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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION

EMERGENCY PLAN
(SMPEP)
Vessel: M/T SARA 1

MARINE & OFFSHORE SOLUTION SDN BHD.


K-01-03, Kuchai Business Park,
No. 2, Jalan 1/127, Off Jalan Kuchai Lama,
58200 Kuala Lumpur
Telephone No.: + 603 7982 7600/01 Telefax No. : +603 7982 7602,
Email: fleet@maroff.com.my

Reproduction of any part of the companys manuals without prior authorization is strictly prohibited. All
information contained herein is for the exclusive use of marOff and managed vessels.

For Every Individual Vessel, Approved By Flag Administration or Classification Society

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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

IMPORTANT

ANY SPILLAGE OF OIL OR NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES


SHOULD BE TREATED AS AN EMERGENCY

IT IS VITALLY IMPORTANT TO PREVENT ANY SPILLAGE OF


CARGO OIL OR BUNKERS FROM FLOWING OVERBOARD
WHENEVER SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS PERMIT,
OIL OR NOXIOUS LIQUIDS SPILT ON DECK
SHOULD BE PREVENTED FROM FLOWING OVERBOARD.

EVERY CREW MEMBER HAS A RESPONSIBILITY


TO PREVENT POLLUTION

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I.

Record Of Changes & Revision History

The table below is to be filled every time a revision is received and applied. Discarded Sections or
pages are to be returned to the originator of the revisions in order to avoid confusion by the
presence of obsolete documentation on the site.
Rev.
No.

Section
No.

All

Rev.
No.

Section
No.

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Revision
Summary
Newly established under
new owner

Revision
Summary

Rev. 0

Revision Entered
Date
By Whom
Jan 2013
Master

Revision Entered
Date
By Whom

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Officers
Signature
Master

Officers
Signature

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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

II.

Record Of Review

Date

Reviewed
By (Initials/Title)

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Comments (Summary)

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Reviewers
Signature

Date

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Reviewed
By (Initials/Title)

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Comments (Summary)

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Reviewers
Signature

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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

III.

Table Of Contents

Section

Item No.

TITLE

General
Record of Changes & Revision History
Record of Review
Table of Contents
Ships Particulars
Regulatory requirements
1.
2.

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0.

Response Plan requirements Introduction


Preamble
Reporting Requirements

1.

When to report

2.
3.

How to report Information required


Whom to contact
National Contacts for Coastal States
Port Contacts
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3.

4.

Ship Interest Contacts


Prediction of oil spill movement by vector addition

4.
0.
1.
2.

Steps to Control Discharge


Operational spills
Spill resulting from Casualties including:
- Priority Actions
- Damage Stability / Hull stress Considerations

0.

National and Local Co-ordination

1.

Responsibilities

2.

Coastal State responds to Pollution Incident

3.

The vessel responds to a Pollution Incident

5.

Additional Information

Append.
1.

List of Coastal Sate & Port Contacts

2.

Additional Port Contacts

3.

List of Ship Interest contacts (including A.O.H)

4.

Pollution Prevention team and Flow chart of activities

5.

Checklists for use in Emergency/ Record of drills

6.

List of Oil spill Response Equipment / Maintenance schedule

7.

Vessels Specific Information

M/T

SARA 1

SHIP'S PARTICULARS

Name:

SARA 1

Ship Type: DOUBLE HULL OIL AND


CHEMICAL TANKER

Port of Registry: PORT KELANG

Flag: MALAYSIA

International Call Sign: 9MQD2

IMO Number: 9301615

Gross Tonnage: 2097

Previous name: ILIOS ERMIS

L.O.A: 80.00 m

Breadth: 14.70 m

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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

Summer Draft: 3.412 m

Keel to top of the mast: 24.35 m

Bow to centre of manifolds : 36.47 m

Transverse thrusters fitted: Yes, Bow Thruster

Does ship operate UMS at sea: YES

Deadweight: 1504

Details of any major modifications or rebuilding: None


Builder : MIURA SHIPYARD SAIKI, JAPAN

Date of Delivery : MAY 28, 2004

Number and identity of tanks where it is permitted to carry oil (crude & product) and noxious
liquid substances: 1-2-3 (p/s), Slop tank.

REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

1. Regulation 37 of Annex I of MARPOL 73/78 requires every oil tanker of 150 tons gross tonnage
and above, and regulation 17 of Annex II of MARPOL 73/78 requires every ship of 150 tons

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gross tonnage and above certified to carry noxious liquid substances in bulk, to have a shipboard
emergency plan with four elements:

procedures for reporting pollution incidents;


a listing of authorities to be notified;
a detailed description of actions to be taken by the ship's crew to reduce or control a
discharge of oil or a noxious liquid substance; and
procedures for co-ordinating shipboard activities with national and local authorities.

2. Without interfering with shipowners liability, some coastal States consider that it is their
responsibility to define techniques and means to be taken against a marine pollution incident,
and approve such operations, which might cause further pollution i.e. lightening. States are in
general entitled to do so under the International Convention relating to intervention on the High
Seas in cases of oil pollution casualties, 1969( 1969 International Convention) and the Protocol
relating to intervention on the High Seas in Cases of Pollution by substances other than oil, 1973
(1973 International protocol). The plan required by MARPOL in the regulations referred to in
paragraph 1 above, will not fully meet regulations in such States applicable to ships which carry
oil in bulk. The USA is the notable example, and owners or operators of ships carrying oil as
cargo in US waters must additionally:

identify and ensure, through contract or other approved means, the availability of private fire
fighting, salvage, lightering and clean-up resources;
identify a qualified individual with full authority to implement the response plan, including
the activation and funding of contracted clean-up resources; and
describe training and drill procedures.

3. The following flow diagram should be used to ascertain whether the vessel has to be ready
to put into effect the MARPOL "Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan" or the U.S.
"Vessel Response Plan".

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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

RESPONSE PLAN REQUIREMENTS

(1) Any petroleum based oil including, but not limited to, petroleum fuel oil, oil refuse and oil mixed with
wastes other than dredged spoil.
(2) Any non-petroleum based oil, including but not limited to, animal and vegetable oils.

Shipboard Marine Pollution Emergency Plan


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INTRODUCTION

1) This plan is written in accordance with the requirements of regulation 37 of Annex I and/or
regulation 17 of Annex II of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution
from Ships, 1973, as modified by the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto (MARPOL 73/78).
2) The purpose of the plan is to provide guidance to the master and officers on board the ship
with respect to the steps to be taken when a pollution incident has occurred or is likely to
occur.
3) The plan contains all information and operational instructions required by the Guidelines 1 .
The appendices contain names, telephone, telex numbers, etc., of all contacts referred to in
the plan, as well as other reference material.
4) This plan has been approved by Lloyds Register on behalf of the Administration and, except
as provided below, no alteration or revision shall be made to any part of it without the prior
approval of a member of the Lloyds Register Group.
5) Changes to Section 5 and the appendices will not be required to be approved by the
Administration. The owners, operators and managers should maintain the appendices up to
date.
6) This plan will be regularly reviewed and updated. Revisions, other than those referred to in
paragraph 5, above will be submitted to the Administration for approval. Revision will be
the responsibility of the HSSE/Ops Manager and will be carried out at intervals not
exceeding 12 months.
7) Following an incident in which the plan has been activated, there will be a thorough review
of its effectiveness.

SECTION 1

1 Guidelines for the development of Shipboard Marine Pollution Emergency Plans; (IMO
resolution MEPC.85(44); adopted on 13 March 2000 as amended by Resolution MEPC.137(53)
adopted on 22/07/2005
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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

PREAMBLE
1. This Shipboard Marine Pollution Emergency Plan is provided to assist personnel in dealing with
an unexpected discharge of oil or a noxious liquid substance. Its primary purpose is to set in
motion the necessary actions to stop or minimize the discharge and to mitigate its effects.
Effective planning ensures that the necessary actions are taken in a structured, logical, safe and
timely manner.
2. The plan makes use of flowcharts and checklists to guide the master through the various
actions and decisions, which will be required in an incident response. The charts and checklists
provide a visible form of information, thus reducing the chance of oversight or error during the
early stages of dealing with an emergency situation.
3. Extensive background information about the ship and its cargoes has been avoided, but for
ready reference, tank plans, pipeline diagrams and capacity charts, with a general arrangement
of the hull and upper deck, are appended to the plan.
4. The plan is designed to link into the Company's corporate plan for dealing with pollution
emergencies; and the master will be backed up on-scene by management appointed personnel as
the circumstances and the position of the vessel at the time of the incident, require.
5. For any plan to be effective it has to be:
SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)
SECTION 1

familiar to those with key functions on board the ship; evaluated,


reviewed and updated regularly; and
tested for viability in regular practices.
6. Training and exercises in implementation of the shipboard mitigation procedures must be held at
regular intervals. Similarly, exercises in the communications procedure will be necessary to
verify that the Company's corporate plan is also effective.

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SECTION 2
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
GENERAL
1. Article 8 and Protocol I of MARPOL 73/78 require that the nearest coastal state should be notified
of actual or probable discharges of harmful substances to the sea. The intent of the requirement is
to ensure that coastal states are informed without delay of any incident giving rise to pollution or
threat of pollution of the marine environment, as well as the need for assistance and salvage
measures, so that appropriate action may be taken.
2. The reporting procedure to be followed by the master or other person in charge of the ship after a
pollution incident involving oil or noxious liquid substances is based on guidelines developed by
the International Maritime Organization.1
3. If the ship is involved in a pollution incident, reports must be made both to coastal state or port
contacts as appropriate, and to contacts representing interest in the ship.
4. A flow chart indicating the reporting procedure to be followed in accordance with the MARPOL
requirements is given overleaf.
5. Some coastal states consider that it is their responsibility to define techniques and means to be taken
against a marine pollution incident, and to approve such operations which might cause further
pollution, e.g. lightening. The United States of America is the notable example of this.

1 "General principles for ship reporting system and ship reporting requirements, including
Guidelines for reporting incidents involving dangerous goods, harmful substances and/or marine
pollutants" adopted by the International Maritime Organization by resolution A.851(20) as amended
by Resolution MEPC.138 (53) adopted on 22/07/2005.
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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

2.0 REPORTING REQUIREMENTS


HAS THERE BEEN AN ACCIDENT OR

Yes

HAZARDOUS INCIDENT?

IS THERE AN ACTUAL
SPILL OF OIL OR
NOXIOUS LIQUID
SUBSTANCE? See 2.1.1

NO REPORT
REQUIRED

No

IS THERE A PROBABILITY OF A SPILL

Yes

OF OIL OR NOXIOUS LIQUID


SUBSTANCE? See 2.1.2

No

Yes

A REPORT IS REQUIRED

No

No

Yes

IS SHIP IN PORT?

NOTIFY NEAREST COASTAL STATE BY

NOTIFY PORT AUTHORITIES BY

QUICKEST POSSIBLE MEANS.


Use format in 2.2 and see 2.3

AGREED MEANS.
See 2.3

NOTIFY SHIP INTERESTS


See 2.3

MANDATORY INITIAL
REPORTING ACTION
NOW COMPLETE

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PREPARE FOLLOW
- UP REPORTS
AS PRACTICABLE

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SECTION 2.1: WHEN TO REPORT


2.1.1 Actual discharge.
A report is required whenever there is:
a discharge of oil or noxious liquid substances resulting from damage to the ship or its
equipment; or
an intentional discharge for the purpose of securing the safety of a ship or saving life at sea; or
during the operation of the ship there is a discharge of oil or a noxious liquid substance in
excess of the quantity or instantaneous rate permitted under applicable marine pollution
regulations.
Reports to coastal states should be in the style given in Section 2.2.
2.1.2 Probable discharge.
Although an actual discharge may not have occurred, a report is required if there is the probability
of a discharge.
In judging whether there is such a probability, and thus whether a report must be made, the
following factors should be taken into account: the nature of damage sustained by the
ship;
failure or breakdown of machinery or equipment which may adversely affect the ability of the
ship to manoeuvre, operate pumps, etc.;
the location of the ship and its proximity to land or other navigational hazards;
present weather, tide, current and sea state;
expected weather conditions;
traffic density;
morale, health and ability of the crew on board to deal with the situation. As a general guide the
master should make a report in cases of:

damage, failure or breakdown which affects the safety of the ship or other shipping: examples of
such situations are collision, grounding, fire, explosion, structural failure, flooding, cargo
shifting;
failure or breakdown of machinery or equipment which results in impairment of the safety of
navigation: examples are breakdown of steering gear, propulsion, electrical generating system,
essential shipborne navigational aids.

Follow Up Reports
Once the vessel has transmitted an initial report, further reports should be sent at regular intervals to
keep those concerned informed of developments.
Follow up reports to coastal states should always be in the style given in Section 2.2, and should
include information about every significant change in the vessel's condition, the rate of the release
and spread of oil or noxious liquid substance, weather conditions, and details of agencies notified
and clean-up activities.

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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

SECTION 2.2:
HOW TO REPORT - INFORMATION REQUIRED
Content of Reports
The format and content of an initial report are given below. The format is consistent with the
General Principles for Ship Reporting Systems and Ship Reporting Requirements, including
Guidelines for Reporting Incidents Involving Dangerous Goods, Harmful Substances and/or Marine
Pollutants, adopted as Resolution A.851(20) as amended by Resolution MEPC.138 (53) by the
International Maritime Organization (IMO), and should be followed so far as possible. (Note: The
reference letters in the listing below do not follow the complete alphabetical sequence as certain
letters are allocated to information required for other reporting formats).
In the case of multiple grades carried on board, their compatibility should be taken into account, as
it is often forbidden to mix incompatible grades, or even to transfer cargo to an unclean tank,
previously loaded with an incompatible grade. The result of such commingling is usually a highly
flammable or explosive mixture, which will aggravate the situation.
The report should contain the following information:
AA. Name of ship, call sign, flag, Inmarsat MES and MMSI.
AB. Date and time (UTC, formerly known as GMT) of incident: a 6-digit group giving day of
month (first two digits), hours and minutes (last four digits). Either
AC. Ship's position, giving latitude: a 4-digit group in degrees and minutes suffixed with N
(North) or S (South); and longitude: a 5-digit group in degrees and minutes suffixed with E
(East) or W (West); Or
AD. Ship's position by true bearing (first 3 digits) and distance (stated) from a clearly identified
landmark.
AE. True course (as a 3-digit group).
AF.Speed (in knots and tenths of a knot as a 3-digit group).
AL.

Route information - details of intended track.

AM.

Full details of radio stations and frequencies being guarded.

AN.

Time of next report (a 6-digit group as in B).

AO.

Draught (a 4-digit group giving draught in metres and centimetres).

AP.Types and quantities of cargo and bunkers on board. Pollution categories X, Y and Z should
be stated for noxious liquid substances and UN number if available. For ships carrying many
different types of bulk liquid cargoes, it may be sufficient for the initial report to indicate
those of prime importance, and the total amount. Follow up reports can identify the types
and their location on board.
AQ.
Brief details of defects, damage, deficiencies or other limitations. These must
include the condition of the ship and the ability to transfer cargo, ballast, or fuel.
AR.
Brief details of actual pollution. This should include the type of oil or noxious
liquid substance, an estimate of the quantity discharged, whether the discharge is continuing,
the cause of the discharge and, if possible, an estimate of the movement of the slick. For
noxious liquid substances, the UN number (if available) should be given, and the MARPOL
pollution category (X,Y & Z) as listed in the IBC Code.

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AS.Weather and sea condition, including wind force and direction and relevant tidal or current
details.
AT.Name, address, telex, facsimile and telephone numbers of the ship's owner or representative
(manager or operator of the ship, or their agents).
AU.

Details of length, breadth, tonnage and type of ship.

AW.

Total number of persons onboard.

AX.

Miscellaneous - to include relevant details including, as appropriate:


Brief details of incident.
Names of other ships involved.
Action taken with regard to the discharge and movement of the ship.
Assistance or salvage resources, which have been requested or provided.
Personnel injuries sustained.
Whether medical assistance is required.
In case of several grades carried on board, their compatibility and stowage on board,
must be advised.
If no outside assistance is required, this should be clearly stated.
Reports should be transmitted by the quickest available means to the responsible authorities of the
nearest coastal state or the Rescue Co-ordination Centre (RCC) via the appropriate shore radio
station or Satellite communication systems. If the ship is within or near to an area for which a ship
reporting system has been established, reports should be transmitted to the designated shore station
of that system.
The following additional information should be sent to the owner or operator either at the same time
as the initial report or as soon as possible thereafter:
Further details of damage to ship and equipment.
Whether damage is still being sustained.
Assessment of fire risk and precautions taken.
Disposition of cargo on board and quantities involved.
Number of casualties.
Damage to other ships or property.
Time (UTC) assistance was requested and time (UTC) assistance expected to arrive at
the scene.
Name of salvor and type of salvage equipment.
Whether further assistance is required.
Priority requirements for spare parts and other materials.
Details of outside parties advised or aware of the incident.
Any other important information.
For ships carrying noxious liquid substances, it may be found useful to report other information
such as the soundness of empty tanks or spaces, the nature of any ballast on board, and the
reliability of power generation for the cargo containment system, main propulsion and crew
environment. After transmission of the information in an initial report, as much as possible of the
information essential for the safeguarding of life and the protection of the ship and the marine
environment should be reported in a supplementary report to the coastal state and the owner or
operator, in order to keep them informed of the situation as the incident develops. This information
should include items P, Q, R, S and X, as appropriate.
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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

Examples of initial reports follow, together with an example of a format, which may be found
suitable for direct transmission.
EXAMPLE REPORTS
The following is an example of an initial report sent to the government of the coastal State and to
the owner or operator:
AA WHITEGOLD CALL SIGN..XXXX...XX FLAG..XXX..IMES..XXXXXX..MMSI..XXXXX
BB 291150
CC 2230N 06000E
AE 137
AF 120
AL BOUND SINGAPORE FROM RAS TANURA
AM BAHRAIN RADIO 2895.2KHZ, VHF 16/70 DSC, INMARSAT NO. 888888
ANAS REQUIRED
AO 1700
AP 2,000 TONNES VARIOUS OIL PRODUCTS, MARPOL ANNEX I. 1,000 TONNES
BENZENE, MARPOL ANNEX II, UN NUMBER 1114, POLLUTION CATEGORY Y.
FULL CARGO DISPOSITION WILL FOLLOW.
AQ COLLISION WITH CARGO SHIP BLACK CLOUD. TANK 2 PORT BREACHED.
SUBSEQUENT FIRE ON MAIN DECK. FIRE NOW EXTINGUISHED. CARGO PUMPS
OPERATIVE BUT UNABLE TO TRANSFER CARGO DUE TO FULL TANKS. BALLAST
SYSTEM INOPERATIVE.
ARESTIMATE 50 TONNES OF MOTOR GASOLINE LOST FROM 2 PORT. OUTFLOW
NOW STOPPED APART FROM SEA ACTION. NO NLS LOST. ESTIMATE OF SLICK
MOVEMENT AND AREA NOT POSSIBLE.
AS WEATHER FINE. WIND SE FORCE 3. SEA SLIGHT.
AT SHIP OPERATOR WHITE GOLD SHIPPING CO., XXXX, XXXXXX, XXXXXX
TELEPHONE: +... ... .... FAX:
+... ... ....
AULENGTH 91.73M. BREADTH 15.80M. TONNAGE 2994. TYPE CHEMICAL
CARRIER
AW25
AXTUG ABC 2 CONTRACTED TO ASSIST ETA 291600. NO SERIOUS INJURIES.
NOT ANTICIPATE FURTHER ASSISTANCE REQUIRED.

The following is an example of additional information for the owner or operator:


AQ
TANK 2 PORT BREACHED FROM DECK TO 1 METRE ABOVE WATER. SHIP
LISTED 5 DEGREES STARBOARD. BOILER OUT OF SERVICE. HOWEVER
ANTICIPATE WILL RESTORE TO SERVICE APPROX. 8 HOURS. GENERATORS OK.
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DO

NO FURTHER DAMAGE. FIRE RISK UNCERTAIN. CONTINUOUS WATER COOLING ON


TANK 2 PORT CARGO TANKS INERTED WHERE POSSIBLE.
ARCARGO DISPOSITION MOTOR GASOLINE IN ONE, TWO, FOUR AND SIX ACROSS,
THREE AND FIVE WINGS. BENZENE THREE AND FIVE CENTRES. ALL TANKS FULL.
XX THREE NON SERIOUS INJURIES (NAMES). DAMAGE TO COASTER BLUE SKY
UNKNOWN. HOWEVER SHE ADVISES NOT IN DANGER OF SINKING.
TUG ABC 2 ETA REMAINS 1600 UTC. LOF 2000 AGREED.
DO NOT ANTICIPATE FURTHER ASSISTANCE REQUIRED.
WILL REVERT WITH SPARES/MATERIALS REQUIREMENTS.
SELF AND WHITE SKY HAVE BROADCAST VHF PAN MESSAGE.
COASTAL STATE ADVISED.
UNDERSTAND LOCAL COAST GUARD ARRANGING AERIAL SPRAYING. NO
OTHER INFORMATION.

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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

EXAMPLE FORMAT FOR INITIAL REPORT BY FACSIMILE


AAName:
Inmarsat MES:

Call sign:

Flag:
MMSI:

AB Date and time (UTC)


__ __ __ __ __ __ D D H H M M
Either:
CC. Position (Latitude and longitude)
__ __ __ __ __
d d m m N/S

__ __ __ __ __ __
d d d m m E/W

or:
ADPosition (Bearing and distance from landmark)
Brg. __ __ __T, Dist. __ __ __ miles from .
AE Course. __ __ __ T

FF

Speed. __ __ . __ Knots LL Route information.

MM
ANTime of next report
AO

Draught

__ __ __ __ __ __
D D H H M M
__ __ . __ __
M M cm cm

AP Cargo and bunkers.

AQ

Defects, damage, deficiencies, limitations.

ARActual pollution.

AS Weather and sea conditions.


Wind direction: .. force .
Swell height: . Tide data: .
AT Manager / Operator contact details.

AUShip details.
Length:
XX

(m); Breadth:

(m); Tonnage:

Other details.

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Ship type:

SECTION 2.3:

WHOM TO CONTACT

NATIONAL CONTACTS FOR COASTAL STATES (Coastal State Contacts)


In order to expedite response and minimise damage from a pollution incident, it is essential that
appropriate coastal states are notified without delay. This process is begun with the initial report.
Guidelines for compiling reports are provided in Section 2.2.
This plan includes as Appendix 1 a list of agencies or officials of administrations responsible for
receiving and processing reports. In the absence of a listed focal point, or where the responsible
authority cannot be contacted by direct means without delay, the master should contact the nearest
coast radio station, designated ship movement reporting station or Rescue Co-ordination Centre
(RCC) by the quickest available means.
The latest list of contact points, published by IMO on behalf of all governments that are signatories
to MARPOL, can be obtained from the IMO Internet site: http://www.imo.org. When on the
Home Page, select Circulars from the left column. When on the Circulars Page select Contact
Points from the right column. MEPC.xxx/Circ.xxx will be shown and, once opened, can be used
to update an appendix to the plan during a review.

PORT CONTACTS
Notification of local agencies will speed response. The variety of trades in which ships engage
may make it impracticable to list local agencies in the plan. Information on regularly visited ports
should however be included as an appendix to the plan. Where this is not feasible, the plan should
require the master to obtain details concerning local reporting procedures upon arriving in port.
If a spill occurs when the vessel is in port, whatever the cause, it is the master's duty
immediately to activate the vessel's Pollution Prevention Team and report the incident.
Precise details of whom to notify locally should be obtained on arrival, but the following is a guide:
Terminal/loading master
Local fire department (in case of explosion and / or fire)
Agent
Port Authority
The vessel's local P&I representative (P&I Club List of Correspondents is filed in.....).
Owner/manager.
Charterer.
Clean-up contractor.
(A pro-forma for listing additional port contacts is shown at Appendix 2.)
SHIP INTEREST CONTACTS
This plan provides details of all those parties with an interest in the ship who should be advised in
the event of an incident. This information is provided in the form of a contact list. When
compiling such a list, it should be remembered that in the event of a serious incident, ships
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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

personnel may be fully engaged in saving life and taking steps to control and minimise the effects
of the casualty. They should, therefore not be hampered by having non-essential communications
requirements imposed upon them.

A list of ship interest contacts is detailed in Appendix 3 which also indicates the order of priority for
notifying those concerned. Out-of-hours contacts are included.
All further reports and copies of messages sent to coastal states and/or port authorities should be
sent to the company. If required, the company's office will be staffed as soon as possible after
receipt of an initial report.
The Master will be responsible for contacting the Coastal State Authorities, the Companys office
and the Vessels agents (if in port). While all other parties will be informed by the DPA or other
authorised companys personnel.
Once initial reports have been made, the company's corporate plan will ensure that other
interests such as flag State authorities, P & I Club and classification society are notified and kept
up to date on the incident.

2.4 PREDICTION OF OIL SPILL MOVEMENT BY VECTOR ADDITION

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2.4.1 Movement of Oil and N.L.S Slicks

Oil or N.L.S slicks will not usually stay in the same position, but will drift influenced by
external forces. The most important of these forces are winds, waves, tides and currents.
It is equally important to be able to forecast the probable movement of the slick as well as
the likely changes in the properties of an oil or a N.L.S after it has been spilled. This allows
appropriate response measures to be put into effect.
2.4.2 Wind Effect
It has been found empirically that floating oil of N.L.S will move at between 2% and 5% of
the speed of the wind measured 10m above the water surface. In open water, 3% of the wind
speed is normally used to estimate drift rates.

OIL

Current to the North at 5 Mph


Figure 1 - Current only

OIL

Wind from the Northwest at 15 Mph


Wind effect = 15 Mph X 0,34 = 0,5 Mph
Figure 2 - Wind only

W
C

Figure 3 - Current & Wind

OIL

to the head of vector C. Maintain magnitude


and direction.effect of current and wind
Combined
2.
resultant
vector
to the head
vector its tail
Add
vector
W toRvector
C byofmoving
1. Draw
W to show actual direction and magnitude
Northeast at 0,3 Mph

Current / Tidal Effect


In the presence of surface water currents an additional movement of the oil equivalent to the
current strength will be added on any wind-driven motion. Close to land, the strength and
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direction of existing tidal currents must be considered, but further out to sea their effect is
usually less significant because they are cyclic and so tend to cancel out over time
Predicting slicks drift
With knowledge of the prevailing winds and currents, it is possible to predict the rate and
direction of movement of floating oil or N.L.S from a given position, by drawing a vector
diagram using the formula V oil = V current + V wind x Q.

Salvage: This Plan contains information on what the crews responsibilities are in a
casualty where a ship is partially or fully disabled, and what constitutes dangerous
conditions. A decision process should be outlined in the Plan that will aid the master in
determining when salvage assistance should be obtained. The decision process should
address the nearest land or hazard to navigation, the ships set and drift, the location and
time of impact with a hazard based on ships set and drift, the estimated time of completing
rectification of a disabling defect, and determination of the nearest capable assistance and its
response time (i.e., for tug assistance, the time it will take to get on scene and secure the
tow).
When a casualty occurs to a ship under way that reduces its manoeuvrability, the master
needs to determine his window of opportunity considering the response time of assistance,
regardless of the estimated time of repair. It would not be prudent to hesitate in calling for
assistance when the time needed to repair something goes beyond the window of
opportunity. The following flow chart may be found useful as a basis for providing
guidance to a master or to the shore management in assessing the need and urgency of
calling for salvage assistance when a casualty occurs.

FLOWCHART TO ASSIST MASTER


TO DETERMINE WHEN SALVAGE ASSISTANCE SHOULD BE OBTAINE

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SECTION 3

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SHIPBOARD MARINE POLLUTION EMERGENCY PLAN (S.M.P.E.P)

3.0

STEPS TO CONTROL DISCHARGE

WHENEVER A SPILL OF OIL OR A NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCE OCCURS IT IS THE


DUTY OF THE PERSON FINDING THE SPILL TO IMMEDIATELY INFORM THE MASTER
OR RESPONSIBLE OFFICER, WHO SHOULD CALL OUT THE VESSEL'S POLLUTION
PREVENTION TEAM (See Appendix 4). REMEMBER THAT AN OIL SPILL MAY CREATE
A FIRE OR EXPLOSION HAZARD, REQUIRING SAFETY PRECAUTIONS TO BE
OBSERVED. SPILLAGE OF A NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCE MAY CREATE THE SAME
HAZARD, OR ADDITIONAL HAZARDS OF TOXICITY, CORROSIVENESS OR
REACTIVITY, REQUIRING APPROPRIATE PRECAUTIONS.
THIS PLAN IS DIRECTED AT POLLUTION CONTROL, AND IT IS NOT APPROPRIATE TO
BURDEN IT UNNECESSARILY BY REPEATING GENERAL SHIP OR COMPANY SAFETY
PROCEDURES.
Ships personnel will almost always be in the best position to take quick action to mitigate or
control the discharge of oil or a noxious liquid substance from their ship. This plan provides the
Master with clear guidance on how to respond in a variety of situations. This plan is not only
outline action to be taken, but it is also identify responsibilities on board so that confusion can be
avoided during the emergency.
This plan contains checklists, which include suggested responsibilities during a spill emergency.
One checklist is for responding to an operational spill, in which avoidance of pollution is a
priority. The other is for responding to a spill resulting from a casualty, where safety of life
can mean that the master has more pressing concerns.
This plan addresses several scenarios with initial emphasis on measures to be implemented
immediately, followed by further measures which can be taken as the situation is assessed. The
list of measures will give guidance during drills and practices, but the use of a checklist in
conjunction will ensure that all measures are considered.
This plan provides the master with guidance to address scenarios listed in the IMO guidelines:

In cases of a discharge of noxious liquid substances the Master has to refer to the
"Characteristics of Liquid Chemicals Proposed for Marine Transport in Bulk" (Data Sheets)
provided onboard for any NLS cargo. Consideration have to be made to any danger resulting
from discharge of such substances, i.e. mixing with water, air, other materials/substances.
Special consideration is to be taken in case of the necessity to transfer cargo into another
compartment onboard the compatability of the material to be transferred and the material of
pipes and tanks to be used for such action.

*Priority Actions*

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The following provides guidance and information to masters on the priority actions required in the
event of an operational spill and/or spill resulting from an accident in order to control or mitigate
the discharge or probable discharge:

(a) Ensure safety of personnel and ship and take action to prevent escalation of the incident.
Immediate consideration should be given to measures aimed at preventing fire and explosion, i.e.,
altering course so ship is upwind of slick, shutting down non-essential air intakes, etc. If ship is
aground and cannot maneuver, all possible sources of ignition should be eliminated and action
taken to prevent flammable vapours entering accommodation and engine room spaces. When it is
possible to maneuver, the master, in conjunction with the appropriate shore authorities, may
consider moving the ship to a more suitable location, in order, for example, to facilitate emergency
repair work or lightering operations, or to reduce the threat posed to any particularly sensitive
shoreline areas.

(b) Assess and obtain detailed information on damage sustained by ship. A visual inspection should
be carried out and all cargo tanks, bunker tanks and other compartments sounded. Care should be
taken when opening spillage plugs or sighting ports, especially when the ship is aground, as loss
of buoyancy could result.

(c) Having assessed the damage sustained by the ship, the master will be in a position to decide what
action should be taken to prevent or minimize further spillage. When bottom damage is sustained,
hydrostatic balance will be achieved fairly rapidly, especially if the damage is severe, in which
case the time available for preventative action will often be limited. When significant side damage
is sustained in the way of oil tanks, cargo or bunkers will be released fairly rapidly until
hydrostatic balance is achieved and the rate of release will then reduce and be governed by the rate
at which oil is displaced by water flowing in under the oil. When the damage is fairly limited and
restricted, e.g., to one of two compartments, consideration may be given to transferring oil
internally from damaged to intact tanks.

SECTION 3.1

OPERATIONAL SPILLS OF OIL OR NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES:

The most likely operational spill will result from:


3.1.1. Pipeline leakages, including transfer hoses
3.1.2. Cargo tank or bunker tank overflows
3.1.3. Hull leakages
3.1.1 Pipeline Leakage During Discharging or Loading of Oil or Noxious Liquid
Substance Cargoes, or During Bunkering Measures to be implemented immediately:
Stop all cargo and bunkering operations, and close manifold valves
Sound the emergency alarm, and initiate emergency response procedures
Inform terminal/ loading master/ bunkering personnel about the incident Further measures:

Consider whether to stop air intake into accommodation and non-essential air intake to engine
room.

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In the case of a noxious liquid substance, consider what protection from vapour or liquid
contact is necessary for the response team and for other crew members.
Consider mitigating activities such as decontamination of personnel who have been exposed.
Locate source of leakage, and begin clean-up procedures
Drain affected section of pipeline into an empty or slack tank (e.g. the slop tank or another
cargo tank)
Prepare portable pumps where it is possible to transfer spilled liquid into a slack or empty tank
If the source of the leakage is located in the pumproom at the sea valves the necessary
measures must be taken to relieve the pressure from the relevant section of the pipeline

If the spilled liquid is contained on board and can be handled by the Pollution Prevention Team
then:
Use absorbents and permissible solvents to clean up liquid spilled on board.
Ensure that any residues collected, and any contaminated absorbent materials used in the clean
up operation are stored carefully prior to disposal.
The use of a simple check list is recommended.
Check lists are included in Appendix 5.
After dealing with the cause of the spill it may be necessary to obtain permission from local
authorities or the terminal (or both) to continue normal operations.
3.1.2 Tank Overflow During Loading Or Bunkering
Measures to be implemented immediately:

Stop all cargo and bunkering operations, and close manifold valves
Sound the emergency alarm, and initiate emergency response procedures
Inform terminal/ loading master/ bunkering personnel about the incident Further measures:

Consider whether to stop air intake into accommodation and non-essential air intake to
engineroom.
In the case of a noxious liquid substance, consider what protection from vapour or liquid
contact is necessary for the response team and for other crew members.
Consider mitigating activities such as decontamination of personnel who have been exposed.
Reduce the tank level by dropping cargo or bunkers into an empty or slack tank
Prepare pumps for transfer of cargo/bunkers to shore if necessary
Begin clean up procedures
Prepare portable pumps if it is possible to transfer the spilled liquid into a slack tank, with due
regard given to grades compatibility.

If the spilled liquid is contained on board and can be handled by the Pollution Prevention Team
then:
Use absorbents and permissible solvents to clean up the liquid spilled on board.
Ensure that any residues collected, and any contaminated absorbent materials used in the clean
up operation are stored carefully prior to disposal.
The use of a simple check list is recommended.
check lists are included in Appendix 5.

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After dealing with the cause of the spill it may be necessary to obtain permission from local
authorities or the terminal (or both) to continue normal operations.
3.1.3

Hull Leakage

If oil or other cargo liquid is noticed on the water near the vessel during cargo or bunkering
operations and cannot be accounted for, the possibility of hull leakage should be suspected.
Measures to be implemented immediately:
Stop all cargo and bunkering operations, and close manifold valves, tank valves and pipeline
master valves
Sound the emergency alarm, and initiate emergency response procedures
Inform terminal/loading master/ bunkering personnel about the incident. Further measures:

Use the Pollution Prevention Team in an attempt to locate the source of leakage
In the case of a noxious liquid substance, consider what protection from vapour or liquid
contact is necessary for the response team and for other crew members.
Consider mitigating activities such as decontamination of personnel who have been exposed.
Consider whether to stop air intake into accommodation and non-essential air intake to
engineroom
If the source of the leak is not readily identified on deck or above the waterline, consider the
use of a diver to assist in locating the leak
Care should be taken for grades which are incompatible with sea water and in case of sea
ingress into cargo tanks, will either deteriorate or polymerised thus turn into unpumpable
mixtures, or form explosive mixtures, or even will be self ignited.
When the source of leakage is identified:
Reduce the head of cargo or bunker oil by dropping or pumping liquid into an empty or slack
tank
Consider the possibility of pumping water into the leaking tank to create a water cushion to
prevent further loss of oil or a noxious liquid substance that is less dense than water.
If the leakage is located below the waterline, call in divers for further investigation. If it is not
possible to identify the actual tank:

The level of liquid in the tanks in the vicinity of the suspected area should be reduced.
Remember to consider the effect on hull stress and stability of the vessel and the compatibility
of noxious liquid substances with tank type, material of construction and tank coating.
The use of a simple check list is recommended.
Check lists are included in Appendix 5.

After dealing with the cause of the spill it may be necessary to obtain permission from local
authorities or the terminal (or both) to continue normal operations.
It is possible that failure of machinery, such as the oily water separating equipment or the oil
discharge monitor or the underwater discharge outlet, can cause an operational discharge while at
sea in excess of that permitted. In such an incident the discharge should be stopped immediately
and the correct report made. It is generally acknowledged that no clean up is possible by the ship,
but the shore authorities can often respond more effectively to a spill in its early stages.

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3.2

SPILLS RESULTING FROM CASUALTIES

In the event of a casualty the master's first priority is to ensure the safety of the ship's personnel
and to initiate action to prevent the incident from getting worse. Mitigating activities that can be
considered are transfer of liquid from damaged compartments, containment of on-board deck
spills, and preparation for dispersal of spills overboard.
If the casualty involves grounding, breaching of the outer hull, or other structural damage for
which calculations of stability and damaged longitudinal strength are beyond the ship's resources,
assistance must be sought from shore.
In case that Damage Stability calculation assistance is required
Call L.R.S in Number +44 207 480 5541 / 46
It may be necessary to transfer all or part of the cargo to another ship. The ICS/OCIMF
publication "Ship to Ship Transfer Guide (Petroleum)" describes procedures to be followed in
such a case. The advice is supplemented for noxious liquid cargoes by advice in the ICS Tanker
Safety Guide (Chemicals). Copies are held on board, and the master should encourage officers to
familiarise themselves with the contents. When arranging a rendezvous, the master should ensure
that the lightering vessel will also follow the same procedures. The following casualty situations
are dealt with:
Grounding
Fire/Explosion
Collision (with a fixed or a moving object)
Hull Failure
Excessive List
Containment System Failure
Submerged or Foundered
Wrecked or Stranded
Hazardous Vapour Release
Dangerous Reactions of Cargo
Other Dangerous Cargo Release
Loss of Tank Environmental Control
Cargo Contamination Yielding A Hazardous Condition
There is much repetition in the following sub-sections, but this is deemed to be acceptable. The
intent is that, in an emergency, the initial guidance given is as appropriate as possible. It is
probable that, once the extent of a casualty has been assessed, the first essential steps taken and
the situation stabilised, careful consideration will allow departure from or variation of preprepared plans. Then cross referral would be appropriate.
3.2.1

Grounding and Stranding

If the ship runs aground, the following steps should be taken immediately:
Sound the emergency alarm and initiate emergency response procedures
Eliminate all avoidable sources of ignition and ban all smoking on board
Consider whether to stop air intake to accommodation and non-essential air intake to the
engineroom

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Further action
Carry out a visual inspection of the ship to determine the severity of the situation
Take soundings around the ship to determine the nature and gradient of the seabed
Check difference in the tidal ranges at the grounding site
Evaluate tidal current in the grounding area
Take soundings of all cargo, ballast and bunker tanks and check all other compartments adjacent
to the hull. Ullage plugs should not be opened indiscriminately as loss of buoyancy could
result
Compare present tank soundings against departure soundings
Evaluate the probability of additional release of oil or a noxious liquid substance.
Further information on the action to be taken when a ship is aground is contained in the
ICS/OCIMF publication "Peril at Sea and Salvage - A Guide for Masters".
Having assessed the damage that the vessel has sustained, and taking into account the effects of hull
stress and stability, the master should decide whether or not any action can be taken to avoid further
spillage, such as:
Transfer of cargo and bunkers internally. If the damage is limited, for example to one or two
tanks, consideration should be given to transfer of liquid from damaged to intact tanks.
Isolate all cargo and bunker tanks to reduce further loss due to hydrostatic pressure during tidal
changes.
Review existing and forecast weather conditions, and whether the ship will be adversely
affected by them.
Evaluate the possibility of transferring cargo to barges or other ships, and request such
assistance accordingly.
Trimming or lightening the vessel sufficiently to avoid damage to intact tanks, thereby avoiding
additional pollution from spillage of oil or noxious liquid substances.
If the risk of additional damage to the ship by attempting to re-float it by her own means is assessed
to be greater than by remaining aground until assistance has been obtained, the master should try to
prevent the ship from moving from its present position by;
Using anchors

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