Question 3 on pg. 56)

Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
TW Point out the following Key Ideas:
Chunks 7 and 8 include the climax and falling action of the story. Have students mark the text to identify each element.
Key Ideas and Details Phaethons disobedience will cause destruction and death on earth and ultimately Phaethons own death.
Key Ideas and Details Phaethons ride causes widespread destruction in the world: ice caps and volcanoes.
Chunk 9 includes the resolution of the story. Have students discuss how Phaetons choices and actions led to this resolution.
Guided Practice
As a class, discuss which plot points belong in each stage of the plot for the story.

Independent Practice
Jigsaw: count students off by 4. Assign each number a portion of the graphic organizer on pg. 56. Students will
independently analyze the statement and agree or disagree, then look through the text for evidence to support their
claim.
Students will next meet in their "Expert" groups with the same number and discuss their findings.
Students go back to their teams and share out their research. Students will add annotations to complete the
organizer.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Review the first list of Greek and Latin Root words. Ask students to add them to their vocabulary journals.
Alt- change
Bio- life
Anthrop- people
Carn- flesh, meat
Aqua- water
Bene- good

Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.12 - Poor Choices: Phaethon [RL.7.1, RL.7.3]

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - SB 1.13 - Flight to Freedom
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
Theme
Analogy

Essential Questions
How does the story of Daedalus fit the criteria of a Myth?

Objective Standard
I can analyze how THEME is conveyed in a MYTH and apply
the conventions of dialogue paragraphing in a story.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Quickwrite:
(Before Reading question 1 on pg. 58)
Do you think you learn best from other people's advice or
from your own experience? Explain with an example from
your own life and/or your reading. Be sure to include your
analysis of the consequences of taking or not taking the
advice.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Share the Power Point on Theme with students while they take Cornell Notes.
* A Theme is a central idea, lesson, or moral conveyed by a story. It is usually an observation about life, people, or morals.
* Characters help convey theme through their characteristics (personality) and choices (actions).
* Conflict helps convey the theme by showing how a character works through their problem. The way a character solves a
problem (or fails) teaches a lesson.

40 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Guided Practice (We do):


Read "Daedalus & Icarus" on pg. 59. Use "Words in Context" aka Diffusing strategy to decipher the meanings of unfamiliar
words. Ask students to read in small groups, summarizing the text as they read.
Independent Practice (You do):
Count off students by four: assign each number one of the "After Reading " bullet points to respond to in journals.
Before-Break Check-In
Review with students the KEY POINTS of the direct instruction.
Direct Instruction or Review
Share with students how narratives often indirectly reveal lessons (themes) through a character's actions and the
consequences of those actions. The reader must make a generalization from the actions and consequences of the story.
For example: Action: Pinochio disobeys his father and runs away-- Consequence: he is kidnapped by a bad man who treats
him poorly. Generalization: If you disobey your parents, bad things will happen.
Another example: Action: The third little pig works hard and does the job right by building a brick house-- Consequence: his
house keeps him and his brothers safe from the Big Bad Wolf. Generalization: If you work hard and do a job right, you will
avoid problems and have success.
Guided Practice
Direct students to work with an elbow partner to analyze the story of Daedalus and Icarus. Ask students to identify the
character's major choices and the resulting consequence. Ask students to make a generalization. Is the consequence
positive, or negative? Does it teach a lesson about choices? What THEME is revealed through this generalization?
Independent Practice
Revisit the definition of a MYTH (traditional story that explains beliefs, customs, natural phenomenon through the actions of
gods or heroes)
Ask students to answer the two prompts in #5 to determine whether the story of Daedalus and Icarus meets the criteria for a
MYTH.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Closure Activity:
How does the Narrative Device characterization help reveal the theme? How does Conflict help reveal the THEME?
Homework: Complete the writing prompt on pg. 63: Imagine and write an "unseen scene" that might be in the "Daedalus and Icarus" myth. Use characterization
techniques, incrporate correct punctuation, and use vivid details (imagery) to enhance the story.

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.13 - Flight to Freedom [RL.7.1, RL.7.2]

Thursday, October 15, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz.

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In

41 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during
the second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they
will create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their
position without making personal attacks or insults.
Guided Practice
As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.
Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and
other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RI.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.

Friday, October 16, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - Daedalus and Icarus Text vs film
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
tension
conflict
theme
characterization

Objective Standard
I can compare and contrast the written story of Daedalus &
Icarus to its filmed version, analyzing how each builds tension
through the plot, shows characterization, and develops a
theme.

Essential Questions
Warm-Up/Introduction
How are the two version of the story similar and how are they
Create a Pot Diagram for the myth "Daedalus and Icarus".
different?
Summarize the MAJOR PLOT POINTS of the story,
remembering that in most narratives, the majority of the story
How is what a director does to show character, conflict and
takes place in the "rising action" stage.
theme in a film DIFFERENT than what a writer does?
Direct Instruction (I do):
Guide students in using the graphic organizer to analyze how the different versions of the story use narrative devices similarly
or differently.
Explain that they will be summarizing the plot points for the film version of the story as they watch the film. Afterward, they will
work independently to analyze the effects of the use of those devices using the organizer.
Guided Practice (We do):
Share with students the filmed version of the story of Daedalus and Icarus created by the Jim Henson Company from their
'StoryTeller" series; "The StoryTeller: Greek Myths - Daedalus and Icarus". Available on DVD or online.
YouTube link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUXiI42tABc

Independent Practice (You do):

42 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Students show their understanding of how the director of the film used narrative devices and compare
Before-Break Check-In
Jigsaw the essential questions:
Kids with even-day birthdays answer the first essential question, students with odd-day birthdays answer the second
essential question.
Share out in Groups.
Discuss as a class.
Direct Instruction or Review
Class reading of novel: Before reading give students a purpose for reading. Examples;
"As we read, pay attention to how the author builds the main character through words, actions and descriptions."
"As we read, think about the mood of the story. What is the mood and how does the author help show it?"
"As we read, pay attention to the level of tension in the story. How does this help us identify what stage of the plot we are in?"
"As we read, pay attention to the themes you see come up. What UNIVERSAL questions is this story asking us to think
about?"
Guided Practice
Class reading of novel.
Class discussion of the essential question set in the purpose, above.
Independent Practice
Students may journal independently to reflect on the purpose set before reading. Ask students to Turn and Talk to share their
reflection on the story.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Study the 20 Greek and Latin Root Owrds with a study buddy (teacher discretion on how to group the students.)
Closure Activity:
How will today's activity help me create an original myth for my embedded assessment?
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.13 - Flight to Freedom [RL.7.1, RL.7.2]
RL.7.7 - Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to
each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

Monday, October 19, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - SB 1.14 - A Matter of Pride
Knowledge Objective: I can compare and contrast character traits that lead to self-destruction as presented in Greek myths.
and analyze the relationship between character and plot and between conflict and resolution.
Reading Strategy: Summary
Component

Introduction

Time

Materials

5 10
Binders
minutes

Assessment
Activities

Grouping

Teaching Activities/ Approach

Partner
Individual

Activate prior knowledge by asking students what they


know about the Greek goddess Athena (also spelled
Athene). Tell or remind them that Athena (called
Student
Minerva by the Romans) is the Greek goddess of
responses
wisdom, the arts, weaving, and war.
You may want students to do a bit of research about
Athena on their ipads.

State the Obj.

1 minutes Planners

Academic Vocab.
3 10
Composition
(Fri. only Read
minutes Books
Aloud)

Whole Class

Class discusses how the day's activities


connects to the knowledge objective.

Whole Class

Class
discusison
Questioning

TW

15 - 20
Direct Instruction
SB 1.14
minutes

43 of 53

Whole Class

Conduct a shared reading of Arachne. Pause at the


end of
the paragraph in which Athene reveals herself to
Arachne and the onlookers. Ask students to predict
what will happen in the last sections.

Turn and
talk: ask
students to
explain their
task.

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

Whole Class
Team
Individual

Guided Practice

15 - 30
SB 1.14
minutes

Before Break
Check In
After Break Check
In

2-3
minutes
23
minutes

Whole Class

Mini Lesson

5 15
minutes

Whole Class

Guided Practice

Grammar/
Conventions

Closure

Whole Class

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Teacher
SW summarize the key ideas and details for
circulates
the story in their Springboard books.
TW Check for understanding by asking
students to share key ideas.

Student
responses
Teacher led
Make prediction about what will happen next.
questions.
Ask student
TW continue the shared reading of Arachne. to "model the
modeling"

10 - 25
minutes

Whole Class
Small Group
Team
Partner
Individual

To build on the understanding that myths explain a


natural phenomenon or show the values
of the culture, guide students in completing the
graphic organizer. To prepare for Embedded
Assessment 2, students should brainstorm additional
phenomena they could explain in an original myth.

5 - 10
minutes

Whole Class
Small Group
Team
Partner
Individual

Discuss the Language and Writers Craft with


students. Have them practice pronoun-antecedent
agreement with the passage provided. They will be
expected to pay attention to pronoun agreement in
future writing.

3 -5
minutes

Whole Class
Small Group
Team
Partner
Individual

Teacher
circulates

Turn and talk: what did you identify as the


phenomenon, choices and lesson?
heck students notes to see that they were able to
Student
correctly identify the story elements. Check students
responses
graphic organizers to see if they were able to identify
the phenomenon, choices, and lesson.

Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.14 - A Matter of Pride [RL.7.1, RL.7.3]

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - SB 1.15 - Symbolic Thinking
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
literal
figurative
symbolism
Essential Questions

Objective Standard
I can analyze and apply symbols used in mythology.

Warm-Up/Introduction

Direct Instruction (I do):


Conduct lesson on the literal and figurative meaning of SYMBOLS.
Guided Practice (We do):
Work in groups to analyze objects in familiar stories using the graphic organizer on pg. 68.
Work in groups to think about the symbolic meaning of colors.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students conduct research using books, iPads or other sources to learn about the different Greek/Roman gods and
goddesses. Students complete the graphic organizer on pg. 70
Before-Break Check-In
Direct Instruction or Review
Review the key ideas of symbolism.
Guided Practice
Students work in groups to think about how animals have symbolic meaning. Students complete the graphic organizer on pg.
71.
Independent Practice
Students independently read the story "The Lion, the Fox, and the Stag" on pg. 72-73 and complete the After Reading activity
on pg. 73
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice

44 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Review Pronouns and Antecedents


Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.15 - Symbolic Thinking [RL.7.4, W.7.7]
SB 1.16 - Animals as Symbols: Aesops Fables [RL.7.1, RL.7.4]

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call Teacher: Greco, Randee
Date: Wednesday, October 21, 2015
Key Vocabulary Terms
objective
subjective
camera angle
Essential Questions

Objective Standard
I can analyze and apply symbols used in mythology.

Warm-Up/Introduction

Direct Instruction (I do):


Share the following videos on camera angles and ask students to take notes as they watch.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXAr2yiYCV4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_P3oxjnFr0c
Guided Practice (We do):
Students will work in groups to create a scene using the video function on the iPads.
Write a short scene in which a group of kids bullies or makes fun of one other kid. Write the scene and decide who will act
and who will film.
Film the scene twice: once using an OBJECTIVE point of view, and a second time from a SUBJECTIVE point of view, as
either one of the bullies or the victim.
For the SUBJECTIVE point of view, think about how to use different camera angles (high, eye-level, and low angle) to create
an effect.
Independent Practice (You do):
SB page 74, #1. and #2.
Students will work independently to sketch an object in a scene using the objective/subjective angles, and using high,
eye-level, and low angle shots.
Before-Break Check-In
Watch your filmed scene and discuss with your group how to adjust your angles for greater effect.
Direct Instruction or Review
NONE
Guided Practice
Continue filming the scene above in groups.
Watch the completed scenes.
Independent Practice
Students independently complete the "Framing" graphic organizer on pg. 75.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None
Closure Activity:
In journals, describe how filmmakers use camera angles for effect to influence the emotional tone of a film scene.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.

45 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.17 - Analyzing Visual Techniques [SL.7.2, L.7.6]

Thursday, October 22, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Knowledge Objective:I can use test-taking and reading strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz
Reading Strategy:Purpose,Words in Context, Summary, Predict, Questioning the Text
Homework: none
Component

Time

Materials

Grouping

Teaching Activities/ Approach

Assessment Activities

Post or project (or make a class copy) of the


test-taking and reading strategies attached.
Ask students to preview their weekly quiz and
Whole Class
Introduction

5 10
minutes

Small Group

Team
Partner
Individual

do the following:
1. Set a Goal (based on the number of
questions). Write this goal on the top of your

Written Product

quiz.
2. Select 1 reading strategy from the list that
they will commit to using during the quiz.
3. Select 1 test-taking strategy they will commit
to use during the quiz.

State the Obj.

1
minutes

I can use test-taking and reading strategies to

achieve on my weekly quiz.

Whole Class

Academic
Vocab.

Whole Class

3 10

(Fri. only Read minutes

Small Group

Reading strategy

Team

Test-taking strategy

Partner

Aloud)

Individual
Explain to the students that they will be taking a
quiz every week to test their reading and
test-taking skills.
Tell students that they will be given a quiz

Direct

15 - 20

Instruction

minutes

Datawise Quiz

Whole Class

grade and a grade based on showing their


thinking through their annotations.

Tell students that they must justify their


answers with a reasoned claim:
"Answer ____ is right because
______________." Explain that they can cite
the text to support their answer or use reasons.
Students will take the weekly quiz. When all
students are finished, collect the answer sheets
or the clickers and put them in small groups.

Whole Class
Guided

15 - 30

Practice

minutes

Small Group
Datawise quiz

Team
Partner
Individual

Ask students to compare answers and agree on


one answer.
Inform them that they must all have the same
answer before they can move on to the next

Written Product

question.
After students have agreed on their answers,
ask students to share their answers and their
reasons/evidence for that answer. Share the
correct answer.

Before Break

2-3

Check In

minutes

After Break

23

Check In

minutes

Mini Lesson

46 of 53

5 15
minutes

Datawise quiz

Whole Class

Have students record their achievement on their

quiz.

Whole Class

Whole Class

Ask "Did you meet your goal?"

Written Product

Discussion

Supporting a claim with reasons and evidence.


Teacher will unwrap 2 questions from the quiz

based on students feedback.

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Ask: what questions would you like to go over?

Guided

10 - 25

Practice

minutes

Datawise quiz

Whole Class

Ask students to reflect on their test-taking

Small Group

experience:

Team

1. How effective were the strategies I chose?

Partner

2. What strategies might have worked more?

Individual

3. What will I do different/the same next time?

Written Product

Whole Class
Grammar/
Vocab. In
Context

5 - 10
minutes

Small Group

Team

NONE due to quiz day

Partner
Individual
Ask students to turn and talk about their

Closure

3 - 5
minutes

Whole Class

test-taking experience:

Small Group

1. How effective were the strategies I chose?

Team

2. What strategies might have worked more?

Partner

3. What will I do different/the same next time?

Written Product

Individual

Test-Taking Strategies
*Help give you an edge in finding the right answer.

Process of Elimination
Mark off answers you know are wrong; Use logic and textual evidence to work your way to the right answer.

Read the Questions First


Figure out what you need to know before you read the passage. Underline the information when you read it.

Close Reading of the Questions


Circle verbs, underline key nouns. Rephrase it so you know what your target is.

Check the Text


Dont rely on your memory. Go back and check that your response is supported by the text.

Read It Again
Read the passage (or paragraph) more than once to get a good understanding.

Reading Strategies
* Help you understand the text and pull meaning from it.

Summarize Each Paragraph (in a few key words/ 1 sentence)


In the margin, write a few words that summarize the information/key Ideas. Use this as a roadmap for the text.

Question the Text (Who, What < Where, When, Why, How?)
Write your answers in the margin to get a good overall summary of what is happening.

Inference (What does this mean?)

Main Idea
Find the Main Idea of each paragraph (like Summary)

Words in Context
Circle words you dont know. Use the context clues to help get meaning: connotation, sounds like, examples/definitions in
context.

Make A Prediction
As you read, pause and make a prediction about what will happen. Annotate the text with your prediction.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

47 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and
other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RI.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.

Friday, October 23, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - SB 1.18 - Creation Myths from Around the Globe
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
creation myth

Essential Questions
What are the features of a myth?

Objective Standard
I can analyze and compare creation myths.
Warm-Up/Introduction
Ask students to skim and scan the text on pg. 77 "A Note
from the Author" underlining unfamiliar words, then use
Words in Context to guess the meaning of those words.
Students should write two possible synonyms. Students may
use a dictionary or iPad to check their accuracy.

Direct Instruction (I do):


As a class, read "A Note From the Author" on pg. 77. As a class, create a summary of the text and write in in #3. on pg. 78.
Guided Practice (We do):
Think-Pair-Share- ask students complete the "Before Reading" graphic organizer on pg. 78, first on their own, then with
sharing out responses with the group. Students will imagine how people in the past might have tried to explain those natural
phenomena.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students read "Voices of the Ancestors: African Myth" on pg. 79 independently. Students sketch an illustration for one of the
incidents in the "My Notes" section.
Before-Break Check-In
TUrn and talk: share a summary of the story with your elbow partner. Share your illustration.
Direct Instruction or Review
Discuss with students the features of a "creation myth" or "origin story".
Share with students the video clip.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6q8E1laQjY
Point out the elements of mythology to students as they watch the video.
Guided Practice
Ask students to read "Raven and the sources of Light" in small groups, summarizing the text in chunks.
Independent Practice
Students complete the "After Reading" activity on pg.82 independently. (Do not do the "check your understanding" activity
yet. Studentsw will do that when they begin their Embedded Assessment.)
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Review the grammar rules for using dialogue in a narrative.
* separate the quoted part from the sentence tag with quotation marks.
* Use a comma to separate the quote from the sentence tag.
* End Punctuation should go inside the quotes, unless the sentence is a question but the quote itself is a statement.
Example: Did he just say, "Give me that"?
* Start a new paragraph whenever a new speaker speaks.
* Capitalize the first word in the quote, even if it comes after the sentence tag.
Ask students to create a short conversation in writing to show their understanding of how to use dialogue.
Closure Activity:

Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
SB 1.18 - Creation Myths from Around the Globe [RL.7.1, W.7.5]

48 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

CCSD - MS/HS Holidays and PD - End of First Grading Period


Monday, October 26, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - EA #2 - Creating an Illustrated Myth
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
natural phenomenon
theme
characterization
dialogue

Essential Questions
How do I teach a moral or lesson using elements of
mythology?

Objective Standard
I can create an original illustrated myth

Warm-Up/Introduction
Read the Instructions on pg. 83 for the Embedded
Assessment: Create an Original Myth.
Brainstorm a list of gods and natural phenomena you find
interesting.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Tell students:
"Your assignment is to work with a partner to create an original myth that explains a belief, custom, or natural phenomenon
through the actions of gods or heroes. Be sure that your myth teaches a lesson or a moral and includes illustrations that
complement the myth as it unfolds."
Inform students that they will be working with a partner to plan and pre-write for their original myth.
Review with students the criteria for the Embedded Assessment. Go over each skill using the A+ Unpacking chart as a class.
Review any terms or skills that the class needs review on.
Planning and Prewriting: Take time to make a plan for your illustrated myth.
How can you use the stories from the unit as models for your own myth?
How will you choose possible natural phenomena that you could explain in your myth?
Which prewriting strategy (such as the plot diagram or outline) will you use to plan the organization?
Teachers may choose to provide students with a planning organizer for their myths.
Guided Practice (We do):
Students work with partners to plan and pre-write to create an original illustrated myth.
Independent Practice (You do):
NONE- This component is not present in this Springboard Embedded Assessment.
Before-Break Check-In
Look over your prewriting
Direct Instruction or Review
Drafting: Create a draft that includes the elements of an effective narrative.
How will you hook the reader with an engaging opening or lead?
How will you apply your knowledge of sensory and figurative language and purposeful dialogue to vividly tell a story?
How will you show the characters responses to the event, including their thoughts and feelings?
How will you express the lesson learned or the significance of the experience?
How will you find or create illustrations to capture key parts of your myth?

Students work with partners to plan and draft to create an original illustrated myth.
Guided Practice
Students work with partners to draft to create an original illustrated myth.
Independent Practice
NONE- This component is not present in this Springboard Embedded Assessment.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Review the rules for using quotation marks.
Closure Activity:
Go over the rubric/ A+ Unpacking chart. Ask students to self-assess their planned story so far according to the rubric criteria.
Homework:

49 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
EA #2 - Creating an Illustrated Myth [W.7.3a, W.7.3b, W.7.3d, W.7.4]

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - EA #2 - Creating an Illustrated Myth
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
natural phenomenon
theme
characterization
dialogue

Objective Standard
I can create an original illustrated myth.

Warm-Up/Introduction
Review the skills for revising on pages 31-39 in SpringBoard.
Essential Questions
How do I teach a moral or lesson using elements of
mythology?

Brainstorm some ideas for creating a hook, adding sensory


details and imagery, and ending with a strong and satisfying
resolution.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Tell students:
"Your assignment is to work with a partner to create an original myth that explains a belief, custom, or natural phenomenon
through the actions of gods or heroes. Be sure that your myth teaches a lesson or a moral and includes illustrations that
complement the myth as it unfolds."
Inform students that they will be working with a partner to evaluate their writing and revise for content, ideas, and organization
for their original myth.
Review with students the criteria for the Embedded Assessment. Go over each skill using the A+ Unpacking chart as a class.
Review any terms or skills that the class needs review on.
Evaluating and Revising the Draft: Create opportunities to review and revise your work.
During the process of writing, when will you share your work with your writing group?
What is your plan to include suggestions and revision ideas into your draft?
How can the Scoring Guide help you self-evaluate how well your draft meets the requirements of the assignment?
Guided Practice (We do):
Students work with partners to evaluate and revise to create an original illustrated myth.
Independent Practice (You do):
NONE- This component is not present in this Springboard Embedded Assessment.
Before-Break Check-In
Look over your draft revisions.
Direct Instruction or Review
Students work with partners to evaluate and revise to create an original illustrated myth.
Guided Practice
Students work with partners to evaluate and revise to create an original illustrated myth.
Independent Practice
NONE- This component is not present in this Springboard Embedded Assessment.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Review the rules for using quotation marks.
Closure Activity:
Go over the rubric/ A+ Unpacking chart. Ask students to self-assess their planned story so far according to the rubric criteria.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
EA #2 - Creating an Illustrated Myth [W.7.3a, W.7.3b, W.7.3d, W.7.4]

50 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - EA #2 - Creating an Illustrated Myth
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
natural phenomenon
theme
characterization
dialogue

Essential Questions
How do I teach a moral or lesson using elements of
mythology?

Objective Standard
I can create an original illustrated myth.

Warm-Up/Introduction
Make a checklist of things you need to do to finish your
original Myth.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Tell students:
"Your assignment is to work with a partner to create an original myth that explains a belief, custom, or natural phenomenon
through the actions of gods or heroes. Be sure that your myth teaches a lesson or a moral and includes illustrations that
complement the myth as it unfolds."
Review with students how they will be working with a partner to evaluate their writing and revise for content, ideas, and
organization for their original myth.
Review with students the criteria for the Embedded Assessment. Go over each skill using the A+ Unpacking chart as a class.
Review any terms or skills that the class needs review on.
Evaluating and Revising the Draft: Create opportunities to review and revise your work.
During the process of writing, when will you share your work with your writing group?
What is your plan to include suggestions and revision ideas into your draft?
How can the Scoring Guide help you self-evaluate how well your draft meets the requirements of the assignment?
Guided Practice (We do):
Students work with partners to publish an original illustrated myth.
Independent Practice (You do):
NONE- This component is not present in this Springboard Embedded Assessment.
Before-Break Check-In
Look over your draft revisions.
Direct Instruction or Review
Students work with partners to publish an original illustrated myth.
Guided Practice
Students work with partners to publish an original illustrated myth.
Independent Practice
NONE- This component is not present in this Springboard Embedded Assessment.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
Review the rules for using quotation marks.
Closure Activity:
Go over the rubric/ A+ Unpacking chart. Ask students to self-assess their planned story so far according to the rubric criteria.
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
EA #2 - Creating an Illustrated Myth [W.7.3a, W.7.3b, W.7.3d, W.7.4]

Thursday, October 29, 2015

ELA7 Team2 Guill Greco Work Park Call - New Calendar Item
Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:

51 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

Key Vocabulary Terms


strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz.

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
(Teacher: GUILLEMETTE; GRECO; WORKMAN; PARKER; CALLOWAY-HENDERSON; ROBISTOW
Subject: ELA 7
Date:
Key Vocabulary Terms
strategies

Objective Standard
I can use WSMPQP strategies to achieve on my weekly quiz.

Essential Questions
How can WISMPQP reading strategies help me achieve on
my weekly quiz?

Warm-Up/Introduction
Teacher will pass out Quiz. Students will preview the
questions and set a goal for the quiz. Direct students to write
"Answer ___ is the best because..." next to each question on
the quiz. Ask students to review the WISMPQP strategies
Words in Context, Inference, and Summary.

Direct Instruction (I do):


Explain to students that they will be using the WISMPQP strategies to help them understand the reading passage for their
quiz. They will show their thinking and use of the strategies by annotating the text for Words in Context, Inference, and
Summary. They will also justify each answer with evidence or reasoning from the text. Explain that they will get two grades for
today's activity; one grade for the quiz answers, and one grade for their text annotations.
Ask students to turn and talk with their elbow partner to ensure everyone understands the directions.
Guided Practice (We do):
None. Students take the quiz independently.
Independent Practice (You do):
Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In
Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during
the second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they
will create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their
position without making personal attacks or insults.
Guided Practice
As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.
Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

52 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM

Custom Date Range (by Day) - August 31, 2015 - October 30, ...

http://curriculum.wiki-teacher.com/print.php?action=customPla...

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.

Students take the quiz Independently. When students have finished the quiz, give them an answer sheet to record their
answers. (Have students show their annotations before giving them their scantron answer sheets. If they are missing
annotations, or have poor annotations, ask them to complete them. This will motivate them to create quality annotations.)
Before-Break Check-In
Collect all scantron answer sheets from students. Explain that they will be working in their groups to debrief the quiz during the
second half of the Block.
Direct Instruction or Review
Pass out a slip of scratch paper or a post-it note to each group and ask them to identify their group (group name, student
names, etc.). Explain to students that they will be given 10 minutes to compare answers with their team mates. They must
agree on only one answer for the team, which they will record on the scratch paper. (Each teacher will decide whether they will
create an incentive for teams to get answers correct; points, prizes, trophy, etc.) Explain that they must argue their position
without making personal attacks or insults.
Guided Practice
As students are discussing answers, walk around and guide thinking, being careful not to influence answers, but encouraging
healthy debate/discussion. When the group is finished, ask students to record their answers on a chart on the board. Collect
the slip of paper from each group.
Once all group answers have been collected, debrief the assessment. You may choose to call on a team to explain what
answer they chose and why they chose that answer, if there is time, or you can share the answer and ask "Which questions
would you like to review?" As you go over each answer, point out which teams answered it correctly.

*** If there is time after the quiz debrief, students read "The Pit and the Pendulum" and watch the Flocabulary video at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmn79SoZ4-k
Ask students to identify words and phrases that convey tone. Text available at: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com
/search?q=cache:_n6Ntp2-H6oJ:etc.usf.edu/lit2go/pdf/passage/5368/the-works-of-edgar-allan-poe-088-the-pit-and-thependulum.pdf+&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us
Independent Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Vocabulary or Grammar Practice
None- quiz debrief.
Closure Activity:
Quick-write: reflect on your quiz from today. "What did I do that helped me today? What was not successful? What will I do
next time?"
Homework:

*Your plan must include at least 3 Turn and Talks and 3 Check for Understandings.
*You must attach the Standards.
Related Standards/Objectives:
RL.7.2 - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).
RL.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and
other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.
RI.7.10 - By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high
end of the range.

Friday, October 30, 2015

CCSD - MS/HS Holidays and PD - New Calendar Item


2016 Clark County School District

53 of 53

8/16/16, 3:05 PM