up to $51 in coupons inside

Patriots advance

New England holds
off Chiefs
n Sports, page C1

TM

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

n $2.00 n LANCASTERONLINE.COM

LNP Special Report

IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL

Sanctions
to be lifted,
Americans
released

RACISM, POVERTY & THE FAILURE OF URBAN RENEWAL IN LANCASTER’S SOUTHEAST

‘I FELT LIKE WE
WERE JUST ERASED’

US says Iran’s pathways
to a nuclear weapon all
have been closed down
DAVID E. SANGER
THE NEW YORK TIMES

VIENNA — International inspectors
confirmed Saturday that Iran had dismantled large sections of its nuclear
program, as agreed in a historic agreement last summer, paving the way for
the lifting of oil and financial sanctions
by the United States and other world
powers.
The announcement came just hours
after Iran said it had released four
Americans, including a Washington
Post reporter, Jason Rezaian, as part of
a prisoner swap with the United States.
U.S. officials said the two deals were

IRAN, page A5

CAMPAIGN 2016

Dems brace
for a messy
winter race
Clinton, Sanders contest
heats up as primaries loom

COURTESY OF BUDDY GLOVER

Neighborhood pride in Lancaster’s Southeast was never greater than when bands and drill teams marched down
South Duke Street during the Conestoga Elks Parade. This undated photo from before the urban renewal of the
1960s captures a sense of community that was later fractured. The homes on this block are long gone.
The top of the Griest Building can be seen in the upper left corner.
Then & now: Photos of what this area of the city looks like today n page A7

LISA LERER AND KEN THOMAS
ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — There was a time
when Democrats fretted about Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign
becoming a coronation and leaving her
without the tests of a primary season to
prepare for a general election matchup
against the Republican nominee.
No one is worried about that anymore.
In the past two weeks, the Democratic race has gone from a relatively
civil disagreement over policy to a contentious winter competition between
former Secretary of State Clinton and
Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.
Clinton’s institutional strength and
her support among the minority voters who make up a large portion of the
party’s base still put her in a formidable position, even as polls show Sanders surging in Iowa and maintaining an

50 years after Lancaster demolished integrated neighborhoods, the Southeast
is burdened by the highest concentration of poverty in Lancaster County
JEFF HAWKES

G

JHAWKES@LNPNEWS.COM

rowing up in a big family in Lancaster’s segregated Southeast in the
1940s and 1950s, Betty
Hurdle saw her father go to work
as a short-order cook, a hospital
janitor and, on Saturdays, a shoeshine.
Her mother cleaned a doctor’s
office because money was still
tight, so much so that when holes
appeared in the bottom of her

Efforts to get firsttime buyers into new
and rehabbed homes
in the Southeast .
show promise. .
But government
cutbacks now
threaten the success.
n page A7

COMING MONDAY

ALSO INSIDE

The 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast
is being held Monday, and staffers from
LNP and LancasterOnline are providing
live coverage. You can watch live
video of the event beginning at 7 a.m..
Randall Robinson, the founder
of TransAfrica and a leader in the
movement to end apartheid in
South Africa, is the keynote
speaker at the event, which
is organized by the Crispus
Attucks Community Center.

INDEX
CLASSIFIEDS........... CL1
LIVING......................... B1
LOTTERY................... A2

n Watch it live on

LancasterOnline or at .
bit.ly/2016mlkbreakfast

MONEY........................ D1
NATION & WORLD...A17
OBITUARIES...........A20
PERSPECTIVE............E1

RELATED
CONTENT

shoes, Hurdle slid in a piece of
cardboard and made do.
Despite the hard times, Hurdle’s
family persevered. They were part
of the Southeast’s supportive,
mostly black community, one that
cultivated a culture of hope.
The Southeast was a place where
neighbors chatted over porch railings, sang in church choirs and patronized each other’s businesses,
including corner groceries, barber shops, pharmacies, a dentist,

Burkina Faso hotel
seizure ends
n Nation & World,
page A17

Film adaptation
of local’s memoir
to be screened
n Living, page B1

Irish dance school
to relocate
n Money, page D1

REAL ESTATE..........RE1
SPORTS....................... C1
TRAVEL.....................B10
TV WEEK..................TV1

DEMOCRATS, page A4

ERASED, page A6

CRIME

Police seek man in homicide
Sheetz, 41, allegedly stabbed Columbia man to death
RYAN ROBINSON

RROBINSON@LNPNEWS.COM

At last report Saturday evening, authorities
were still seeking a man
charged with homicide
in a late-night stabbing
Friday.

36 17 H

Columbia
police
charged Ronald Lee
Sheetz, 41, with homicide in the death of
44-year-old
Michael
Oberdorff Sr., Lancaster
County District AttorHOMICIDE, page A5

TODAY'S WEATHER

FORECAST, PAGE C14

Ronald
Sheetz,
41, has
been
charged
with
homicide,
officials
say.

221st Year, No. 214

COPYRIGHT © LNP MEDIA GROUP, INC.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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A physician, physician assistant or nurse practitioner is committed to working diligently to
have you initially seen within 30 minutes of your arrival. • Lancaster Regional Medical Center and
Heart of Lancaster Regional Medical Center are directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that
proudly includes physician owners, including certain members of the hospitals’ medical staffs.

A2

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

PENNSYLVANIA LOTTERY n
SUNDAY,
JAN. 10

Here are the winning Pennsylvania and Powerball lottery numbers for the week starting Jan. 10

MONDAY,
JAN. 11

TUESDAY,
JAN. 12

WEDNESDAY,
JAN. 13

THURSDAY,
JAN. 14

FRIDAY,
JAN. 15

SATURDAY,
JAN. 16

DAY PICK 2

1-1

7-6

2-1

2-0

1-6

0-7

2-4

DAY PICK 3

1-5-0

2-8-9

5-2-9

6-9-5

9-2-4

8-0-1

3-7-5

DAY PICK 4

2-4-2-0

8-6-2-2

3-8-9-8

3-7-1-5

1-9-2-4

5-4-0-1

9-9-8-1

DAY PICK 5

5-2-9-9-7

2-3-1-5-3

2-1-1-9-1

5-7-3-6-6

6-4-1-2-6

0-2-7-9-6

2-2-1-8-3

08-11-21-24-26

03-04-07-25-26

07-10-18-25-27

13-17-22-24-26

03-09-21-27-30

02-11-22-24-30

04-05-17-29-30

TREASURE HUNT
NIGHT PICK 2

5-9

7-7

6-4

3-4

1-9

7-2

8-6

NIGHT PICK 3

6-4-5

4-2-1

2-1-6

0-2-3

3-8-7

7-9-7

4-4-0

NIGHT PICK 4

5-4-9-5

1-8-6-7

3-9-5-0

3-8-0-4

7-1-9-7

0-3-7-9

9-1-8-4

NIGHT PICK 5

4-3-6-3-0

6-5-8-5-3

3-7-3-1-1

3-4-4-5-8

4-8-6-4-0

0-3-1-0-2

1-5-5-1-3

13-17-22-26-43

08-12-25-26-37

14-18-26-30-36

19-20-23-24-34

14-20-25-36-41

11-12-13-30-42

02-05-16-33-34

15-27-29-31-48
MEGABALL: 15
MEGAPLIER: 4

04-08-19-27-34
POWERBALL: 10
POWERPLAY: 2

29-41-53-54-70
MEGABALL: 12
MEGAPLIER: 2

03-51-52-61-64
POWERBALL: 06
POWERPLAY: 2

CASH 5

16-29-32-43-44-45

MATCH 6

05-14-23-30-42-45

CASH4LIFE:
04-20-30-34-36
CASH BALL: 2

CASH4LIFE
POWERBALL &
MEGA MILLIONS

CASH4LIFE:
23-27-29-36-60
CASH BALL: 4

Through the Viewfinder
ANDY BLACKBURN

ABLACKBURN@LNPNEWS.COM

CONTACT US
General info: 291-8811, P.O. Box
1328, Lancaster, PA 17608
Newsroom: Tips, stories and
announcements, 291-8622,
news@LNPnews.com
Home delivery &
subscriptions: 291-8611,
circulation@LNPnews.com
E-Editions free to 7-day
subscribers
Advertising: 291-8800,
advertising@LNPnews.com
Classified: 291-8711,
class@LNPnews.com
Engagements, weddings
& anniversaries: 291-4957,
celebrations@LNPnews.com,
www.lancasteronline.com/
celebrations/create

Online: LancasterOnline.com,
LancasterOnline.com/mobile
Newspaper Digital Replica:
LNPToday.com
Facebook, Twitter, Youtube,
Instagram, Google+:
LancasterOnline

CORRECTIONS
LNP wants to correct
substantive errors of fact.
To request a correction or
clarification, call the news desk
at 291-8622 or email
news@LNPnews.com

M

onday, we will celebrate Martin Luther King
Jr. Day. And for this week’s Through the
Viewfinder, I was interested in photographing something on King’s legacy and the civil
rights movement. And it turns out there’s a local tie to
him: He gave a speech in Mayser gym at Franklin & Marshall College on Dec. 12, 1963.
I hunted around for something that would suit my photographic needs and learned of a 5-foot bust of Dr. King in
a park in Chester, Pennsylvania. So I decided to go there
with my Graflex Speed Graphic 4x5 camera and eight expired black-and-white film sheets. (Of course, I brought
my digital camera in case the expired films failed in the
processing.)
Why did I take the Speed Graphic with me? That’s the
exact kind of camera King had stood in front of at the
beginning of his work in the civil rights movement. This
camera started to disappear when medium format and 35
mm cameras became popular in the 1960s.
When I arrived in the park and stood in front of the bust,
I was in awe of how big it is.
With a digital camera, it’s easy to move around, fire away

many images and check the screen to make sure the exposures and compositions are good.
But when I used the Graflex Speed Graphic, I realized
I had to slow down. The camera is bulky for still photography and needs to be set up on a tripod. And I needed a
light meter to help set the camera’s speed and aperture for
the proper exposure. I also had to wear my reading glasses
when I looked at the viewfinder — which shows the camera’s subject matter upside down —to make sure the subject was in focus.
I shot only eight film sheets and at the time I had no idea
if they would come out OK.
When I got home from Chester, I gathered the darkroom
chemicals and the processing equipment. After an hour
of setting up and processing, I was excited to see how the
negatives turned out.
I decided to choose a 4x5 image. The textures and
streaks — likely created by heat from when the film sat in
storage for roughly eight years — can be seen in the image
above.
Though King has passed, it was important to me to capture his legacy in this special way.

THE METHOD Graflex Speed Graphic Camera with 4x5 Kodak Tri-X 320 film sheet. Exposure 1/400 @ 5.6. ISO 320.

Shot in black and white with a red filter and processed with Kodak photographic chemicals. Negative shot with Nikon D600
with backlight. Inverted and processed in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop. For more Through the Viewfinder photos and
musings, visit LancasterOnline.com/TTV

2016

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LOCAL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Catching up
on the news
FARM SHOW
n Lancaster County claimed

some big prizes at the
Pennsylvania Farm Show
in Harrisburg. Among top
winners: Tidal Wave, a
prized bull from the herd
owned by Masonic Village at
Elizabethtown, champion of
the shorthorn breed; Leah
Kossove, of Lititz, and her
alpaca, Griffin, champions in
the senior division, obstacle
competition; and Dolores
Murray, of Brickerville, Best
of Show in sewing. The 100th
edition of the Farm Show
ended Saturday.

A3

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

FARM SHOW 2016

Historic week comes to a close
2.

FOR SALE
n The long-vacant Bulova

building in downtown
Lancaster is listed for an
online auction in February.
City officials had threatened
to seize the building by
eminent domain last year. The
auction is set for Feb. 22-24.
Starting bid for the building is
$800,000.

1.

PERDUE FILING
n Perdue Agribusiness, in a

filing with the state, argued
against installing special
pollution control equipment
at its planned soybean
plant in Conoy Township.
Perdue said a “regenerative
thermal oxidizer,” designed
to cut hexane emissions,
would create risk of fire and
explosion.

3.

4.

ART MANAGER
n Heidi Leitzke was named

the new public art manager
of Lancaster city. Leitzke is
an artist and former adjunct
professor and gallery director
at Pennsylvania College of Art
& Design.

100 NEW JOBS
n A New York City firm,

BrandYourself.com, which
manages online reputations,
plans to open an office in
Lancaster, bringing 100 fulltime jobs here in the next
three years. The office will be
at 53 W. James St.

5.

$1M WINNER

VINNY TENNIS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS

n A $1 million Powerball ticket

was sold at the Turkey Hill store
on Clay Street in Lancaster,
lottery officials reported. The
winner matched 5 numbers in
the record $1.5 billion Powerball
drawing, in which three winners
split the big prize. As of
Saturday, the local winner had
not yet come forward.

FIRE ESCAPE
n Three city residents,

including a young child,
escaped from their burning
Beaver Street rowhome on
Thursday by climbing out a
second-story window. The fire
caused an estimated $100,000
damage to the rowhome and
a vacant adjoining property.

SURPLUS FALLS
n Lancaster General Health,

the county’s largest employer,
saw its year-end surplus fall
by about $74 million, thanks
primarily to the stock market.
The health system’s stock
portfolio fell by $16 million in
2015.

MARTIN LUTHER
KING JR. DAY
Government offices
and many agencies are
observing a holiday on
Monday.
n Closed are: City
Hall, Lancaster County
Courthouse, federal and
state offices, banks, state
liquor stores, schools. There
is no regular mail delivery.
n RRTA: Regular service.

100TH PA FARM SHOW
2016: PHOTO GALLERY

Browse more photos from the week at the Farm
Show at lancasteronline.com/lnpfarmshow

6.

The 100th Pennsylvania Farm Show came to a close on Saturday. n 1. Caleb Flohr puts a hat on a brown Swiss cow. n 2. Emma Oberholtzer,
of East Earl, prepares a horned Dorset ewe for judging. n 3. Jeremiah Snyder, of Manheim, tucks away a second-place ribbon during
Shropshire sheep judging. n 4. Sheep are lined up during the final day of competition. n 5. Brooke Killmon throws an axe during a lumberjack
demonstration. n 6. Maggie Geyer makes potato donuts, a popular treat inside the food court at the Farm Show.

As exciting as 100th Pennsylvania Farm Show was, exhibitors also are happy when it ends
EARLE CORNELIUS

ECORNELIUS@LNPNEWS.COM

HARRISBURG — David Smith’s week
finally caught up with him.
Smith is a Palmyra dairy farmer who,
as executive director of the Pennsylvania Dairymen’s Association, oversees the
dairy booths at the Pennsylvania Farm
Show.

By Saturday, he had hit a wall. Seated on
a chair not far from where dozens of people lined up to buy milkshakes, he smiled
the smile of someone who was ready for
the eight-day event to end.
“We run on a lot of adrenaline,” he said
as he took a break from compiling inventory numbers. “For many of us, we’re here
at 5:30 or 6 in the morning and leave at

TRANSPORTATION

East Earl Twp. road
realignment a no-go

New board won’t support much-debated Route 897
project; use of eminent domain among concerns
DAVE LEFEVER

LNP CORRESPONDENT

East Earl Township supervisors
have decided to stop pursuing a
controversial road project that was
under discussion for years.
At their first regular monthly
meeting with newly elected Super-

visor Nelson Groff, the board in a 2-1
vote Tuesday halted the proposed
realignment of Route 897, where it
meets Route 322.
Many township residents stated
their opposition to the project at
township meetings in the past year.
EAST EARL, page A11

hear the love

SERVING LANCASTER AND LEBANON COUNTIES SINCE 1962

127 College Avenue • Lancaster • 397-2046

FARM SHOW, page A10

RECRUITMENT

Fire department
wants you to join
Prospective volunteer day is set
CHRISTOPHER PRATT
CPRATT@LNPNEWS.COM

Ever considered joining your local fire department?
Here’s your chance: Mark your calendars for
Jan. 23. That’s when 12 fire departments serving a
swath of Lancaster County will throw open their
doors to provide information to prospective volunteers.
Participating departments are Masterson-

VOLUNTEER, page A11

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don’t fit
anymore?

Don’t miss a word! Start with a Free Office
or In-Home Assessment. Call today!

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10:30 at night. I’m pretty exhausted.”
That’s understandable. Since the beginning of the new year, Smith has been
focused on the Farm Show. He had no
chance to watch last weekend’s playoff
football games. And what about Thursday’s Republican Presidential debate?
“That wasn’t even on my radar,” he said

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A4

FROM PAGE A1

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Democrats: Sanders, Clinton heat up presidential race
Continued from A1

edge in New Hampshire.
But should Sanders
prevail in those first two
states on the 2016 campaign calendar, Clinton’s
bid to succeed President Barack Obama may
mean a much longer and
messier path than her
supporters once envisioned. It would plunge
Democrats into the kind
of primary fight they
have gleefully watched
Republicans struggle to
contain in the past year.
“You have to look at
these numbers and say
there’s a real race going
on,” said Democratic
pollster Mark Mellman.
“It’s a race where Hillary
Clinton has significant
advantages in the long
run. But it’s a real race.”

New phase
The contest was certain
to intensify this weekend, with the Democratic candidates gathering
in Charleston, South
Carolina, on Saturday
night for a party dinner
and the annual fish fry
hosted by Rep. James
Clyburn, D-S.C. Then
there’s tonight’s debate,
the final one before the
Iowa caucuses on Feb. 1.
The New Hampshire primary is Feb. 9.
“I think it is a new
phase of the campaign,”
said Joel Benenson,
Clinton’s chief campaign
strategist. “We talked
about how close this was
going to be in (Iowa and
New Hampshire). They
always are historically
and we’re ready to have
this debate engaged.”
In the past week, Clinton has shifted course
in apparent response to
Sanders’ strong poll results. She has stepped up
her criticism of her rival,
a self-described democratic socialist, after
carefully avoiding that
during the campaign.

The new approach carries risks. Sanders is popular with liberals who
are part of the coalition
that Clinton will need to
win the White House.
Clinton and her supporters still remember
her disappointing thirdplace finish in Iowa in
2008 against Obama.
Clinton’s team has retooled her schedule to
add stops in Iowa in the
week ahead. The candidate has made near-daily
television appearances
where she has challenged Sanders’ stances
on health care and gun
control.
Clinton and Sanders were each booked
on four morning news
shows today.
Her campaign said
Saturday it was sending out top party representatives, including
the mayor of Atlanta
and the former mayor
of Philadelphia, to campaign for her in Iowa.
Former President Bill
Clinton has been out
making her case in early
voting states, and daughter Chelsea Clinton has
offered critical words
about Sanders, leading
to a back-and-forth over
his health care plan.
“They’re very afraid
of a repeat in 2008 and
they’re getting very aggressive,” said Sanders
campaign manager Jeff
Weaver. “I expect at any
moment now they’ll go
hard negative on us and
we’re prepared for that.
But we won’t be negative
on them.”

Gun control
Clinton has tried to
dismiss Sanders’ proposals as unrealistic and
disingenuous. She points
to his 2005 vote for legislation giving gun manufactures immunity from
lawsuits as a sign that
the senator wouldn’t

Thursday:

Home &
Garden

Tips & trends for every home

In an antiestablishment
time, you’re
essentially
branding
yourself as the
establishment
candidate.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Above, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Ames, Iowa, in this
photo taken Jan. 12. Below, Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders,
I-Vt, speaks in Hanover, N.H., in this Jan. 14 photo. There was a time when Democrats
fretted about Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign becoming a coronation, leaving
her without the tests of a primary season to prepare for a general election matchup
against the Republican nominee. In the past two weeks, the race for the Democratic
Party’s 2016 presidential nomination has evolved from relatively civil disagreement
over policy into a contentious winter competition between Clinton and Sanders.

—David Axelrod, Obama
campaign strategist on
Hillary Clinton

fight forcefully enough
against powerful interest groups.
Today’s debate is in
the city where a 21-yearold white man shot and
killed nine people attending a prayer service
at an African-American
church last summer. The
setting may give Clinton a chance to confront
Sanders on his past votes
related to gun control.
But in a campaign
that has seen billionaire
Donald Trump rise to
the top of the Republican presidential field by
capitalizing on an electorate angry with the
political establishment,
Clinton may once again
be embracing the mantle
of experience at a time
when outsider status is
in vogue.
“What she’s trying to
do is cast Bernie as, I
don’t want to say a protest candidate, but as
a message candidate
against someone who is
grounded in the reality
of governance,” said former Obama campaign

strategist David Axelrod.
“The danger is that you
also make yourself an
exponent of governance
the way people see it today.
“In an anti-establishment time,” Axelrod
said, “you’re essentially
branding yourself as the
establishment
candidate.”
The campaign could
take a much tougher
turn in the weeks ahead.

Clinton’s campaign
complained this past
week when Sanders

NOW thru Tuesday January 19

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aired an ad that suggested Clinton wouldn’t
be tough enough on
Wall Street. That could
clear the way for Clinton’s team to retaliate
with its own critical advertising.
After Iowa and New
Hampshire, the calendar seemingly swings in
Clinton’s favor. She has
an edge in Nevada, the
first caucus state with
a significant segment
of Latino voters, and in
South Carolina, where
black voters make up
more than half of the
electorate.
From there, the campaign will play out in a
series of Southern states

holding contests on the
March 1 “Super Tuesday” primaries, where
African-American voters
are pivotal.
The question for Sanders is whether he can
expand his support beyond the white voters
who dominate the first
two contests in Iowa and
New Hampshire.
“If — and it’s a very
big if — Bernie Sanders
wins both Iowa and New
Hampshire, there will be
a lot of heartburn. There
will be a lot of handwringing,” Mellman said.
“But for him to win the
nomination over the
long term, he’s got to get
beyond that base.”

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and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley.
n Broadcast: NBC stations, NBCNews.com and
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n Moderators: NBC Nightly News anchor Lester
Holt will be main moderator during the debate
while Andrea Mitchell will also ask some questions.

Nutrient Rich
Fresh 

Our Own

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n When: Tonight, 9 p.m.
n Where: Charleston, S.C.
n Who: Hillary Clinton, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt,

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FROM PAGE A1

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Homicide: Suspect on lam
Continued from A1

ney Craig Stedman reported in a press release.
“He is presumed dangerous, so anyone who
sees him or knows of his
whereabouts, call police
immediately at 6842120,” the release said.
“Do not try to confront
or apprehend him.”
Police were dispatched
to 322 S. 2nd St. at about
11:35 p.m. for a reported
domestic incident in
progress, Stedman said.
Allison Oberdorff told police her husband needed
help in an upstairs master
bedroom. Police found
Michael Oberdorff Sr. on
the floor of that bedroom
with an apparent stab
wound to his chest.
Oberdorff told an officer, “Help me! Help me!
I’m dying. Ronald stabbed
me,” according to Stedman. Oberdorff died a
short time later at Lancaster General Hospital.
Allison Oberdorff told
police “Ronald” was

Iran
Continued from A1

negotiated separately,
but Secretary of State
John Kerry had made
it clear in recent weeks
that he was engaged in
behind-the-scenes talks
on the fate of the Americans, and clearly wanted
the issue cleared up before the nuclear agreement went into effect.
In a statement, the director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Yukiya Amano,
said that “agency inspectors on the ground verified that Iran has carried
out all measures required
under the JCPOA, to enable implementation day
to occur,” using the abbreviation for the accord,
the Joint Comprehensive
Plan of Action.

Lifting sanctions
In recent weeks, Iran
has shipped 98 percent
of its nuclear fuel out of
the country, destroyed
the innards of a major
plutonium-producing
reactor and mothballed
more than 12,000 of the
centrifuges that enrich
uranium.
For President Barack
Obama, the lifting of the
sanctions — a step attacked by Republicans
in Congress, who voted
unanimously against the
nuclear deal — is a major
step in ending more than
three decades of hostility between the two
countries. In the waning
months of his presidency, it fulfills a promise
Obama made to reverse
course in the countries’
relations, and will clearly
be one of the defining elements of his legacy.
Iran’s actions, he has
argued, will assure the

Ronald Sheetz, a former boyfriend, and that
she had seen Sheetz in a
physical altercation with
her husband, Stedman
said.
Columbia police Officer Edgar Mann filed
charges, which were
approved by Lancaster
County Assistant District Attorney Christopher Lechner.
County Coroner Dr.
Stephen
Diamantoni
said an autopsy is scheduled for Monday.
Efforts to reach a representative of the Oberdorff family were not immediately successful.

No steady job
Sheetz was living a
half block away from the
Oberdorffs at 226 Lawrence St., with seven other people. Several of his
roommates on Saturday
said they were shocked
by the incident because
they didn’t think he was

United States at least
a year’s notice if Iran
races to build a bomb,
and it ends peacefully a
confrontation that led
to some of the most severe economic sanctions
ever, sabotage of Iran’s
facilities by a U.S.-Israeli
cyberoperation and periodic threats of military action if Iran failed
to relent. His critics in
Congress claim that the
effort is dangerously naïve, and that Iran will use
the roughly $100 billion
in frozen assets it will
receive to support terrorism and other misadventures and, after a few
years, when attention
has turned elsewhere,
will return to surreptitiously building a nuclear weapon.

‘Closed down’
Speaking to reporters
late Saturday night at
the IAEA’s headquarters
overlooking the Danube,
Kerry said that he had
now achieved his goal:
rolling back Iran’s facilities so far that the United States would have at
least a year’s notice if
the country were to race
for a bomb. “We would
know it almost immediately and we would have
time to respond appropriately,” he said.
“Each of the pathways
that Iran had to a nuclear weapon have been
verifiably closed down,”
he said. Noting that Iran
has frozen much of its
activity during the negotiations, he responded to
critics of the deal — including, without naming
them, the Republican

violent.
Harold Franklin, 40,
said Sheetz had been in
Huntingdon State Prison for years, but got out
last year and had been
trying to turn his life
around ever since.
Sheetz was doing some
remodeling in the house,
including installing new
cabinets, but had been
trying for months to get
a steady job. His criminal record, however,
hampered his chances,
Franklin said. At one
point, he was hired for
a position but was fired
after one day when the
employer discovered his
record.
Sheetz’s roommates
said he loved Allison,
but couldn’t move away
with her like he wanted
because he could not secure a job to raise enough
money.
Court records show
that Sheetz had a series of convictions from
the early 1990s through

presidential candidates
— who say that Iran will
immediately cheat.
“We have now two years
of compliance under our
belt,” he said. “Obviously,
past performance does
not guarantee future results.” But, he said, “we
know without doubt that
there is not a challenge
in the entire region that
wouldn’t become much
more complicated if Iran
had the ability” to produce nuclear weapons.
The completion of the
deal comes at a crucial
time for the Iranian government of President
Hassan Rouhani, who
came to power vowing
to get rid of the crippling
sanctions and faces a
critical
parliamentary
election at the end of
February. Iranian officials raced to dismantle
the facilities quickly —
U.S. intelligence agencies
had estimated it would
take far longer — so that
they could go to the polls
with news that the frozen
assets, mostly from oil
sales, had been released,
and could be used to prop
up an ailing, contracting
economy.
Facing intense criticism at home from military officials who fought
giving up Iran’s nuclear
abilities, Rouhani will
also argue that he succeeded in getting lifted
the restrictions that kept
Iranians from transferring funds with overseas
relatives and trading in
everything from carpets
to crude oil.
He and Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad
Zarif have an uphill battle: hard-liners did not

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2008, including theft,
DUI, criminal trespass,
concealing the whereabouts of a child, procuring or providing weapons or implements for
escape, and escape.

The husband knew
Sheetz played with the
Oberdorff’s sons, Jaydin, 9, and Camrin, 6, and
8-month-old daughter,
Heavin, according to another of Sheetz’s roommates, 23-year-old Tiffany Morrissey. Sheetz
visited them at their house
when Allison’s husband
was away at work and she
frequently brought them
to Sheetz’s home.
Sheetz and Allison
walked the children to
school and sometimes
picked them up together,
Franklin and Morrissey
added.
Michael
Oberdorff
knew for a while Sheetz
and his wife were having
a relationship and he forbade Sheetz from ever entering his home, Franklin
said. The rivals “antago-

want to reach any deal at
all. Many were making
a fortune from the sanctions, and others viewed
the ability to build a nuclear weapon, even if they
did not yet possess one, as
critical to standing up to
Israel and Saudi Arabia,
both avowed enemies.
So for the United
States, and for Obama,
the arrival of “implementation day,” as it was
called in the nuclear accord, represents a huge
roll of the dice.
The president and
Kerry, with a little over
a year left in office, are
hoping to foster a new
dialogue that will bear
fruit in other areas, from
ending the war in Syria
to moving, slowly, to the
eventual restoration of
diplomatic relations.

nized” each other in texts
but didn’t physically fight.
A few months ago, Sheetz
told Franklin he “wanted
to beat the (expletive) out
of” Michael Oberdorff
but didn’t want to be sent
back to jail.
It is unclear when the
relationship between Allison and Sheetz ended.

Friday night
Morrissey said she saw
Sheetz talking on the
phone to Allison around
8:30 or 9 p.m. Friday and
said Allison must have
been agitated.
“He was saying, ‘What’s
wrong?’ and ‘Where you
at?’ and asked if she was
walking or in a car,” Morrissey said. “Then he came
down, slammed the door
behind him and leaves.”
That’s the last time his
housemates saw him.
“It’s a shock, it really is,”
Morrissey said of the tragedy. “He always seemed
like a nonviolent person.” She said he helped
her carry groceries and
chipped in to assist neigh-

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Sheetz is on
the run

Franklin said he hopes
Sheetz surrenders to
police to avoid being injured, but fears he may
not do so because he
does not want to return
to prison. Morrissey said
Sheetz told her a few
months ago he should
run away to Kentucky,
Tennessee or Florida
and never return.
Investigators, including Columbia police and
Lancaster County detectives, are pursuing him,
Stedman said.
Brett Hambright, a
spokesman for Stedman,
said the Oberdorffs’ children are in the care of
their mother and other
family members.

 ATCH
W
THE VIDEO

Harold Franklin talks about
homicide suspect Ronald
Sheetz at bit.ly/1Q6iMPJ

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry talks with Iranian Foreign
Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, right, after the International Atomic Energy Agency verified that Iran has met all
conditions under the nuclear deal, in Vienna, Saturday.

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A5

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A6

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

The fallout of urban renewal

South Duke Street once was the black community’s “Main Street.” But urban renewal in the 1960s transformed
whole blocks of that vibrant hub into public housing and suburban-style institutional buildings. Since
1993, SACA has worked to rebalance the Southeast by building and rehabbing scores of homes for sale.

n
pe
ip
Sh

New North Street homes built for sale by SACA.
S.

.
St

E.

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Buildings demolished
in Southeast
Lancaster during
1960s-70s urban
renewal.

Low-rent apartments
built with public funds
in Southeast Lancaster
during 1960s-70s
urban renewal.

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Ch

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HDC MidAtlantic, Multifamily Management of Philadelphia,
and Preservation Management

976 831

Phoenix
Academy

Susquehanna St.

Woodward Hill
Cemetery

n Built by the government during 1960s-70s urban renewal.
n Occupy blocks where traditional homes were demolished.
n Apartments managed by Lancaster City Housing Authority,

Juniata St.

ke
Du
S.

S. Queen St.

Consequences
of Urban
Renewal
NEW/REHABILITATED UNIT
FOR 1ST-TIME HOMEOWNER
URBAN RENEWAL AREA
URBAN RENEWAL HOUSING

Subsidized apartments in the Hillrise complex, off Rockland Street.

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grants.
n Sold to households earning less than 80 percent of Lancaster
County’s median income.
n Selling price of $99,600.
n Four clusters in Southeast: Palm Street (16 homes), Plum
and East End (11 homes), North and Locust (13 homes),
Chesapeake Street (12 homes.)
n Received award for good urban design.

LOW-INCOME PUBLIC
HOUSING FOR RENT

n
ee
Gr

St.

S. Ann St.

E. Farnum St.

n Construction subsidized by government and foundation

Green

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E. Vine St.

S. Plum St.

E. Mifflin St.

S.

Lancaster
County
Convention
Center

S. Lime St.

NEW HOMES FOR
FIRST-TIME BUYERS

nest

oga

Lancaster County
Central Park

Rive

r

358 144
Lancaster landlords
and homeowners
who refused to rent
or sell to blacks in
1964-65.

Homes built or rehabbed
in Southeast Lancaster
and sold by Spanish American
Civic Association to first-time
homebuyers since 1993.

Erased: The failure of urban renewal in the Southeast
Continued from A1

a general practitioner, a soda fountain
and Haddie’s sub shop.
Neighborhood pride was never greater than when bands and drill teams
strutted down South Duke Street during the Conestoga Elks parade. Hundreds lined the sidewalks, many in
their Sunday best.
It was a hard-working community
that wanted better jobs and greater
opportunity. Instead it got change it
hadn’t sought: Demolition crews in
the 1960s razed whole blocks of the
Southeast — places where people with
a range of incomes lived — to make way
for public housing for thousands of
Lancaster’s poorest residents.
The government called the initiatives of the 1960s “urban renewal.”
But the Southeast experienced nothing of the sort. Instead, poverty only
deepened, and neighborhood cohesiveness collapsed. The impact reverberates today.
“I felt like we lost a community,” said
Hurdle, 74, of Lampeter, who grew up
in a Locust Street row home knocked
down during urban renewal. “I feel like
we were just erased.”
In later decades, the government
poured in millions — an LNP estimate
is $51.2 million since 1990 — to try to
rectify the growing concentration of
poverty, but the investment has yet to
reverse the slide.
“We haven’t really had the resources
to move the needle,” says Carlos Graupera, who, as the long-time director
of the Spanish American Civic Association, has persevered in trying to
rebuild the Southeast, something, he
says, that’s “not been the community’s
priority.”
Now, however, that may be changing.
A special, 12-member mayoral commission is tasked with studying poverty in Lancaster and releasing a major
report and plan of action by the end of
the year.
As the commission gets to work, it
will confront the stubborn geographical reality of the Southeast: it’s the
place Lancaster County’s leaders almost six decades ago chose to put the
urban poor. That decision led to the
city at large, and not just the Southeast,
ultimately becoming home to growing

concentrations of poor people.
Lancaster’s poverty problem today is rooted in deliberate racial and
class segregation, an understanding
of which may be instructive as the city
considers a path forward.

Lancaster’s burden
While each impoverished household
has its own circumstances that sabotage self-sufficiency, experts say living
in an environment where almost everyone else earns too little to support
themselves makes poverty doubly burdensome.
Those neighborhoods have more
crime and dispiriting blight; they have
less access to good schools and jobs,
the nonprofit National Housing Conference says. Dysfunction is no longer
the exception, but the norm. Poverty
becomes embedded in the culture of
the place.
The U.S. Census Bureau specifically
defines concentrated poverty as places where more than 40 percent of the
families are living below the federal
poverty line, currently $24,250 for a
family of four.
Three of the city’s 14 census tracts
exceed the 40-percent threshold, and
two of those three are in the Southeast.
Not a single Lancaster County census
tract outside the city comes close to
40-percent poverty. (A tract in struggling Columbia borough tops out at 24
percent.)
Particularly worrisome for the
Southeast is the stickiness of concentrated poverty. The United States had
1,110 high-poverty urban neighborhoods in 1970. Forty years later, only
100 of those neighborhoods saw poverty decline.
But over the same period, the number of high-poverty neighborhoods
nearly tripled to 3,100. The data is in
a report by CityObservatory, a Knight
Foundation-supported think tank.
The Southeast’s story, then, is a microcosm of the larger, national narrative of segregation, suburbanization,
de-industrialization and institutional
racism.
It’s a story that goes back more than
100 years to when Lancaster relegated
almost all black people, both the poor

OCTOBER 28, 1970
The lead story in the Intelligencer Journal reported on the massive protest against proposed public housing in the 800 block of Fremont Street.

The Southeast’s story, then, is a microcosm of
the larger, national narrative of segregation,
suburbanization, de-industrialization and
institutional racism.
and the middle class, to housing along
the streets of the Southeast, a grid oddly askew to Lancaster’s downtown.
It shouldn’t be forgotten, however,
that the Southeast before urban renewal was also home to Italian, Greek
and European Jewish immigrants trying to get a foothold in the American
economy.

“Nice” neighborhood
The diversity of incomes and races
made for “a nice neighborhood,” says
Richard Simms, 80, a retired city police
officer and district judge who, while
living on North Street as a boy in the
1940s, worked in a Jewish-owned corner grocery.
Observant Jews would ask Simms
into their South Duke Street homes
on the Sabbath to turn the lights and
stoves on and off.
“They’d hug and kiss me,” recalls
Simms, who is black. “They were just
nice people.”

But in the late 1950s, Lancaster’s
civic leaders, residents of almost exclusively white neighborhoods, associated
the Southeast not with nice people in
nice houses, but with junkyards and
pockets of blight. Prodded by federal
policies playing out in cities across the
country, they chose wide-scale demolition and big housing projects as the
remedy.
By one count, 976 buildings, almost all of them homes and many
of them habitable and salvageable,
came down in the ‘60s and early ‘70s,
making way for clusters of subsidized
projects of bland low-rise and highrise housing that define much of the
Southeast today: Franklin Terrace,
Susquehanna Court, Hillrise, Duke
Manor, Church Street Towers and
Farnum Street East.
Urban renewal did, in fact, give some
of the poor decent, affordable apartments. But the projects corralled the
poorest of the poor into an area re-

ERASED, page A7

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

A7

Vision of new Southeast is in jeopardy

Despite millions in investment, plans to lift neighborhoods out of poverty face uncertain future
JEFF HAWKES

JHAWKES@LNPNEWS.COM

Rather than sleep at his
apartment after closing
on his first home, Rafael
Garcia, then 42, lay on
the floor of his unfurnished house with just a
blanket and pillow.
As moonlight bathed
the master bedroom in a
bluish glow, Garcia marveled at owning the new
$99,600 row house.
It was a 2 1/2-story,
three-bedroom,
twobath home with central
air, a front porch and
brick facade, part of a
13-home development
in Lancaster’s impoverished Southeast the nonprofit Spanish American
Civic Association built,
in part, with $1 million in
government grants.
“I didn’t move in for
another month, but it
was mine,” said Garcia, a
cat-loving bachelor and

group home supervisor
who cares for his disabled mother. “I had to
claim it.”
It took two-by-fours and
hammers to build the 13
homes on North and Locust streets, which were
available to first-time
buyers who earn less than
$45,186, or 80 percent of
Lancaster County’s median income.
But it also took vision.
For more than a decade, SACA and city
leaders identified homeownership as a tool for
transforming the lowrent Southeast into a
place where lower-wage
workers could obtain a
mortgage and start to
build wealth.
Three years after Garcia bought his home, the
Zillow real estate website estimates its value at
$147,000.
Multiply Garcia’s ex-

Erased
Continued from A6

moved from good-paying industrial
jobs in the suburbs while displacing
many minorities who either didn’t
qualify for public housing or lingered
on waiting lists.
The federal government, in fact, required Lancaster to find alternative
housing for the hundreds of people
displaced by demolition. But housing
discrimination succeeded in thwarting
the mandate.
If you were a displaced white person,
officials did have success finding you a
place to live in Lancaster’s white neighborhoods. But officials had little success in finding housing outside of the
Southeast for blacks, a development
that only intensified the city’s black/
white divide and assured impoverished
families remained in and around the
Southeast.

Blatant discrimination
Concerned about the plight of displaced black Lancastrians, members
of Lancaster’s Friends Meeting tried
to hold the city accountable by documenting housing discrimination.
Starting in March 1964, a Friends
committee systematically called city
landlords and real estate agents whenever an apartment or home became
available and asked if they would rent
or sell to a minority.
“Most people told us an abrupt ‘No,’
and hung up,” recalled Bob Neuhauser,
88, of East Lampeter Township, who
served on the committee.
If a black person seeking housing
went to see a landlord or a home owner, he or she was often informed the
place was already rented or sold. The
committee proved that kind of discrimination was happening by sending
a committee member to confirm that
an apartment was available before the
black housing seeker showed up, only
to be turned away.
Of the committee’s 409 contacts with
Lancaster landlords and home sellers,
only 51 — or one in eight — were open
to minority housing seekers, Neuhauser said in a 2007 paper recounting the
committee’s work.
After the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibited discrimination in public housing, the Lancaster Housing Authority
could no longer shirk responsibility for
relocating blacks to other parts of the
city.
But the authority’s proposal to build
so-called “scattered housing” at sites
around the city met with stiff resistance.
White city residents formed pressure
groups that succeeded in getting city
council and the zoning board of appeals
to block scattered-site projects.
In October 1970, 500 marched to a
city council meeting to oppose a plan
for 26 two-story, brick homes in the
800 block of Fremont Street in Lancaster’s Southwest.
“It has been proven ... that property
values decrease whenever public project housing has been planted,” a citizens’ group leader told council members. “There is also an element of crime
that follows public project housing
wherever it goes.” Another opponent
called the plan “the assassination of a
neighborhood ... the assassination of
beautiful Lancaster city.”
The foot-dragging by Lancaster leaders worked. By 1974, President Richard
Nixon halted public housing subsidies.
Federal money for scattered-site projects in Lancaster evaporated as the

perience by 144 — the
number of homes SACA
has rehabbed or built
for sale in the Southeast
since 1993 — and a vision of a rising, mixedincome neighborhood
suddenly doesn’t seem
far-fetched.
But that potential
game-changer may now
be endangered by what
appears to be the government’s declining commitment to rebuilding disadvantaged communities
through home construction. Fewer public dollars is a complication the
mayor’s Commission to
Combat Poverty will have
to consider as it proposes
an anti-poverty plan for
Lancaster by the end of
the year.
The Southeast remains
a largely minority neighborhood of increasing
poverty, the unfortunate
legacy of decisions 50

demand for affordable, decent housing
continued to grow.
Franklin & Marshall College professor David Schuyler in his 2002 book,
“A City Transformed,” documented
Lancaster’s urban-renewal years and
its failure to improve the plight of the
poor. His book is a major source for this
report.
Schuyler’s research documented how
it was no accident Southeast Lancaster
became synonymous with poverty.
Racism reinforced by local government housing policies all but guaranteed it.
Once embedded in the Southeast,
concentrated poverty bled into adjoining neighborhoods. Homeowners who
were worried about declining property values sold to landlords, some of
whom carved houses into multi-unit
apartments and skimped on upkeep.
As property values fell, city and school
taxes shot up to compensate for declining revenue, making homeownership
in the city more problematic.

years ago to concentrate
public housing there.

Multiple
strategies
Promoting homeownership as a counterbalance to public housing
was only one strategy for
remaking the Southeast
after the setback of 1960s
urban renewal. Other efforts include workforce
training, business loans
and infrastructure improvements.
Millions of dollars of
public and philanthropic
investment have been
pumped into the Southeast to try to achieve a
turnaround that remains
elusive.
LNP attempted to
quantify the investments made over the last
25 years. Our conservative estimate: $51.2 million. (The amount isn’t

adjusted for inflation because some records LNP
acquired did not show
spending by the year.)
Here’s the breakdown:
— SACA spent $31.6 million on housing, commercial and educational infrastructure (including the
$3.5-million Tec Centro
bilingual vocational training center, which opened
two years ago).
— The Community First
Fund made 125 business,
commercial real estate
and housing loans totaling $12.3 million.
— Tabor Community Services targeted
two blocks of East King
Street with $3.4 million
in upgrades.
— The Inner City
Group used at least $1.3
million for improvements along South Duke
Street.
—The short-lived Bright
Side Development and

Land Trust built eight
subsidized homes for sale
on Locust Street.
— And the city in the
past decade funneled
$2.6 million for other
improvements
across
the Southeast.

Limited success

But what has that investment achieved? For
some individuals and
businesses, the investment has created opportunity.
Out of work after 14
years in the bindery department at RR Donnelley, Ivette Marcano,
51, of South Reservoir
Street, trained as a certified nursing assistant at
SACA’s Tec Centro and
found rewarding work
almost immediately.
“You go there, they will
definitely find a job for

VISION, page A8

Urban renewal did, in fact, give some of the poor
decent, affordable apartments. But the projects
corralled the poorest of the poor into an area removed
from good-paying industrial jobs in the suburbs while
displacing many minorities who either didn’t qualify
for public housing or lingered on waiting lists.

Dysfunction took root
Meanwhile, in the Southeast, the
reshaped landscape created a psychic disruption to vulnerable families who, already disadvantaged by
discrimination in housing and employment outside of the Southeast,
lost not only their homes but also
the benefits of living in a functional
neighborhood.
Those benefits are quantifiable, according to the National Housing Conference. It says research shows that
communities are more prosperous
when they reduce economic segregation and “make it possible for more
types of people to live in neighborhoods with good schools and better access to jobs.”
Lancaster County has fallen short of
that ideal. Today, local experts report
a dire shortage of workforce apartments in Lancaster’s suburbs close to
jobs and to the schools with the highest
test scores and graduation rates, giving
low-wage earners little choice but to
seek housing in the city.
The legacy of urban renewal in the
Southeast is one of replacing an older ghetto with a new one, but one,
Schuyler wrote, “without the fabric
of community, the network of institutions and patterns of human interaction that had characterized the
Southeast in the decades preceding
urban renewal.”
Gerald Wilson, 62, laments the loss
of community in the Southeast he experienced as a black boy growing up
on an integrated block of Woodward
Street.
“The neighborhood was self-sufficient,” he said. “There were people that
helped you. It was well known, for example, that you needed to know somebody to get into Armstrong,” a flooring
manufacturer and major Lancaster
employer.
“When they tore down those South
Duke Street houses, those were significant, attractive houses,” said Wilson, a
retired city police officer and educator.
“They displaced a lot of people. They
didn’t come along with the replacement housing until much later.”
One can only speculate what the
Southeast would be like if urban renewal had never happened. The neighborhood no doubt would have, like
much of Lancaster, experienced the
decades-long drip-drip-drip of white
flight and decline.
But the unique legacy of urban renewal makes the Southeast a special

KEITH SCHWEIGERT | STAFF

Senior public housing, upper left, and general public housing, foreground, reshaped the
landscape of Lancaster’s Southeast.

RICHARD HERTZLER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Unlike the front-page photo, this image shows the east side of South Duke Street today,
a suburban-style plaza in stark contrast to the historic architecture demolished during
urban renewal.

SUZETTE WENGER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Betty Hurdle grew up in a Locust Street home demolished during urban renewal.

case. The fracturing of the community
and the concentration of public housing there vastly complicates any plan
today that seeks to restore that neighborhood to some semblance of wholeness.
Decades ago, outsiders chose to double down on marginalizing the South-

east, and ever since it has suffered
from, and been stigmatized by, the social maladies associated with ghettos:
unemployment, low-educational attainment, crime.
“This is what happens when the people have no voice,” Wilson said. “The
results were nothing less than tragic.”

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Vision: Uncertain future

Business
development

Percent of
homes in
poverty

Ha
rri
sb
ur
g

41-50%
31-40%
21-30%
Below
20%

Walnut St.

Av
e.

King St.

Lancaster
City
.
St

t.
hS
ep
s
Jo

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$15 million, to $21.2 million. But the budget the
Legislature passed, and
that Wolf vetoed, provided only $6.35 million.
As of this writing, state
housing funds remain in
limbo.
Patterson, who oversees
distribution of federal and
state money Lancaster
receives for neighborhood development, said
the prospect of less government investment for
workforce housing means
“fewer projects will get
done, if at all.”
In particular, the days
of building clusters of
affordable homes for
sale in the Southeast —
SACA projects include
11 homes at South Plum
and East End Avenue,
16 on Palm Street, 12 on
Chesapeake Street, 13 at
North and Locust — are
now threatened.
“There is no financial model that works
to develop housing that
is affordable ... without
providing
subsidies,”
Patterson said.
Rather than subsidize
construction of six to 12
homes, the city may de-

Vine St.

.
ve
dA
n
lla
Ho

ke
Du

But as the seeds of the
Southeast’s restoration
are being planted, Lancaster has reason to be
concerned that declining government funding
could stall progress.
Since 2009, for example, the annual federal
funding the city receives
to distribute to nonprofits for housing stock has
fallen by more than a
third, to $431,000.
Meanwhile, the state
grants Lancaster has
received for new and
rehabbed housing have
been in free fall: from
$741,500 in 2008, to
$300,000 in 2011 to zero
in 2015. Gov. Tom Wolf in
March proposed to boost
neighborhood development funds statewide by

Southeast Lancaster home to
county’s most concentrated poverty.

Ann St.

RICHARD HERTZLER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Rafael Garcia, former renter, stands outside the North
Street home he bought in 2013.

Shrinking funds

LANCASTER’S
POVERTY POCKET

e.
Av

Jane Pugliese, who was
executive director of Inner City Group from
1997 to 2006, said the organization’s investments
to make South Duke
Street safer and more
pedestrian friendly and
to enhance the facades
of homes and businesses
along South Duke were,
in and of themselves,
not intended to reduce
poverty, but to prime the
pump for private investment by homeowners
and businesses.
The opening of Belco
Community Credit Union
on South Duke in 2008
was one success. Fulton
Bank’s continuing commitment to its South
Duke branch is another.
“It’s a profitable venture
for us,” said Smokey Glover, a Fulton senior vice
president. “We’ve seen a
slow, but steady increase
in credit portfolios at that
branch.”
Even more important

will be the opening of
Conestoga River Plaza,
transforming a 5.9-acre
brownfield in the 900
block of South Duke
Street into a commercial
hub, including Brothers
Grocery, General Dollar,
a Chinese restaurant and
several shops.
And, as Garcia’s story
illustrates, government
subsidy of home construction has helped
scores of working-class
families own attractive,
well constructed townhouses. The investment
builds equity for lowerwage workers and stabilizes entire blocks with
wage earners and property taxpayers who have
a stake in their neighborhood and in their children’s schools.
“The healthiest neighborhoods are those that
are economically integrated,” Pugliese said.
“The city strategy needs
to be to attract middleincome people back to
the city.”

iew
irv
Fa

you,” Marcano said of Tec
Centro. “I always tell (job
hunters), go to Tec Centro. They will help you.”
But individual success
stories have not added
up to poverty reduction.
At least not yet.
A report by Franklin
& Marshall College researchers last year suggests the Southeast is
becoming an ever more
distressed neighborhood.
The report documents
falling incomes across
the Southeast and the
share of residents living
in poverty in most of the
quadrant exceeding 40
percent for the first time.
Daniel
Betancourt,
president and CEO of
nonprofit
Community
First Fund, a local lender
to low-wealth community
projects and entrepreneurs, points out parts
of Lancaster now have
“higher poverty levels
than Detroit and Philadelphia.”
City official Randy Patterson’s view is the investments of recent decades weren’t “bad,” but
insufficient to reverse
the damage of urban renewal.
“The public policy of
clearing out and creating these large swaths of
publicly assisted hous-

ing, as opposed to the
housing we have in the
rest of the city, that was
bad investment,” said
Patterson, the city’s director of economic development and neighborhood revitalization.

Lime St.

Continued from A7

Queen St.

A8

cide to use the declining
funds to help people buy
existing houses, Patterson said.
“While our preference
would be to add to the
inventory of housing
available through new
construction,” he said,
“the level of financial
incentives available may
simply make that choice
impossible from a costbenefit analysis.”

commission — on which
he and another SACA
manager sit — and to private-sector and philanthropic commitments.
The Southeast will
need new commitments,
energy and local dollars,
especially local dollars, if
state and federal funding
continues to recede.
“You don’t give up.
You don’t roll back your
agenda because the other guy won’t help you,”
Graupera said. “You
have to find out who
will.”
SACA’s refusal to quit on
the Southeast is why Garcia, of North Street, is now
starting his fourth year
as a homeowner. Garcia
remains elated, having
festively displayed his
pride over the holidays by
decorating his porch with
wreaths, garland and beribboned baskets.
While he would welcome a stronger police
presence in his area and
better code enforcement
across the Southeast,
Garcia thinks the neighborhood is getting better.
Garcia says his positive
outlook also extends to
himself. Homeownership gave Garcia a confidence that he lacked
when he was a renter in
his ability to accomplish
more in life.
“Owning a house,” he
said, “made me more
accountable. It became
more important for me
to make more money. It
became more important
for me to push a little
further.”

No giving up
Carlos
Graupera,
SACA’s long-time director, is concerned about
the growing headwinds
to progress, although
he is no stranger to the
slog of community development. He has tried
for decades to convince
Lancaster’s leaders to invest in the Southeast, not
always with success.
“They didn’t know how
committed we were,
and they didn’t think
anything could happen
here,” Graupera said.
SACA’s website continues to express a degree
of skepticism, noting
Lancaster’s poverty crisis gets lost in the excitement about Lancaster’s
burgeoning downtown.
It calls on policy makers
and community leaders to “replace feel-good
Band-Aids” with solution-focused, povertyfighting investments.
Graupera,
however,
said he’s encouraged old
attitudes are changing.
He points to the mayor’s 12-member poverty

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

A9

URBAN RENEWAL

City southwest sees promise of progress
Revitalization plan seeks funding to tackle poverty, housing and crime
DAN NEPHIN

DNEPHIN@LNPNEWS.COM

When Dick Hecker
learned last summer that
his Cabbage Hill neighborhood would be the focus of revitalization plans,
he was skeptical.
At 66, the retired Armstrong World Industries
employee had heard of
plans before.
Nothing much came of
them.
Meanwhile, problems
facing the city’s southwest
community continued:
Significant poverty, high
crime and a high proportion of renters — nearly
75 percent of its residents
rent, according to Lancaster Housing Opportunity Partnership.
So Hecker got involved
in the latest revitalization effort, helped by a
$100,000 grant the Wells
Fargo Regional Foundation awarded the housing partnership to develop a community-driven
plan.
The plan is intended to
address housing, safety,
economic development
and related concerns.
Come June, when the
plan is put together, the
partnership will submit
it to Wells Fargo in hopes
of securing between
$750,000 and $1.5 million
to implement it, James
Shultz, the partnership’s
program development director, said Wednesday.
“That’s a very significant
play ... that neighborhood
has seen very little money
coming in in the past 30 to
40 years,” he said.
One reason Hecker decided to volunteer was to
get information.
And as a homeowner
who raised two sons with
his wife, GeorgAnn, on
West Vine Street, “I just
would like to see ... the
neighborhood
return
to the stature of days of
yore.”
It’s embarrassing, he
said, for homeowners
who take care of their
properties to live next
to run-down and vacant
homes.
Hecker said he could afford to live elsewhere, but
doesn’t want to. He went
to school through eighth
grade at St. Joseph’s and
goes to church there. The
neighborhood is close to
downtown and is convenient to major roads.
He’d like to see more
homeownership
and
less crime. And halfway
into the planning process, Hecker said he’s
convinced the various
partners involved, led by
the housing partnership,
mean business.
“They
represented
more than I thought they
would. They are very involved. They’re more than
just words,” Hecker said
Thursday.

A newer view
Emerson Sampaio is a
newer face in the community.
He and his wife, Nora,
bought a house from the
housing partnership in
the first block of West
Strawberry in December
2014. They now have a
10-month-old son, Arlo.

Sampaio, 27, and his
family moved to the United States in 1992, when
he was 4 years old. Their
country, Angola, was in
the midst of a civil war.
He decided to move
from New York City to
Lancaster in January
2013 after reading that
the city ranked high for
happiness and well-being
in national polls. He also
had relatives in the area.
After living near Franklin & Marshall College,
Sampaio and his wife
wanted to be closer to
downtown.
“I wanted to be within
walking distance to restaurants and transportation,” he said. “We could
see ourselves growing
with the neighborhood.”
And you could say the
Sampaios moved to the
southwest because of —
not in spite of — its troubles.
“I grew up with the
model that you want to
improve a place, and you
can’t do that when you
move somewhere that the
conditions are rather perfect on a relative scale,” he
said.
Sampaio is the administrative coordinator/event
planner for the Mayor’s
Commission to Combat
Poverty.
Mayor Rick Gray announced last August he
was putting together the
commission to study poverty and propose solutions.
“We have a lot to look
forward to, especially
with the Mayor’s Commission to Combat Poverty,” Sampaio said of the
work being done in the
city’s southwest.
Sampaio is on a steering committee and task
forces looking at education and job training and
public spaces for the plan
being developed for the
southwest.
Since the formal announcement of the grant
last June 29, those involved have been following a protocol established
by Wells Fargo to begin
laying the groundwork,
Shultz said.
A big piece has been
gathering data .
Students with Millersville University’s department of sociology interviewed 292 residents
using a 47-question survey.
The survey sought information such as how
residents felt about the
neighborhood, closeness
of schools and quality of
social services.
And a consulting group
completed a survey of
7,500 properties, including 2,200 single-family
homes. The consultants
also interviewed about 40
residents and people with
neighborhood
groups,
as well as representatives with outside organizations, including Millersville University and
Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster General
Health and the Lancaster
Chamber of Commerce
and Industry.
The information was
used to identify seven
themes, which people assigned to task forces will

examine over the next
couple months and make
recommendations on.
The themes include
housing, education and
job training, job opportunities and community
safety.

Hecker is on the housing and community safety
task forces.
Shultz said he’s optimistic at the partnership’s
chances at winning funding. But if it doesn’t win, it
can reapply next year.

BLAINE T. SHAHAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Dick Hecker stands along the 400 block of West Vine Street. 

 


NOW
THROUGH
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A10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Farm show: Final competitions and last milkshakes
Continued from A3

with a laugh.
Instead, he was making
sure the booth wouldn’t
run out of milkshakes
before Saturday’s close.
“I was sweating a little bit (Friday) night,”
he said, noting that the
booth had run out of
printed cups and that
supplies ran low Friday
night.
Saturday, people stood
in long lines to sample
the three milkshake
flavors — chocolate, vanilla and this year’s new
flavor, strawberries and
cream.

Tons of potatoes
Nearby, Rahn Troutman was trying to keep
up with the rapid sales
of baked potatoes, sweet
potatoes, French fries
and potato donuts.
By the time the Farm
Show closed Saturday at
5 p.m., Troutman estimated they had sold 12
tons of baked and sweet
potatoes, another 12
tons of French fries and
24,000 dozen potato donuts.
Troutman, of Dornsife,
is an institution at the
Farm Show. His family
has run the Pennsylvania Co-Operative Potato
Growers booth since
1973.
He was excited when
the 100th Farm Show
began last week. But
he, too, was ready to go
home.
“You’re excited when
it’s over,” he said.
Miranda Hernley, 22,

VINNY TENNIS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PHOTOS

Above: Parker Lengel takes a sip of his milkshake during the final day of the 100th Pennsylvania Farm Show
Saturday. Top right, Joy Schultz pulls and her daughter
Jen Supplee pushes a cart of supplies as granddaughter
Karlie gets to ride. Right, farm-class horse-pulling took
place in the large arena.

of Bethel Township in
Lebanon County, said
her cows were ready to
return home.
“They’re never happy
to be here,” she said, noting that Farm Show week
throws off the cows’ routines.
“They
miss
their
‘friends,’ ” she said.
One thing the cows do
enjoy at the Farm Show,
she said, are the warm

indoor temperatures.

Prize-winning
day
Not everyone was ready
for the 100th edition of
the Farm Show to end.
Saturday was Burnell
Oberholtzer’s
family’s
time to shine. The Oberholtzers, of East Earl,
took top honors in the
All Other Entries sheep

2

1

competition when they
showed both the champion Horned Dorset ram
and ewe.
The
Oberholtzers’
9-year-old
daughter,
Emma, wore a smile most
of the day. Her Cheviot
ewe lamb placed third in
the youth division Friday.
Emma also was named
outstanding young shepherd in her age group.
When asked what
she would do this coming week, she said, “I’ll
take my two plaques to
school.”
Ribbons were dangling
from Jeremiah Snyder’s
pants pocket. Snyder, an
eighth-grader at Manheim Central, took a
fourth and sixth place
in the yearling Shropshire ewe categories and
placed third with his ewe

lamb.
He also showed the
champion ram and
champion and reserve
champion ewe in the
youth division.
“It was a busy week, but
well worth it,” said his
father, Brian, who owns
Weeping Willow Farm in
Manheim.
Three years ago, Jeremiah’s sister, Gwendolyn,
showed the champion
Shropshire ram.

Sidelights:
— Attendance: Because the Farm Show
does not charge an admission fee, there is no
exact attendance count.
Officials instead use a
car count. This year, despite raising the parking

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fee from $10 to $15, the
number of cars parking at the Farm Show
and in satellite lots was
only slightly lower than
in 2015 when the Farm
Show set four daily carcount records.
— What happens to
the butter sculpture?
Will Nichols, press aide
for the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture,
said the sculpture will
be shipped to Reinford
Farm near Port Royal
where it will be placed
in a digestor and used as
biofuel.
— Star Barn sighting:
Replicas of the Star Barn
and its accompanying
structures — the carriage
house, chicken house
and hog barn — were a
point of interest. The
structures are scheduled
to be moved to Ironstone Ranch, outside of
Elizabethtown, in 2017.
Rich Thomas of Elizabethtown, a craftsman
who is helping with the
reconstruction, is working on the second of 10
cupolas, using as much
of the original material
as possible. The former
Belmont Farm Barn that
stood along Fruitville
Pike until last year, also
will be rebuilt at Ironstone Ranch.
— Why Pennsylvania? Magen Moore is a
native of of Eatontown,
Georgia. Saturday, she
was watching over a
10-week-old Holstein in
the Weis Exposition Hall
and answering questions. Moore, a senior at
Delaware Valley University in Doylestown, said
she chose the school because it is one of the few
in the country to offer a
degree in dairy science.
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FROM PAGE A3

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

A11

23

East Earl: Plan to realign Route 897 is scrapped
The project would have
involved taking farmland by eminent domain on the north side
of Route 322. Route 897
would have been rerouted through Nevin Martin’s farm to meet Route
322 directly across from
where Route 897 currently meets Route 322
on the south side.
Supervisor
Justin
Sauder made the motion
to stop the project, and
Groff seconded it, to applause from residents in
the audience. Supervisor
Chairman Earl Kreider
cast the dissenting vote.
“I talked to a lot of
people,” Sauder told
the crowd of about 30
people. “There is a lot of

support for this project
from people who are not
in this room. However,
they don’t think (the
township) should be doing it.”

The issues
Route 897 is a state
road. Residents at past
public meetings repeatedly pointed that out to
supervisors, questioning why the township
was taking the lead on
the project, estimated
to cost $1.5 million in
state, county and township funds.
Residents at those
meetings also asked if
there was a connection
between the realignment and a 235-unit

Shady
Maple
Smorgasbord

897
Realigned
roadway
plan
scrapped

Todd
y Drive

Continued from A3

322

East Earl
500 ft.

897

residential
development with commercial
space proposed by East
Earl LLC just to the
east.
On a sketch plan, East
Earl LLC had shown a
secondary access road
coming off the proposed realigned section

Volunteer: Fire companies
Continued from A3

ville Fire Co., Elizabethtown Fire Department, Rheems Fire Co.,
Maytown/East Donegal
Fire Co., Pioneer Fire
Co., Fire Department
Mount Joy, Manheim
Fire Department, Penryn Fire Department,
Brickerville Fire Co.,
Brunnerville Fire Co.,
Rothsville Fire Co. and
Lititz Fire Co.
Those interested in
volunteering are encouraged to stop by those individual firehouses between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
“It’s a very exciting and
rewarding opportunity,”
said Bill Hall, outgoing
chief for Fire Department Mount Joy.
It’s not just traditional firefighters who are

It’s a very
exciting and
rewarding
opportunity.
—­Bill Hall, Fire
Department Mount Joy

needed. Local departments are seeking junior
firefighters, fire police,
technology professionals, event planners and
volunteers to step into
support roles.

Potential volunteers
don’t need to have prior
experience in emergency services, said Hall,
who helped organize the
event.
Hall said applications
handed out at a similar open house in 2015
helped the Mount Joy
department add nine
members, a shot in the
arm for an agency whose
call volume has increased in recent years.
Fire departments face
several challenges in filling positions, including
an aging volunteer force.
Statewide,
volunteer
firefighter numbers have
declined from 300,000
in the 1970s to about
50,000, according to a
University of Pittsburgh
committee.

HIGHER EDUCATION

PCA&D names new fine arts chair
STAFF

The Pennsylvania College of
Art & Design has named William Mammarella as chair of its
fine art department, effective
Jan. 1.
Mammarella, of Lancaster, is
a painter and has been on the

Saturday:

college faculty for 18 years. He
has a bachelor’s degree from
Rutgers University and a master’s degree from the University
of Delaware.
He succeeds Eric Weeks, who
remains chair of the photography department.

traffic.
The project had been
in planning since the
late 1990s, according to
Shriver and Kreider.
But residents said that
a traffic light installed
in the meantime at Toddy Drive and Route 322
alleviated their safety
concerns, which were
originally part of the
reasoning for the realignment when it was
first proposed.
In pushing the project, Shriver and Kreider had also pointed
out that $500,000 of
county grant funds
would be lost if it were
abandoned prior to the
county’s deadline.
Kreider said last February that $123,416 of

county grant money
had already been spent
on planning the project. And the township
had spent that same
amount as a condition
of the grants, according
to township secretary
Connie Gross.
The vote to stop the
project was preceded
by Kreider announcing
that the county had extended the most recent
deadline by one month,
until Jan. 31.
In June of last year,
supervisors agreed to
apply for more state
grants for the project.
Sauder said the vote to
halt the project means
the township will no
longer be pursuing the
grants.

HACC

College launches nondegree
educational program

Offered for students with developmental disabilities

STAFF

Community college
HACC is launching a
nondegree educational
program for students
with
developmental
disabilities.
Participants in the
Career Bridges program will be able to
earn either a culinary
specialist or nurse aide
training
certificate,
learning skills alongside other HACC stu-

Connect with us

dents.
The program is underwritten by a $150,000
grant from the Pennsylvania Developmental Disabilities Council,
a state-level advocacy
group authorized by
federal disability law.
The community college is accepting applications through March
15. Classes will start in
the fall at HACC’s Harrisburg campus.

The fee for Career
Bridges will be about
$12,000, coordinator
Linda Leavens said. Because it is a noncredit
program, “typical financial aid is not always
available,” she noted.
People with developmental disabilities who
receive postsecondary
education are more
likely to have paying
jobs and to earn more,
researchers say.

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of Route 897, and had
said it would pay part of
the cost of the realignment. Later, the developer said it would not
need the realignment.
Sauder said a big part
of his decision to oppose the project was
the need for eminent
domain, which he said
should be reserved for
more urgent purposes,
such as those involving
safety.
Former
supervisor
Joe Shriver, who lost
his seat to Groff, had
been a major force in
pushing the project forward, saying it would
make the intersection
of Route 897 and Route
322 safer and better
able to handle truck

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A12

LOCAL

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Crash closes road Footprints in snow lead police to suspect
CRIME

Boy, 14, has been charged with two counts of theft from a vehicle, police say
DAN NEPHIN

DNEPHIN@LNPNEWS.COM

TOM AMICO | LNP CORRESPONDENT

STAFF

Part of Route 741 was
closed for several hours
because of a fatal crash
in Pequea Township, a
county dispatch supervisor said Saturday evening.
The crash was reported at 7:34 p.m. at Route
741 and Bean Road. The
dispatcher said he could
not confirm whether

there was more than one
fatality. Two vehicles
were involved, he said,
and at least one person was trapped in the
wreckage. He also said
he could not confirm
whether initial reports
that one of the vehicles
was on fire were true.
No further information
was immediately available.

INVESTIGATION

Armed robber holds
up a Turkey Hill
Man got away with some cash
RYAN ROBINSON

RROBINSON@LNPNEWS.COM

An armed robber
got away with a small
amount of cash at a Turkey Hill convenience
store in southwest Lancaster city on Friday.
The robber pulled out
a small handgun in front
of an employee who was
standing outside the
520 Hershey Ave. store
shortly before 2 a.m., city
police Lt. Kevin Fry said.

Both went inside and
the robber held up another store clerk.
The robber ran away
with a small amount of
cash, Fry said. No one
else was in the store.
No description of the
robber was available
Friday, Fry said. His face
was covered, possibly by
a hooded sweatshirt. Police were working to obtain video surveillance of
the robbery.

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Lancaster police say
they were able to track
down a 14-year-old thief
by following his footprints in the snow Tuesday.
The boy, a city resident, was found coming out of an alley after
police responded to a

Police log
ASSAULT
n NEW HOLLAND:

Gregory Scott Bauer,
52, of 22 Village Lane,
was charged with simple
assault and harrassment.
Police said he had a
physical altercation with
his wife at their house
around noon Thursday.
Bauer was committeed to
county prison in lieu of
$10,000 bail.

ATTEMPTED
BURGLARY
n LITITZ: A resident

of the 300 block of
Partridge Drive reported
that at about 12:30 p.m.
Jan. 14 a man knocked
on the door of the home.
The resident didn’t
answer and watched the
man walk away from the
home. Several minutes
later the homeowner
heard a loud crash and
breaking of the sliding
glass patio door to the
rear of his home. When
the resident went to
see what happened, he
caught a glimpse of a
male reaching his hand
through an opening in
the broken part of the
glass door in an attempt
to unlock a deadbolt lock.
The suspect observed
the homeowner standing
inside the home and fled.
Police ask anyone with
information to contact
them at 626-6393.
n BRECKNOCK TWP.:
The contents of a trailer
in the 100 block of Abbey
Lane were reported stolen
between 9 a.m. Dec. 25

report of a theft from a
vehicle in progress in the
400 block of State Street,
police said.
Police found a parked
vehicle with its door
open and footprints in
the snow — the first measurable snow of the season at six-tenths of an
inch.
Thieves have been tar-

geting the area for vehicle break-ins over the
past several months, police said.
The boy was linked to
an attempted theft in
December, police said.
He is charged with two
counts of theft from a vehicle, police said.
Police found two bikes
in the area and said there

may be a second suspect.
Police ask anyone with
information to call 7353300 or submit a tip at
lancasterpolice.com.
Tipsters also may call
Lancaster City/County
Crime Stoppers at (800)
322-1913 or anonymously text LANCS plus
your message to 847411
(TIP411).

and 7:30 a.m. Dec. 28,
state police said.
n DRUMORE TWP.: A
resident of the 1200 block
of Furniss Road reported
that someone stole a
computer, TV and gaming
system from his home
between 5:15 a.m. and 5
p.m. Dec. 18, state police
said.
n DRUMORE TWP.:
Power equipment was
reported stolen from the
maintenance building of
Musser’s Market in the
first block of Friendly
Drive on Dec. 7, state
police said.
n LITTLE BRITAIN TWP.:
Cash was reported stolen
from a vehicle in the 100
block of Kirks Mill Road
between 3:30 p.m. Jan.
6 and 9:19 a.m. Jan. 8,
police said.
n LANCASTER: A woman
who lives in the 600
block of George Street
reported that two men
with guns were in her
home from 2:40 a.m. to 3
p.m. Jan. 14 and that after
stealing money from her
purse they left through
the back door, police said.
n PROVIDENCE TWP.:
On Dec. 15, tools were
reported stolen from
outside Beiler Engine
Service in the 200 block
of Pennsy Road, state
police said.

the parking lot of Super
Shoes, 2750 Columbia
Ave., according to police.

was arrested Jan. 11 on
two charges each of
retail theft and criminal
conspiracy to retail
theft, then committed to
prison. He was accused
of stealing merchandise
worth $112.93 on Jan.
6 and $157.83 on Jan.
9 from Kmart at 2600
Willow Street Pike, police
said.

DUI
n MANOR TWP.: Jorge

A. Torres, 30, of the 2900
block of Scenic Drive,
was charged after he
was determined to be
under the influence of
marijuana at the time of a
traffic accident Nov. 12 in

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FORGERY
n LEOLA: Police said

they charged Clyde A.
Miller, 24, of New Holland,
with forgery and theft
after he passed a forged
check in the amount
of $2,821.15 at Ephrata
National Bank, 361 W.
Main St., on Jan. 12. Miller
then withdrew $2,200 in
cash from the account
in which the fraudulent
check had been
deposited. Miller was
committed to Lancaster
County Prison in lieu of
$15,000 bail.

HARASSMENT
n MANHEIM TWP.: Harry

E. Reitzel, 40, of Saddle
Drive, and Kristi L. Reitzel,
35, of Belle Valley Drive,
were charged after a
domestic incident Jan.
13 at the Sadde Drive
address, police reported.

RETAIL THEFT
n LANCASTER: John

Shirey, 42, of the 200
block of South Prince
Street in Lancaster, was
arrested on charges
of retail theft after an
incident in the first block
of North Queen Street
at 10:39 a.m. Jan. 14,
police said. They reported
he was accused of
concealing several items
in his coat pocket and
attempting to leave the
store without paying for
them.
n WEST LAMPETER
TWP.: Josue Rivera
Mercado, 30, of Lancaster,

ROBBERY
n LANCASTER: A

13-year-old male was
walking in the 800 block
of Crystal Street around
3:10 p.m. Jan. 11 when he
was approached by three
males, aged 16-18. One
of the suspects pointed
what appeared to be a
BB gun at the victim and
told him to hand over
his possessions while
another assaulted him,
knocking him to the
ground. The two then
began to go through
the victim’s pockets,
taking his headphones
and cellphone. The three
suspects then fled east on
Crystal Street.

THEFT
n LANCASTER TWP.:

A cellphone that was
inadvertently left behind
by a customer was taken
around 11 p.m. Jan. 12
at Regal Cinemas, 1246
Millersville Pike. Loss is
$700.

VEHICLE THEFT
n LANCASTER TWP.:

A 2001 Chrysler Town
& Country minivan was
stolen around 10 p.m. Jan.
12 from the 700 block of
Wyncroft Terrace.

POLICE

Shooting reported in
Lancaster city Saturday
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A shooting in Lancaster city was reported shortly
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The person shot had wounds in the abdomen and
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No further information was immediately available.

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NATION/WORLD

A14 SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Roll call

headwaters.
Voting yes: Meehan, Pitts

WASHINGTON — Here’s how area
members of Congress voted on major
issues in the week ending Jan. 15.

House
n Mountaintop-removal coal mining:

Voting 235 for and 188 against, the House
on Tuesday passed a GOP-sponsored
bill (HR 1644) that would shelve a new
federal rule aimed at protecting streams
and drinking water from pollution
caused by mountaintop-removal coal
mining. The rule addresses the practice
of companies blasting mountaintops and
then dumping fractured rocks and other
debris into nearby streams and valleys.
The bill would delay implementation of
the rule until the National Academy of
Sciences has completed a study of its
impact.
A yes vote was to shelve the proposed
“Stream Buffer Zone Rule.”
Voting yes: Pat Meehan, R-7, Joseph
Pitts, R-16

n Birth defects, lung cancer, kidney

disease: Voting 186 for and 237 against,
the House on Tuesday refused to delay
the impact of HR 1644 (above) if the bill
would cause or increase the incidence
of birth defects or ailments such as
lung cancer or heart or kidney disease
in communities close to mountaintop
mining sites.
A yes vote supported a Democratic
motion to expedite the environmental
rule on health grounds.
Voting no: Meehan, Pitts

n Dispute over Clean Water Act: The

House on Wednesday voted, 253 for and
166 against, to kill a new Environmental
Protection Agency rule that gives
protection under the 1972 Clean Water
Act to headwaters, wetlands and other
waters upstream of navigable waters.
The act already covers navigable waters.
The rule does not apply to non-navigable
waters used in farming. This vote sent a
GOP-sponsored resolution of disapproval
(SJ Res 22) to President Obama, who
said he would veto it.
A yes vote was to pass a measure that
would kill an EPA rule for protecting

n North Korean Economic Sanctions:

Voting 418 for and two against, the
House on Tuesday passed a bill (HR
757) that would expand U.S. economic
sanctions on businesses and countries
engaged in transactions that
directly or indirectly bolster the North
Korean military and supply Pyongyang
with hard currency. The bill is a response
to North Korea’s recent thermonuclear
testing. Because the bill does not
include offsetting revenue measures, it
would add $10 million to the national
debt through 2020, according to the
Congressional Budget Office.
A yes vote was to send the bill to the
Senate.
Voting yes: Meehan, Pitts

Senate
n Congressional audit of Federal

Reserve: Voting 53 for and 44 against,
the Senate on Tuesday failed to reach 60
votes needed to advance a bill (S 2232)
that would authorize a full congressional
audit of the Federal Reserve System.
The Government Accountability Office,
the investigative arm of Congress,
would conduct the audit, with authority
to inspect internal communications
among Fed governors and staff. The
bill would inject politicians into internal
Fed deliberations over matters such as
setting interest rates and regulating the
currency supply. Established in 1913 as
both an independent agency and central
bank, the Fed is charged with setting U.S.
monetary policy, with fiscal policy left to
the legislative and executive branches.
A yes vote was to advance the bill to full
debate.
Voting yes: Pat Toomey, R
Voting no: Robert Casey Jr., D

Votes Ahead
This week, the Senate will debate a
bill to intensify screening of refugee
applicants from Iraq and Syria, while
the House will be in recess.

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

ELECTIONS

Taiwan chooses first female
leader, rejects pro-China party
CHRISTOPHER BODEEN
and RALPH JENNINGS
ASSOCIATED PRESS

TAIPEI, Taiwan — Taiwan elected Tsai Ingwen as its first female
president
Saturday,
handing her pro-independence party its first
majority in the national
legislature and rejecting
the China-friendly party
that has led the self-governing island for eight
years.
The result should be
deeply unsettling to China, which may respond
by further reducing
Taipei’s already limited
ability to win diplomatic
allies and participate in
international organizations.
In a statement issued
after Tsai’s win, the Chinese Cabinet’s body for
handling Taiwan affairs
reaffirmed its opposition to Taiwan independence, but said it would
work to maintain peace
and stability between
the two sides of the Taiwan Strait.
“Our will is as strong as
a rock, our attitude un-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tsai Ing-wen raises her
hand as she declares victory in the presidential
election on Saturday in
Taipei, Taiwan.

swerving on the principal matter of safeguarding national sovereignty
and territorial integrity,”
the Taiwan Affairs Office
said.
Voters concerned that
Taiwan’s economy is under threat from China
and broadly opposed to
Beijing’s demands for
political unification resoundingly chose Tsai
over the Nationalists’
Eric Chu, a late replacement for his party’s original candidate who was

seen as alienating voters.
Tsai said her victory
was a further show of
Taiwan’s ingrained democracy and its people
wish for a government
“steadfast in protecting this nation’s sovereignty.” She too pledged
to maintain the status
quo with China. She said
both sides have a responsibility to find a mutually
acceptable means of interacting, while adding
that Taiwan’s international space must be respected.
She said she would correct past policy mistakes,
but warned that “the
challenges that Taiwan
faces will not disappear
in one day.”
Chu resigned from
his party’s leadership to
take responsibility for
the massive loss. In the
final tally, Tsai won more
than 56 percent of votes,
while Chu had 31 percent and a third-party
candidate trailing in the
distance. Outgoing President Ma Ying-jeou is
constitutionally barred
from another term.

VENEZUELA

President faces an economy
in crisis, hostile assembly
JIM WYSS

MIAMI HERALD

Venezuelan
President Nicolas Maduro
has called on his opposition counterparts to
work with him to help
get the country out of
a deep economic crisis.
But even as he called for
unity, Maduro invoked
emergency decree powers.
Maduro made the pitch
during his annual speech
Friday before a National
Assembly that is in opposition hands for the
first time in 17 years.
The Central Bank released economic information for the first time
in more than a year, confirming what everyone
knew: The economy is in
shambles.

B.R.
BOOKS

The bank said the
economy contracted 7.1
percent for the year ending September 2015 — a
historical low for the
country. In addition, annual inflation reached
141.5 percent in the year.
The bank said collapsing oil prices, in a nation
addicted to crude exports, were pummeling
the economy. But it also
blamed “next generation economic warfare”
for the problems, saying websites and foreign
interests were driving
speculation and hoarding.
The bank had not released economic figures
since late 2014, despite
the constitutional obligation to do so.
In his speech, Maduro stayed on familiar
ground, blaming the
deep economic crisis on
private-sector sabotage
and international plots
aimed at dismantling
17 years of socialist re-

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forms.
In a rebuttal, National
Assembly
President
Henry Ramos said he
and his colleagues were
willing to work with the
administration if it was
truly willing to change.
The socialist “model
is wrong. It’s flawed and
there are the figures that
prove it,” Ramos said,
referring to the grim
economic data. “If there
was truly a will to change
course, then obviously
we would be interested.
… How can we want lines,
inflation, and insecurity?”
Also during the session,
Maduro presented a decree giving him “emergency economic powers”
for 60 days. The decree
had been approved in the
waning days of the outgoing assembly but was
published in the official
register only on Friday.
The assembly is expected to debate the decree
next week.
Ramos also said his
bloc in the assembly
would not back down
from a proposed amnesty law.
“We cannot move
forward here without
liberating political prisoners,” he told the president.

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LOCAL/NATION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

CALIFORNIA

Blast
fears
stall gas
leak plan
LOS ANGELES TIMES

The possibility of a
catastrophic explosion
prompted
regulators
Saturday to delay efforts
to capture and burn leaking natural gas that has
sickened and displaced
thousands of residents
of Porter Ranch.
Mohsen Nazemi, deputy executive officer of the
South Coast Air Quality
Management District,
which was expected to
approve the plan at a
meeting Saturday, acknowledged that the
idea was “very unusual”
and somewhat untested.
The plan is now on
hold until local fire officials and state and federal regulators have signed
off, Nazemi said.
For more than two
months, a damaged well
at Southern California
Gas Co.’s Aliso Canyon
storage facility has been
spewing noxious fumes
and foul odors into nearby communities.
To stop the leak, the
company is drilling a relief well to the giant natural storage tank about
8,500 feet beneath the
surface, but that isn’t expected to be finished until early February.
So officials, looking for
more immediate relief,
came up with the plan to
burn the gas.
Earlier in the week,
however, the state Public Utilities Commission
expressed concerns that
the damaged well could
be vulnerable to a blowout, which would allow
even greater release of
environmentally damaging gases or cause an explosion.
A letter from the commission to the company
included a warning that
damage to the well system, which was subjected to two months of
aggressive high-pressure
pumping to try to plug
the leak that began in
October, might now permit air to mix with methane in a way that “could
be catastrophic.”

Deaths from
earlier in the week
The following deaths
were reported in the
past week.
Complete obituaries
can be found in the
LancasterOnline.com
news archives.
ALLGYER, Lydia A., 52,
Mill Hall, Jan. 8.
ANDERSON, Barry R.,
69, Lititz, Jan. 8.
AUGHINBAUGH,
Charles H., 93, Akron,
Jan. 10.
BARLEY, Gladys M., 87,
Millersville, Jan. 8.
BATTAGLIA, Nancy
(Norton), 69, Columbia,
Jan. 11.
BEDNAR, Louis E., 76,
Lancaster, Jan. 10.
BENNER, Anna M., 84,
Elida, Ohio, Jan. 8.
BERGMANN, Evelyn,
85, Lancaster, Jan. 5.
BOWMAN, Margaret
P., 87, East Earl and
Ephrata, Jan. 10.
BRESCH, Anthony M.,
60, Lancaster, Jan. 9.
BRITTON, Franklin E.,
83, New Holland, Jan. 7.
BROWN, Diane L., 63,
Lancaster, Jan. 7.
BRUBAKER Jonas B.
Jr., 89, Marietta and
Lancaster, Jan. 8.
BUOHL, Richard E., 70,
Seminole, Fla., Jan. 10.
CAMPBELL, Cody A.,
24, Jan. 11.
CARROLL, Patricia
(Brady), 74, East
Petersburg, Jan. 10.
COEN, Karen J., 62,
Lititz, Jan. 12.
CRESPO, Miguel A., 59,
Lancaster, Jan. 10.
DANZ, Richard A., 64,
Washington Boro, Jan.
7.
DECKER, James E., 77,
Elizabethtown, Jan. 7.
DOMBACH, Richard D.,
90, Lancaster, Jan. 9.
DOURTE, Jeanette
(Frey), 94,
Mechanicsburg, Jan. 8.
EBNER, Frederick W.,
84, Lancaster, Jan. 11.
ESH, Elias S., 86,
Intercourse, Jan. 7.
ESH, Susan M., 9
months, daughter
of Henry Esh Jr. and
Martha Smucker Esh,
Coatesville, Jan. 9.
FALLAN, Ann C., 86,
Lititz, Jan. 9.
FORBERGER, Paula M.,
87, Lancaster, Jan. 13.
FORRY, Alfred P. Sr.,
90, Wrightsville, Jan.

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Food

Local recipes & area chef profiles

Get Moving & Feeling
Better Again

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

TODAY’S OBITUARIES
Today’s obituaries can be found on pages A20, A21, A22 and A23.

13.
FREEMAN, Paul H., 96,
Denver, Jan. 8.
FREY, Charles E., 87, Lititz,
Jan. 8.
FRICK, Elizabeth M., 87,
Quarryville, Jan. 12.
FRITZ, Janet C., 85,
Ephrata, Jan. 7.
FRY, Thomas E., 65,
Bradenton, Fla., Jan. 4.
GARMAN, Isaac S., 90,
Lebanon, Jan. 8.
GAUS, Ardythe M., 78,
New Providence, Jan. 14.
GINGRICH, John H., 82,
Lebanon, Jan. 6.
GOTTSHALL, David W., 73,
Ephrata, Jan. 13.
HARROLD, Michael D., 69,
Columbia City, Ind., Jan. 9.
HARTLEY, Christopher J.,
50, Conestoga, Jan. 7.
HECK, Cleo R., 98,
Nottingham, Jan. 12.
HERR, Audrey M., 73,
Hummelstown, Jan. 9.
HERSHEY, Robert E., 92,
Elizabethtown, Jan. 9.
HERTZLER, Irene, 97,
Honey Brook, Jan. 11.
HERZOG, Veronica C., 90,
Manheim, Jan. 4.
HEVNER, Nancy A., 82,
Columbia, Jan. 9.
HINTON, James H., 64,
Lancaster, Jan. 9.
HOCKENBERRY, Mija, 83,
Erie, Kan., Jan. 12.
HOOVER, Herbert B., 88,
Reading, Jan. 11.
KENDIG, John F., 86, Lititz,
Jan. 7.
KENDIG, Richard L., 62,
Lancaster, Jan. 11.
KENNEDY, Ernest L. Sr.,
98, New Holland, Jan. 10.
KING, Mary L., 73,
Gordonville, Jan. 11.

KLOPP James W. Sr., 71,
Ephrata, Jan. 13.
KRALL, C. Joseph, 87,
Columbia, Jan. 14.
LAMMEY, Alice K., 87,
Honey Brook, Jan. 10.
LANTZ, Richard A., 91,
Strasburg, Jan. 12.
LENTZ, Betty S., 82,
Ephrata, Jan. 13.
LEONARD, William R., 93,
East Petersburg, Jan. 7.
LIGDAY, Katherine A., 57,
Pittsburgh, Jan. 12.
LUNDAHL, Mary E., 82,
Westminster, Md., Jan. 9.
LUTZ, Anna (Deppen), 86,
Lancaster, Jan. 9.
LYLE, Amos S. Jr., 64,
Huntingdon, Jan. 8.
MacALARNEY, John, 85,
Lancaster, Jan. 9.
MARTIN, Bertha M., 95,
Ephrata, Jan. 11.
McGAHEY, Twila J., 89,
Lancaster, Jan. 8.
MELLINGER, Mervin S., 85,
Lancaster, Jan. 5.
MILLER, Andrew K., 42,
Mount Wolf, Jan. 10.
MILLER, Marion E., 76,
West Chester, Jan. 14.
MILLER, Melvin J., 53,
Terre Hill, Jan. 8.
MUSSER, Simon W., 69,
Elizabethtown, Dec. 30.
NAFPLIOTIS, Harry J., 87,
Lancaster, Jan. 12.
NGAU, Kim H., 76,
Lancaster, Jan. 6.
OBERHOLTZER, Esther M.,
79, Narvon, Jan. 13.
OLIVERAS, Josue, 54,
Lebanon, Jan. 9.
PLANK, Pauline E.,
95, Willow Street and
Columbia, Jan. 12.

PLAUGER, Bonnie J., 59,
Lancaster, Jan. 12.
PRINZ, Charles A. Jr., 78,
Ephrata, Jan. 10.
ROHM, Helen A., 73,
Lancaster, Jan. 13.
RUTT, Esther E., 84,
Reinholds, Jan. 13.
RUTTER, Joseph E. Jr., 67,
Columbia, Jan. 13.
SANCHEZ-RODRIGUEZ,
Jorge L., 48, Lancaster,
Jan. 6.
SCHMICK, Donald E., 88,
Elizabethtown, Jan. 10.
SCHOENBERGER, Mary J.,
86, East Petersburg and
Lititz, Jan. 7.
SCHORR, Darla K., 74,
Mount Joy, Jan. 8.
SEYMOUR, Australia, 84,
Lancaster, Jan. 14.
SGRO, Paul A., 76, York,
Jan. 9.
SHAUD, Clyde M. Jr., 76,
Columbia, Jan. 6.
SHOEMAKER, Thomas W.,
55, Mount Wolf, Jan. 10.
SLUSSER, M. Douglas, 77,
Lititz, Jan. 9.
SOUDER, Polly A., 100,
Lancaster, Jan. 13
STARK, Sally L., 82,

Paul Erwin
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Lemoyne, PA 17043

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1128 Cocoa Avenue
Hershey, PA 17033
(717) 533-7000

BIG IDEA
CONTEST

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or commercializing a new, innovative
product or process?
Are you located in South Central PA?

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for breaking news

This year, Ben Franklin Technology Partners
is offering two prize packages!
For Rules, Entry form and FAQs, visit
bigidea.benfranklin.org
or contact Jill Edwards at 717-948-6625

You Deserve
The Best In Hearing
Maria Brouse,
Au.D., FAAA

We offer the pinnacle of compassionate hearing care —
the kind of personal attention you won’t find online or in
big-box stores — because we believe you deserve to
hear everything you’ve been missing.
You deserve the best in hearing, and we can help. Call Red
Rose Hearing Center for your free consultation!

Application Deadline

1/20/16

COMING UP AT THE WARE CENTER

AWARE LANCASTER
YOGA & WELLNESS DAY

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SAT., JANUARY 16, 2016

AT THE WARE CENTER, LANCASTER
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Manheim, Jan. 9.
STAUFFER, Franklin D., 82,
Leola, Jan. 10.
STEFFY, Jason J., 82,
Ephrata, Jan. 9.
STONER, Amelia R., 78,
Quarryville, Jan. 12.
STONER, Phyllis L., 75,
Mount Joy, Jan. 11.
SUTER, Donald K., 87,
Lancaster, Jan. 7.
SWEARER, Lynford V., 83,
Elizabethtown, Jan. 11.
SWINEHART, Clarence R.,
83, Lancaster, Jan. 8.
WAGNER, Frederick K., 80,
Lancaster, Jan. 8.
WALKER, Mildred, 90,
Lancaster, Jan. 7.
WALTMAN, Martin E., 80,
Lancaster, Jan. 13.
WENGER, Richard C., 89,
Lititz, Dec. 10.
WISE, Clarence R. Jr., 73,
Ephrata, Jan. 9.
WRIGHT, David S., 74,
Mountville, Jan. 5.
WRIGHT, Jane F., 84,
Akron and Lancaster, Jan.
3.
ZINK, Mildred C., 102,
Mount Joy and Columbia,
Jan. 5.

FOR THE LATEST LOCAL NEWS

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A16 SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

MarketPulse
PLAYBOY PAD
The storied Playboy Mansion is on
the market for $200 million. But
there’s a catch: Buyers have to
agree to allow Playboy Magazine
founder and party master Hugh
Hefner to continue to work and live
there. Negotiations between the
seller and buyer would determine
whether the 89-year-old playboy
stays for free or rents the place
back. The 5-acre property located
in Los Angeles’ exclusive Holmby
Hills hit the market earlier this
week. It features 29 rooms, game
house, home theater, wine cellar,
gym, tennis court, swimming pool
and four-bedroom guest house. It
also comes with the notorious
cave-like grotto where Playboy
bunnies have long frolicked with
guests.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Dow industrials

V
19,000

52.12

117.65 -364.81 227.64 -390.97

MON

TUES

V

-2.95% (wkly)

-3.68% (wkly)

t 4-wk. -7.67%
t YTD -9.21%

-5.64

47.93 -159.85 88.94 -126.58

MON

TUES

WED

THUR

t 4-wk. -10.11%
t YTD -11.28%

FRI

$1,000

15,000
J

Close: 15,988.08
1-week change: -358.37 (-2.2%)

A

S

O

E

E

K

N

L

D

Y

P

INDEX

E

R

F

O

R

HIGH

LOW

J

A

M

A

S

N

C

O

YTD
1YR
CHG %CHG MO QTR%CHG %CHG

16593.51

15842.11

15988.08

-358.37

-2.2

7013.67

6560.11

6689.06

-257.30

-3.7

11254.87

9192.07

NYSE Comp.

9644.45

9192.07

9299.63

-229.13

-2.4

5231.94

4292.14

Nasdaq Comp.

4714.80

4419.41

4488.42

-155.21

-3.3

2134.72

1857.83

S&P 500

1950.19

1857.83

1880.33

-41.70

-2.2

1551.28

1246.65

S&P MidCap

1318.12

1246.65

1269.83

-38.65

-3.0

22537.15 19075.51

Wilshire 5000

20099.65

19075.51

19335.23

-531.87

-2.7

Russell 2000

1056.92

983.98

1007.74

-38.46

-3.7

Common owners
and airfares

’15

* - annualized

t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t

t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t

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(((^%$!9875432| -8.7

-10.9

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-8.3

((&%#@!9987| -12.8

-10.4

((((&^#@!865| -3.2

-8.0

(((*%$@!9765421| -6.9

-9.2

((*^$!9976431| -11.3

-8.7

(((^$98764321| -9.0

-11.3

(*&^%$#@!99954| -14.4

David Koenig; Jenni Sohn • AP

TICKER

NAV

AmBalA m
CapIncBuA m
CpWldGrIA m
FnInvA m
GrthAmA m
IncAmerA m
InvCoAmA m
WAMutInvA m
Income
IntlStk
Stock
Contra
500IdxAdvtg
IncomeA m
TotRetBdI
TotRetIs
GrowStk
500Adml
HltCrAdml
InstIdxI
InstPlus
IntlStkIdxIPls
MuIntAdml
PrmcpAdml
TotBdAdml
TotIntl
TotStIAdm
TotStIIns
TotStIdx
WelltnAdm

ABALX
22.70
CAIBX
52.98
CWGIX 39.77
ANCFX 46.39
AGTHX 37.18
AMECX 19.15
AIVSX
30.80
AWSHX 35.44
DODIX
13.26
DODFX 32.24
DODGX 147.16
FCNTX 90.45
FUSVX
66.11
FKINX
1.96
MWTIX 10.69
PTTRX
10.06
PRGFX 47.91
VFIAX 173.53
VGHAX 85.28
VINIX
171.82
VIIIX
171.83
VTPSX
87.58
VWIUX
14.38
VPMAX 94.33
VBTLX
10.74
VGTSX 13.09
VTSAX
46.49
VITSX
46.50
VTSMX 46.48
VWENX 60.43

1.6

Investment-grade bonds

1,007

0.2

983

-1.3

955

-3.0

942

-1.7

941

-1.1

REITs

S&P 500

Technology stocks

European stocks

Copper

Asian stocks

Emerging-market stocks

Small-cap stocks
Oil

$500

940

0.2

926

-1.9

926

-2.3

919

-2.7

911

-2.1

903

-3.6

842

-6.2

$1,000

20 Best Stocks One Year

3.4
2.6
2.4

1

5.5%
3.6
3.2
2.3
1.9

1

6.9%
4.4
3.4

5
9
3
7

5.2
3.9

3

5.8%

COMPANY

FRIDAY %CHG %CHG
TICKERCLOSE 1WK 1MO

Nymox Pharmaceutical

NYMX

2.20

+0.9

-39.6

Eagle Pharmaceutical

EGRX

76.94

-6.1

-20.8

Voltari Corp

VLTC

3.86

-10.9

-25.9

Sophiris Bio

SPHS

1.67

+9.2

-3.5

DS Healthcare Grp

DSKX

2.10

-16.0

-21.9

Anacor Pharma

ANAC

93.75

-2.1

-10.4

Heron Therapeutics

HRTX

22.71

-3.9

-11.7

Exelixis Inc

EXEL

4.23

-13.6

-15.2

NeoPhotonics Corp

NPTN

8.50

-3.1

-12.4

Dyax Corporation

DYAX

38.09

+0.9

+1.8

Sarepta Thera

SRPT

14.28

-60.3

-62.0

Eldorado Resorts

ERI

10.34

-3.0

+0.3

GigOptics Inc

GIG

2.83

-4.1

-3.4

Energy Focus Inc

EFOI

10.79

-16.0

-25.4

Cambium Learning Grp

ABCD

NexPoint CreditStrat

NHF

4.44

-5.3

-13.1

17.70

-9.3

-9.0

MeetMe Inc

MEET

3.31

-23.7

+4.7

LightPath Tech

LPTH

3.21 +14.2

+44.6

Aoxing Pharmaceut

AXN

0.75

+1.4

-24.2

Recro Pharma Inc

REPH

7.01

-19.9

-18.8

4.4
3.4

4
5
1
2

-1.8
-7.7
-9.2
-2.4
-2.1
-6.2
-6.8
-5.4
-1.7
-20.3
-10.0
+0.6
-3.6
-12.4
-0.3
-1.1
+2.4
-3.6
+1.6
-3.6
-3.6
-12.5
+2.6
-4.0
-0.4
-12.7
-5.1
-5.1
-5.2
-3.8

High-yield bonds

Health care stocks

5.8%

11.4
6.9

1 +8.3
3 +5.2
4 +4.8
1 +8.8
3 +9.2
4 +6.9
4 +8.5
1 +9.9
4 +3.5
5 -0.3
4 +8.6
1 +10.1
2 +10.0
5 +3.4
+4.7
3 +3.5
1 +11.3
2 +10.1
1 +19.2
2 +10.1
2 +10.1
5 -1.0
1 +5.3
4 +11.4
2 +3.3
5 -1.1
3 +9.6
3 +9.6
3 +9.4
2 +7.6

%RTN
1YR
+450.6
+381.2
+374.0
+238.3
+226.9
+175.8
+171.6
+168.3
+165.3
+164.4
+158.7
+153.2
+151.3
+149.3
+148.1
+147.8
+143.8
+141.7
+138.7
+134.2

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IndustryRankings

$CHG ---------- PERCENT RETURN ---------1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR RANK 5YRS* RANK
-0.34 -1.5
-4.8
-0.86 -1.6
-4.5
-1.10 -2.7
-7.8
-1.30 -2.7
-8.6
-1.37 -3.6
-9.8
-0.33 -1.7
-4.9
-0.74 -2.3
-7.5
-0.82 -2.3
-8.0
-0.07 -0.5
-0.2
-1.19 -3.6 -10.9
-4.69 -3.1
-9.8
-2.10 -2.3
-8.8
-1.45 -2.1
-7.8
-0.05 -2.5
-5.3
+0.02 +0.1 +0.5
-0.03 -0.3 +0.1
-1.85 -3.7 -10.4
-3.82 -2.2
-7.8
-2.52 -2.9
-6.9
-3.77 -2.1
-7.8
-3.78 -2.2
-7.8
-3.13 -3.5
-8.3
...
... +1.3
-2.38 -2.5
-8.6
+0.02 +0.2 +1.0
-0.47 -3.5
-8.3
-1.19 -2.5
-8.3
-1.19 -2.5
-8.2
-1.18 -2.5
-8.2
-0.73 -1.2
-4.8

-3.1 %

1,012

Performance benchmarks: industries - sectors of the Standard & Poor’s 500 index; international
stocks - MSCI indexes; bond returns - Barclays Capital and BofA Merrill Lynch Indexes.
Source: FactSet Data through Jan. 14
AP

PERCENT CHANGE
1WK 1MO 1QTR

INDUSTRY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

LocalFunds
FUND

1-week
... today is percent
worth change

3.7

3
4
6
7

3
6
7
8

Commodities

$1,013

Utilities stocks

0

Share
holder
rank
2

Do consumers pay more because airlines have
Airline
overlapping owners?
ownership by
The same five investment funds rank
among the biggest 10 shareholders at all four
investment
leading U.S. airlines, according to figures
funds
compiled by FactSet.
Vanguard
The Vanguard Group ranks first, second or
BlackRock
third among shareholders at American Airlines
SSgA Funds
Group, Delta Air Lines, United Continental
Primecap
Holdings and Southwest Airlines. BlackRock,
Fidelity
SSgA Funds, Primecap Management and
Fidelity funds also hold top-10 positions at all
four, and two other funds rank in the top 10 at three of them.
Mutual funds and pension funds with billions of dollars under
management are major investors in many industries. But does
that matter?
University of Michigan researchers say it does because
companies with common owners have less incentive to compete.
They conclude that common ownership causes fares on the
average U.S. route to cost 3 percent to 11 percent more than if
the airlines were under separate ownership. That’s about $12 to
$42 for the average domestic round-trip ticket.
And that’s on top of any increase due to less competition
because of mergers, the researchers wrote.
They presented their results to a U.S. Justice Department
seminar just months before antitrust regulators at the department
asked the four airlines for information about their
communications with each other and with big shareholders about
capacity. That investigation is still pending.

140

J

CLOSE

Dow Jones transportation

Fidelity
Fidelity Spartan
FrankTemp-Franklin
Metropolitan West
PIMCO
T Rowe Price
Vanguard

D

Bonds

Gold

E

6560.11

983.98

N

Stocks

$1,000 invested at the end of last year ...

Close: 4,488.42
1-week change: -155.21 (-3.3%)

9214.77

1296.00

Dow Jones industrial average

J

Nasdaq composite

4,400
4,200

The crude oil rout continued, pushing the price
below $30 a barrel for the first time in 12 years.
Investors looked for safety in utilities stocks.

Derby

4,600

Dow Jones industrials

150

AT&T Inc
Air Products
Alcatel-Lucent
Alcoa Inc
Applied Indl Tch
Armstrong World Inds
Bco Santander SA
Bon Ton Store
CNH Indl NV
Campbell Soup
Carpenter Tech
Clarcor Inc
Costco Wholesale
Donegal A
Donnelley RR & Sons
Exelon Corp
Frontier Comm
Fulton Financial
GlaxoSmithKline PLC
Harley Davidson
Henry Schein Inc
Hershey Company
Intl Paper
Johnson & Johnson
Kellogg Co
Kroger Co
L-3 Communications
M&T Bank

t 4-wk. -6.24%
t YTD -8.00%

Russell 2000

V

4,800

160

COMPANY

5,400

FRI

16,000

Dodge & Cox

Source: FactSet
AP

-2.17% (wkly)

5,000

170

’06

V

S&P mid-cap

5,200

HOUSING OUTLOOK
Fitch Ratings sees U.S. home
prices climbing about 5 percent
this year. That should nudge home
prices closer to levels last seen
during the peak of the housing
Source: FactSet
boom 10 years ago. Even so, the
credit ratings agency says home
values now appear more sustainable than they were in 2006. Since
then, the nation’s population has
added more than 20 million people
FAMILY
and incomes have increased.
When adjusted for inflation,
American Funds
current home prices remain more
than 20 percent below their 2006
peak, the firm notes. Still, in states
like California where prices have
risen sharply in recent years,
home values could ease
somewhat this year.

130

THUR

17,000

CONSISTENTLY INCONSISTENT
The notion that the past
performance of an investment fund
should augur how it will fare
consistently into the future doesn’t
hold up most of the time, according
to a new report by S&P Dow Jones
Indices. Out of 678 domestic
equity funds that were in the top
quartile of top-performing funds as
of September 2013, only about 4.3
percent remained there by the end
of last September. Even a smaller
portion of large-cap funds held the
high ground, just 1.2 percent. The
more time passes, the less likely it
is that top-performing funds will
hold on to their status, S&P said.

180

WED

18,000

18351.36 15370.33

190

t 4-wk. -8.83%
t YTD -10.36%

S&P 500

StocksRecap

52-WEEK
HIGH
LOW

200

-3.34% (wkly)

t 4-wk. -6.66%
t YTD -8.25%

W

210

V

-2.19% (wkly)

14,000

S&P/Case-Shiller
20-city home price index
2006-2015

Nasdaq

Utilities
Telecommunications
Consumer Goods
Health Care
Industrials
DJ Total Market index
Consumer Services
Oil & Gas
Financials
Technology
Basic Material

0.5
-0.7
-2.0
-2.1
-2.2
-2.4
-3.1
-2.6
-3.0
-2.5
-4.8

6.
7.
1 HHHHI 8.
9.
1 HHHII
10.
3 HHHII
3 HHHII
3 HHHII
1 HHHII
Aerospace & Defense
-2.5
3 HHIII FLIR Systems
FLIR
+3.2
1 HHHHI Heico Corp
HEI
-3.2
HEI/A
-5.4
2 HHHHI Heico Inc A
-1.0
4 HHHII General Industrials
NC
+5.2
2 HHHHI NACCO Inds
Luxfer Hldgs PLC
LXFR
+2.4
2 HHHHH
Bemis Co
BMS
-0.1
1 HHHHI
Support Services
-1.8
3 HHHII Rentrak
RENT +16.9
HHHHH Franklin Covey
FC
+5.3
ONE
+1.8
2 HHHHI Higher One Hldgs
-3.0
1 HHHHH Industrial Engineering
HURC
-5.3
1 HHHHI Hurco Mfg
Milacron Holdings
MCRN -8.1
2 HHHHI
AGCO Corp
AGCO
-0.8
1 HHHHI Industrial Transportation
-2.5
1 HHHHI Willis Lease Finance
WLFC
-2.2
5 HHIII Air Transport Svcs
ATSG
-0.8
CHRW +0.7
2 HHHHI C.H. Robinson Wwde
-3.1
1 HHHHH Electronic/Elec. Equipment
ESIO
-2.2
3 HHHII Electro Sci
Landauer Inc
LDR
+0.4
5 HHHII
Nam Tai Property
NTP
-8.9
2 HHHHI Construction & Materials
-3.4
2 HHHHI Layne Christensen
LAYN
+8.6
2 HHHHI Integrated Electricl
IESC
-1.9
USLM +0.1
1 HHHHH US Lime & Minerals
RATING

1.9
-1.5
-5.3
-5.8
-6.4
-6.6
-6.7
-7.4
-8.0
-8.1
-10.1

%RTN
1YR

-2.9
-1.8
-7.0
-4.8
-7.9
-8.3
-7.8
-21.1
-8.9
-7.7
-14.0

(((^%!987652| -10.6
(((($@9542| -6.0
((((*$85421| -3.3
(((($@9542| -6.0
(((&^%@!9865| -9.2
(((*^%976521| -7.9
((((*&^%$!642| -0.9
9999963| -28.0
(((*^#@!976543| -8.1
((((&%$!8742| -4.3
*&^!999972| -23.2

Industrials sectors (best performers)
-5.0
+11.7
+9.2
+4.3
-5.6
+9.7
+2.9
+1.0
-6.0
+11.9
+11.1
+9.4
-6.9
+7.4
+3.6
+1.7
-7.6
+5.1
+3.4
+1.9
-8.3
+3.3
+0.9
-0.4
-9.4
+32.0
+14.2
+0.1

-3.2
+12.4
+7.4
+2.0
-4.2
-9.2
-7.6
+6.1
-8.2
-11.0
+5.6
+63.8
-12.5
-5.9
-21.4
+1.1
-16.7
+16.8
-0.7
-11.4
-8.2
+10.9
-27.3
-22.5
-7.0
-22.5
+42.8
+13.5

(*&^%#653| -4.0
((^$|754 +6.8
(*&$#!75421| -7.0
((^$|542 +2.0
((^$|6321 3.0
(%$#@942| -20.5
*&^@!9731| -25.0
((^$|53 +1.6
(*&^%#@!651| -3.8
&^%$#986421| -32.9
((^$|31 +0.4
(*%!8532| -11.6
*&^%#9653| -23.7
*%$!984321| -30.7
((^$| 0.0
((^$|654321 +4.9
*^%$#97643| -28.0
(*^%$764321| -8.6
((^$|875432 +17.1
(*%#!852| -11.3
(*#@!861| -12.4
*&^$#965421| -24.3
(*&^%65321| -4.3
((^$|8654321 +14.7
(($6| -2.5
9964| -42.5
((^$|9986432 +52.8
($#!95421| -21.8

Local Stocks
52-WK RANGE
FRIDAY $CHG %CHG
%CHG %RTN RANK %RTN
TICKER LOW
HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE Yld COMPANY
T
30.97
APD 115.64
ALU
3.06
AA
6.85
AIT
36.72
AWI 40.24
SAN
4.27
BONT 1.10
CNHI 6.13
CPB 44.45
CRS 24.75
CLC 44.13
COST 117.03
DGICA 13.05
RRD 12.78
EXC 25.09
FTR
3.96
FULT 11.00
GSK 37.24
HOG 40.90
HSIC 126.17
HSY 82.41
IP
35.69
JNJ 81.79
K
61.13
KR
27.32
LLL 101.11
MTB 105.42

6
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
9
1
2
7
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
6
1
1
7
8
8
4
1

36.45
158.20
4.96
17.10
45.56
60.70
7.79
7.67
9.72
55.08
45.42
67.10
169.73
16.40
20.22
38.25
8.46
14.59
49.08
66.28
161.62
111.35
57.90
106.33
73.68
42.75
132.92
134.00

33.99
117.82
3.91
6.90
37.66
39.95
4.30
1.52
5.96
52.99
25.25
46.45
150.39
13.12
13.15
27.46
4.24
11.76
38.90
40.44
146.72
83.32
36.42
97.00
70.67
38.49
111.69
104.49

0.45 1.3
-1.20 -1.0
-0.09 -2.3
-1.17 -14.5
-0.77 -2.0
-2.51 -5.9
0.01 0.2
-0.23 -13.1
-0.25 -4.0
1.88 3.7
-2.02 -7.4
1.45 3.2
-1.72 -1.1
-0.66 -4.8
0.33 2.5
-0.36 -1.3
-0.43 -9.2
-0.43 -3.5
-0.52 -1.3
-3.31 -7.6
-3.56 -2.4
-1.60 -1.9
0.52 1.4
-1.16 -1.2
-0.81 -1.1
-2.31 -5.7
-2.86 -2.5
-5.68 -5.2

s
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t

s -1.2 +7.9
t -9.4 —13.2
s 2.1 +20.3
t -30.1 —53.1
t -7.0 —4.6
t -12.6 —20.4
t -11.7 —34.3
t -27.6 —71.1
t -12.9 —17.8
s 0.8 +17.7
t -16.6 —37.0
t -6.5 —22.7
t -6.9 +12.7
t -6.8 —14.7
t -10.7 —9.4
t -1.1 —23.0
t -9.2 —30.6
t -9.6 +5.2
t -3.6 —3.7
t -10.9 —33.5
s -7.3 +6.5
t -6.7 —21.1
t -3.4 —28.7
t -5.6 —2.5
s -2.2 +7.3
s -8.0 +16.8
s -6.5 —9.1
t -13.8 —6.2

1
3
1
5
2
3
4
5
3
1
4
4
1
3
3
4
4
1
2
4
1
3
4
2
1
1
3
2

8.7
8.3
3.3
-14.0
4.2
2.6
-7.8
-26.2
...
11.0
-7.2
2.1
18.4
2.3
0.8
-3.7
-6.8
4.5
5.4
3.9
18.0
13.3
8.7
11.9
9.4
30.1
11.0
6.5

37 5.6
19 2.7
... ...
12 1.7
14 2.9
29 ...
... 8.1
... 13.2
75 ...
25 2.4
17 2.9
17 1.9
28 1.1
15 4.1
12 7.9
12 4.5
... 9.9
14 3.1
... 6.3
11 3.1
26 ...
21 2.8
14 4.8
18 3.1
69 2.8
19 1.1
16 2.3
14 2.7

Merck & Co
Natl Penn Bcs
Nwst Bancshares Inc
PNC Financial
PPL Corp
Patterson Cos
Penn Natl Gaming
Penney JC Co Inc
Pfizer Inc
Rite Aid Corp
Sears Holdings Corp
Skyline Cp
Supervalu Inc
TE Connectivity Ltd
Tanger Factory
Tegna Inc
Tyson Foods
UGI Corp
Univrsl Corp
Urban Outfitters
Verizon Comm
WalMart Strs
Weis Mkts
Wells Fargo & Co
Windstream Hldgs
YRC Worldwide Inc

52-WK RANGE
FRIDAY $CHG %CHG
%CHG %RTN RANK %RTN
TICKER LOW
HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE Yld
MRK
NPBC
NWBI
PNC
PPL
PDCO
PENN
JCP
PFE
RAD
SHLD
SKY
SVU
TEL
SKT
TGNA
TSN
UGI
UVV
URBN
VZ
WMT
WMK
WFC
WIN
YRCW

45.69
9.66
11.52
81.84
29.18
39.90
13.34
6.50
28.47
5.88
17.30
2.17
4.46
54.32
30.30
21.30
37.10
31.51
39.02
19.26
38.06
56.30
38.56
47.75
4.42
9.50

4
6
3
3
6
1
2
2
3
5
1
0
1
1
2
3
9
3
7
1
5
2
1
1
1
1

63.62
12.80
14.11
100.52
36.74
53.07
20.23
10.09
36.46
9.47
46.23
4.30
12.00
73.73
40.80
33.40
54.42
38.61
58.89
47.25
50.86
90.97
51.91
58.77
14.05
21.37

51.14
11.38
12.29
86.33
33.29
40.24
14.13
7.01
30.81
7.64
17.14
4.60
4.53
55.08
31.35
24.02
51.49
33.28
51.63
21.17
44.43
61.93
39.16
48.82
5.24
9.94

0.06
-0.19
-0.37
-1.12
-0.10
-2.15
-1.04
-0.16
-0.19
-0.12
-0.89
0.90
-1.56
-3.07
-1.16
0.52
-0.81
-0.15
0.03
-1.19
-0.40
-1.61
-1.46
-0.74
-0.65
-2.25

0.1
-1.6
-2.9
-1.3
-0.3
-5.1
-6.9
-2.2
-0.6
-1.5
-4.9
24.3
-25.6
-5.3
-3.6
2.2
-1.5
-0.4
0.1
-5.3
-0.9
-2.5
-3.6
-1.5
-11.0
-18.5

t
t
t
t
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
s
t
t
t
t

t -3.2 —14.4
t -7.7 +20.9
t -8.2 +8.3
t -9.4 +7.2
t -2.5 +6.2
t -11.0 —17.3
t -11.8 —7.0
t 5.3 —9.2
t -4.6 —1.5
s -2.6 +4.1
t -16.6 —49.6
s 29.4 +33.3
t -33.2 —52.0
t -14.8 —9.6
t -4.1 —18.2
t -5.9 +2.6
s -3.5 +29.6
t -1.4 —8.0
t -7.9 +36.1
t -6.9 —35.8
t -3.9 -0.9
s 1.0 —26.9
t -11.6 —15.0
t -10.2 -0.8
t -18.6 —44.3
t -29.9 —43.6

3
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
2
2
5
1
5
3
3
2
1
3
1
4
2
4
3
2
4
4

11.8
8.3
5.9
8.2
11.3
6.8
12.3
-23.4
14.2
49.0
-19.3
-26.6
-7.3
10.4
7.6
18.1
25.5
11.3
9.6
-10.0
9.1
5.2
2.9
10.6
8.3
-60.6

14
15
18
12
11
18
...
...
23
35
...
...
7
9
25
5
17
23
15
12
17
13
18
12
...
11

3.6
3.9
4.6
2.4
4.5
2.2
...
...
3.9
...
...
...
...
2.4
3.6
2.3
1.2
2.7
4.1
...
5.1
3.2
3.1
3.1
11.5
...

Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over
prior four quarters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (1) to bottom 20 percent (5).

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

A17

Nation&World
FOR THE LATEST UPDATES, GO TO LANCASTERONLINE.COM

In brief

VIRGINIA

Feds:
Man
tried
to join
ISIS

HUNTINGBURG, IND.

9 more turkey farms
hit with bird flu
Birds from nine more commercial
turkey farms in Indiana have tested
positive for bird flu, and officials were
trying Saturday to determine the strain
of the highly contagious virus.
The nine farms are in Dubois County,
Indiana. Authorities on Friday confirmed another commercial flock in
Dubois County was infected with the
H7N8 strain, which is different than
the H5N2 virus that led to the deaths of
about 48 million turkeys and chickens
last summer.

MARK MAZZETTI
THE NEW YORK TIMES

FLINT, MICHIGAN

Obama signs aid
order over water
President Barack Obama signed an
emergency declaration Saturday that
clears the way for federal aid for Flint,
Michigan, which is undergoing a drinking water crisis.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency will coordinate all disaster relief efforts. Republican Gov.
Rick Snyder requested emergency and
disaster declarations late Thursday,
saying needs “far exceed the state’s
capability,” and added that emergency
measures could cost $41 million.
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.

Trump booed at
conservative event
Donald Trump ran afoul of some
conservative activists Saturday with an
attack on GOP presidential rival Ted
Cruz for his failure to disclose certain
bank loans during his 2012 Senate bid.
“You give a campaign contribution
to Ted Cruz, you get whatever the hell
you want,” Trump told a tea party gathering in the early voting state of South
Carolina. By the time Trump added
that he thinks Cruz is “a nice guy,” loud
boos had commenced among the hundreds of attendees.
POWERBALL

Player wins $2M on
another’s ticket
A 19-year-old Florida man and first
time lottery player used the numbers
off someone else’s unpurchased Powerball ticket to win $2 million.
Frederick Walker said there was
already a completed play slip at the
Sav-A-Ton in Lake Mary where he purchased his ticket and decided to try his
hand using those numbers.
He matched five numbers to win $1
million, but added an extra feature
which doubled his prize to $2 million.
DENMARK

Plan aims to cut
immigration
Hoping to diminish Denmark’s appeal to migrants, the country’s government plans to force asylum-seekers to
hand over any valuables worth more
than $1,500 to help cover their housing
and food costs while their cases are being processed.
The center-right government’s proposal is expected to be approved by
Parliament this month. Backers noted
the rules would be no different from
those that apply to Danes receiving
welfare benefits.
COSTA MESA, CALIF.

Man who hit Uber
driver sues driver
A Southern California man captured
on video attacking an Uber driver has
sued the driver for $5 million, claiming the video was recorded without his
consent.
Former Taco Bell executive Benjamin Golden, 32, of Newport Beach was
arrested in November and charged
with misdemeanor assault and battery
for allegedly hitting driver Edward Caban, 23, on Oct. 30.
Caban recorded him and posted the
video to YouTube.
SOURCE: WIRE REPORTS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A security man walks past the Splendid Hotel in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, on Saturday.
BURKINA FASO

Hotel seizure ends; 4
jihadis, 28 others dead
BRAHIMA OUEDRAOGO
and BABA AHMED
ASSOCIATED PRESS

O U A G A D O U G O U,
Burkina Faso — The
Al-Qaida fighters who
stormed a popular hangout in Burkina Faso’s
capital at dinnertime
came with a mission to
kill as many people as
possible, survivors and
officials said Saturday,
firing at people even as
they fled and setting the
cafe ablaze.
When the gunfire
stopped after a more
than 12-hour siege on
the cafe and nearby hotel, at least 28 people had
been slain in an unprecedented attack on this
West African country
long spared the jihadist
violence experienced by
its neighbors.
Like the extremist attacks from Paris to Jakarta, the assailants in
the Friday evening attack
targeted an area where

people from different
nationalities gathered to
enjoy life. Here in Ouagadougou, the victims
had been grabbing a cold
drink outside or staying
at one of the capital’s few
upscale hotels.
In this city with a large
aid worker presence, the
attackers sought to shoot
as many non-Muslims as
possible, screaming Allahu akhbar (Arabic for
God is great) as they entered.
An audio tape later released by the al-Qaida
group claiming responsibility for the carnage
was entitled: “A Message
Signed with Blood and
Body Parts.”
Among the victims
from 18 different countries were the wife and
5-year-old daughter of
the Italian man who
owns the Cappuccino
Cafe, where at least 10
people died in a hail of
gunfire and smoke af-

ter the attackers set the
building ablaze before
moving on to the Splendid Hotel nearby.
Some survivors cowered for hours on the
roof or hid in the restaurant’s bathroom to stay
alive. Two French and
two Swiss citizens were
confirmed among the
dead late Saturday by the
two countries’ foreign
ministries.
Authorities said the
four known attackers
— all killed by security
forces — had come in a
vehicle with plates from
neighboring Niger. At
least two of them were
women and one was of
African descent. Witnesses said they wore
the turbans often worn
in the sand-swept countryside of the Sahel, and
some spoke in French
with an Arabic accent,
suggesting some may
have come from further
north in Africa.

WASHINGTON — The
Justice
Department
charged two Virginia
men Saturday with terrorism-related offenses,
one day after FBI agents
arrested one of them at
an airport where officials
believe he was planning
to begin a journey to
Syria to fight with the Islamic State.
Both men, Joseph Hassan Farrokh and Mahmoud Amin Mohamed
Elhassan, are in FBI custody and face up to 20
years in prison if they are
convicted, the Justice
Department said Saturday in a news release.
The department did
not cite any evidence
that the two men had
direct contact with operatives for the Islamic
State and seemed to base
the terrorism charges in
large part on conversations they had with three
FBI informants.
The arrests came as
counterterrorism officials reported that the
number of Americans
trying to get to Syria and
Iraq to fight with the
Islamic State has fallen
off.
In October, the FBI director, James B. Comey,
said he was not certain
of the reasons for the
decline, but cited as possibilities the brutal living conditions in Syria
as well as what seemed
to be a new effort by the
Islamic State to inspire
Americans to carry out
attacks at home.
The prospect that the
Islamic State might incite its American followers to attack in the
United States has led the
FBI to drastically escalate surveillance — including electronic eavesdropping — of people
suspected of having ties
to, or sympathies for, the
Islamic State.
Farrokh, a 28-year-old
native of Pennsylvania,
was arrested at the airport in Richmond, Virginia, where he was planning to fly to Chicago and
on to Amman, Jordan,
according to a criminal
complaint released Saturday.

HAWAII

High surf complicates search for missing Marines
HALEIWA,
Hawaii
(AP) — Rescuers battled
winds of up to 23 mph and
waves up to 30 feet Saturday as they searched for
12 Marines who are missing after two helicopters
crashed off the Hawaiian
island of Oahu.
The winds and the
waves dispersed the debris and complicated the
search, which was expanded Saturday to include waters off Oahu’s
west coast.
“It makes finding things
incredibly
difficult,”
Coast Guard spokesman
Lt. Scott Carr said.
The Coast Guard was

notified late Thursday
of the crash by a civilian
who saw the aircraft flying then disappear and
a fireball. Someone else
reported a flare in the sky,
Carr said. It was not clear
if the fireball and the flare
were the same.
The Marines were
alerted when the CH53E helicopters carrying
six crew members each
failed to return to their
base at Kaneohe Bay following a nighttime training mission. Hours later,
a Coast Guard helicopter
and C-130 airplane spotted debris more than 2
miles off Oahu.

A Navy P-3 airplane was
scouring the ocean, along
with helicopters from the
Coast Guard, Army, Navy
and Honolulu police and
fire departments. Two
Navy warships and two
Coast Guard cutters are
on the scene. Honolulu
lifeguards on personal
watercraft are also looking.
The Coast Guard was
keeping people out of a
wide zone that spanned
about 30 miles of shoreline, citing danger from
debris. The zone extended from the shore to 8
miles off the coast.
National Weather Ser-

vice meteorologist Derek
Wroe said Saturday that
the surf peaked Friday afternoon and is slowly declining. However, a high
surf warning remains in
effect.
A storm about 1,500
miles to the north and
northwest of Oahu was
sending large swells to
the islands, he said.
The transport helicopters were part of the 1st
Marine Aircraft Wing at
Marine Corps Base Hawaii. Known as Super
Stallions, they are the U.S.
military’s largest helicopter, capable of carrying a
light armored vehicle.

A18

STATE

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

COURTS

Ex-DA expected to be key defense witness at Cosby hearing
PHILADELPHIA (AP)
— An ex-prosecutor is
expected to testify that
he promised Bill Cosby
would never be charged
over a 2005 sex-assault
complaint, but a judge
must decide if that constitutes an immunity
deal.
Then-prosecutor
Bruce Castor will be a
key witness for the defense at a Feb. 2 hearing
over what Cosby’s lawyers have called a “nonprosecution agreement.”
The defense argues that
prosecutors who charged
Cosby last month unfairly used his deposition testimony from the
accuser’s civil lawsuit
against him. Castor supports their position.
But
Montgomery
County District Attor-

ney Kevin Steele, the
prosecutor
handling
Cosby’s case, said there
is no evidence of a signed
immunity agreement.
Cosby’s lawyers did not
attach one to their recent motion to dismiss
the case.
On Saturday, Andrea
Constand’s lawyer said
she never knew of such
an agreement.
“He (Castor) said ...
that he talked to us about
it. That’s a lie,” lawyer
Dolores Troiani said. “It
never happened.”
Castor, in announcing
that he wouldn’t charge
Cosby in 2005, had
warned both sides that
he could revisit the decision.
“District Attorney Castor cautions all parties ...
that he will reconsider

this decision should the
need arise,” he wrote in a
press release. “Much exists in this investigation
that could be used (by
others) to portray persons on both sides of the
issue in a less than flattering light.”
Castor did not immediately return a call Saturday, after CNN reported
that he sent an email to
his successor last fall explaining the agreement
with Cosby’s attorneys.
Castor mounted an
unsuccessful campaign
against Steele to return
to office last fall. His decision not to charge Cosby
was an issue in the race.
In Cosby’s deposition,
unsealed last year, the
TV icon and champion
of family values detailed
his romantic interest in

Bruce L. Castor Jr.

Kevin Steele

Constand, who is gay; his
pursuit of other young
women during his long
marriage; and his use of
quaaludes in the 1970s
as a seduction tool.
He said that on the
night in question, he
gave Constand wine and
pills before performing a
sex act. He called it consensual. She said she was

drugged and violated.
Cosby settled the lawsuit soon after giving his
deposition.
Steele considered the
deposition
testimony
along with the avalanche
of new accusers making similar claims as he
weighed the decision
to charge Cosby before
the 12-year statute of

limitations expired this
month.
According to Troiani,
Cosby could have invoked his Fifth Amendment right not to answer
some questions at the
deposition. But a jury
could have made “a negative inference” about
the decision if the case
went to trial, she said.
The Feb. 2 hearing was
initially scheduled as a
preliminary hearing to
determine if Steele has
enough evidence to send
the case to trial. But a
judge has agreed to instead hear arguments
on the defense motion to
dismiss. His lawyers will
also attack the 12-year
delay to file charges and
Steele’s plan to call other
Cosby accusers to show a
pattern of behavior.

ANALYSIS

High-profile Pennsylvania races overshadow others
PETER JACKSON
ASSOCIATED PRESS

HARRISBURG — With
a Feb. 16 deadline looming for would-be candidates to gather the voter
signatures to get on
Pennsylvania’s primary
election ballot, the high
profiles of some statewide contests are overshadowing other races.
Nomination races for
president and U.S. Senate have been heating up
for months. So has the
battle over the state attorney general’s office,
where incumbent Kathleen Kane faces at least
five potential opponents
for the Democratic nod.

gK

Yet hardly any attention has focused on the
two other row offices
— treasurer and auditor general — that will
be on the April 26 ballot. Those office-holders
receive the same salary
as the attorney general
— $158,764 this year —
serve the same four-year
terms and oversee the
same statewide jurisdiction.
Similarly obscure are
proposed amendments
to the state constitution
that would increase the
mandatory retirement
age for Pennsylvania
judges and complete the
abolishment of the for-

Treasurer
A race for the Democratic nomination is
shaping up between Joe
Torsella of Montgomery County, a former
state Board of Education
chairman who President Barack Obama appointed to a top United
Nations post in 2011,
and Albert Baker Knoll
of Pittsburgh, son of the
late Lt. Gov. Catherine
Baker Knoll and a former
oil industry lobbyist.
Otto Voit, a business
executive from Berks
County, is the only Republican hopeful to sur-

face so far.
This would be the first
statewide campaign for
all three candidates.
The current treasurer,
Tim Reese, is not seeking a full term. Gov. Tom
Wolf appointed him to
finish the second term
of ex-Treasurer Rob McCord, who resigned a
year ago before pleading
guilty to attempted extortion for using his post
to strong-arm state contractors into contributing to his gubernatorial
campaign.

Auditor general
First-term incumbent
Eugene DePasquale, a
Democratic former state
legislator from York who
is seeking re-election,

has no apparent primary
opposition but faces a
general-election challenge from Republican
John Brown, the elected
executive of Northampton County.

Judicial
retirement age
The state’s 1,029 judges
and justices currently
must step down by the
end of the year in which
they turn 70. The constitutional amendment
would move the age to
75.
Proponents of the
change argued that it
would benefit the judiciary by allowing seasoned judges to stay on
the bench longer. Opponents called it unneces-

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sary.
Twenty judges will
turn 70 in 2016, according to the Administrative
Office of Pennsylvania
Courts.

Unusual twist

Because the primary
election is open only to
registered Democrats
and Republicans, this
one will require special
arrangements for independent or third-party
voters who want to vote
on the constitutional
changes. Those voters
will be given a special
electronic access card, a
separate voting machine
or a paper ballot that allows them to vote only
on those items, state
elections officials said.

ALLENTOWN

Council:
Mayor
must go

(AP) — City council
members in Pennsylvania’s third-largest city
are set to vote this week
on a no confidence motion calling on the mayor
to resign in the wake of
an FBI probe of government contracting.
A resolution scheduled
for a vote Wednesday in
Allentown says council members have concluded that Mayor Ed
Pawlowski “is no longer
an effective leader and
can no longer carry out
the duties of the office of
mayor.”
The resolution, which
would only be symbolic, cites the subpoena
served last summer at
Allentown City Hall as
well as criminal charges
and subsequent guilty
pleas by three former
city officials.
The city’s former
controller, Mary Ellen
Koval, pleaded guilty
Thursday to a conspiracy charge in what authorities called a bribery
and kickback scheme.
Prosecutors alleged that
Koval and an unnamed
official seeking statewide
office “requested and received campaign contributions as incentives
and rewards for past,
continued and future official actions.”
The official was unnamed, but was described as an elected official with authority over
city contracts who announced his candidacy
for a position in the federal government on April
17. Pawlowski announced
his candidacy for U.S.
Senate on that date.

NATION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

HEALTH

Manners fit Jeb, if not an uncouth race
ASHLEY PARKER
THE NEW YORK TIMES

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Judy Rummler holds a photograph of her son, who took
OxyContin prescribed for a back injury, became addicted
and later died of a heroin overdose, at home in Bonita
Springs, Florida.

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Drug overdoses are
driving up the death rate
of young, white adults in
the United States to levels not seen since the end
of the AIDS epidemic
more than two decades
ago — a turn of fortune
that stands in sharp
contrast to falling death
rates for young blacks, a
New York Times analysis of death certificates
has found.
The rising death rates
for those young white
adults, ages 25 to 34,
make them the first
generation since the
Vietnam War years of
the mid-1960s to experience higher death rates
in early adulthood than
the generation that preceded it.
The Times analyzed
nearly 60 million death
certificates collected by
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention from 1990 to 2014.
It found death rates for
non-Hispanic
whites
either rising or flattening for all the adult age
groups under 65 — a
trend that was particularly pronounced in
women — even as medical advances sharply reduce deaths from traditional killers like heart
disease.
Death rates for blacks
and most Hispanic
groups continued to
fall.
The analysis shows
that the rise in white
mortality
extends
well beyond the 45- to
54-year-old age group
documented by a pair of
Princeton economists
in a research paper that
startled policy makers and politicians two
months ago.

groups of whites. Death
rates for drug overdoses
and suicides “are running counter to those of
chronic diseases,” like
heart disease, said Ian
Rockett, an epidemiologist at the West Virginia
University.
In fact, graphs of the
drug overdose deaths
look like those of deaths
from a new infectious
disease, said Jonathan
Skinner, a Dartmouth
economist.
“It is like an infection
model, diffusing out and
catching more and more
people,” he said.
Yet overdose deaths for
young adult blacks have
edged up only slightly.
Overall, the death rate
for blacks has been
steadily falling, largely
driven by a decline in
deaths from AIDS.
The result is that a
once yawning gap between death rates for
blacks and whites has
shrunk by two-thirds.

DERRY, N.H. — Tennis. Boating. Summers at Walker’s
Point.
Life among the
white Anglo-Saxon
Protestant elite (or
WASPs, in sociological shorthand) was
good for a young John
Ellis Bush.
James
Bruner,
whose father was the
Bush family pastor
at St. Ann’s Episcopal Church in Kennebunkport, Maine,
remembers
Bush,
known as Jeb, as a
larger-than-life presence at the Kennebunk River Club.
His enduring image
is of a youthful Bush
“playing tennis in tennis whites” — a white
Lacoste shirt, white
shorts and canvas
sneakers.
“I’ll never forget Jeb
kind of stepping back
to take a high popper
— a kind of lob — and
doing an overheard
smash that was so
loud that it sent the
ball down and then up
onto the roof behind
his opponents,” Bruner said.
“For me,” Bruner
concluded, “he was
like the big cheese on
the court.”
But that era of polite and high society
— on the courts and
playing fields of New
England, in the halls
of boarding schools
and in the corridors of
government — is fast
fading. And in many
ways, the travails of
Bush’s presidential
campaign can be seen
as perhaps the last,
wheezing gasp of the
WASP power struc-

ture.
Against a frustrated,
profoundly un-WASPlike Republican electorate that craves the
visceral pugnaciousness
of Donald Trump or the
outsider anger of Sen.
Ted Cruz, Bush’s family values — of cordial restraint, of civil discourse,
of earnest public service — can seem almost
quaint.

Barbara’s shadow
Bush tells voters who
wonder why he cannot summon Trump’s
TV-friendly fury that he
“wasn’t brought up that
way.” He struggles with
a basic task in politics —
bragging — conceding
that, when he does, he
feels “the looming presence of Barbara Bush,”
his boast-averse mother.
And in an age of topicchanging sound bites, he
is oddly determined to
respond to every inquiry.
“I’ve had 62 years of
life that’s been jammed
into my DNA that when
someone asks you a
question, you answer it,”
he said recently.
Longtime friends still
speak with admiration
of Bush’s anachronistic
outlook, sounding a bit
like Miss Manners tsktsking the political world
for leaving its elbows on
the table.
C. Boyden Gray, who
served as White House
counsel under the elder
Bush, ticked through the
code of conduct the Bush
dynasty has long embodied: “Civility and good
manners were kind of
assumed,” he said.
“You would be generous to a loser, you would
not boast about your
victory, you would be
civil during an engage-

ment, but you’d use every trick you had, every
skill you had to win,”
Gray continued. “They
represented a whole
generation of people,
and I think a whole way
of looking at things has
been lost.”
Many voters, however,
are eager for something
less, well, dignified. Jeb
Bush has struggled to
gain traction with his
party’s base, and sits at
single digits in the polls.
Recently, Tom Emanuel of Laconia, New
Hampshire, stood at a
Bush event here to say
he was leaning toward
supporting
Trump,
whose dynamism and
contrarian nature he admired. Bush, channeling his respectful roots,
responded by first saying “some good things”
about Trump.
After the event, Emanuel said Bush had not yet
won him over, but even
he sounded a nostalgic
note for what Bush rep-

resented.
“He obviously has
manners,
he’s
restrained, he’s not going
to go out and nail somebody because he doesn’t
like them. He doesn’t
come across a dirty politician,” Emanuel said.
“So if I say I’m leaning
toward Trump, I also
have a sentimental place
in my voting heart for
Jeb Bush, as well.”
For decades, the blueblooded Bush dynasty
occupied an elevated
position in the nation’s
social and civic fabric.
“I would use the word
‘old-school,’ ” said Gregory W. Slayton, whom
George W. Bush appointed chief of mission
to Bermuda, and who
is now supporting Sen.
Marco Rubio. “Humility is something I love
about the Bush family. That’s an admirable
leadership trait that has
been completely lost,
at least for many of our
candidates.”

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LANCASTER

Less-educated
While the death rate
among young whites
rose for every age group
over the five years before 2014, it rose faster
by any measure for the
less educated, by 23
percent for those without a high school education, compared with
only 4 percent for those
with a college degree or
more.
The drug overdose
numbers were stark. In
2014, the overdose death
rate for whites ages 25 to
34 was five times its level
in 1999, and the rate for
35- to 44-year-old whites
tripled during that period. The numbers cover
both illegal and prescription drugs.
“That is startling,” said
Dr. Wilson Compton,
the deputy director of
the National Institute on
Drug Abuse. “Those are
tremendous increases.”
Rising rates of overdose deaths and suicide appeared to have
erased the benefits from
advances in medical
treatment for most age

A19

CAMPAIGN 2016

Drugs propel a rise
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OBITS
A20 — SUNDAY,
A20 SUNDAY,
JANUARYJANUARY
17, 2016 17, 2016

Deaths Reported
Agesen, Sandra J.
Stump
November 3, 2015.
Stewart Family Funeral Home, 903-5812008
Alspach, Patricia A. *
62, wife of Jim C.
Alspach, of Lancaster.
January 13, 2016.
Andrew T. Scheid
Funeral Home, 3978298
Buller, Paul T.
62, of Mount Joy. January 12, 2016. Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.,
653-5441
Chico, Benjamin Corchado *
78, of Lancaster. January 15, 2016. Cremation Services of Lancaster, 273-6283
Cooper, Clyde D. Jr.
75, of Masonic Villages.
January 11, 2016.
DeBord Snyder Funeral Home & Crematory,
Inc., 394-4097
Dietz, Suzanne M.
73, wife of Marlin Dietz
Jr., of Marietta. January 15, 2016. Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.,
653-5441
Dodds,
Katherine
Heitmueller
85, of Mountville. January
15,
2016.
Workman
Funeral
Homes, Inc., 285-4513
Dougherty,
Dan
Robert
65, husband of Pamela
Kay
Dougherty.
January 14, 2016.
Matinchek & Daughter Funeral Home,
944-7015
Foltz, Lester Franklin
85, husband of Betty E.
(Beam) Foltz, of
Brownstown. January
15, 2016. Stradling
Funeral Homes, Inc.,
733-2472
Forberger, Paula M.
87, of Lancaster. January 13, 2016. Charles F.
Snyder Jr. Funeral
Home & Crematory,
560-5100
Fry, Thomas E.
65, husband of Cleta
Geltz, of Bradenton,
FL. January 4, 2016.
Hambleton, Mildred
C.
109, of Lancaster. January 14, 2016. DeBord
Snyder Funeral Home
& Crematory, Inc.,
394-4097
Hess, Lynn R.
60, husband of Cindy
K. Kreider Hess, of
New Providence. January
14,
2016.
Workman
Funeral
Homes, Inc., 285-4513
Hillas, Thelma Mae
(Scheid)
69, of Lancaster. January 13, 2016. Andrew T.
Scheid Funeral Home,
397-8298
Hollinger, Jay Scott
48, husband of Stacy
Jane
(Richards)
Hollinger, of Holtwood. January 14,
2016. Dewald Funeral
and Cremation Services, Inc., 786-3530
Obituary notices are provided as an advertising service
by the Classified Advertising
department of LNP Media
Group, Inc.
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calling the Obituary Coordinator at 295-7875, then submitting the written notice either
by
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(obits@LNPnews.com) or by
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6 p.m.
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may be edited for style, policy
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Jenkins, Russell Jr.
Husband of Cindy
Binderup
Jenkins.
January 13, 2016.
DeBord Snyder Funeral Home & Crematory,
Inc., 394-4097
Kilp, Nancy L.
89, of Country Meadows, York. January 11,
2016. DeBord Snyder
Funeral Home & Crematory, Inc., 394-4097
Kohr, Bradley D.
66, husband of Vivian
E. Strickler Kohr, of
Kerrville, TX. January
9, 2016. Workman
Funeral Homes, Inc.,
684-6633
Krall, C. Joseph
87, husband of Dorothy
(Steele) Krall, of
Columbia. January 14,
2016. Charles F. Snyder
Funeral Home & Crematory, 393-9661
Matroni, Louis T. Jr.
63, husband of Susan
(Marouchoc) Matroni,
of Lancaster. January
13, 2016. Charles F.
Snyder, Jr. Funeral
Home & Crematory,
560-5100
McMellen, Roxanne
73, wife of Joseph C.
McMellen, Jr., of Willow Street. January 12,
2016. DeBord Snyder
Funeral Home & Crematory, Inc., 394-4097
Minter, James T. *
87, husband of Dorothy
(Helmuth) Minter, of
Washington Boro. January 15, 2016. Charles
F. Snyder Funeral
Home & Crematory,
872-5041
Ramsey, Rose A.
96. January 11, 2016.
Sheetz Funeral Home,
Inc., 653-5441
Rosier, Mary K.
84, wife of Mel Rosier,
of Spring Run at Willow Valley. January 14,
2016. Charles F. Snyder
Funeral Home & Crematory, 393-9661
Shelley, William E.
77, of Lititz. January 6,
2016. Charles F. Snyder
Jr. Funeral Home &
Crematory, 560-5100
Snyder, Jay R.
96, of Mount Joy, companion of Ruth Evans.
January 9, 2016. Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.,
653-5441
Spangenberg, Alana
M.
70, wife of Arthur C.
Spangenberg, Jr., of
Lancaster. January 16,
2016. Charles F. Snyder
Funeral Home & Crematory, 872-5041
Strickler, Alfred B. Jr.
87, husband of Nina
Anne
Petticoffer
Strickler. January 9,
2016.
Stypulkoski, Rose
93, of Lancaster. January 9, 2016. Charles F.
Snyder Funeral Home
& Crematory, 393-9661
* No Obituary appears

Addendum
Thomas E. Fry

Thomas E. Fry, 65, is
also survived by granddaughter, Tiffanie
Shaub.

Services
Today

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Clyde
“Chick”
D. Cooper, Jr. 75, of
Masonic
Villages,
died
at
9:50 PM on
Mo n d a y,
January 11,
2016, after a
long siege of
heart problems
and diabetes.
Cooper,
known mostly
as “Chick,” was born in
Lancaster, a son of the
late Clyde D. and Frances
Elizabe th Billmeyer
Cooper. He graduated
from McCaskey High
S c h o o l i n 1 9 5 8, f r o m
Millersville University
in 1970 and from
Missouri Auc
u tion school
in 1982.
H e once work ed
for the new spapers
in Lancaster, Pa., and
Wilmington, Del., and,
quite separatelyy, for
A m t ra k an d f o r t h e
Railroad Museum of
Pennsylvania. At one
t i m e , h e a l s o ow n e d a
restaurant in Strasburg
and, among other activities, held a Pennsylvania
auctioneer’s license.
As a Freemason,
Cooper was a member of
Lodge 286 of Columbia
and the Craftsman
Cl ub o f th at l odg e;
the Lancaster Lodg e
of Perfection; and the
Harrisburg Consistoryy.
He also was a member of the Columbia Fish
and Game Association
and a lover of nature,
fine art, literature, history, philosophy, women
and sherryy.
Cooper was preceded
in death by his wife of
36 years, Helen Jane
Brubaker Cooper, but
is survived by a sister,
Frances Elizabeth, wife
of S. Paul Schmuck, of
Palmyra; two brothers, John R., of near
Manheim, and Thomas
B., of Lancaster; and a
number of nieces and
nephews. He also was
a close companion of
DelDonna Forrest, of
Millersville.
Services will be private at the convenience
of the familyy. In lieu of
flowers, contributions
in his memory may
be made to Masonic
Village, 1 Masonic Drive,
Elizabe thto wn, P A
17022. To leave an online condolence for the
family please visit:
DeBordSnyder.com

Lester
Franklin Foltz

Lester Franklin Foltz,
85, of Brownstown,
passed away on Friday,
January 15, 2016, at
Manor Care, Sinking
Spring.
He was born in
Groffdale to Alvin and
Florence (Sheaffer)
Foltz and was the husband of Betty E. (Beam)
Foltz.
He was a member
of Brownstown United
Methodist.
In addition to his
wife, Lester is survived by son, Lesley
Vaughn, husband of
Donna (Hadesty) Foltz
of Lititz; 2 daughters,
Penny Foltz of Lititz,
Roxanne, wife of Randy
Kroh of Ephrata; 7
grandchildren, Sherrie
Stoltzfus of Lititz,
Tracy Deimler of Lititz,
Michele, wife of Andy
Ayers of Lancaster, Billy
Lastinger, husband
of Kelly Hermann of
Manheim, Wendy, wife
of Ken Morris of Port
Orchard, WA, Michael
Wilson of Reinholds,
Shan Groff of Santa
Clarita, CA; 11 greatgrandchildren; 2 brothers, Galen Foltz of North
Haven, ME, Timothy
Foltz of Ephrata; 2 sisters, Lucille Bahrenberg
of Reinholds, Audrey
Wyble of Richfield.
He was preceded in
death by 2 brothers,
Gene and Carl William
Foltz.
Services and interment will be private at
the convenience of the
family.
Arrangements by
Stradling
Funeral
Homes, Inc., Akron/
Ephrata. Online condolences can be given at
stradlingfuneralhome.
com.

Louis T.
Ma
atr
t oni, Jr.

Louis T. Matroni,
Jr., 63, of Lancaster,
PA, passed
away u n expectedly
on January
13, 2016 at
his second
home in
Holly Springs, NC. Born
in Lancaster, he was
the son of Mary (Suter)
Matroni of Lancaster,
PA and the late Louis
T. Matroni, Sr. Louis
was the loving husband
of 44 years to Susan
(Marouchoc) Matroni.
He was a 1970 graduate of J.P
P. McCaskey
High School. He retired in January 2011
after 38 years of service
with Armstrong World
o
Industries. Louis was
an avid sports enthusiast. He loved golf &
bowling. In his younger
years, he played softball & baseball. He also
played with the York
o
Barbell Softball Team.
He liked watching sprint
car races & NAS CAR.
Louis enjoyed watching
the Carolina Hurricanes
Hockey Games with his
son & grandchildren.
Surviving in addi tion to his wife, Susan, &
mother, Maryy, is a son,
L. Thomas Matroni, III,
husband of Barbara; 2

OTHER OBITUARIES
ON PAGES A21,
A22 & A23

grandchildren: Helena
Matroni and Louis T.
Matroni, IV
V, all of Holly
Springs, NC; brother,
Mark Matroni; sis ter, Barbara Matroni;
mother-in-law, Helen
Marouchoc; and sister -in-la w, Roberta
Marouchoc, all of
Lancaster, PA
A.
Louis was preceded
in death by a brother,
Kevin Matroni.
Friends will be received from 4-6 PM
with a Prayer Service
beginning at 6 PM on
Tuesday, January 19,
2016 at the Charles
F. Snyder, Jr. Funeral
Ho me & C rem at oryy,
3110 Lititz Pike, Lititz,
PA 17543. In lieu of flowers, contributions may
be made to Dominican
Sisters of the Perpetual
Rosaryy, 1834 Lititz Pike,
Lancaster, PA 17601. To
send the family online
condolences, please visit SnyderFuneralHome.
com.
In life, there are two
kinds of people. Some
come and go in our lives
unnoticed. And then
there are the very precious few who touch our
lives, and we are forever
blessed.

Offer your condolences through Facebook or Twitter at
LancasterOnline.com/Obituaries

Welcoming A New Addition To The Family
We are pleased to announce that the Heisey Funeral
Home has joined the Buch Family of Funeral Homes.
Faithfully Serving Families For Over A Century
Theodore J. Beck, Supervisor
Aaron S. Abbott, Licensed Director
Richard H. Heisey, Licensed Director

Browse or leave a condolence
from your smart phone at
LancasterOnline.com/Obituaries

The Buch Family of Funeral Homes
MOUNT JOY
MANHEIM
LITITZ

~

IN LOVING MEMORY OF

BETTY ROBERTS
GIGL CAPP

www.BuchHeisey.com

626-2464

216 South Broad Street, Lititz

Nov. 20, 1927 – Jan. 15, 1991

“I didn’t realize how
complicated a funeral
could be until I had to
make all the arrangements
when my uncle died.”
We love you and miss you
more than words can say,
and what we wouldn’t give just
to talk to you today.
Love, Joe, Valerie, & Lisa

(717) 394-4097

More than a
funeral service,
it’s about
sharing a life.

Few families understand how much
is involved in a funeral until
they’re called upon to plan one.
We would like you
to have our guidebook,
“Ten concerns you may
have about organizing
your personal affairs.”
It’s free; call us at

717-394-5300

Jeremy R. DeBord

TM

Formerly Kearney A. Snyder Funeral Home
141 East Orange Street
Lancaster, PA 17602
Jeremy R. DeBord, Supv.

2024 Marietta Avenue
Lancaster, PA 17603
Randy L. Stoltzfus, Supv.

528 West Orange Street, Lancaster, PA 17603 
 
Branch: Fred F. Groff, Inc., Thomas S. Buter, Licensed Supervisor
The Groffs Family Funeral & Cremation Services, Inc.,
Elizabeth M. Groff, Licensed Supervisor

(717) 394-4097 | www.DeBordSnyder.com

coffee and chat

Fourman, Samuel B.
Hill United Church of
Christ, 3801 Hill
Church Rd., Lebanon,
1:30 PM. Kreamer
Funeral Home

For anyone who recently experienced the loss of an adult family member.
Here you can learn from others, listen, and share if you’d like. We will give
you a workbook that will help you journey through the seemingly endless
tasks you must undertake in the coming weeks. Coffee provided.

Gottshall, David W.
Roseboro Stradling
Funeral Home, 533
Walnut St., Denver, 4
PM
Souder, Polly A.
Orr Auditorium, Willow Valley Manor, 211
Willow Valley Square,
Lancaster, 2 PM.
Foster-Warne Funeral
Home

Obituaries

Clyde D.
Cooperr, Jr.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016 | 10:00 am
Manheim Township Public Library
595 Granite Run Drive | Lancaster, PA 17601
Reservations required.
717.560.5100 | email: preplan@SnyderFuneralHome.com
Lititz Pike

3110 Lititz Pike
717.560.5100
Charles F. (Chad) Snyder, III

WAY P

INTS

Funeral Director/Supervisor

Spacht-Snyder – Lititz
127 South Broad Street
717.626.2317
Jacqueline Adamson

Millersville

Downtown Lancaster

441 North George Street

Supervisor/Pre-Planning Specialist

Funeral Director/Supervisor

414 East King Street
717.393.9661
Charles F. (Chip) Snyder, Jr.

717.872.5041
Mark D. Burkholder

TM

Funding underwritten by Physicians Life Insurance Company

Funeral Director/Supervisor

www.SnyderFuneralHome.com

OBITS
A21 — SUNDAY,
LNP
| LANCASTER,
PA JANUARY 17, 2016

Russell
“Butch”
Jenkins, Jr.

Russell “Butch”
Jenkins, Jr. passed into
the Lord’s
hands on
Wednesday,
January 13,
2016, joining his belov ed son,
Rus ty. H e
was surrounded by his family as he courageously battled
cancer and is now at
peace.
He was married 40
years to Cindy Binderup
Jenkins.
Butch was a member of Millers ville
Community United
Methodist Church and
enjoyed his relationship
with his church and the
Lord.
Butch w as em p lo y e d
by
Dart
Container for 30 years
in the Maintenance
Department.
He
was a Brother of the
Lamberton Lodge #476
F.&A.M.
.
in Lancaster.
He enjoyed racing, hunting, fishing and most of
all, his son Rusty ’s ’69
Mustang.
In addition to his
wife, he is survived by a
daughter, Shelley wife of
Ken Dauberman of FL; a
sister, Bonnie Arista of
TX; and five grandchildren. He was preceded
in death by his son,
Rustyy.
A Viewing will be
held on Weednesda y,
January 20, 2016 from
6:00 to 8:00 P..M. at the
DeBord Snyder Funeral
Home, 141 E. Orang e
St., Lancaster, PA. A
Masonic Service will
be held at the Funeral
y
Home on Wednesda
e
evening at 7:45 P..M.
Funeral Services and
Interment will be private and held at the convenience of the familyy.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in Butch’s
memory may be made
to Lamberton Lodg e
#476 F..&A.M., 213 W.
Chestnut St., Lancaster,
PA 17601. To send an online condolence, visit
DebordSnyder.com

717-394-4097

Roxanne
McMellen

Roxanne McMellen,
73, of Willow Street,
p a s s e d
away o n
January
12, 2016 at
C o n es t o g a
View. She
was the loving wife of Joseph C.
McMellen, Jr. Born in
Lancaster, PA,
A she was
the daughter of Russell
and Marguerite (Miller)
Botzum.
In addition to her
husband Joseph, she is
survived by her three
sons, Eric, Harry and
Robert Myers; and her
s tep so ns, Frankl in
Tr i mb le an d Jas on
and Jeremy “BuBa”
McMellen. Also surviving are 11 grandchildren.
Relatives and friends
are respectfully invited
to at tend M emorial
Service at DeBord
Snyder Funeral Home
& Crematoryy, 141 E.
Orange St., Lancaster,
PA 17602 on Thursday,
January 21, 2016 at 2:00
PM. Friends may greet
the family at the funeral
home from 1:00 PM until the time of the service. Interment to follow in Riverview Burial
Park. To leave an online
condolence for the family please visit:
DeBordSnyder.com

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Obituaries
Rose
Armstrong
Ramsey

Rose A. Ramsey entered into eternal rest
and was welcomed into
the loving arms of our
Lord and Savior on
January 11, 2016.
She
was
born
February 5, 1919 in her
home in Little Sioux,
Iowa, the daughter of
Ethel (Kerr) and Joseph
Armstrong. She lived
and worked on their potato farm and graduated
from Mondamin High
School. She moved to
Mount Joy, PA in 1937
when she married her
beloved husband, Louis
F. Ramsey.
In addition to her
husband, she was preceded in death by her
brothers, Bruce, Hugh,
Lyle and Phil. She is survived by her loving sister
Elizabeth and brother
Wayne.
She was the longest
member of Chiques
United
Methodist
Church, Mount Joy,
PA, joining in 1938. She
participated in Sewing
Circle, Crafts and Bible
Study. She was a superb seamstress and did
clothing alterations in
her home for customers
for over 50 years. She
also enjoyed making
clothes for her grandchildren.
The most used word
to describe Rose from
her family and friends
was “Amazing.” She was
a very kind and giving
person. Nothing was
ever too much trouble
for her. The following
quote was taped on her
kitchen cupboard door
for many years that she
abided by each and every day: “I shall pass
through this world, but
once. Any good that I
can do, or any kindness
that I can show another
human being, let me do
it now and not defer it,
for I shall not pass this
way again.”
Surviving are two
sons, Ronald Ramsey
husband of Elaine
(Mueller)
Ramsey
and Duane Ramsey
husband of Joyce
(Sutter) Ramsey. Four
grandchildren: Susan
R a m s e y,
Michael
Ramsey, Kimberly
(Ramsey) Fasnacht,
Keith Ramsey husband
of Debra (Haddad)
Ramsey, Six great
grandchildren: Rebecca
(Fasnacht) Murphy
wife of Jared Murphy,
Nathan Fasnacht, Emily
Ramsey, Sophia Ramsey,
Olivia Ramsey and Ella
Ramsey.
At Rose’s request,
there will be a private
service and interment.
Contributions in her
memory may be made
to: Chiques United
Methodist Church, 1215
East Main Street, Mount
Joy, PA, 17552.
Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.
Mount Joy

Dan Robert
“Doc”
Dougherty

OTHER OBITUARIES
ON PAGES
A22 & A23

Jay Scott
Hollinger

Dan Robert “Doc”
Doughertyy, 65, passed
from this
world to
the next on
Thursday
January 14,
20 16 with
h is fa m i ly
by his side. Dan fought
hard against his cancer
for the past year, driven
by a desire to do more
with and for the people
he lov ed, remaining
characteristically strong
until the very end. Dan
was born on November
21, 1950 to Doris
Menear Dougherty and
the late George Robert
Doughertyy. Grandson
of the late George and
Meta Dougherty and
Russell and Meriam
Menear, he was raised in
Londonderry Township
and graduated from
Lower Dauphin High
School.
Dan is survived by
his loving wife Pamela
Kay Doughertyy, with
whom he spent the last
29 years; his mother;
his brother, Michael
Dougherty; and loving
step-children Stephanie
and husband Stev e
Goff; Scott and wife
Jodi Higgins; and his
beloved grandchildren
Chris topher “ Yogi”
and Cameron “Moose”
Goff and Bridget “Git”,
M a s o n “ Pet e ” a n d
Connor
“Re-P e te”
Higgins, all nicknames
given by Dan.
To say that Doc lived
life to the fullest would
be a huge understatement.
H e proudly
served his country as a
U.S
. . Marine and worked
for 30+ years at Three
Mile Island, a place
he helped both build
and operate until his
retirement. Dan was
a lifelong rugby and
ice hockey player but
was most happy in the
woods hunting, angling,
trapping and scouting
ground in Pennsylvania
and virtually ev erywhere he traveled. His
many close frriends and
family know well his
love of the outdoors,
especially in Northern
Pennsylvania at the
family ’s Tioga County
hunting camp. In recent years Dan became
a certified outdoor guide
in Maine, and supporting our veterans in the
outdoors was one of his
many passions.
A memorial service
will be announced by
the family in the near
future. In lieu of flowers the family ask s
that contributions be
made in Dan’s name to
the Wo
ounded Waarrior
Project. We love you
“Doc”, you will be
missed.
Condolences may be
sent online at www.matinchekanddaughterfuneralhome.com

Jay Scott Hollinger,
48, of Holtwood, passed
peacefully
on January
14, 2016, in
the loving
arms of his
wife and
daughter.
He battled ALS courageously for 8 years.
He is survived by
his wife, Stacy Jane
(Richards) Hollinger,
to whom he was married for 20 years. His
son Jacob Rush (15) and
his daughter Sara Jayne
(14) were his pride and
joy.
He will be missed by
his loving family: father,
Jay Lloyd and his wife
Audrey; sisters: Sherry
wife of Andy Farkas,
Jayne wife of Ray
Hutchison, and Patti
wife of Mark Webb. He
was predeceased by his
mother, Dorothy Ann
(Hahn) Hollinger.
Scott was also supported and loved by his
in-laws Jack and Sandy
Richards.
Born in Lancaster,
PA, Scott was a graduate of Hempfield High
School (1986) and
served honorably in the
US Marine Corps.
He was employed by
Erb Brothers landscaping, and was a tower
technician for Baldwin
Electric and self-employed as a landscaper.
Scott loved the outdoors and appreciated
God’s beauty in nature.
Vacationing at the Outer
Banks with his family
were special times.
He was an avid kayaker, rock climber
and sportsman. As a
member of the New
Providence Church of
God, he served as a leader in AWANA children’s
ministry and participated in a church mission
team to Haiti.
Scott spoke publicly on many occasions
about ALS as a gift.
His inspirational message can be viewed at
YouTube SIC 2013 Scott
Hollinger.
A service celebrating Scott’s life will be
held at the Hempfield
Church of the Brethren,
1186 Stevens Street,
Manheim, PA 17545 on
Saturday, January 23,
2016, at 2:00 p.m. Help
us to honor Scott’s love
of life by wearing bright
colors.
Please omit flowers and consider a contribution to the Scott
Hollinger Fund. Checks
made payable to New
Providence Church of
God, 269 Cinder Road,
New Providence, PA
17560.
Arrangements entrusted to Dewald
Funeral and Cremation
Services, Inc. Online
guestbook at www.dewalds.com

Kattherine Dodds

K a t h e r i n e
Heitmueller Dodds, 85,
of Mountville, passed
away peacefully into
the arms of
God, sur rounded by
her loving family on
Friday, January 15, 2016
at home. She was the
wife of the late William
E. Dodds, Jr. to whom
she was married for 56
years before he passed
away on May 4, 2006.
She was born in the river
hills of Cones toga,
da ugh ter off t he la te
Walter and Bertha Reiff
Heitmueller. She was a
longtime member of
Trinity
Reformed
United Church of Christ.
She loved nature and offten visited the river hills
of Conestoga, sharing
that love with family and
friends her entire life.
Kate was a proffiicient
gardener, which was her
passion. She loved growing flowers, going to the
beach and traveling all
over the United States.
She thoroughly enjoyed
any gam e s he e v er
played, and thrived on
teaching her children,
grandchildren, and
friends how to play new
ones. She believed that
all things were an adventure, even if not for pleasure. She lived a full life
with family and friends
that adored her and
whom she adored. She
will be deeply missed by
all that knew her.
She is survived by
four children: Michael
E . ( M i c h e l l e ) D o d d s,
Mountville; Revv. Patricia
A. Dodds, Lock Haven;
K atrina M. (Mark)

Crockett, Mount Joy;
and W. Edward (Lisa)
D o d d s, I I I , M a r i e t t a .
Nine grandchildren:
Laura, Heather, Hillaryy,
Kristin, Tanner, Cera,
Adam, Mason, and Coryy.
One great-granddaughter: Avery. One greatgrandson: Zyler. One
brother: Ernest (Merle)
New
H eitmueller ,
Providence. One sister:
Joanne Zimmerman,
Lancaster. One sister-inlaw: Alice Heitmueller,
Lancaster. She was preceded in death by four
brothers: Eugene Reiff,
K arl, Walter , and
Richard Heitmueller.
Three sis ters: Els a
Schlembaker, Margaret
Leed, and Rose Good.
The Funeral Service
will be held at Trinity
Reformed
United
Church of Christ, 450
We s t M a i n S t r e e t ,
Mountville
on
Weednesday, January 20,
2016 at 10:00 A.M. with
R e v. D o n Fe n e s t r e Marek, off iciating.
Interment in Conestoga
Memorial Park. Friends
may call at the church on
Tuesday from 6:00 P..M.
to
o 8:00 P.M.
. and also on
Wednesda
e
y from 9:00
A.M. to 10:00 A.M.
Please omit flowers.
Memorial contributions
may be made in her
memory to: Hospice and
Community Care or
Trinity
Reformed
United Church of Christ.
Arrang ements by the
W orkman
F uneral
Homes,
Inc.,
Mountville/Columbia.
To send an online condolence,
visit:
Workmanfuneralhomes
o
.
com

Bradley D. Kohr, 66,
of Kerrville, TX, passed
away
on
S a t u r d a y,
January 9,
20 16 . H e
was the husband
of
Vivian E.
Strickler Kohr to whom
he was married for
o 45
years. He was born in
Lancaster, son of the late
Archie and Edith Reiber
Kohr. An entrepreneur
involved in the ranching
of cattle and horses, he
was most recently associated with Kohr Family
Ice Cream. Bradley was
a member of Calvary
United
M e thodis t
Church; a founding
member of the Eagles
Club
at
Crys tal
Cathedral; and was very
activ e with the Boy
Scouts off America in
Kerrville. He enjoyed
sailing and the outdoors.
Surviving in addition
to his wife, are two sons:
Bradley D. Kohr II,
Kerrville; and Matthew
B. (Inna) Kohr, Myrtle
Beach, S C. One granddaughter: Zoe Kohr. Tw
Two

brothers: James Kohr,
Yo
ork; and Randolph
Kohrr, Virginia. Two sisters: Diane Sheaffer,
Carlisle, and J udy
Kowalski, Yo
ork. He was
preceded in death by
two brothers: Jefffrey
and Ronald Kohr.
The Funeral Service
will be held at Calvary
United
M e thodis t
Church,
Richland
A v enue and Mark e t
Stree ts , York, on
Tuesday, January 19,
2016 at 2:00 P.M.
.
with
Pastor Dennis K. Regitz,
officiating. Interment in
Shiloh
C e m e t e r y.
Friends may call at the
church from 1:00 P..M. to
2:00 P.M. Please omit
flowers. Memorial contributions may be made
in his memory to: The
Texas Heart Institute,
Development Office, PO
Box 20345-MC3-117,
Houston, TX 77225.
Arrang ements by the
Workman
Funeral
Homes, Inc., Columbia/
Mountville. To send an
online condolence, visit:
Workmanfuneralhomes
o
.
com

Bradley D. Kohr

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717-392-6312

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Ephrata, PA 17522
717-733-0808

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A21

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OBITS
A22 — SUNDAY,
A22 SUNDAY,
JANUARYJANUARY
17, 2016 17, 2016

Nancy L. Kilp

Nancy L. Kilp, 89, formerly of Lancaster, a
resident of
Country
Meadows in
York,
o
died
Mo n d ay,
January 11,
2016.
She was the wife of
the late Paul W. Kilp
who died in 2011. Born
in Yo
ork, she was the
da ugh ter off t he la te
Ralph Wo
olfe and Martha
Stover Wo
olfe.
Nanc y was a 1944
graduate of William
Penn High School in
Yo
ork and then attended
Traphag en School of
Fashion in New York
o
Cityy. She was employed
for many years in the offf ice
of
Stemgas
Publishing in Lancaster.
Nancy was known as
a talented seamstress
and often made clothing
for herself and her
daughters. She enjoyed
needlework and crafts
and for nearly 50 years
was a member of a group
of crafters in Millersville.
She created a warm and
welcoming home for her
familyy. Spending time
with her children,
grandchildren and
great-grandson was a
source of great joy. She
had close relationships
with all her siblings and
they kept in touch and
got together regularlyy.
Nancy had been an
activ e member of
Hamilton Park United
Church of Christ for many years. The church
was an integral part of
her life and the family
would like to thank the
members of the church
for their friendshi p.

Special thanks also to
Grane H ospice and
Country Meadows for
the compassion and care
they provided to Nancy
over the last weeks of
her life.
Surviving are two
daughters, Melissa, wife
of Robert Ellison of
Jarrettsville, MD and
Julia Klarquist of Yo
ork;
two grandchildren,
Thomas Ellison, marmar
ried to A ubrey and
Caroline Ellison and her
fiancé,
fiancé, Mark Parks; a
great grandson Teddy
Ellison and a baby boy to
be born in May. Also surviving are a sister, Joann
Cotton of York and two
brothers, Ralph Wolfe,
o
married to Joan off Yo
ork,
k
of
and Thomas Wolfe
o
Lancaster.
A Memorial Service
will be held on Friday,
January 22, 2016 at 11:00
A.M. at the Hamilton
Park United Church of
Chris t, 1210 Maple
Avenue, Lancaster, PA
with the Rev. Catherine
M Shile
M.
Shiley offficiating.
ici
i ti g
Friends may greet the
family following the service. Interment will be
private and held at the
convenience of the family in the Memorial
Gardens at Hamilton
Park Church. In lieu of
flowers, contributions in
her memory may be
made to Hamilton Park
United Church of Christ,
1210 Maple A v e.,
Lancaster, PA 17603. To
send an online condolence, visit
DeBordSnyder.com

Suzanne M.
Dietz

are two children, Sarah
Reichelt wiffe of Bryan,
of Reading and Preston
Dietz, of Marietta; two
grandchildren, Travis
and Connor Reichelt;
and a brother James
Buchala husband of
Joan, of Boonville, NY
Y.
She was preceded
in death by two brothers, Michael and Robert
Buchala.
A funeral service
honoring Suzanne’s life
will be held at the Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc. 16
East Main Street, Mount
Jo y, on Wednesda y,
January 20, 2016 at 11
AM. Family and friends
will be received at the
funeral home before the
service from 10 AM to
11 AM. Interment will
be held at Indiantown
Gap National Cemetery
on Thursday, January
21, 2016 at 12:30 PM. In
lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be
made to the American
Cancer Socie ty, 314
Good Drive, Lancaster,
PA 17603.
To send an online
condolence, please visit
www .shee tzfuneral home.com
Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.
Mount Joy

Suzanne M. Dietz, 73,
of Marietta, went to the
loving arms
of J esus ,
surrounded
by her family on Friday,
January
15 , 20 16
at Lancaster General
H ospital. Born in
Bronxville, NY
Y, she
was the daughter of
the late Andrew and
Sarah (Quinn) Buchala.
Suzanne was the wife
of Marlin Dietz Jr. with
whom she celebrated 41
years of marriage this
past April 27th.
Suzanne had an
amazing smile; she was
outgoing and lit up the
room. She was a loving wife, mother and
grandmother. She retired from Longwood
Manor as a C AN.
Suzanne was a member of Trinity Lutheran
Church, M ount Jo y
VF W A uxiliary and
the Marietta American
Legion Auxiliary. She
enjoyed gardening and
spending time with her
familyy.
Surviving in addition
to her husband, Marlin,

717-394-4097

Always

In Loving Memory:
Steven Fisher

We little knew that morning that God was going to call
your name. In life we loved
you dearly, in death we do
the same. It broke our hearts
to lose you, you did not go
alone; for a part of us went
with you, the day God called
your home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still
our guide; and though we cannot see you, you are always at
our side.
We miss you Dad. May your
soul rest in peace.
Tom, Jen and Sis

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Obituaries

OTHER
OBITUARIES
ON PAGE
A23

Alfred B. Strickler, Jr.

Alfred B. Strickler, Jr.
passed away peacefully
in his sleep on Saturday,
January 9, 2016, in his
87th year. He was born
on October 5, 1928 in
Charlotte, NC.
He was preceded
in death by his parents, Henrietta Bodder
Strickler and Alfred B.
Strickler, Sr., and his
older sister, Alice Deam.
He is survived by his wife
of 55 years, Nina Anne
Petticoffer Strickler of
Ephrata; daughter, Nina
Suzanne (Drew) Goddin
of Lake Mary, FL, granddaughter Carrie and
grandson Scott; son,
Charles Alfred (Jojo)
Strickler of Hilliard, OH,
and grandsons Niko and
Kristo.
While spending much
of his early childhood
in Greensboro, NC, his
family eventually moved
north to Philadelphia,
PA where he attended
Lower Merion High
School, lettering in four
sports. Upon graduation, he enlisted in
the U.S. Navy, serving

on the battleship, the
U.S.S. Wisconsin. He
later graduated from
Penn State University
and started working for
the family business in
Philadelphia, Charles
Strickler and Sons, a
wholesale grocery company. Once the company
sold, he moved his family
to Lancaster, PA, where
he worked for 18 years
at the Weaver Chicken
company as a regional
sales manager before
retiring and traveling
the world with his wife.
They eventually settled
in Dublin, OH, where
they’ve lived for the
past nine years. Al was
raised in the Moravian
Church and was most
recently a member of
the Worthington, OH
Presbyterian Church.
Al’s three big passions in
life were his family and
friends, cooking and eating great food and playing with his many dogs
over the years, including Judy, Schwartzie,
Gretchen and Molly.
A memorial celebration
will
be
held at Westminster
Presbyterian Church
in Lancaster, PA on
March 26 at 10 AM.
Condolences can be
made at tiddfuneralservice.com. Contributions
in Al’s honor are encouraged to be made to the
Capital Area Humane
Society at http://cahsp e t s. o r g / i -w a n t - t o help/donate.

Lynn R. “Skip” Hess

Lynn
R.
“ Skip” H ess ,
60, of New
Providence,
passed a w a y
on Thursda y,
J anuary 1 4,
2016 at home.
H e w as the
husband of Cindy K.
Kreider Hess to whom
he was married for 31
y ea rs. He w as b or n
in Lancaster, son of
Joann L. Brachendorf
He rsh eyy, m arri ed to
Da vid Hershey, East
Pe tersburg, and the
late Robert P. Hess.
He was a grounds and
maintenance superin tendent for Millersville
University before his
retirement in 2011. He
was a veteran of the US
Air Force; life member
of the NRA; a member of the Academy of
M odel A eronautics;
and enjo yed hunt i n g , f l y fi s h i n g , c o o king, yard work, Harley
Davidson Motorcycles;
and NASCAR, with Dale
Earnhardt, Sr. as his favorite driver.

Surviving in addition
to his wife, mother, and
step-father, his stepmother: Brenda S. Hess,
Conestoga. One daughter: Jennifer L. (Jason
D.) Rowland, Pequea.
Two grandchildren:
Zoe K. and Zachary C.
Rowland. Three sisters:
Kimberly A. (Andrew)
Youndt, Manheim;
K aren L. (Donald)
Carter, Quarryville;
and Kathryn M. (Chris)
Skiles, Quarryville. Two
half-bro thers: Da vid
Hersheyy, Bainbridg e;
and Brian R. (Carrie)
Hess, Lancaster.
The family requests
hat those atttending the
that
service should wear blue
jeans.
The Funeral Service
will be held at the
Funeral
W orkman
e t
Homes, Inc., 114 Wes
Main Street, Mountville,
e
y, January
on Wednesda
.
20, 2016 at 3:00 P.M.
with Pastor Charles A.
Deutsch, off iciating.
Interment in Creswell
Ceme tery with Full
Military
Honors.
Friends ma y call at
he Wo
orkman Funeral
the
Homes, Inc. from 2:00
P..M. to 3:00 P..M. Please
omit flowers. Memorial
contributions may be
made in his memory
to: Lancaster County
Veteran’s Affairs. To
send an online condolence, visit:
Workmanfuneralhomes
.
o
com

Simple, Dignified
Cremation Services
at a Much Lower Cost

Mary K. Rosier, 84,
of Spring Run at Willow
Valley entered into rest
at The Glen at Willow
Valley on Thursday,
January 14, 2016.
Born in Crawford
County, PA, Mary was
the eldest daughter of
six children of John and
Sarah Katulich who had
immigrated to America.
Her early life was often
difficult and much was
expected of her.
Following graduation from high school in
1948, Mary worked in a
factory for eight years.
She married her husband, Mel, in 1952, less
than a month before
he was called into the
Army. Mary remained at
home working and caring for her mother while
Mel served in Korea.
After Mel’s discharge
from the service, Mary
joined him in State
College, PA, where Mel
was attending Penn
State. She immediately
found employment at
the university to help
finance family expenses.
Following graduation from college, Mel
taught high school for
five years. During this
time, Mary fulfilled
her dream to become
a teacher by completing studies at Edinboro
University graduating in 1964 with a B.S.
Degree in Elementary
Education. She later

William E.
Shelley

William E. Shelley,
77
7, of Lititz, PA
A, passed
away
on
We d n e s d a y,
J anuary
6,
2016 at his residence.
H e w as the hus band off the late Sue A.
Eckhardt Shelleyy, Ph.D,
who passed away in
2007
7. Born in Decatur,
IL, he was the son of
Frank Shelley and Belva
Peters Peel.
Bill had been an attorney for 20 years,
practicing in Illinois and
Florida.
H e w a s a U S A r my
veteran, serving as a
Captain. He had been
s tationed in South
Korea and the US.
He enjoyed playing
old time Americana folk
music on his guitar.
He is survived by
his daughter, Mary
K. Shelley, married
to Ralph Dubayah of
University Park, MD; his
2 grandsons, Wyyatt and
Bryce Dubayah and his
brotherr, Donald Shelley
of Macon, IL.
Services will be held
in Decatur, IL. Please
make contributions in
Bill’s memory to the
Paralyzed Veterans of
America, 801 18th St.
NW
W, Washington, DC
20006. To send an online condolence, please
visit
SnydeerrFuneralHo
ome.com

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taught kindergarten for
20 years at Drumore
Elementary School in
Solanco School District.
Throughout her life,
Mary faithfully supported her husband and
her children. She never
deviated from her primary responsibilities
of being a wife and a
mother. If one were to
describe Mary in one
word – that word would
be determined – she
never quit and, truly,
was a remarkable person.
Surviving in addition
to her husband, Mel,
are a son, Kyle, of San
Fransisco; and a daughter, Elise Bjordammen,
and her husband,
David, of Blue Bell, PA,
as well at two grandchildren, Gwyneth and
Joel Bjordammen of
Blue Bell, and her sister
Lois Ostryniec of Erie,
PA. Mary was preceded
in death by her brothers, Rudolph, Michael,
Charles and Anthony
Katulich.
A viewing will take
place from 10 to 11 am,
followed by the funeral
at 11 am, with the Rev.
David R. Alderson officiating, on Wednesday,
January 20, 2016,
at Wesley United
Methodist Church, 40
W. Main St., Strasburg,
PA 17579. Interment in
Strasburg Cemetery.
Please omit flowers.
Kindly consider a memorial contribution
in Mary’s name to the
Lampeter- Strasburg
Education Foundation,
Box 528, Lampeter, PA
17537.
To place a condolence
online, please visit
SnyderFuneralHome.com

Paul T. Buller

Paul T. Buller, 62, of
Mount Joy, passed away
on Tuesday,
January
1 2, 20 16
at Golden
L i v i n g
Center,
Wes
e t Shore.
Born in Lancaster, he
was the son of the late
Theodore P. and Patsy
(Sourbough) Buller.
Paul grew up in
Florin. He later worked
for AMP
P. Paul enjoyed
camping, fishing, hunting and was an avid
Philadelphia sports fan.
He was a member of the
Mount Joy American
Legion Post 185.
P au l is su rv i v e d
by a daughter, Sara
Muehling wife of Matt,
of
Elizabe thto wn;
a
g r a n d d a u g h t e r,
Madison Muehling, of
Elizabethtown; and many uncles and cousins.
A memorial service
honoring Paul’s life will
be held at the Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.,
16 East Main Street,
Mount Joy, on Monday,
February 8, 2016 at 11
AM. Family and friends
will be received at the
fu ne ra l h om e be for e
the service from 10 AM
to 11 AM. Interment
will be private. In lieu
of flowers, memorial
contributions may be
made to the Mount Joy
American Legion Post
185, 255 Wes
e t Main
Street, Mount Joy, PA
17552.
To send an online
condolence, please visit
www .shee tzfuneral home.com
Sheetz
Funeral Home, Inc.
Mount Joy

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Living

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

n SEND STORY TIPS & INFO TO: JON FERGUSON, 291-8839, JFERGUSON@LNPNEWS.COM

Lancaster

B

Movie magic
Members of the arts community
recall most memorable films
n Entertainment, page B4

ALSO INSIDE: TRAVEL & BOOKS

James Adams, left, and his
brother, John Adams, are
shown on the set of the
film “Waffle Street,” which
is based on a memoir by
James Adams, who appears
in the movie as an extra.

JAY DROWNS

MOVIES

Forkful of finance
Film adaptation of local man’s memoir to be screened in Carlisle

JENELLE JANCI

W

der cook whom Adams befriends.
The film adaptation of “Waffle Street” will
be screened at the Carlisle Theatre on Saturday, Jan. 30. The film has been shown at numerous film festivals throughout the country
since its September premiere and has won
awards for best narrative feature at the Hollywood Film Festival, the audience award for
best feature at the Red Rock Film Festival and
the Carpe Diem Andretta Award at the Woodstock Film Festival.
The film recently has been acquired by
MarVista Entertainment and will reach audiences worldwide this spring, according to its
website.
“The storyline itself is kind of inspirational,” says Leslie Sterner, the theater manager
at Carlisle Theatre. “It gives people hope. The
local draw, of course, is even better.”

JJANCI@LNPNEWS.COM

hile on a business trip to Kansas City, James Adams anticipated an important phone call
while he grabbed some lunch
at a barbecue restaurant.
Adams was waiting for word about who
would play him in the film adaptation of his
memoir, “Waffle Street,” which recounts Adams’ transition from a product manager at
a $30 billion money management firm to a
waiter at a 24-hour waffle diner after the financial crisis of 2008. The book interweaves
lessons in finance and business with vignettes
from his time serving waffles.
“The Secret Service comes in this restaurant while we’re waiting in line,” says Adams,
who lives in Lancaster. “Like, ‘You either
need to leave, or you need to subject yourself
to a pat-down. We have an important visitor.’
’’ Patrons also were instructed not to take any
phone calls during President Barack Obama’s
visit. Sure enough, the film’s screenwriter and
producer, Autumn McAlpin, called as he was
eating his barbecue near the president.
“I’m like, ‘You’re not going to believe this,
but I’d rather take this phone call than meet
the president,’ ’’ Adams says. “It was more important to me than meeting the president. I
want to know who’s going to play me. This is
a big deal.’ ’’
Turns out, James Lafferty, who played Nathan Scott in the television series “One Tree
Hill,” was picked to play Adams in the film.
Actor Danny Glover, best known as Detective
Sgt. Roger Murtaugh in the “Lethal Weapon”
film series, assumes the role of the short-or-

Area beginnings
Adams grew up in Mechanicsburg and attended school in the Cumberland Valley
School District until his was in fifth grade,
when his parents sent him to Harrisburg
Academy. He was the captain of the lacrosse
team and a member of the swim team, graduating as salutatorian.
He excelled in history and political science
classes, and eventually decided on an accounting finance major at Wake Forest University.
“Finance is a very comprehensive discipline,” Adams says. “If you’re a generalist like
I was, it’s like a kid in a candy store, because
you have to know a little about everything.”

IF YOU GO
n What: “Waffle Street” screening
n Where: Carlisle Theatre, 40 W.
High St., Carlisle
n When: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 30
n Cost: $10
n More info: carlisletheatre.org

WAFFLE, page B17

MUSIC

Teen finds strength through songs
Maryland girl releases first EP, recorded at Lancaster’s Atrium Audio
JENELLE JANCI
JJANCI@LNP.COM

For Chloe Wildman,
a song’s got to have
meaning.
On the high school
sophomore’s debut
EP,
“Unbroken”
— released Friday
and recorded at
Lancaster’s Atrium
Audio — she tackles
heavy topics like betrayal, deception and
heartbreak.
“Writing is the way
that I express emotion,
good or bad,” Chloe
says. “All of these song

55

up
to

Fa
Sp cto
ec ry
ial
%
s
Off

are obviously pretty
negative, but they are
a good way to feel better. It’s a way of putting
down my emotions on
a piece of paper, being
able to look down and
deal with them.”
Did we mention she’s
15?
Chloe was born in
Sinking Spring and
moved to Lonaconing,
Maryland, when she
was 10.
“I’ve always just sung,
even if I really didn’t
know words,” Chloe
says. “I just hummed a

tune.”
She says she made
her first attempt at
songwriting at age 6
and started a YouTube
Channel when she
was in eighth grade,
inspired by other YouTubers she watched
online.
“I admired them being able to say, ‘This is
who I am,’ and putting
it out there on the Internet for everyone to
see,” Chloe says.
She used the channel
as an outlet for humor-

“Unbroken,” Chloe Wildman’s
debut EP, features original
songs by the 15-year-old
Maryland resident.

MUSIC, page B3

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Mon, Thurs 9am-9pm; Tues, Wed, Fri, Sat 9am- 5pm
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B2

LIVING

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

MOVIES

Oscars again snub people of color
Tone-deaf academy also ignores ‘The Force Awakens’ and other box-office blockbusters
STEVE PERSALL
TAMPA BAY TIMES

Hollywood bit the
hand feeding it Thursday when the 88th annual Academy Awards
nominations were announced.
Then, it shotgun-blasted its foot for good measure.
Fresh off a recordsetting $11 billion year
at U.S. box offices, the
Oscars decreed Hollywood’s most valuable
movie, “Star Wars: The
Force Awakens,” isn’t
worthy of a best picture
nomination.
And neither are any
2015 movies about, or
performances by African-Americans, a year
after #OscarSo
White trended on
Twitter. Instead, “The
Revenant” led with 12
nominations, followed
by George “Miller’s Mad
Max: Fury Road” with 10
and Ridley Scott’s “The
Martian” with seven.
This year’s comedian
host Chris Rock got
plenty of monologue
material from Thursday’s announcements.
He’ll roast the major
award snubbings of “Star
Wars: The Force Awakens” and the NWA biopic
“Straight Outta Comp-

ton,” in addition to actors Will Smith, Samuel
L. Jackson, Idris Elba
and Michael B. Jordan,
whose
performances
have been rewarded
elsewhere.
Others won’t see the
humor in an institution
remaining so unrepresentative of the public
supporting its cause.

Downward trend
A downward trend
in TV ratings indicates
the red carpet glow is
fading, so the academy
would benefit by attracting a more diverse crowd
through its nominations.
Bring in more viewers of
color, or of geekdom, by
celebrating their movies,
too.
“Star Wars: The Force
Awakens” did receive
five Academy Award
nominations in technical categories, so quality
isn’t the issue.
Moviegoers
haven’t
plunked down more
than $820 million to appreciate sound mixing,
and “The Force Awakens” isn’t revered only
for its visual effects. Buying John Williams’ nominated musical score on
iTunes would be cheaper
than a movie ticket, if

that were the main attraction.
Six years ago, the academy expanded its number of best picture finalists to as many as 10,
after “The Dark Knight”
was similarly stiffed.
The reasoning then was
more slots meant better
chances for blockbusters
to be nominated.
This year there are
eight movies contending for the best picture
Oscar.
“The Force Awakens”
could fill the remaining
two spots by itself.
Movies don’t come
any blockier or bustier.
Disney’s continuation
of the Skywalker saga is
poised to sell $1 billion in
tickets to U.S. moviegoers. Worldwide grosses
will end up behind only
James Cameron’s “Avatar” — which earned a
best picture Oscar nomination — and ahead of
Cameron’s
“Titanic,
“which won the prize.
Yet in the academy’s
balloting math, quality
plus popularity multiplied by four decades of
an
industry-changing
franchise doesn’t equal
a best picture candidate.
Be assured that potential advertisers on ABC’s
Academy Awards broad-

Restaurant inspections
The Pennsylvania
Department of Agriculture,
866-366-3723, uses a
“risk-based” inspection
reporting process for
restaurants and other food
handlers.
Asian Market LLC, 248
E. Liberty St., Jan. 8. No
violations.
Lancaster Cupcake, 120
N. Duke St., Jan. 8. No
violations.
The Bakers Table, 480 New
Holland Ave., Suite 300,
Jan. 8. Food employee
in deli area not wearing
proper hair restraints, such
as nets, hats, or beard
covers.
US Gas Mart, 401 N. Lime
St., Jan. 8. New food facility
in operation more than 90
days has not employed
a certified supervisory
employees as required.
Raw eggs stored above
ready-to-eat foods in walkin refrigerator. Women’s
toilet room not provided
with covered waste
receptacle for sanitary
napkins. Mops not being
hung to air-dry.

W. Grant St., Jan. 5. No
violations.

Tec Centro, 102 Chester St.,
Jan. 7. No violations.

Burgard Elementary
School, 111 S. Penn St.,
Manheim, Jan. 5. No
violations.

La Academia Partnership
Charter School, 30 N. Ann
St., Jan. 6. No violations.
Old Country Buffet, 1700L
Fruitville Pike, Jan. 6. No
violations.
Par Cafe at Liberty Place,
313 W. Liberty Place, Jan. 6.
No violations.
Peking Palace Restaurant,
1025 Dillerville Road, Jan.
6. Food prep area hood, a
nonfood contact surface, is
not cleaned at a frequency
to preclude accumulation
of grease. Preset tableware
for customers is not
displayed so that only
handles are touched by
consumers and employees.
Paint is peeling from walls
behind equipment in food
prep area, and walls are not
durable and smooth.

Mean Cup, Central Market,
Jan. 8. No violations.

Phoenix Academy, 630
Rockland St., Jan. 6. No
violations.

Stoltzfus Fresh Meats LLC,
Central Market, Jan. 8. No
violations.

Reynolds Middle School,
605 W. Walnut St., Jan. 6.
No violations.

El Jibarito Restaurant,
546 S. Lime St., Jan. 7. No
violations.

Sheetz Store No. 421, 1180
Manheim Pike, Jan. 6. No
violations.

Farnum Street East, 33
E. Farnum St., Jan. 7. No
violations.

Simply From Scratch, 2317
W. Chestnut St., Jan. 6. No
violations.

John J. Jeffries, 300
Harrisburg Pike, Jan. 7. No
violations.

Barr’s Farms, Central
Market, Jan. 5. No
violations.

Nissley Wine Shop, 481

Brogue Hydroponics, 2

cast on Feb. 28 didn’t like
the news. The network
charges
near-Super
Bowl rates for ad time,
and a best picture chance
for “The Force Awakens”
would keep eyes glued
until the last minute.

Highest ratings
It isn’t coincidence
that the show’s highest
ratings ever — 55 million
viewers — occurred in
1998 when Titanic, then
the top grosser ever, won
a boatload of Oscars.
Quick solution: Create a major award or two
for most folks watching at home, who won’t
see “Carol” but loved
“Furious 7” (another

Kum-Essa, 2 W. Grant St.,
Jan. 5. No violations.

Park City Center, Jan. 7. No
violations.

Family Dollar Store No.
11181, 420 N. Franklin St.,
Jan. 6. No violations.

LUCASFILM

Peter Mayhew as Chewbacca and Harrison Ford as Han Solo are shown in a scene from
“Star Wars: The Force Awakens.”

Dunkin Donuts, 1838
Fruitville Pike, follow-up,
Jan. 5. No violations.
Ephrata Middle School,
957 Hamilton Road,
Ephrata, Jan. 5. No
violations.
Ephrata Senior High
School, 803 Oak Road,
Ephrata, Jan. 5. No
violations.
Fairland School, 8 Fairland
Road, Manheim, Jan. 5. No
violations.
Gap Citgo Truck Stop,
54 Route 41, Gap, followup, Jan. 5. Food facility
has employee who held
a certified food manager
certificate; however,
certificate has expired.
Three-compartment
sink does not have drain
plugs to maintain water
level in sink basins for
proper wash/rinse/sanitize
procedure. Food facility
does not have available
chlorine sanitizer test strips
or test kit to determine
appropriate chlorine
sanitizer concentration.
Sanitizer not being used
to sanitize utensils and
equipment. Hand-wash
sink in store area does not
have single-use towels,
continuous towels, or airdrying device.
John R. Stoner Vegetables,
Central Market, Jan. 5. No
violations.
Kmart No. 9662, 1127 S.
State St., Ephrata, Jan. 5.
No violations.

Linden Dale Farms, 2
W. Grant St., Jan. 5. No
violations.
Martin’s Country Kitchen,
2853 Hershey Road,
Elizabethtown, Jan. 5.
Food facility does not
have available sanitizer
test strips or test kit to
determine appropriate
sanitizer concentration.
McQueen’s White Horse
Inn, 5589 Old Philadelphia
Pike, Gap, Jan. 5. Ham,
chicken, cheese were
held at 48 degrees in
refrigerator, rather than
41 degrees or below as
required.Items discarded.
Food facility does not
have available quaternary
sanitizer test strips or test
kit to determine appropriate
sanitizer concentration. Soda
gun in bar area has black,
moist residue accumulation;
cleaned. Lights not shielded
or shatterproof over food
prep area.
Mount Pepper, 1930
Columbia Ave., follow-up,
Jan. 5. Working containers
in ware-washing area, used
for storing cleaners taken
from bulk supplies, were
not marked with common
name of chemical; repeat
violation. Person in charge
has failed in their managerial
duties in following the state
food code and ensuring
food safety; repeat violation.
Food facility is using chlorine
at an extremely high
concentration of 300 ppm,
not approved in the Code
of Federal Regulations for
food contact sanitizing at
this level; repeat violation.
Burn medicine stored above
food prep area rather than
in employee locker; repeat
violation. Two employees’
open beverage containers
were in back food prep
area; repeat violation. Food
utensils in back food prep
area stored in container of
water not maintained at 135
degrees; repeat violation.

blockbuster
snubbed
Thursday). Make room
by handing out technical
awards earlier, like the
Grammys.
Oscar’s recent color
barrier — two years running with all-white acting nominees — isn’t as
easily corrected. In recent years the academy
added members of color,
increasing diversity but
obviously not enough.
One suggestion: Expand the acting and
directing races to 10
nominees. The move
did make the academy’s
best picture voting more
inclusive of small films
like “Room,” if not box
office hits. It might allow smaller groups sup-

porting, for example,
director Ryan Coogler
(“Creed”) or “Straight
Outta Compton” to be
heard.
“Creed” and “Straight
Outta Compton” each
earned one Oscar nomination. Both went to
white artists: Sylvester Stallone for playing
Rocky Balboa again, and
two screenwriters, one
a self-described “white
Jewish gay guy from
Connecticut.”
Even when the academy gets it right, it comes
out wrong. Rock will roll
with this material, on another Oscar night whiter
than Kylo Ren’s stormtroopers.

Food employee not using
available sanitizer test strips
or test kit to determine
sanitizer concentration;
new violation. Heavy
accumulation of old food
residue on splash guard and
underside of floor-model
mixer; repeat violation. Old
food residue on cleavers
and knives; repeat violation.
The plumbing for threecompartment sink is
completely disconnected
and leaking; new violation.
Lights are not shielded or
shatterproof over cook line;
new violation.

blade and meat slicer. Old
food residue in back of bain
maries. Excessive grease,
food residue and debris in
trough area behind cook
line. Clean food equipment
in ware-washing area, stored
wet in manner that does not
allow for draining and/or airdrying (wet nesting). Handwash sink in ware-washing
area does not have water
at a temperature of at least
100 degrees. Facility does
have hand-wash sink located
outside of food prep area
with water at 100 degrees.
Leak under bowl of handwash sink in ware-washing
area. Missing and cracked
tiles around mop sink area.
Rodentlike droppings in
back storage area.

MoviE-Town Cinema
8, 700 N. Hanover St.,
Elizabethtown, Jan. 5. No
violations.
Neffsville Sunoco, 2548
Lititz Pike, Jan. 5. Cleaning
detergent for retail sale
displayed on shelving above
snack foods. Raw shell eggs
stored above milk in reach-in
cooler.

Tulip Tree Hill Farm, 2
W. Grant St., Jan. 5. No
violations.

Pureblend Tea, 2 W. Grant
St., Jan. 5. No violations.

Albright Life, 417 W.
Frederick St., Jan. 4. No
violations.

Riverbound, 2 W. Grant St.,
Jan. 5. No violations.
S. Clyde Weaver Inc., 1509
Lititz Pike, B, Jan. 5. No
violations.
Sweethearts of Lancaster,
Central Market, Jan. 5. No
violations.
Thomas Produce, Central
Market, Jan. 5. No violations.
Trio Bar and Grill, 3707
Marietta Ave., Columbia,
change of owners, Jan.
5. Food facility is using
chlorine at an extremely
high concentration of 200
ppm, not approved in the
Code of Federal Regulations
for food contact sanitizing at
this level. Food employees in
food prep area, not wearing
beard cover. Excessive ice
buildup on freezer door due
to the walk-in cooler door
not closing properly. Old
food residue on can opener

U Thai, 2359 Oregon Pike,
change of owners, Jan. 5. No
violations.

Applebee’s No. 9270, 2321
Lincoln Highway E., Jan. 4.
Two gallons of milk used
for beverages with expired
use-by dates. Ice build-up
around freezer door and
along base of walls on
interior of walk-in cooler,
indicating walls are not
sealed between freezer and
walk-in units. Fan guards
on condensing units in
walk-in cooler have static
dust accumulation. Old
food residues in hand-wash
sink in ware-wash area,
indicating uses other than
hand-washing.
Caruso’s Italian
Restaurant, 2933 Willow
Street Pike, Willow Street,
opening, Jan. 4. No
violations.
College Hill Children’s
Center, 417 W. Frederick
St., Jan. 4. No violations.

INSPECTIONS, page B17

Customer
Appreciation Week!
Any Half Bone in Ham

$39.99

2350 Lincoln Hwy East, Lancaster, PA • 717-208-3595
In the Kohl’s Shopping Center
HoneybakedHamLancaster.com
Must present coupon. Not good with other offers or coupons.
Valid at the Lancaster Honeybaked Store Expires 2/6/16

Mindy Donecker Beatty,
of

4 Sturgis Lane
Lane, Lititz
Lititz, PA 117543
75 • 717-627-7856
7543
Mon-Sat 10am-5pm; Second Friday til 9pm

LOCAL/ADVICE

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

AMY DICKINSON
ASK AMY

Artist copes with
unsolicited artless advice
DEAR AMY: I’m an artist hoping to get a career
in art, specifically as an illustrator.
Three years ago, I graduated with an art
degree and have since been working to make
that happen: doing a lot of research, building a
portfolio and exploring all my options.
I work part time to keep myself fed, but otherwise I’m always drawing, painting and networking.
From what I’ve learned, it takes years before
most artists can quit their day jobs. I’m prepared for this; I’m in no way lazy, but I know it
will take me a long time. I keep my head down
and keep trying.
My family and friends are very supportive,
which is wonderful, but there’s one big problem. They don’t understand why it’s taking me
so long to get an art job, thus they’re always
offering me art advice, though they aren’t artists themselves — advice on what to paint, how
much to sell for, who to work for and so on.
Sometimes the advice is a little ridiculous, if not
insulting: “Just go work for Disney” or “Nobody
wants to buy those kinds of paintings. Paint
portraits; those will sell.” Or, “Do it for the exposure if you have to.”
They don’t trust that I know what I’m doing,

and they don’t recognize how hard I’m working. It gets to the point I don’t want to talk
about my art at all. I want to enjoy my family
get-togethers again. How can I let on (politely)
that I’m not interested in their bombardment of
ill-informed advice? — Struggling Artist
DEAR STRUGGLING: Everybody’s an expert, and
the less people know about your particular field, the
more “expert” their advice becomes.
What you are going through is akin to people telling a certain struggling writer (yours truly), “You
should write a book and get Oprah to endorse it!”
This sort of statement might actually be a vote of
confidence from the person offering it; unfortunately, instead it highlights the fact that none of these
spectacular goals has been met. It’s a quick way to
feel like a loser.
Don’t stop talking about your work (if you’re
asked) — or avoid or ignore this unsolicited advice
— but look for effective ways to cope with it. “You
should work for Disney” could be met with — “That
might be very cool. Do you know anyone there I can
call?”
Remember always that this is really your fan club;
they’re just disguised as a Greek chorus of know-italls.
DEAR AMY: Two months ago, I got married.
Up until the night before my wedding, I was
given the impression that my mother and
stepfather would be there. It wasn’t until my
rehearsal that I found out they weren’t coming.
I was devastated. My mom and I had a bond
that I thought couldn’t be broken.
I found out that the reason she didn’t come
was because my husband isn’t religious.
How do I move on from this? She texted me
on my one-month anniversary, and it was like
nothing had happened. Every time I think

Music: Teen releases EP
Continued from B1

ous musings and her
covers of popular songs
such as Sam Smith’s
“Stay With Me” and Gotye’s “Somebody That I
Used To Know.” She was
just hoped to get some
feedback on her singing and says received
the most comment on
her original song “Paralyzed.”
“It was the first song
I ever showed to anybody,” Chloe recalls. “I
showed it to one of my
friends. It originally
started with me messing around on my guitar.”
“Paralyzed” deals with
a concern many highschoolers have, struggling to show their true
identity.
The song talks about
how “you’re so distracted by the image
that somebody puts out
there or the words that
they’re saying (that) you
miss who they actually
are, … and sometimes
that can end up messy,”
she explains.

Meaningful
messages
Chloe says she admires how her favorite
bands Panic! at the Disco and Paramore make
music with meaningful
messages.
“You’ll find a lot of
songs now that don’t
have any meaning. Or if
they do have meaning,
it’s rude to some person,” Chloe says.

“But with Panic! at the
Disco and Paramore,
they focus on social
problems. …They just
have a lot of meaning behind their lyrics. That’s
a really important thing
to me, to be able to relate to a song.”
“Unbroken” features
four original songs —
with meaning — recorded at Atrium Audio.
The album is available
on iTunes, Google Play,
Amazon Music and
Spotify. CDs are available for purchase on her
website, chloewildman.
com.
“They all definitely
have a view to them,”
Chloe says. “They all
come from experiences
that I’ve had.”
Chloe’s mom, Carisa
Fazenbaker-Wildman,
bought her studio time
to record some cover
songs as a birthday present.
When Chloe quickly
finished the cover songs,
she decided to record
“Paralyzed,” and went
back to record more
originals.
Chloe worked with
Grant McFarland and
Carson Slovak at Atrium
Audio., located at 440 N.
Prince St. Grant McFarland and Carson Slovak
of Atrium Audio have
worked with August
Burns Red, Texas in July
and From Ashes to New.
They’re also the driving
force behind Galactic
Empire, the metal Star
Wars tribute band with
a music video that went

viral.
“Since I recorded my
first song with them,
it feels like I can only
grow from there,” Chloe
says. “They don’t seem
to ever be disappointed
in me. They seem to be
proud of me, whether
my voice cracks or not.”

Cancer research
Once the album was
finished, Chloe decided
to donate 10 percent of
its sales to ovarian cancer research.
“Recently, my greataunt passed away from
ovarian cancer,” Chloe
says.
“I really wanted to
do something with that.
She was a very caring
person, so I wanted to
honor her.”
Chloe
occasionally
performs with The
Cramer Brothers at a
restaurant near her
home, where she’s
shared some of her
original music, and
her music plays on local radio. That’s not
bad for a high-schooler
who’s also juggling being sophomore student
council president as
well as a member of the
French club and multiple choral groups.
Hearing her songs on
the radio is “not something that just happened
in a day,” Chloe says.
“It’s something that I
wanted to do and I was
determined to do, but
I never believed would
happen.”

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

about it though, I get angry and hurt all over
again.
Where does someone go from here? — Heartache in OR
DEAR HEARTACHE: You need to communicate
directly with your mother about this. She is obviously a terrible communicator, and she is trying to
ignore and move on from a very deliberate and hurtful action on her part.
You should choose to be honest, direct and transparent about this. The only way you can repair your
relationship is to raise this issue, personally, with
your mother. Understand that she will duck and dive
in order to avoid this confrontation. She may blame
her husband or yours. But she should answer for
her own choice, and your goal should be to be calm,
completely honest and to find a way to accept that
this reveals your mother’s deficits, not yours.
DEAR AMY: I really don’t get your answer to
“Wondering,” the man who received a fundraising solicitation out of the blue to help pay
the funeral expenses of an ex-girlfriend who
had dumped him unceremoniously 35 years
before.
If he wanted to recognize this ex, he could easily donate to a charity in her memory or send
flowers or simply send a card to the family. —
Bewildered
DEAR BEWILDERED: Great advice. It has become more common for people to send out a wide
net fundraising for any number of things; anyone
who is solicited in this way should investigate the
request and make an informed decision about donating.

n Contact Amy Dickinson via email: askamy@tribpub.com.

You can also follow her on Twitter @askingamy or “like” her on
Facebook.

HAWAII

Baby with brain damage first
US case tied to Zika virus
DONALD G. MCNEIL JR.
THE NEW YORK TIMES

The first case of brain
damage linked to the
Zika virus within the
United States was reported Friday in Hawaii.
The Hawaii State
Department of Health
said that a baby born in
an Oahu hospital with
microcephaly — an unusually small head and
brain — had been infected with the Zika virus, which is believed to
have caused the same
damage in thousands
of babies in Brazil in recent months.
The presence of the
virus was confirmed by
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
The child’s mother
had lived in Brazil in
May last year and probably was infected by a
mosquito then, early
in her pregnancy, the
health
department
said. The virus presum-

ably reached the embryo and damaged its
developing brain.
“We are saddened by
the events that have affected this mother and
her newborn,” Dr. Sarah Park, Hawaii’s state
epidemiologist, said in
a statement.
Also on Friday, the
CDC recommended that
pregnant women consider postponing travel
to any countries or regions with active Zika
virus transmission.
As of Saturday, those
included 17 Latin
American and Caribbean countries and
territories: Barbados,
Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador,
French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti,
Honduras, Martinique,
Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Saint Martin, Suriname, Venezuela and
the Commonwealth of
Puerto Rico.

Births
BROWN, Seth U. and
Stephanie (Bender),
Columbia, a son, at
Women & Babies
Hospital, Tuesday.
DeJESUS, Eliana M.,
and John Luis Cotto,
Lancaster, a daughter,
at Women & Babies
Hospital, Monday.
HUNT, David C. and Jodi
(Lacock), Washington
Boro, a son, at Women
& Babies Hospital,
Tuesday.
MILLISOCK, Bryan M.,
and Tarsheima Davis,
Adamstown, a son,
at WellSpan Ephrata
Community Hospital,
Thursday.
TORRES, Efrain A. and
Tara (Miller), Lancaster,
a daughter, at Women &
Babies Hospital, Jan. 10.

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LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Entertainment
FILMMAKING

THE POWER OF MOVIES
“Strictly Ballroom”

“The Sound of Music”

“It’s a Wonderful Life”

“Toutes les Matins du Mond”

“The World’s Fastest Indian”

“To Kill a Mockingbird”

“The Wizard of Oz”

“The Fountainhead”

Members of the regional arts community recount some of the films that changed their lives
JANE HOLAHAN

AARON YOUNG

One hundred twenty years ago this
month, a landmark silent movie was
released that made it clear that film
was a powerful force.
Film pioneers August and Louis
Lumiere released “L’Arrivée d’un
Train,” a 50-second film showing a
train arriving at a station.
The brothers were experimenting with 3D, and when that huge
train came roaring onto the screen,
audience members in Paris started
screaming and running to the back of
the theater, convinced it was going to
run them down.
Movies have held a power over us
ever since.
Movies that made our hearts break,
movies we can watch again and again,
movies that helped determine our
careers, influenced our values and
shaped the way we think of the world.
We asked members of the Lancaster
arts community what movies had the
most impact on their lives.
Here’s what they had to say, with responses edited for space:

Managing director of Fulton Theatre:
“Strictly Ballroom”

JHOLAHAN@LNPNEWS.COM

The moral about a life lived in fear is
a life half-lived has given me courage to
do what I’m passionate about despite
the naysayers around me.

moving. ... When I saw it first, I already
knew what I wanted to do. This movie
gave me a taste of how good it could be.

KATHLEEN SPENCER
Director of the Early Music Series at St.
James Episcopal Church: “Toutes les
Matins du Mond”

theater, and trying to find the time to
spend with my son and family. I knew I
was exhausted and burning the candle
at both ends. (Bob Fosse directed the
film, his own life story, including his
own death scene.) The zipper pulled
around the body bag while a vamp of
“No Business Like Show Business”
accompanied the closing credits, convinced me that it was time to change
the direction of my life.

Filmmaker: “The Wizard of Oz”
As a child, I saw this many times,
and it never fails to transport you into
a completely different and amazing
world, a world full of fear and hope and
friends and longing. As a child, this film
introduced me to the power of cinema,
and watching it thrills me to this day.
It’s hard to top the moment you fell in
love.

When I first saw it in 1991, I loved it
because it captured how for composers and performers music is more than
what they do; it is who they are. Somewhere around 1997, the movie aired
on TV and within 15 minutes the tears
were streaming down my face. I went
into the next room and opened up the
case that held my viola de gamba (an
early cello that’s featured in the movie), which hadn’t been touched in over
10 years. It was at that moment that I
decided I wanted to play again.

DAVID DISAVINO

DAVE DIERWECHTER

DAVID NICE

Executive producer of Rainbow’s
Comedy Playhouse: “The Producers”

Theater director: “All That Jazz”

Playwright: “To Kill a Mockingbird”

I was very involved with several organizations in leadership capacities,
directing educational and community

For me, I’m not sure there is a better
fictional hero than Atticus Finch. He’s a

MARY HAVERSTICK

The original, 1967, not the musical.
It is smart and sharp and cutting and

ANNE MEEDER
Actress, singer: “The Sound of Music”

I left the Philadelphia theater (at age
6) believing I was Julie Andrews and
sang all the way home in the back seat
of my parents’ Country Squire station
wagon. I was told later that my dad
turned to my mom and said, “That little girl can sing!”

MOVIES, page B5

THEATER

Millersville’s ‘Dead’ refuses to die

JENELLE JANCI
UNSCRIPTED

Bowie was an inspiration
for many popular musicians
One of my friends
had a habit of daydreaming in middle
school.
He was particularly
bad at feigning interest. More often than
not, his vacant stare
would be a pretty obvious marker that he had
checked out of that
day’s lesson.
Our teacher would
become so frustrated,
she’d saunter over to
his desk determined
to wake him from his
spaced-out state while
simultaneously embarrassing him.
“Ground Control
to Major Tom,” she’d
belt in his face, doing
a sincere injustice to
David Bowie’s “Space
Oddity.” I blushed on
my friend’s behalf.
That was the first
time I heard Bowie’s
music.
Bowie, who died last
Sunday, paved the way
for so much more than
suburban teachers

David Bowie

embarrassing their students. His work carved
entire genres, inspired
countless musicians
and gave androgyny
and sexual liberation a
mainstream platform
for discussion.
I have Bowie to thank
for so many of my
favorite artists today.
Here’s just a sampling:

Brandon
Flowers
Flowers says hearing
Bowie’s “Changes” inspired him to drop out
of school and pursue
music. Flowers was
one of the most popu-

BOWIE, page B5

University production recently honored with festival staging at West Chester
JANE HOLAHAN

JHOLAHAN@LNPNEWS.COM

In the world of college theater,
being asked to “bring a show to
festival” is a high honor.
Millersville University theater
professor Tony Elliot and the cast
of “Bury the Dead” got that honor
for their production, which originally was staged in April at Rafters
Theatre.
It was one of eight shows invited
to the Kennedy Center American
College Theater Festival, Region
II, held this week at West Chester
University.
There are eight regions across
the country, and it’s estimated
that 20,000 theater students and
700 academic institutions are involved in the festival. Region II includes all of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Washington, D.C.,
and New Jersey. It also includes
western New York, northern Virginia, Ohio and West Virginia.

The process
Throughout the school year,
hundreds of plays are produced
at colleges and universities, and
“respondents” — mostly professors from other schools in the region — are asked to see each show,
then talk to the students about it,
remaining as objective as possible.

The cast of Millersville University’s “Bury the Dead” includes, from left, Jules
Diehl, Ryland X. Beck and Christian Kriebel.

It is not criticism so much as an
exploration of how the show was
put on, the challenges and what
the students gained from the process.
“We talked a lot about the relevance of the show when the respondent came,” Elliot said of
“Bury the Dead.” “And we talked
about the challenges of engaging
an audience. The respondent said
he was immediately engaged and
moved right along with it until the
end.”
“Bury the Dead” was written in
1936 by Irwin Shaw, who would
become a best-selling novelist. It
is a starkly antiwar play.

In it, a military burial detail goes
about its sad duties, but the six
dead soldiers refuse to be buried.
Loved ones are called in to console
each dead soldier, to try to force
them to give up.
“I have known it for 25 years,
and whenever I look at it, sadly, it’s
been incredibly relevant,” Elliot
said.

Reprise
“Bury the Dead” was scheduled
to be performed three times last
Friday at West Chester.
“We go in on Thursday night and

PLAY, page B5

ENTERTAINMENT

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Bowie
Continued from B4

lar “guyliner”-wearing musicians
of the early 2000s, a clear homage
to Bowie’s frequent and fearless
use of makeup. The Killers’ frontman also is known for donning
flamboyant clothing onstage like
patterned and metallic blazers,
which harken back to Bowie’s
Ziggy Stardust days.
In an interview with British
music magazine NME, Flowers
actually admitting to stealing
the bassline from Bowie’s “Slow
Burn” for The Killers’ “All These
Things That I Have Done.” Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, I suppose.

choices —meat dress, anyone?
— are in part inspired by Bowie’s
extraterrestrial allure.
Just days before Bowie’s death,
Gaga (born Stefani Germanotta)
spoke on a podcast interview with
The Hollywood Reporter about
Bowie’s influence on her.
“When I fell in love with David
Bowie, when I was living on the
Lower East Side, I always felt that
his glamour was something he
was using to express a message to
people that was very healing for
their souls,” Gaga said. “He is a
true, true artist and I don’t know
if I ever went, ‘Oh, I’m going to be
that way like this,’ or if I arrived
upon it slowly, realizing it was my
calling and that’s what drew me
to him.’’

St. Vincent

Morrissey

Annie Clark, better known as
St. Vincent, has always been open
about Bowie’s enormous influence on her creative endeavors.
In January 2015, Clark discussed
Bowie’s music and fashion at
The Museum of Contemporary
Art Chicago’s “David Bowie Is”
exhibit.
Clark, a natural dark brunette,
dyed her curly locks a mystical
lavender hue around the time of
her self-titled “St. Vincent” album. She says part of her inspiration for such a drastic makeover
was inspired by Bowie’s orange
hairdo on the cover of 1975’s
“Young Americans.”

I love sad songs, so naturally, I
love Morrissey. The Smiths frontman says that when he was a teenager he deeply admired Bowie.
“Manchester then was full of
bootboys and skinheads and
macho-macho thugs,” Morrissey
told the BBC. “I saw Bowie’s appearance as the ultimate bravery. He was so important to me
because his vocal melodies were
so strong and his appearance was
so confrontational.”
Once Morrissey rose to his own
stardom, he actually had some
bad blood with Bowie. It seemed
to begin when Morrissey quit
just before he was supposed to
begin as the opening act of the
European leg of Bowie’s 1995
tour. The pair squabbled again
when Morrissey wanted to use an

Lady Gaga
Gaga’s outrageous fashion

Movies
Continued from B4

man who does the right
thing skillfully, even
when it’s difficult and
unpopular. I would guess
that what most strongly influences us in life
happens in those years
between, say, age 8 and
perhaps 15. That story,
about courage and leadership and justice had
a big impact on me. It’s
tragic yet hopeful.

ELISEO ROMAN
Actor, singer: “It’s a
Wonderful Life”

This movie always
brings me back to zero.
To remind me that family, friends, kindness of
spirit, service to others,
giving freely without
expectation of return is
living fully and in gratitude. And when we do
those things, the universe conspires to bring
our dreams and desires
and passions to us in its
proper time.

JACK HUGHLETT
Playwright, composer,
theater director: “The
Fountainhead”

This 1949 film starring
Gary Cooper was based
on the Ayn Rand novel
about an architect modeled after Frank Lloyd
Wright, who designed
the buildings the way he
wanted to, not according

unreleased photo of them on an
album cover, but Bowie wouldn’t
let him.
I’d rather remember the happier times the pair had, like this
fun exchange over breakfast that
Morrissey shares in his autobiography.
“David quietly tells me, ‘You
know, I’ve had so much sex and
drugs that I can’t believe I’m still
alive,’ and I loudly tell him, ‘You
know, I’ve had SO LITTLE sex
and drugs I can’t believe I’m still
alive,’ ” Morrissey wrote.

Nirvana
Nirvana’s cover of “The Man
Who Sold the World” was popularized through the band’s nowiconic 1993 “MTV Unplugged”
performance. After Kurt Cobain,
the band’s frontman, died just a
few months later, Bowie spoke
out about the cover.
“I was simply blown away when
I found that Kurt Cobain liked my
work, and have always wanted to
talk to him about his reasons for
covering ‘The Man Who Sold the
World,’ ’’ Bowie said.
He added: “It was a good
straightforward rendition and
sounded somehow very honest.
It would have been nice to have
worked with him, but just talking
with him would have been real
cool.”
Maybe now, they’ll finally get
the chance to chat.

n Jenelle Janci is an LNP staff writer.

“Unscripted” is a weekly entertainment
column produced by a rotating team of
writers.

to traditional standards
of what they ought to look
like. I was in eighth grade
at the time and the concept that struck me was
the message of following your own instincts in
creating new things. In
my case it was composing
and writing, which I continue to do all my life.

like the classic “West
Side Story” reverberate
in my work today.

JOE DEVOY

I love everything about
this movie and have seen
it hundreds of times —
and not just at Christmas! It is extremely entertaining yet supports
two important truths
by which I try to live:
that each life touches so
many others, and that no
man is a failure who has
friends.

Owner of Tellus360: “The
World’s Fastest Indian”

It tells the amazing
story of how this lad
from New Zealand (Anthony Hopkins) builds
his own motorbike and
breaks the land speed
record. He was way too
old, way too poor, way
too crazy and way too far
away from America to do
it. Despite all this, he did
it anyway and with his
motorbike built out of
nothing but belief, went
ahead and did the impossible, having a good
laugh along the way.

MITCH NUGENT

BONNIE BOSSO
Director of theater
production and public
relations manager at
Franklin & Marshall
College: “It’s a
Wonderful Life”

TONY BRILL

Director of fine and
performing arts at
Lancaster Catholic High:

“Mr. Holland’s Opus”

That movie made me
realize that what I was
doing was important and
that I should look for
ways to get even more
students involved in the
arts. I started to reach
out to kids who never
even played an instrument before to get them
involved with our band
program.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Play: Millersville

Saturdays and Sundays,” he said. “They
were surprised at what
they
remembered
and what they didn’t
remember about the
show.”
The Millersville students, like hundreds
of other students attending the festival,
had plenty to do. There
were all kinds of classes and workshops,
from stage combat to
makeup methods; student plays were staged,
and a variety of competitions, from acting to
theater criticism, were
held.
Networking is always
a big part of the festival
as well.
Any student attending a participating college or university can
attend the festival.
In April, a national
festival will be held at
the Kennedy Center in
Washington, D.C, and,
once again, the best
shows from across the
country will be invited
to participate.
“Bury the Dead” certainly could go to the
national festival.
“Yeah, there is also a
Powerball ticket worth
$1.7 billion,” Elliot
joked last week.
Of course, three tickets did win that Powerball, so you never
know.

Continued from B4

have four to five hours
to put up the set, do the
lighting and the cues,”
he said last week. “The
show is 90 minutes
long, with no intermission, and it will be
performed at 9 a.m., 12
and 3 p.m., and then we
have to be out of there
by 6:30 p.m.
“We have actually
had rehearsals totally
dedicated to putting
up the set and taking it
down. It’s a very tight
schedule,” Elliot said.
Elliot credited set designer Victor Capecce,
technical director for
MU’s theater program,
for making the set easy
to dismantle and reassemble.
“He’s very adaptive at
thinking that way,” Elliot said. “It takes a lot
of prior planning.”
Restaging the show
almost nine months after they first produced
it has been a challenge
for everyone, he said.
“It put a heck of a
bump in the students’
winter break. But
that’s what you have to
do,” Elliot said.
The cast members
stayed at school to be
available for rehearsals. Elliot noted that
some of the students
graduated and now
have jobs.
“We rehearsed all day

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MOVIES IN REVIEW

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

COMEDY

‘Ride Along 2’: 100 minutes of recycled shtick
RICHARD ROEPER
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

Straddling the line between flat-out farce and
buddy-cop action movie,
“Ride Along 2” is a slick,
good-looking, fast-paced
and profoundly unoriginal piece of work.
This is 100 minutes of
recycled shtick — a cop
film with no roots in actual police work, but a deep
connection to dozens of
other cop films. From
the supervisor chewing
out the rogue cops to the
slick businessman who’s
actually a crime lord to
the obligatory big finale
on the docks, “Ride Along
2” is the movie equivalent of a cover band.
We’ve seen it all before,
and often in much better
films.
Director Tim Story’s
follow-up to the 2014 hit
reunites Ice Cube’s snarling veteran Atlanta cop,
James, with Kevin Hart’s
pesky motormouth Ben,
the former high school
security guard who is now
a month out of the police
academy and a week away
from marrying James’ sister Angela (Tika Sumpter), whose main function
in this film is to look beautiful and shake her head at
Ben’s wacky antics.
Like this. Ben gets into
a heated argument in

his kitchen with wedding planner Cori (Sherri
Shepherd), who is nixing
all of his ideas. To make
his point, Ben stands on
a chair so he won’t appear so tiny. When Cori
also stands on a chair,
Ben climbs onto the table,
right under the whirring
ceiling fan ... Cue the cartoon slapstick.
Time and again, Ben
is punched, kicked and
pushed around. He falls
from a second-story
ledge, he lands on his
face several times during a foot chase, he narrowly avoids being eaten
by an alligator — and
that’s only a partial list of
Ben’s suffering. Yet, like
a character in one of the
violent video games Ben
loves to play, he’s never
really hurt. All of the
aforementioned suffering (and more) is played
for big, broad laughs.
Sometimes it’s funny.
Mostly it’s just loud and
brutal and pointless.
Through a convoluted
turn of a plot device,
James and Ben make
the trek from Atlanta
to Miami to interview
a possible witness in
a case they’re working. This gives director
Story and the team of
screenwriters a chance
to fill up the screen

DVDS

Here’s what’s coming out on DVD
Tuesday:
“Straight Outta Compton” (R)
This biopic chronicles the rise and
fall of N.W.A., one of the the most
influential and controversial rap groups
of the 1980s and early 90s. The group
was comprised of four rap artists from
the city of Compton, California. Their
turbulent upbringing in a decidedly
violent neighborhood would be
the basis for an aggressive, socially
conscious brand of music that polarized
hip-hop and rap audiences.

Kevin Hart is a rookie policeman who gets in over his head in “Ride Along 2.”

with many images of
women in skimpy outfits
gyrating about, whether
they’re on the beach or
in a nightclub or even
working retail.
In fact, with the exception of that abrasive
wedding planner, I’m
fairly certain every other
single female character
in “Ride Along 2” ap-

“The Intern” (PG-13)
Jules (Anne Hathaway) is a young
woman running a thriving online
fashion website. In a senior outreach
program, she hires 70-year old Ben
(Robert DeNiro) as an intern. While he
has much to learn, so does Jules and
the two help each other out.
“Woodlawn” (PG)
In 1973, Birmingham’s Woodlawn High
School is forced to desegregate and
the school must deal with a shocking
amount of anger and racism. Tony
Nathan (Caleb Castille) is a gifted
African-American football player who
joins the team. The coach struggles to
bring the team together and accepts
the help of a Christian outsider to help
the team put aside its differences.
“Everest” (PG-13)
The story of the 1996 disaster, in which
two climbing expeditions on Mount
Everest battle a
blizzard as they
try to reach the
summit. Eight
of the climbers
perished,
including the
two expedition
leaders Rob Hall
(Jason Clarke)
Jason Clarke
and Scott Fischer
(Jake Gyllenhaal). Based in part on
“Into Thin Air” by Jon Krakauer.
“Diary of a Teenage Girl” (R)
Minnie (Bel Powley) is a 15-year-old
girl living in the 70s with her mother
(Kristen Wiig), and her mother’s cokeloving boyfriend (Alexander Skarsgard).
The teenager keeps a diary on her
tape recorder, and she tells that diary
she lost her virginity to her mother’s
boyfriend. She finds she enjoys
experimenting with sex and begins
having sex with strangers and continues
to pursue her mother’s boyfriend.

have a sweatshirt in the
car or anything.
(In an earlier scene,
Tika Sumpter’s Angela seduces Ben while wearing a
bra, panties and a naughty
cop outfit. The scene feels
about half-finished, with
no payoff, when we cut
to the next locale. Apparently the main goal was
to get Tika Sumpter in a

What’s Playing
“Alvin and the Chipmunks: The
Road Chip” (PG, 86 minutes,
animated) Through a series
of misunderstandings, Alvin,
Simon and Theodore think
Dave is going to propose to his
new girlfriend in Miami ... and
dump them. They have three
days to get to him and stop the
proposal. «
“Band of Robbers” (NR, 95
minutes, adventure) A modernday retelling of Mark Twain's
iconic books. When Huck Finn is
released from prison, he hopes
to leave his criminal life behind,
but his lifelong friend, and
corrupt cop, Tom Sawyer, has
other plans. «««
“The Big Short” (R, 130 minutes,
comedy/drama) Four outsiders
in the world of high-finance who
predicted the credit and housing
bubble collapse of the mid2000s decide to take on the big
banks for their lack of foresight
and greed. «««½

Robert DeNiro and Anne Hathaway
star in “The Intern.”

pears in a bikini or halter
top at some point. When
Olivia Munn’s no-nonsense Miami homicide
detective, Maya, shows
up at a crime scene, she’s
fresh from a workout, so
of course she’s wearing
tights and a sports bra,
her badge dangling from
a chain around her neck.
Because she wouldn’t

“Bridge of Spies” (PG-13, 103
minutes, drama) Tom Hanks
plays a civilian attorney asked
to negotiate the release of a
U-2 spy plane pilot who was
shot down over Russia at the
height of the Cold War. Steven
Spielberg directed. ««««
“Brooklyn” (PG-13, 105 minutes,
drama) A young Irish woman
(Saoirse Ronan) immigrates to
America in the 1959s but then
finds herself drawn back home.
««««
“Carol” (R, 118 minutes, drama)
Cate Blanchett, a well-to-do
housewife and mother in the
1950s, falls passionately in
love with a yougner woman
(Rooney Mara) who works at a
department store. ««««
“Concussion” (PG-13, 123
minutes, drama) Will Smith
stars as the doctor who
discovered CTE (chronic
traumatic encephalopathy) in
football players, and the uphill
battle he faced in bringing the
information to the public. «««
“Creed” (PG-13, 95 minutes,
drama) Rocky Balboa (Sylvester
Stallone) is back, this time
coaching the son of Apollo
Creed (Michael B. Jordan).
««««
“Daddy’s Home” (PG-13, 96
minutes) Will Ferrell plays an
amiable guy who feels the
pressure when his stepkids’
dad, played by Mark Wahlberg,
returns. ««
“The Forest” (PG-13, 95
minutes, supernatural thriller)
An American in search of her
twin sister goes to Japan to
investigate her disappearance in
what is called the Suicide Forest,
where supernatural creatures
overwhelm her. (no reviews)
“The Good Dinosaur” (PG, 92
minutes, animation) In this Pixar
world, the dinosaurs never went
extinct and Arlo, who can’t seem
to do anything right, has an
unlikley friendship with a feral
human kid. «««
“Goosebumps” (PG, 103
minutes, horror/comedy)

Samuel L. Jackson is a bounty
hunter with a serious attitude in
“The Hateful Eight.”
Zach Cooper (Dylan Minnette)
learns that his new neighbor,
the beautiful Hannah (Odeya
Rush), is the daughter of author
R.L. Stine (Jack Black). But the
monsters live there too and Zach
lets them out of their books.
«««
“The Hateful Eight” (R, 207
minutes, comedy/drama) In the
dead of a Wyoming winter, a
bounty hunter and his prisoner
find shelter in a cabin currently
inhabited by a collection of
nefarious characters. «««
“Hotel Transylvania 2” (PG, 89
minutes, animated) Dracula has
opened his hotel to humans and
things are getting better. But he
worries that his grandson, who
is half human, is not showing his
vampire side. ««
“The Hunger Games:
Mockingjay Part 2” (PG-13,
dystopic adventure) The
revolution is finally here and
Kitniss is leading it. «««
“Joy” (PG-13, 124 minutes)
Jennifer Lawrence plays the
inventor of the Wonder Mop,
who sees her life change when
she appears on QVC. ««½
“Krampus” (PG-13, 98 minutes,
horror) A child who is unhappy
with his divorcing parents,
has no Christmas spirit and
unleashes the evil Krampus and
his cohorts. «««
“Love the Coopers” (PG-13,
106 minutes, holiday comedy)
Four generations of the Cooper
family gather for Christmas
Eve and everything goes crazy.
Diane Keaton, John Goodman,
Olivia Wilde and Marisa Tomei
star. «½
“The Martian” (PG-13, 142
minutes, adventure) Matt
Damon stars as an astronaut
who is left behind on Mars and
must survive until — or if — he is
rescued. ««««
“Mustang” (PG-13, 97 minutes,
drama) In a village in Northern
Turkey, five free-spirited
teenaged sisters splash about
on the beach with their male
classmates. Though their games
are merely innocent fun, a
neighbor passes by and reports
what she considers to be illicit
behavior. ««««
“The Night Before” (R, 101
minutes, comedy) Three guys
who need to grow up have
one last Christmas Eve of
debauchery and they want to
make it memorable. Seth Rogan
stars. «««
“Norm of the North” (PG, 86
minutes) A polar bear worries

push-up bra.)
Ken Jeong has the
Ken Jeong role as A.J., a
squirrely,
comic-relief
hacker who is the key to
cracking the big case. A.J.
often cracks wise from
the back of the car as Ben
and James bicker the
day away. The hyperactive Ben never shuts up
and constantly screws
up on a level that would
have him facing criminal
charges in the real world.
The closed-off, perpetually growling James keeps
telling Ben to shut up and
to stay focused. If either
character has anything
approaching a second dimension, it has eluded me
through two movies.
Kevin Hart is an enormously talented stand-up
comic and an instantly
likable screen presence.
Most of his movies haven’t
been very good, but they
make a lot of money. Hart
has the talent and the charisma to take it to the next
level and do stellar work
in more challenging fare.
In “Ride Along 2,” he’s
on cruise control all the
way.

n “Ride Along 2” is playing

at the Penn, Regal and MoviETown theaters. It’s rated PG13 for sequences of violence,
sexual content, language and
some drug material. Running
time is 102 minutes.

STREAMING
about his home in the Arctic,
which is being taken over by
developers, and comes to New
York with his three lemming
pals. (No reviews)
“The Peanuts Movie” (G, 86
minutes, animated) The gang is
back in 3D! Charlie Brown tries
to get the Red-Haired Girl to
notice him and Snoopy fights his
enemy, the Red Baron. «««½
“Point Break” (PG-13, 113
minutes) An undercover cop
makes his way into a scene
of bank-robbing extremesports athletes in this remake
of Kathryn Bigelow's “Point
Break.”«
“The Revenant” (R, 156 minutes,
drama) Leonardo DiCaprio stars
as explorer Hugh Glass, who is
attacked by a bear and left for
dead by members of his team.
Guided by his sheer will, he
survives a brutal winter to find
redemption and seek revenge
for those who betrayed him.
Inspired by a true story. «««½
“Ride Along 2” (PG-13, 101
minutes, comedy) Kevin Hart
continues to annoy his future
brother-in-law Ice Cube, even
though he’s now a cop. The two
are sent to Miami to capture a
big drug dealer. «
“Sisters” (R, 118 minutes,
comedy) Amy Poehler and Tina
Fey star as sisters who have one
last wild party in their parents’
house before the new owners
arrive. ««½
“Spectre” (PG-13, 148 minutes,
action) Bond is back for the
24th film in the franchise. He
must fight a sinister organization
that is set on destruction, with
stops in Mexico City and Rome.
«««
“Spotlight” (R, 128 minutes,
drama) The true story of how
the Boston Globe uncovered
the massive scandal of child
molestation and cover-up within
the local Catholic Archdiocese,
shaking the entire Catholic
Church to its core. ««««
“13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers
of Benghazi” (R, 144 minutes)
Michael Bey’s tribute to the
men — all former soldiers — who
fought the terrorist attack at the
Libyan consulate. (no reviews)
“Star Wars: The Force
Awakens” (PG-13, 136 minutes)
Three decades after the defeat
of the Galactic Empire, a new
threat arises. The First Order
attempts to rule the galaxy and
only a ragtag group of heroes
can stop them, along with the
help of the Resistance. ««««

A lot of amazing
documentaries have
been made in the last
decade or so, and any
number of them can be
found on Netflix. Here’s a
list of seven of the best:
1. “The Up Series”
In 1964, the BBC
program called “Seven
Up” interviewed 14
7-year-old kids from
across the country. And
then, seven years later,
came another program
with those same kids,
now age 14. Director
Michael Apted has
returned every seven
years ever since. The
latest is “56 Plus,” which
was completed in 2013.
2. “Stories We Tell”
Actress/director Sarah
Polley transforms an
incredibly personal story
into a look at the nature
of storytelling and truth
as she investigates the
man she has always
assumed was her
biological father.
3. “Life Itself”
Film critic Roger Ebert
had a complicated and
amazing life. Here, as
he comes to the end of
it, we look back at his
childhood, his passion
for newspapers, late
nights spent in bars and
his many relationships.
4. “Keep on Keepin’ On”
A heartwarming look
at 93-year-old jazz
trumpeter Clark Terry
and his mentorship of
a 20-something piano
prodigy who is blind and
stricken with debilitating
nerves.
5. “What Happened,
Miss Simone?”
The great singer Nina
Simone struggled with
fame, anger, self worth
and ultimately her
mental health. The film
explores her powers as
a singer as well as the
politics of the 1960s.
6. “20 Feet from
Stardom”
Backup singers are
often unappreciated
and forgotten about,
but they play an integral
part in the success of the
music. This documentary
looks at what it takes to
be a successful backup
singer and the cost it
can have. It is filled with
plenty of great songs.
7. “Muscle Shoals”

Rob Schneider voices the
eponymous polar bear in “Norm
of the North.”

The tiny town of Muscle
Shoals, Alabama, and
Fame Studios founder
Rick Hall changed rock
‘n’ roll forever. This
documentary looks
at how it happened,
particularly during the
Civil Rights Movement.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

B7

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Health & Fitness
HEALTH

DR. PIA FENIMORE
ASK THE EXPERT

10 ways you
can boost
healthy
changes in
your home
If you are making
healthy change in
your household to
start the new year off
right, consider the
following tips put
forth by dietitians
and pediatric weightmanagement experts.
— Don’t focus
on numbers. New
research suggests
that BMI and other
weight-related numbers do not necessarily correlate with
healthy outcomes.
Focus instead on
small changes that do
make a difference.
— Spend more time
outdoors. Walk, play,
hike, explore. Nature
fosters both physical
and mental health.
— Teach portions.
Divide your plate:
Half of it goes to fruit
and vegetables; onequarter of it goes to
carbohydrates and
starches; and the final
quarter of it to meat
and protein.
— Bring mindfulness to your dinner
table. Eat slowly.
Have conversations.
At first it will seem
forced but, with practice, it will become
second nature.
— Drink only
water and milk. Add
lemons, strawberries,
etc. to water to give
it flavor if needed.
Stop buying soda and
sports drinks.
— Eat out less often.
Take steps to make
eating at home on
busy evenings easier.
Use a slow cooker,
make meals ahead of
time and allow yourself a night of canned
soup and sandwiches.
— Do not single out
one person in the
household. Healthy
changes will make
everyone feel better,
even kids who are not
overweight. Success
rates are low for children and teens who
are asked to make
changes alone.
— Make small
changes. Start by adding in exercise and
outdoor time. Then
change what you
are drinking. Then
decrease restaurant
foods. Spread these
changes out over
months so they do
not feel drastic.
— Have healthy
snacks readily accessible. Snacks make
up about a third of
a child’s diet. Don’t
eliminate them, just
change them.
— Pay attention to
breakfast. It is critical
that your child eat a
breakfast every day
that contains protein,
calcium and carbohydrates. Don’t skip it.
No matter what.

MORE INFO
n healthychildren.org
n choosemyplate.gov
n Dr. Pia Fenimore, of

Lancaster Pediatric Associates, answers questions
about children’s health. You
can submit questions at
Features@LNPnews.com.

Western diets do damage
The depletion of gut microbes that comes with diets deficient in fiber extends
well beyond the lives of those whose dietary choices made it happen, a new study finds
MELISSA HEALY
LOS ANGELES TIMES

It may take more
than a tub of yogurt to
reverse the effects that
a high-fat, low-fiber
diet have wrought in
the bellies of men and
women in the industrialized world, new research says.
Indeed, the depletion
of gut microbes that
comes with diets deficient in fiber extend
well beyond the lives
of those whose dietary
choices made it happen, a new study finds.
Over generations of exposure to diets low in fiber, the research shows
that a microbiotic population die-off threatens to drive some of the
trillions of species that
live in healthy human
guts to the brink of extinction.
And just as in the
world of larger plants
and animals, when the
population of a given
gut bacterium falls below a certain level, it’s
as good as gone, the
new research suggests.
The reintroduction of
more dietary fiber, and
the frantic hawking of
probiotic powders, may
not be enough to bring
all the endangered microbiotic taxa back and
restore gut health to
successive generations.
The new research,
published last week in
the journal Nature, was
conducted on laboratory mice whose guts
were deliberately colonized with a wide array of microbes from
humans. Researchers
from Stanford, Harvard and Princeton
universities fed a generation of lab mice a
diet very low in microbiota-accessible carbohydrates — nutrients
that are plentiful in the
diets of agrarian hunter-gatherers but not in
diets that are common

ebru/flicker

A splurge is OK, but following a high-fat, low-fiber diet on a regular basis may be harming more than your own
health: A new study shows that it can create lasting harm for the generations that come after you.

in industrialized societies.
The
results were stark
enough in the
mice, whose guts,
collectively, were
colonized by an increasingly impoverished population of bacteria,
viruses
and
protozoa. They
then fed four
successive
generations
of mice a diet
that was low
in microbiota-accessible
carbohydrates.
Even when they put
parent generations back
on a high-fiber diet, the
dearth of microbial diversity in the guts of
younger generations became ever starker.
And when the researchers switched subsequent
generations
back to a high-fiber diet,
the shift failed to restore
the microbiotic diver-

sity that had
originally
flourished
in the guts of
their ancestor
generations.
The findings
suggest
that,
when diseases
arise from a
depleted gut
microbiome,
it may take
more than
a course of
probiotics
or a daily
tub of yogurt to manage
those
diseases.
The findings demonstrate “a diet-induced
ratcheting effect” in
which species of microbiota “are not effectively
transferred to the next
generation,” the researchers wrote. Bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidales family were
particularly prone to intergenerational die-offs
that couldn’t be reversed

STUDY SUMMARY
n The high-fat, low-fiber

diet followed by many
Western cultures destroys
beneficial gut microbes.
n When that diet is
followed over generations,
many of those microbes
that thrive in healthy
human guts fall below the
point of no return.
n Efforts to restore them,
whether through more
dietary fiber or probiotic
powders, were not enough
to bring back what was
lost.
n The gut biodiversity in
newer generations is much
less diverse than it was in
their ancestors’.
n The abrupt changes
in gut microbiota, the
researchers wrote, “cannot
be accommodated by our
human biology.”

with intentional reintroduction of a diet high in
fiber.
There are no “charismatic megafauna” — the
equivalent of tigers and
elephants — among the
trillions of microbes that

colonize the gut. Indeed,
the microscopic population of the human gut is
so large and diverse, scientists are far from fully
characterizing what role
individual taxa play in
health.
But there’s clear and
growing evidence that
species diversity in
there is a key factor in
digestive, metabolic and
even immune health,
and when that diversity
takes a hit, some aspect
of health is sure to suffer.
The authors of the latest study warn that their
data hint that “further
deterioration of the
Western microbiota is
possible,” as generational changes drive some
taxa closer to the brink.
The results of doubling
down on diets that pose
a threat to the gut’s microbiotic diversity could
be downright apocalyptic, they suggest.
The result might be
diseases that defy easy
treatment.

FITNESS

How coffee can dramatically impact your workout
SUZEE SKWIOT

cle, which enhances the
strength of the muscle
contraction,” Sims says,
to Selene Yeager, the author of “The Bicycling
Big Book of Cycling for

RODALEWELLNESS.COM

Forget about the
electrolyte-filled sports
drink or a simple bottle
of water when it comes
to hydrating for a workout, because new research shows that an
old favorite could actually be your best go-to
solution.
We already know
about coffee’s amazing longevity benefits,
and its cancer-fighting
perks, but a recent
study from the University of Georgia shows
that coffee can actually
improve your workout
endurance.
Lead study author
Simon Higgins, who
is a third-year doctoral student at the
university,
reviewed
more than 600 scholarly articles to find a
link between caffeine
— specifically from
coffee — and workout
performance. He noticed that fitness after
coffee was far more efficient and longer. In
fact, those participants
who consumed coffee
had a workout that was

Women.” During endurance efforts, caffeine
helps the body utilize fat
as fuel so you don’t burn
through your carbohydrate stores as quickly,

Sims adds.
Now, you can get your
caffeine fix and make
your session all-themore successful. How’s
that for productive?

OPENING FALL 2016
ebru/Flickr

more than 24 percent
improved, when compared to those who did
not have coffee.
“While there is a lack
of high-quality research
on coffee as a source
of caffeine, there is an
abundance of research
on pure caffeine,” Higgins says. “There’s a perception that coffee won’t
give you the same benefits as pure caffeine. New
research could mean
that athletes could have
a cup of coffee versus
taking a pill.”
This caffeine and endurance connection has
not been fully utilized,
according to cyclist, triathlete, and nutrition
and exercise physiology researcher Dr. Stacy
Sims.
“Caffeine increases the
calcium content of mus-

Personal and Memory Care Communities

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• never having to cook, do laundry
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• watching your grandchildren play in the
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31 Millersville Road
Lancaster, PA 17603
717-208-8655
License Pending

• entertaining your card or bridge club
in the library overlooking the courtyard
• reading your Sunday Paper while relaxing
in the Bistro with the coffee and juice bar
• enjoying the Media Theatre & Fitness Center
with your friends and guests

80 West Millport Road
Lititz, PA 17543
717-283-4255

www.SignatureSeniorLiving.com

B8

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Food
KARA NEWHOUSE
THE PRESS TABLE

Vegan nut pate boosts
nutrition in salads

Black bean flour the secret
to cheesy enchilada casserole

KARA NEWHOUSE

KNEWHOUSE@LNPNEWS.COM

Because I’m a vegan, people often ask
me with bewilderment, “WHAT do you
eat?”
It gets a little tiresome.
True, I don’t have cherished childhood treats that I still make today, but
my culinary repertoire feels far from
limited.
And in the last year, as I’ve focused on
eating more raw foods, I’ve discovered
a whole new world of easy-to-make and
delicious recipes.
A raw vegan diet includes vegetables,
fruits, nuts, sprouts and other foods
that haven’t been heated above 118
degrees. Most raw foods have a higher
nutritional value than when they are
cooked.
Some of the simplest and most satisfying raw recipes are made by combining
nuts, herbs and a few other ingredients
in a food processor. These are called nut
pates. I’m sharing one of my favorite
nut pate recipes below: “celery spread”
made with celery, walnuts and raisins.
For those trying to reset dietary habits
for the new year, adding this to a salad
of fresh greens is a great way to boost
nutrition while still feeling satisfied.
I first tried this recipe while doing a
raw cleanse last January. It was created by Laura-Jane, a Canadian blogger
who runs “The Rawtarian” website and
online community.
I had limited experience making raw
foods before doing the cleanse, but by
the end of two weeks, I was hooked.
And it’s not just because I loved the
food and felt great.
Many raw dishes are made simply
by chopping ingredients and putting
them in a food processor or high-speed
blender. The simple steps make it hard
to mess up (no burning!) and easy to
play with. For instance, in this celery
spread recipe, I often omit the dill and
throw in a handful of fresh parsley.
The change in my diet also has simplified my meal planning and grocery
trips. No more looking in the pantry
and wondering how to use up the rest
of the couscous or that one can of diced
tomatoes. No more trekking across the
supermarket for obscure ingredients.
I typically just hit the produce section
and head home. (I also visit Costco to
stock up on raw nuts.)
And if you’re imagining my life as one
free of indulgences, think again. Experimenting with raw desserts is one of my
favorite weekend activities. If you’re
interested in those, check out LauraJane’s website, therawtarian.com, for
some ideas.

ANN FULTON PHOTOS

Black bean flour can be reconstituted into a lush, velvety sauce for this comfort-food enchilada casserole.

ANN FULTON

W

hen I began my little
Fountain
Avenue
Kitchen adventure
four years ago, I
hadn’t the slightest idea where it
would take me.
I had never posted anything on
social media, didn’t own a real camera, and didn’t follow a single blog.
In fact, I was reluctant to call my
website a blog because, to me, that
implied I was spilling the innermost
details of my life, and why would
anyone care?
Early on, someone asked about my
business plan. Good question. But
I had no solid answer. I figured I’d
just keep sharing recipes that people
might actually be inclined to try and
ultimately enjoy. My dad always
told me that if you worked hard at
something you enjoyed, good things
would follow. And if not, you’d
at least be happy. That was good
enough for me.
Four years into this process, I continue to refine old recipes as I create
new ones. I’ve also had the pleasure
of working with a variety of food
companies.
Mostly, I do recipe development,
but I’ve done some product consulting, too. My personal rule is that I
only work with products that I truly
enjoy and feel good about feeding my family. To me, it would feel

disingenuous to use and thereby
promote a product that I didn’t
wholeheartedly embrace.
Most of us have noticed recipes on
package labels. Have you ever considered how they get there or when
and why they go away? Bob’s Red
Mill, a Seattle-based company that
mills a variety of grains, seeds, and
legumes, decided it wanted to clean
house, so to speak.
So I joined an effort to test their
archived recipes, rate them, suggest
changes, etc. The process is quite
fun and has nudged me out of my
comfort zone as I work with newto-me products like teff flour and, in

KARA NEWHOUSE | STAFF PHOTO

n 1 cup walnuts (rinsed)
n ¾ cup chopped celery
n 1 tablespoon lemon juice
n 1 tablespoon raisins
n 1 clove garlic
n 1 teaspoon olive oil
n 1 teaspoon dried dill
n ¼teaspoon sea salt
Place all ingredients in a food processor.
Process until you can’t see the nuts anymore.
(It will look similar to tuna salad.)
Serve on top of a salad or use a a dip for
crudites.
Store leftovers in the fridge for up to five
days.
This recipe makes four quarter-cup servings
with 214 calories each.

n Follow LNP staff writer Kara Newhouse on

Twitter at @KaraNewhouse. The Press Table is
a weekly column written by a rotating group of
LNP staff members.

ENCHILADA CASSEROLE, page B9

Black bean flour starts out white and powdery, but can be turned into a dark,
sauce when mixed with a liquid.

A raw, vegan spread made with celery,
walnuts and raisins makes a great topping
for a salad.

Raw Vegan Celery Spread

this case, black bean flour.
I always know the recipe titles in
advance but don’t know the actual
ingredients until I receive a monthly package with instructions and the
required products. When I opened
the box for a cheesy black bean
enchilada recipe and saw a powdery
flour made of black beans, I had my
doubts.
As I prepared the recipe for dinner, I contemplated what I might
serve as a quick backup for my
family when this recipe potentially
flopped.
My doubts, however, were unfounded. The fine flour reconstituted into a lush, velvety sauce, and
the final outcome was wholesome
comfort food that my family called a
definite “make-again meal.’’
In fact, as we sat around the table,

ESTHER MARTIN
COUPON CUTTING MOM

New columnist: Blogger
will share her money-saving
tips twice a week in LNP
Today we introduce a new column designed to help our
readers make the most of their shopping dollars by using
coupons. The Coupon Cutting Mom, written by Esther
Martin, will run on LNP’s Food pages on Sundays and
Wednesdays. You can read her blog at couponcuttingmom.
com.
Hi, I’m Esther Martin. I’m a wife, mother of children
ages 7 and 10 and a Coupon Cutting Mom.
My couponing journey started about six years ago, and
it has completely changed the way I shop. I still remember my first couponing trip, where I visited a local drugstore and walked out with a bag full of items that I was
able to score for free after combining coupons and sales.
Using coupons and saving money on items I was
already buying for my family allowed me to feel like I
was able to make a contribution to our family household income and budget, even though I wasn’t bringing

a paycheck home and was a stay-at-home mom to two
toddlers.
Ever since that first coupon shopping trip, I was
hooked and have been using coupons on a regular basis
as a way to save on groceries, clothing, household items,
dining out and so many other purchases.
I’ve even been known to take coupon inserts, my laptop
and a small printer along on family vacations so we can
save money even when we are away from home. The
ways to save money really are endless once you enter the
world of coupons.
Not only do I love the savings, but I love how coupons
allow me to pay it forward and bless others. I love to be
able to go to the stockpile of items I scored for free or
very low cost and find things to donate to the local food
pantry or Humane Society, or those going through a
rough patch in life.
I’m excited about this new couponing column, which
will be published Sundays and Wednesdays, and I’m
hoping to inspire all LNP readers to learn more about
coupons and how these small pieces of paper can make
a huge difference in the amount of money spent on any
shopping trip.
If you are reading this and have never used a coupon
or even if you are a seasoned coupon user, I’m hoping to
share with you tips, scenarios and more that will quickly
help you stretch your hard-earned dollars on purchases
you are already making.

n Read more from Esther Martin’s Coupon Cutting Mom blog at
http://lancasteronline.com/couponcuttingmom/

FOOD

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

B9

COMFORT FOOD

Soy sauce and cocoa powder add depth to turkey chili
Game-day dish can be both healthy and hearty

n 1 medium yellow onion,

MELISSA D’ARABIAN

and finely chopped

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Everyone has a favorite chili recipe, and this
is the time of year to
break out yours, invite
over some friends and
yell at football players on
TV.
Maybe it’s time to try
a new, healthier recipe,
too?
Chili is classic American comfort food, so we
automatically assume
that it can’t be healthy.
But since it is so darned
tasty, it’s worth the price
of admission to try.
And while I’m not
against the occasional
indulgence, I also love a
recipe that manages to
be both comforting and
healthy.
Enter my game day
turkey chili. Stay with
me, here. This will not

be your typical turkey
chili because I have a few
tricks up my sleeve.
Don’t get me wrong; I
love a good turkey chili.
But they do occupy a special place in the stratified
chili eco-system. Put
them in a chili competition and you’ll see they
land well below the fatty
brisket chilies that feature tiny puddles of tasty
melted fat that pleasantly coat the palate.
Turkey chili, if I’m
honest, has been relegated to the “at least it’s hot”
status for too long.
Here are my tricks.
First, make it a red chili.
The red part comes from
tomato, which is healthy,
and frankly just feels like
comfort food.
Second, skip the salt.
Instead, use soy sauce
directly on the meat

after cooking it. This
is perhaps the greatest tip I can give you
regarding ground turkey. White-ish meat in
a deep red chili looks a
little strange. You are reminded that you are eating The Healthy Turkey
Chili.
But deepen that meat
color just a little with the
soy sauce and you are
back in the land of Real
Meaty Chili. The soy
sauce also adds tons of
rich, savory meaty flavor,
a big benefit for a meat
that can taste a little flat.
Final tip: Add a bit
of unsweetened cocoa
powder, which deepens
both the color and the
flavor. This is turkey
chili done right. And
so, 2016 is off to a good
start.

well-coated. Continue to cook
until any moisture in the pot is
gone, about 3 minutes. Spoon
the meat out of the pan and
set aside.

finely chopped

n 1 red bell pepper, cored
n 12-ounce light beer
n 2 (15-ounce) cans low-

Return the pot to the heat and
add the remaining oil. Add
sodium black beans, drained the onion and red pepper,
and rinsed
then cook until tender, about
n 14-ounce can low-sodium 5 minutes. Increase the heat
to high, then add the beer to
tomato sauce
deglaze the pan, scraping the
n 2 (14-ounce) cans crushed bottom to loosen any stuck
tomatoes
bits. Simmer for 2 minutes.
Return the meat to the pot,
n 2 tablespoons chili
along with the beans, tomato
powder
sauce, crushed tomatoes, chili
n Dash of cayenne pepper
powder, cayenne and cocoa
n 1 teaspoon cocoa powder powder. Bring to a simmer.
Reduce the heat to low, then
n Hot sauce, to taste
simmer for 30 minutes.
n Plain low-fat Greek
Serve with hot sauce, yogurt,
yogurt, to serve
scallions and cheese on the
n Chopped scallions, to
side.
serve
Nutrition information per
n Shredded cheddar or
serving: 320 calories; 90
Mexican cheese, to serve
calories from fat (28 percent
of total calories); 10 grams
In a Dutch oven or other large,
fat (3 grams saturated;
heavy pot over medium-high,
0 grams trans fats); 50
heat 1 teaspoon of the oil. Add
milligrams cholesterol; 660
the turkey and cook, breaking
milligrams sodium; 33 grams
it up, until cooked through,
carbohydrate; 11 grams fiber;
about 7 minutes. Sprinkle the
10 grams sugar; 24 grams
turkey with the soy sauce and
smoked paprika, then mix until
protein.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Soy sauce adds flavor and
color to this hearty red
turkey chili.
Game Day Turkey Chili
Start to finish: 45 minutes
Makes 8 servings

n 2 teaspoons vegetable
oil, divided

n 1 pound lean ground
turkey

n 2 tablespoons lowsodium soy sauce

n 2 teaspoons smoked
paprika

Enchilada casserole: Fountain Avenue Kitchen
Continued from B8

they told me that I had
to take a picture. That’s
their way of saying that
this recipe rated highly
and I needed to share it
on my blog.
To humor them, I
grabbed my camera.
Darkness was approaching, and it was pouring
rain. So, I placed the
half-eaten casserole just
outside our front door
where it was protected
by a small overhang but
soaked up what little
natural light remained.
I snapped a few pictures
and managed to keep the
food — and myself — dry.
When I completed my
report, I did make a few
suggestions and corrections to the recipe
instructions, one of
which I mention below.
Overall, my feedback
was glowing, and my
friends at Bob’s Red
Mill graciously gave me
permission to share the
adjusted recipe here.
Black bean flour is not
available at all grocery
stores, but because this
meal is easy, healthy
pantry cooking at its
best, I did some calling around on behalf of
those who may wish to
try the recipe.
Locally, the Stauffers
of Kissel Hill locations
in Lititz and Rohrerstown have the product
in stock, and several
other stores are trying
to order it. The flour
may also be purchased
online directly through
Bob’s Red Mill for $4.59
per 24-ounce bag. I
found several other
online sources offering
the flour for a similar or

higher price.
I dumped out some
of the contents of the
bag to show what black
bean flour looks like —
whitish and powdery.
As soon as the flour is
mixed with a liquid,
however, it transforms
into the deep black color
you would expect.
The texture is smooth
and velvety while the flavor is the precise equivalent of unsalted, cooked
or canned black beans in
pureed form, making it
perfectly suited for use
in enchiladas, burritos,
tacos, soups and dips.
Black bean flour is high
in fiber and protein and
is a good source of iron,
magnesium and phosphorus.
Just like whole black
beans, the flour is low in
both sodium and fat.
Economical with a
long shelf life, black
bean flour will incorporate into recipes quickly
— no soaking time
needed. Simply reconstitute it with water, broth,

etc. It’s well suited to a
healthy vegetarian diet
or the occasional meatless meal.
For a little extra experimenting, recipes for
bean dip, burritos and
taco pizzas are included
on the package.

Easy Cheesy
Enchilada Casserole
Makes approximately 8
servings
Ingredients:

n 3½ cups low-sodium
vegetable broth

n 1 cup finely chopped
onion

n 1 cup (or one 8-ounce
can) tomato sauce

n 2 tablespoons chili

sauce (or hot sauce of
choice)

simmer and cook, stirring
occasionally, for 4 to 5
minutes.

n 2 cups (8 ounces)

which is my favorite part.)
Bake the enchiladas,
uncovered, for
approximately 20 minutes
or until a little bubbly
around the edges. Remove
from the oven.

Whisk in the black bean
flour and cook, stirring
constantly, for 1 minute.
Add the pinto beans
and hot sauce, and cook
another 1 to 2 minutes.
Remove from the heat.

shredded Mexican blend
cheese

n 12 (6-inch-diameter)
corn tortillas

n Optional toppings for

serving: chopped cilantro,
tomato, and/or avocado;
sour cream; salsa

Ladle ¼ of the sauce into
the baking dish, evenly
covering the bottom of the
dish. Layer 3 tortillas and ½
cup of the cheese on top of
the sauce. (I like to cut 2 of
the tortillas in half, and 1 of
them in sixths in order to
create a layer that doesn’t
overlap.)

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 400
degrees. Set aside an
ungreased 9-by-13-inch
baking dish.
In a large saucepan,
combine the vegetable
broth, onion, tomato sauce,
chili powder, oregano and
salt.

Repeat the layering process
three more times — sauce,
tortillas, and cheese. (Not
ending with a sauce layer
allows the top layer of
tortillas to become crisp,

Bring the mixture to a low

Sprinkle with any of the
desired toppings and pass
salsa and sour cream at the
table, if desired.

For leftover enchiladas,
lightly cover with foil and
reheat in a 350-degree
oven for 20 minutes or until
hot throughout.

n Have questions or com-

ments about Ann Fulton’s
column? Check out her blog
at fountainavenuekitchen.
com or at facebook.com/
thefountainavenuekitchen.
She also welcomes email at
ann@fountainavenuekitchen.
com.

powder

n ½ teaspoon dried
oregano

n ½ teaspoon kosher salt
n ¾ cup black bean flour

(see accompanying buying
suggestions)

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n 2 cups cooked pinto

beans (may use one
15-ounce can, rinsed and
drained)

2015

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B10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Travel

An exterior view
of the five-star
Montage Laguna
Beach resort in
Laguna Beach,
Calif.

THE LOS ANGELS TIMES PHOTOS

DESTINATION

TOP SPOTS TO TAKE A TRIP
Bozeman, Mont., Washington, D.C., are must-see destinations in 2016

Open since
1907, Pike
Place Market
is the hub
of Seattle
where fresh,
local produce,
seafood, specialty foods
and crafts are
bought by
thousands of
visitors each
day.

CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
LOS ANGELES TIMES

Elsewhere called. It misses you. In
fact, it wants you to hit the road soon.
Here are 16 destinations (alphabetically arranged) that look especially pleasing in 2016.

Botswana
It’s a smallish country, about the size
of France, with not quite 2 million people. But Botswana, in southern Africa,
has the Okavango Delta and the vast
Central Kalahari Game Reserve. In
fact, 38 percent of the country’s territory is set aside for national parks, reserves and wildlife management areas.
And as of 2016, it also has 50 years
of independence. Before 1966 it was a
British protectorate known as Bechuanaland.
Now, as a democracy with a reputation as the least corrupt country in

Africa, Botswana is an increasingly
popular destination for safari-seekers.
In the delta, you can canoe past hippos.
In Moremi Game Reserve, you see
lions on the prowl. In Chobe National
Park — well, you’ll find about 50,000
elephants for starters. Among tour
operators offering safaris here are Abercrombie & Kent, Micato Safaris and
Wilderness Safaris.
Info: botswanatourism.co.bw

Bozeman, Montana
Bozeman makes a great gateway to
Yellowstone National Park 80 miles
south, in part because of Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport. Day
by day, this college town (population:
about 42,000) seems to sprout more
reasons for a visitor to linger, especially if it’s summer.
The Lark Hotel, opened early this
TOP, page B11

DID YOU KNOW?
n In Dublin, Ireland, the

National Museum of Ireland
will unveil “Proclaiming a
Republic: the 1916 Rising”
on March 3. On Easter
Sunday, March 27, at
1:15 p.m., wreath-laying
ceremonies are planned at
spots throughout the city.

IF YOU GO
n Harlem Heritage

Tours offers half a dozen
itineraries, as does Big
Apple Jazz Tours.
n Harlemheritage.com
n bigapplejazz.com

CRUISE NEWS

What’s new in 2016?
Big changes and bigger ships coming this year
RICHARD TRIBOU
ORLANDO SENTINEL

ORLANDO, Fla. — Out with the old
and in with the new. That’s the theme
for the Florida cruise port shuffle in
2016 as new builds make their way to
the Sunshine State.
PortMiami, Port Everglades and Port
Canaveral will all benefit as newer and
larger ships arrive this year, with big
shifts coming from Royal Caribbean,
Norwegian and Carnival Cruise Line.
The biggest change literally will be
the arrival of the new record-holder
for world’s largest cruise ship, Royal
Caribbean’s 5,479-passenger Harmony of the Seas, which is set to debut in
Europe this spring and then make its
way to Fort Lauderdale by November.
The third Oasis-class ship from the
line, it’s a sister ship that will be slightly larger than the current record holders for world’s largest cruise ship, the

two Oasis-class ships that currently
call Port Everglades home, Oasis of the
Seas and Allure of the Seas.
To make room for Harmony, though,
Royal Caribbean will see if Central
Florida has a taste for giant ships,
sending the 5,400-passenger Oasis
of the Seas to Port Canaveral starting
November.
Port Canaveral is benefiting from
the giant ship shuffle from Norwegian
Cruise Line as well.
Since PortMiami is now home to
both Norwegian Getaway and the new
Norwegian Escape, what used to be
Norwegian’s largest cruise ship and
used to call the Magic City home, the
4,100-passenger Norwegian Epic, will
also make its way to Port Canaveral.
The line, which just this fall returned
to Port Canaveral after a three-year
absence, will bring Epic the same
NEW, page B11

THE NEW YORK TIMES

Snow in New Mexico caused vacation plans to change for writer of this story.
TRAVEL TIPS

What to do when weather
upends your vacation
With a bit of preparation and the right attitude, it
doesn’t have to proverbially rain on your getaway
STEPHANIE ROSENBLOOM
THE NEW YORK TIMES

In this file
photo, the
Carnival
Legend
arrives at
Port Everglades
in Fort
Lauderdale, Fla.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

I flew out of New York City during
Christmas week, when the temperature was in the 70s. I landed in southern New Mexico, hours before a giant
snowstorm.
The governor, Susana Martinez, declared a state of emergency. My flight
back to New York was canceled.
Even if it hadn’t been, I was snowed
in. At the same time, nearly a dozen
tornadoes slammed the Dallas area in
Texas, the deadliest to sweep through
since 1927, according to the National
Weather Service. Meanwhile, in the
Midwest, there was deadly flooding in

Missouri and Illinois.
Severe weather events such as
floods, storms and heat waves appear
to be happening with greater frequency. There have been an average of 335
weather-related disasters each year
between 2005 and 2014, up 14 percent
from the previous decade, and nearly
double the level of the decade before
that, according to a November report
issued by the United Nations.
Travel in an age of uncertain climate
means that at some point, your plans
are likely to be upended by weather.
Still, with a bit of preparation and
the right attitude, it doesn’t have to

TIPS, page B11

TRAVEL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

B11

Travels & Trips
n If your school, nonprofit club or organization is

offering a trip, tour or a travelogue open to the public,
please send us a typed notice in care of Travels, Trips
& Tours, LNP, P.O. Box 1328, Lancaster, PA 17608-1328.
Our fax number is 399-6507. Email address is estark@
lnpnews.com. Please include day of the week with the
date of your trip. See examples. Due to space, trips will
run one time. Deadline to submit is noon Tuesday.

The back of the
1947 Victory
brand trailer is
Victory Tacos,
and the front
of the trailer is
the Genuine Ice
Cream Company
in Bozeman,
Mont. Bozeman
is an old town
with a young
spirit just 90
minutes from
the northern
gate of Yellowstone National
Park.

ATLANTIC NORTHEAST SENIORS
n Thursday, April 7: Washington, D.C. Cherry Blossom

tour and luncheon cruise with narrated tour of Arlington
Cemetery. Not much walking. Cost: $115 includes bus,
lunch, all fees and tips. Pickups at Ephrata, Brethren
Village, A.C. Moore, and York First Church of the Brethren.
n Tuesday-Tuesday, June 14-21: San Francisco to San
Diego. Includes round trip flight, Monterey, Hearst Castle,
Shepherd’s Grove Church, whale watch, libraries of Ronald
Reagan and Richard Nixon and more. Cost: $3,900,
double occupancy.
Call Earl K. Ziegler, 560-6488 or evzieg@gmail.com.
THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

LANCASTER COUNTY
SCHOOL RETIREES
n Tuesday, March 8: Philadelphia Flower Show/100th

Anniversary of National Park Service. Depart 11:30 a.m.
and return approx. 8:30 p.m. Includes bus, driver tip,
admission to show, snacks and door prizes. Cost: $59.50.
Deadline: Feb. 1.
n Saturday, April 16: Brooklyn N.Y., and Coney Island.
Sample foods and desserts. Visit Dumbo, on the
waterfront, pizza, chocolate, Carroll Gardens for pastry,
Fort Green and a stop at Coney Island. Includes bus, driver
and guide tip, all touring and sampling of food, brownbag breakfast and more. Cost: $119.50. Deadline: March 1.
n Sunday-Friday, May 15-20: Montreal, Quebec City
and Old Quebec City, Canada. Lake George, Hudson
River Valley, West Point, Notre-Dame Basilica, dinner
with folk music, Chateau Frontenac, Place Royale and so
much more. Includes bus, driver and guide tips, 5 nights
lodging, ten meals, guided tour of West Point and West
Point Museum, guided tour of Montreal and Quebec. Cost:
$1,345. Deadline: March 1. Passports needed.
n Saturday, June 25: Baltimore Inner Harbor “on your
own.” The National Aquarium, Fort McHenry National
Monument, Maryland Science Center and more options.
Includes bus, driver tip, snacks and more. Cost: $45.
Deadline: May 15.
Call Carol Tangert, 984-2108.

SWEET SIXTEEN SENIORS
n Tuesday-Wednesday, June 7-8: Rivers of Steel tour in

Pittsburgh. Includes Horseshoe Curve Incline, Flight 93
Memorial, lodging at Station Square, Monongahela Incline
ride, Gateway Clipper cruise, waltzing water fountain,
guided Steel City tour and more. Cost: $325.
Call Don Henning, 285-9795.

EXCHANGE RATES
These foreign exchange selling rates, as of the close of
business Jan. 14, apply only to the purchase of currency
amounting to $1,000 or less. These retail exchange rates
apply only to Fulton Bank and are furnished by the
International Services Department.
CURRENCY

RATE

U.S. $

Australian Dollar (AUD)

0.7496

1.33

Canadian Dollar (CAD)

0.745

1.34

Swiss Franc (CHF)

1.0673

0.94

Danish Kroner (DKK)

0.1582

6.32

Euro (EUR)

1.1724

0.85

British Pound (GBP)

1.5483

0.65

Japanese Yen (JPY)

0.009091

110.00

Mexican Peso (MXN)

0.06024

16.60

Norwegian Kroner (NOK)

0.1223

8.18

New Zealand Dollar (NZD)

0.6969

1.43

Scottish Pound (GBP)

1.5483

0.65

Swedish Kroner(SEK)

0.1274

7.85

Tips
Continued from B10

proverbially rain on your
vacation. Below are some
tips on how to be ready for
whatever comes your way.
Be among the first to
learn your flight’s been
canceled: Every minute of lead-time counts
when trying to rebook.
To that end, you should
set up flight alerts before leaving for the airport, no matter what the
weather (flights can be
delayed or canceled for
any number of reasons).
The websites of major
airlines allow passengers
to sign up for information
about trip changes, be it
through texts, emails or
notifications from their
smartphone app.
Know what your airline will (ahem, not)
give you: To save time
and eliminate confusion
if your flight is canceled,
know this: In all but the
most extreme circumstances, you’re not getting anything from the
airline. United States
carriers typically do not
provide passengers with
amenities such as hotel
rooms or food vouchers if a flight is canceled
because of weather, although they may sometimes help you get a dis-

counted rate at a nearby
hotel (you still foot the
bill).
Each airline has a
“contract of carriage” or
“conditions of carriage”
that lays out what, if
anything, you’ll receive
if your flight is canceled.
Delta, American and
United all have contracts
that say they have no liability if a flight is canceled owing to weather.
If delayed on the
tarmac, know your
rights: The Department
of Transportation’s rules
state that within two
hours of the flight being
delayed, United States
airlines must provide
passengers on the tarmac with food, water and
access to bathrooms.

Top: D.C. 200 restaurants on the rise
Continued from B10

year, has transformed an old
motor lodge into a snappy, stylish stop. In its parking lot is the
gleaming silver trailer of Victory
Taco, a casual food stand that’s
also a popular summertime ice
cream stop for families strolling
Main Street.
Info: downtownbozeman.org.

Dublin, Ireland
A hundred years ago, Dublin’s
Easter Rising launched Ireland on
a path to independence from British rule. The armed insurrection
brought bloody results, including
the execution of 16 leaders, but in
1922 the Irish Free State was established.
In months ahead, dozens of
centennial events are planned in
Dublin, including an exhibition
at the National Library of Ireland,
lectures at Trinity College and
various historical re-enactments.
The National Museum of Ireland will unveil “Proclaiming
a Republic: the 1916 Rising”
on March 3. On Easter Sunday,
March 27, at 1:15 p.m., wreathlaying ceremonies are planned at
spots throughout the city.
Info: ireland.ie; museum.ie.

Harlem, New York
For too long, Manhattan above
110th Street was terra incognita
among tourists. But that’s been
changing as the area gains prosperity. Harlem Heritage Tours
offers half a dozen itineraries, as
does Big Apple Jazz Tours.
On lively 125th Street, there’s the
Apollo Theater, opened in 1934
and busy with music and comedy
acts as well as Wednesday-night
amateur acts. Nearby stands the
Studio Museum in Harlem.
Sylvia’s may be the neighborhood’s best-known restaurant (especially its Sunday gospel breakfast). But there’s plenty more
well-loved soul food at Amy Ruth’s
Restaurant and Miss Mamie’s
Spoonbread Too.
Info: Harlemheritage.com; big-

New
Continued from B10

month as Oasis of the
Seas.
Carnival Cruise Line
is also bringing one of
its largest ships to Port
Canaveral when the
3,690-passenger Carnival Magic arrives in April.
Magic is the second of the
line’s three Dream-class
ships, built in 2011.
Also coming to South
Florida in 2016 will be
what’s billed as the most
luxurious cruise ship
ever built when Regent
Seven Seas Explorer
makes its way to Miami
by December.

applejazz.com.

Natchez, Mississippi
This small Mississippi city,
about 170 miles upriver from New
Orleans, celebrates its 300th anniversary in 2016. Natchez is on a
bluff above the Mississippi and full
of tragic, surprising history and
elegant architecture. It’s also the
southwestern end of the Natchez
Trace Parkway, a 444-mile scenic highway through Mississippi,
Alabama and Tennessee that was
once a Native American trail.
No billboards, no businesses, no
commercial vehicles but plenty of
cars and bicycles. Natchez has home
and plantation tours; horse-drawn
carriages; art galleries; a Museum of
African-American History and Culture; more than 40 bed-and-breakfasts and Natchez National Historical Park.
Info: visitnatchez.org; nps.gov/
natr; natchezms300.com.

Orange County,
California., coast
This territory is about as pleasant as California gets. And as these
four examples show, improvements continue. In Dana Point,
the completion of a $30 million
overhaul at the St. Regis Monarch
Beach is expected in the spring.
(It has two goats on site to supply
fresh goat cheese for the restaurants.) Another five-star property, the Montage Laguna Beach,
upgraded its spa offerings and
further gilded its Catalina, Sunset
and Aliso suites. The former Aliso
Creek Inn has been reborn as the
Ranch at Laguna Beach.
Info: stregismb.com; montagehotels.com/lagunabeach; islandhotel.com; theranchlb.com.

Seattle
The Seattle light-rail system in
April will add stops in Capitol Hill
(perhaps the city’s best restaurant neighborhood) and the University of Washington. Later in

OUR

the year, a new streetcar line will
connect Capitol Hill to Pioneer
Square.
Meanwhile, Pike Place Market will sprout a new western
entrance, terrace and plaza area
called Marketfront, making room
for 47 new market stalls. A Thompson hotel is due to open in 2016 at
First Avenue and Stewart Street.
Info: visitseattle.org.

Washington, D.C.

When its doors open in the fall,
the National Museum of African
American History and Culture
will become the 19th museum in
the Smithsonian family, a project
more than a decade in the making. Meanwhile, D.C. tourism
leaders estimate that more than
200 restaurants have opened in
the last three years _ pretty good
for a city just 10 miles square.
Alongside the Potomac River,
the long-closed Watergate Hotel
is due to reopen in March after a
$125 million renovation.
Among its features: a rooftop bar
(Top of the Gate); staff uniforms
designed by “Mad Men” costumer
Janie Bryant; and rates north of
$500 a night.
Info:
washington.org;
s.si.edu/1uQwVU5.

Williamstown,
Kentucky

Here’s a destination for the
traveler who’s been everywhere
and done everything. In Williamstown, a devoted creationist group
is building an ark, a 510-foot-long
wooden sailing vessel that matches
the one described in Genesis. If all
goes as planned, the Ark Encounter (and petting zoo) will open July
7, a date chosen based on another
passage in Genesis. The builder is
AiG (Answers in Genesis), which
also runs a Creation Museum
nearby in Petersburg, Kentucky.
Tickets are $40 per adult, plus
$10 parking.
Info: arkencounter.com; answersingenesis.org.

January

BIG

Cruise
Sale

January 1

1 – 23
®

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select river
cruises + $300
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Ask about
onboard credit
up to $125
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select Boscov’s
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sailings in
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Receive
specialty
dining
on select
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Receive up to
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+ a coupon
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Choose a
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& receive a $20
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Boscov’s Travel Exclusive Journey West is the
best way to tour “out West”. Learn more at this
free event! Saturday, January 30 at 10:00am in the
Park City Mall Community Room. Call to reserve
your seat today!
Boscov’s Travel is located within select Boscov’s
Boscov’s Travel, Lancaster: 717-291-5460

bostravlancaster@boscovs.com

boscovstravel.com
*New bookings only. Booking window January 11 - 23, 2016. Restrictions apply and vary by offer. All offers are subject to availability at time of booking. Offers may apply to
select sailings. Complimentary gifts are provided with final travel documents. Travel Insured $20 Boscov’s Gift Card will be issued after purchase. Onboard credit is per cabin
and is not redeemable for cash. Offers are not valid on private groups. Offers may not be combinable with other offers. For complete terms and conditions, contact your
Boscov’s Travel Specialist.

B12

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

N.Y. Times
best-sellers
Nonfiction Paperbacks
1. The Big Short, by Michael Lewis. (Norton)
The people who saw the real estate crash
coming and made billions from their foresight.
2. Yes Please, by Amy Poehler. (Dey Street/
Morrow) A humorous miscellany from the
comedian and veteran of “Saturday Night Live”
and “Parks and Recreation.”
3. The Boys in the Boat, by Daniel James
Brown. (Penguin) A group of American rowers
pursued gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympic
Games.
4. I Am Malala, by Malala Yousafzai with
Christina Lamb. (Little, Brown) The Nobel
Peace Prize-winner and teenage activist
recounts her path to learning.
5. The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson.
(Vintage) A story of how an architect and a
serial killer were linked by the World’s Fair of
1893.
6. Alexander Hamilton, by Ron Chernow.
(Penguin) First published in 2004, this
biography of a founding father has been turned
into the Broadway hip-hop musical “Hamilton.”
7. In the Heart of the Sea, by Nathaniel
Philbrick. (Penguin) The sinking of the New
England whaleship Essex in 1820, by a sperm
whale. The basis of the movie.
8. 13 Hours, by Mitchell Zuckoff with members
of the Annex Security Team. (Twelve) An
account by U.S. security personnel of their
battle against the terrorists during the attack
on the State Department compound in
Benghazi, Libya, in 2012.
9. Quiet, by Susan Cain. (Broadway) Introverts
— approximately one-third of the population —
are undervalued in American society.
10. Thinking, Fast and Slow, by Daniel
Kahneman. (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) How we
make choices in our business and personal
lives.

Trade fiction paperbacks
1. The Martian, by Andy Weir. (Broadway)
Separated from his crew, an astronaut embarks
on a quest to stay alive on Mars. The basis of
the movie.
2. The Revenant, by Michael Punke. (Picador)
In the old American West, a wounded bear
trapper is left to die alone but sets out on a
3,000-mile journey for retribution; inspiration
for the movie.
3. Brooklyn, by Colm Toibin. (Scribner) An
unsophisticated young Irishwoman leaves her
home for New York in the 1950s. The basis of
the movie.
4. The Alchemist, by Paulo Coelho.
(HarperOne/HarperCollins) A Spanish shepherd
boy ventures to Egypt in search of treasure.
5. My Brilliant Friend, by Elena Ferrante.
(Europa Editions) The first installment in the
author’s Neapolitan series, about the lifelong
friendship between two women.
6. The Man in the High Castle, by Philip K. Dick.
(Mariner) In this alternative history, the Allies lost
World War II, and America is ruled by Japan and
Nazi Germany. The basis of the TV series.
7. 14th Deadly Sin, by James Patterson and
Maxine Paetro. (Grand Central) Detective
Lindsay Boxer and her friends must risk their
lives to save the city and each other when a
rash of murders grips San Francisco.
8. The Choice, by Nicholas Sparks. (Grand
Central) How a North Carolina man’s decisions
about love and death play out in his life.
9. Orphan Train, by Christina Baker Kline.
(Morrow/HarperCollins) A historical novel
about orphans swept off the streets of New
York and sent to the Midwest in the 1920s.
10. A Man Called Ove, by Fredrik Backman.
(Washington Square) An angry old
curmudgeon gets new next-door neighbors,
and things are about to change for all of them
— and others.

Mass-market paperbacks
1. The Choice, by Nicholas Sparks. (Vision) How
a North Carolina man’s decisions about love
and death play out in his life.
2. The Martian, by Andy Weir. (Broadway) After
a dust storm forces his crew to abandon him,
an astronaut embarks on a dogged quest to
stay alive on Mars.
3. Point Blank, by Fern Michaels. (Kensington)
In this continuation of the Sisterhood series, the
group heads to China to search for a friend’s
missing daughter.
4. Last One Home, by Debbie Macomber.
(Ballantine) After years of estrangement, sisters
get an unexpected opportunity to start fresh.
5. Invisible, by James Patterson and David Ellis.
(Grand Central) Searching for her sister’s killer,
a former FBI researcher finds a link between
scores of unsolved cases.
6. The Patriot Threat, by Steve Berry.
(Minotaur) When stolen Treasury documents
threaten America’s very foundation, Cotton
Malone, a retired intelligence officer, gets on
the trail.
7. Motive, by Jonathan Kellerman. (Ballantine)
While investigating a woman’s murder, the
psychologist Alex Delaware and Lt. Milo Sturgis
see a link to a cold case and the possibility of a
serial killer.
8. Mr. Mercedes, by Stephen King. (Pocket
Books) In a race-against-the-clock thriller, a
murderer’s weapon is a luxury car, but now he’s
ready to take down thousands at once.
9. Burn, by James Patterson and Michael
Ledwidge. (Grand Central) Detective Michael
Bennett gets a report of strange goings-on in a
condemned building, leading to a burned body
and an underground criminal world of terrifying
depravity.
10. Trust No One, by Jayne Ann Krentz. (Jove)
Stalked after the death of her murdered boss,
a woman gets help in the form of a rich but
bored venture capitalist.

Books
REVIEW

‘Dark Money’ traces
Koch brothers’ influence

DETAILS
n “Dark Money:

LISA ABITOL

Jane Mayer, a writer for The New Yorker magazine, has written a book about the Koch
brothers titled “Dark Money.”

The Hidden
History of the
Billionaires Behind
the Rise of the
Radical Right”
n By Jane Mayer
n Doubleday
n 449 pages
($29.95)

Book says their political machine rivals that of 2 major parties
DAVID NASAW
NEW TORK TIMES

When Jane Mayer published
her 10,000-word article about
Charles and David Koch in The
New Yorker in August 2010, David Koch denounced her piece in
print and, as she reports in her
new book, “Dark Money: The
Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right,” a “private investigative
firm with powerful political and
law enforcement connections
was retained.” While there was no
hard evidence on who had hired
the firm, “clues leading back to
the Kochs were everywhere.”
That effort may have backfired:
Since that first article, Mayer has
followed the trail of the tax-deductible “dark money” the brothers have secretly donated to political causes; absorbed the work
of dozens of outstanding independent investigative journalists;
ferreted out articles, speeches
and interviews the brothers, or
their advisers, have given, many
of them quite revelatory; and secured access to previously unpublished sources.
“Dark Money,” the result of
Mayer’s research, is a persuasive,
timely and necessary story of the
Koch brothers’ empire. It may
read overly long and include some
familiar material, but only the
most thoroughly documented,
compendious account could do
justice to the Kochs’ bizarre and
Byzantine family history and the
scale and scope of their influence.

Family patriarch
Mayer begins with Fred Koch,
the family patriarch. “Oddly
enough,” she writes, “the fiercely
libertarian Koch family owed
part of its fortune to two of his-

tory’s most infamous dictators,
Josef Stalin and Adolf Hitler,” for
whose regimes Koch’s company
built oil refineries in the 1930s.
Largely because of his experience in the Soviet Union, Fred
Koch became a staunch antiCommunist and, in 1958, one
of the 11 founding members of
the John Birch Society. His son
Charles did not fully commit himself to his father’s political project
until the mid-1970s, when, Mayer writes, Charles Koch “began
planning a movement that could
sweep the country.” His declared
goal? Nothing less than destroying what he referred to as “the
prevalent statist paradigm.”
The 1980 platform of the Libertarian Party, to which the Koch
brothers provided financial support and on which David Koch
ran for vice president, offered a
preview of their anti-government
zealotry. The Libertarians opposed federal income and capital gains taxes. They called for
the repeal of campaign finance
laws; they favored the abolition
of Medicaid and Medicare and
advocated the abolition of Social
Security and the elimination of
the Federal Election Commission, the Securities and Exchange
Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Food
and Drug Administration and the
Occupational Safety and Health
Administration. “The platform
was, in short,” Mayer concludes,
“an effort to repeal virtually every major political reform passed
during the 20th century.”

Less than 1 percent
Not surprisingly, given the extremism of their views, which
William F. Buckley Jr. characterized as “Anarcho-Totalitarian-

ism,” the Libertarians polled less
than 1 percent of the votes. Ronald Reagan was elected president.
As Mayer notes, the Kochs, instead of accepting the voters’
verdict, chose to spend money
changing the way Americans
voted. “During the next three decades,” Mayer writes, “they contributed well over $100 million,
much of it undisclosed, to dozens
of seemingly independent organizations aimed at advancing their
radical ideas.”
When the Supreme Court in
the 2010 Citizens United case
permitted nonprofits to spend
money on political campaigning,
the Koch brothers funded their
own political machine, which, in
size, dollars and sophistication,
rivaled that of the two major parties. Their success in the 2010
midterm election was remarkable, and, Mayer says, took the
Democrats by surprise. Republicans picked up seats in the House
and the Senate and 675 in state
legislatures. “As a consequence of
their gains, Republicans now had
four times as many districts to
gerrymander as the Democrats”
and the legislative power to pass
a series of laws suppressing the
vote of those who might not support their agenda.

Outsize influence
The Kochs, Mayer is careful to
remind us, are only one of several fabulously wealthy families
that have tried to move America
to the right. Their outsize influence is a result not only of their
outsize fortune — according to
Forbes magazine, the brothers
are the fifth and sixth wealthiest
Americans, with a combined family income larger than that of Bill
‘DARK MONEY’, page B13

Check it out!

Treat yourself to one of these new graphic novels. Find them on the graphic novel shelves at the Duke Street Library.
1. Ody-C Volume 1: Off to Far Ithicaa, by
Matt Fraction. A science fiction retelling
of Homer’s Odyssey starting with the
end of a great war in the stars and the
beginning of a very long journey home
for Odyssia and her crew of warriors.
2. Legendary Star-Lord Volume 1: Face
it, I Rule, by Sam Humphries. Peter Quill
battles the Badoon, fights to save an
orphanage and still finds time to flirt
with the X-Men’s Kitty Pryde — all in a

day’s work for Star-Lord.
3. Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A
Marvelous Memoir, by Stan Lee, Peter
David, and Colleen Doran. A graphic
memoir about the career of Stan Lee,
the American comic book writer, editor,
publisher, and former president and
chairman of Marvel Comics.
4. Snowden, by Ted Rall. Delves into

Edward Snowden’s early life and work
experience, his personality, and the
larger issues of privacy, new surveillance
technologies, and the recent history of
government intrusion.
5. Killing and Dying: Six Stories, by
Adrian Tomine. A showcase of the
possibilities of the graphic novel
medium and a wry exploration of loss,
creative ambition, identity and family
dynamics.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Bookends
Luncheon to host
Anna Quindlen
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anna
Quindlen is coming to Lancaster to talk
about her latest novel, “Miller’s Valley,”
which is set in northeastern Pennsylvania.
Quindlen will speak at the 2016 Lancaster Library Luncheon. The event is a fundraiser for county libraries organized by
Aaron’s Books in Lititz and the Friends of
the Lancaster County Library System.
Tickets for the luncheon at Calvary
Church, 1051 Landis Valley Road, are $45
and can be purchased at Aaron’s Books in
Lititz or by calling Cathy Doremus at 6273772. More information and a ticket order
form are online. A copy of the book will be
included with each ticket.
The author has written novels (“One
True Thing,” “Black and Blue” and “Blessings”) and nonfiction books (“A Short
Guide to a Happy Life” and “How Reading
Changed My Life.”) Her New York Times
column “Public and Private” won the Pulitzer Prize in 1992. She now has a column in
Newsweek.
“Miller’s Valley,” according to the author’s website, “is about a woman coming
of age as she unearths surprising secrets
about her family, and unexpected truths
about herself.”

BOOKS/LOCAL HISTORY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

FLASHBACK LANCASTER

Shoppers pause as U.S.
goes to war against Iraq

Children’s laureate
to visit libraries
Sandy Asher, Lancaster County’s Children’s Laureate, is leading a special project happening at public libraries through
March 30 that encourages children to “Celebrate Libraries.”
Asher will lead a program at Manheim
Community Library on Saturday at 10 a.m.
The project also will be presented at:
Manheim Township Public Library, Jan.
26, 6 p.m.; Columbia Public Library, Feb. 3,
1:30 p.m.; Strasburg-Heisler Library, Feb.
11, 6:30 p.m.; Eastern Lancaster County Library (New Holland), March 3, 6:30 p.m.;
Lancaster Public Library, March 4, 5:30
p.m; Moores Memorial Library (Christiana), March 17, 6 p.m.; and Adamstown Area
Library, March 30, 4 p.m.
All the programs are free and open to the
public, but those interested should contact
the individual library in case registration is
required.
The project will culminate on April 1 with
a special exhibit at Millersville University’s
Ware Center in downtown Lancaster.
Asher was named Lancaster County’s Children’s Laureate in December 2014 by the
Lancaster Literary Guild. She saw it as an opportunity to promote literacy and libraries.
The “Celebrate Libraries” project took
shape with the help of the Literary Guild,
Millersville University, the public libraries
of Lancaster County, and staff from the Library System of Lancaster County.

Author will read
from debut novel
Carmine Sarracino will read from his
debut novel, “Point Blank,” on Wednesday
from 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. at Bowers Writers
House on the campus of Elizabethtown
College.
The novel is set in a Civil War hospital
amid drug trafficking, espionage and murder.
Sarracino was educated at Rhode Island
College and The University of Michigan.
His poems have been published in many
magazines, including Prairie Schooner,
The Beloit Poetry Journal and The Laurel
Review.
Sarracino’s reading will be followed by
a book signing and a chocolate-fondue reception.

B13

LNP FILE PHOTO

Shoppers gather around a television at a store at Park City Center to learn about the start of Operation Desert Storm.

Excerpts and summaries of local
news stories from the pages of the
Intelligencer Journal, the Lancaster New Era and the Sunday News
appear each Sunday. They focus on
events in the county’s past that are
noteworthy, newsworthy, or just
strange. Full versions are available
on microfilm at the Lancaster Public Library, 125 N. Duke St.
25 Years Ago: The Jan. 17, 1991,
Intelligencer Journal reported
the start of bombing raids on Bagdad, Iraq, which began on the eve
of Operation Desert Storm. Countians who were at Park City Center
around 7 p.m. put their shopping on
hold as word of the start of the war
spread. The image of a somber Dan
Rather could be seen on a 52-inch
TV screen at the Video Concepts
store. At 9 p.m., a crowd gathered
around a small TV set at the Family
Entertainment stand as shoppers
watched President Bush address
the nation.
In that same edition, the Intelligencer Journal told the story of
the solitary protest of 32-year-old
architect and Navy veteran John
Andrysick, who served on the USS
Saratoga. Holding a sign that read,
“Make Peace, Not War,” Andrysick
stood alone on Penn Square in the
wind and rain for about 90 minutes.
Andrysick said, “I heard about war
being declared, and I was trying to
do my part to show I didn’t approve
of what was going on.”
National Headline: The War Begins // U.S., Allies launch massive
airstrikes against sites in Iraq

50 Years Ago: The Jan. 17, 1966,
Intelligencer Journal reported that
the Lancaster Bar Association had
given its preliminary approval to
helping expand legal aid to the indigent through the use of anti-poverty funds.
On Jan. 17, 1966, the New Era had
the story of students from New
York who were visiting Lancaster
county to prepare their college research papers. Twelve students and
one professor from Colgate University in Hamilton, New York, were
here to do independent research
on the Pennsylvania Dutch. Despite
the academic nature of the visit,
the students also had a good time,
visiting Landis Valley Museum, the
Pennsylvania Farm Museum, the
Mennonite Information center and
more.
National Headline: U.S. Will
Cease Fighting 78 hours for Viet
New Year
75 Years Ago: The Daily New Era
of Jan. 17, 1941, reported on H.M.
Stauffer of Lititz, who was charged
with the unnecessary blowing of an
auto horn, and prosecuted by Lancaster city police. It was reported
that he was apprehended in the act
at the intersection of Queen and
Chestnut streets at 1:45 a.m.
The Lancaster Intelligencer on
Jan. 17, 1941, reported that two
paintings by Charles Demuth, one
owned by his mother, Mrs. Augusta
Demuth, and the other by Lancaster residents Mr. & Mrs., J. Nevin
Schroeder, Jr., would be included
in a memorial exhibit of the artist’s

work that was opening at Franklin
and Marshall College. “Provincetown,” on loan from Mrs. Demuth,
and “Zinnias with Scarlet Sage,” on
loan from the Schroeders, were valued at $1,000 each.

National Headline: Nazis Say Illustrious Hit Again // Claim Three
Direct Hits on Carrier in Mediterranean

100 Years Ago: The Jan. 17,
1916, Daily New Era had the story
of Annie Eisenberger, who was on
trial for allegedly murdering her
husband. The first case of the January term turned in by the Grand
Jury was against Mrs. Eisenberger, who was charged with murdering her husband while he was
asleep in his bed. The court appointed attorney J.W. Brown to
defend the accused. She pleaded
“not guilty.”
Also in the Jan. 17, 1916, Daily New
Era was the story of Phares Heisey
of 557 N. Lime St., who was on his
way home early on a Sunday morning. Mr. Heisey was the victim of
an attack by an unknown thug. He
was struck in the eye, knocked out
and left bleeding. When he came
to, he discovered nothing had been
stolen. Heisey said he did not know
of any enemies he might have who
would attack him, and wondered
if he was mistaken for somebody
else.

National Headline: Paris Avenues Still Crowded on Eve of War //
Gaiety Rules Despite German Nearness

LANCASTER THAT WAS

‘Dark Money’
Continued from B12

Gates — but also of their intellectual prowess and organizational skills. For more than
a decade, they have organized donor summits to which they have invited like-minded billionaires, political consultants, media
celebrities and elected officials. At these
meetings, plans are made, issues chosen,
money raised, donations pooled, spending
coordinated for the next election cycles.
The Koch brothers and their allies insist, and no doubt believe, that their war
on big government has been motivated by
their commitment to the individual freedoms that government interferes with.
Still, “it was impossible not to notice,”
Mayer writes, “that the political policies
they embraced benefited their own bottom
lines first and foremost. Lowering taxes
and rolling back regulations, slashing the
welfare state and obliterating the limits
on campaign spending might or might not
have helped others, but they most certainly
strengthened the hand of extreme donors
with extreme wealth.”

Farm workers take a break
Five young workers pose at the farm of John and Mary Groff at 396 S. Farmersville
Road in Ephrata. They are, from left, James White, Harvey Metzler, Roy Mull, Harry
O. Hoover and John Hoffman.
Year after year, before the spring plowing, local farm families collected field stones
that were pushed to the surface after winter frosts.
The stone were taken by wagon to make a large pile. A stone-crushing rig then went
from farm to farm, crushing the stones, which would be used on gravel driveways
around farm buildings or in the foundations of some new farm buildings under construction. The date this picture was taken is unknown.

LANCASTER MENNONITE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Send
photos and
information
to: Valerie
Marschka, LNP,
P.O. Box 1328,
Lancaster, PA
17608-1328,
or by email to
vmarschka@
LNPnews.com.

B14

LOCAL

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Her dress a success at the Farm Show
Brickerville woman wins Best in Show for crocheted garment, plus other prizes
ERIN NEGLEY

ENEGLEY@LNPNEWS.COM

Dolores Murray’s sewing inspiration comes
straight from her fashion
models — her grandchildren.
Mathew asked for an
Iron Man sweatsuit. Nathan wanted a Steelers
coat. And Anna requested a dress for her doll
with a checkered skirt
and a flower at the waist
— plus a matching dress
to wear herself.
It’s a little different
from New York Fashion Week, but Murray
made it work. This week,
she brought a Pennsylvania Farm Show Best
in Show prize home to
Brickerville.
Murray also won first
place in the handcrafted
garment category for
Anna’s crocheted dress
with matching doll
dress. Plus, she won second place in the “Two or
More Pieced Outfit” and
“Children’s Clothing”
categories for the boys’
outfits.
The 64-year-old started sewing as a child. She
made clothing for her
own children and, after
retirement, started entering her creations at
local fairs. In the past 15
years, those wins at lo-

cal fairs added up to earn
her a spot at the Farm
Show.
She likes to work with
her grandchildren on the
designs and loves how
modeling the clothes
gives them a boost of
confidence.
Through
the years, Cayla, Anna,
Mathew and Nathan all
have lent a hand. They
get both the outfits and
the prize money.
Their requests push
Murray to try new things.
Last year, Mathew wanted a Star Wars coat, so
Murray had to make her
own Star Wars applique. This year, Nathan
wanted a Steelers coat,
and grandma appliqued
“Steelers.”
“I would have been
happier with the Jets,”
she said. “And Roethlisberger? That was out of
the question.”
Hometown: Ephrata.
Education:
Class
of 1969, Ephrata High
School.
My family consists
of: Husband Ken and
children Lisa Weidman,
Landisville; Gina Kilhefner, Cape Coral, Florida;
and Tom Weitzel, Ephrata; in addition to the
grandchildren.
Growing up, I want-

Follow us on Instagram at

LancasterOnline

for photos from around the County

DELORES MURRAY PHOTOS

Dolores Murray made these outfits, modeled by her
grandchildren.

Dolores Murray of Brickerville earned a Pennsylvania
Farm Show Best in Show prize with creations like this
crocheted dress modeled by her granddaughter Anna.

ed to be: A New York
designer, or a costume
maker for a show.
My first job was:
Making baby clothing in
Moyer’s sewing factory
in Ephrata.
My favorite thing
about
competitive
sewing: Always trying to
improve.
The most challenging
thing about these com-

Seafood Market and Sushi Bar
The Finest Catch in Berks County

petitions: In the beginning, I was not driving
a car, and my husband
needed to pick me up.
He was very supportive.
Then you have the actual sewing: coming up
with a unique idea, finding the right fabric, ripping everything out if
it’s not perfect.
My next sewing project: Anna wants a business suit: a skirt and a

jacket. Finding the right
material is going to be a
challenge.
My favorite way to
spend a day: I love to
find an extra hour or
two to sew, go to Pleasant View in Manheim
and swim in the pool,
garden or play with my
cat, Beanie.
Favorite kind of music: Oldies but goodies,
like The Beatles.
Something you’ll always find in my refrigerator: My husband
and I are vegetarians,
so you’ll find broccoli —
and Coke.

My guilty pleasure:
Stopping at Dunkin’ Donuts for a blueberry cake
doughnut.
Hobbies: I love my
flowers and houseplants.
I love my outside gardens. I’m trying to attract a bluebird.
My taste in movies: I love sci-fi movies.
Because of my grandchildren, I’m working
through all of the “Star
Wars” movies.
If someone wrote a
book about my life,
I would like the title
to be: “Think Good
Thoughts.”

Saturday:

Faith &
Values

The social and ethical fabric of community

LancasterOnline

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Lunch
& Learn

Personal Care at Mennonite Home

Thursday, January 28th | 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Mennonite Home, 1520 Harrisburg Pike, Lancaster

Lunch is on us! Meet team members and residents as you learn
about our life-enriching programs and how they can benefit you
or your loved ones needing a little extra care. Mennonite Home also
offers skilled nursing, rehabilitation
and specialized services for those
with memory disorders.
Space is very limited!
Please RSVP by January 21

RSVP BY CALLING CATHY AT 3907979
717-390-7979 | www.MennoniteHome.org
1520 Harrisburg Pike, Lancaster, PA 17601

Getting better never
felt this good.
At MedExpress, we don’t feel good until you do. So when a sore
throat, cold or fever hits, we’re here to make sure you’re never
down for long. With warm, welcoming centers, a full medical team
and no appointment necessary, you can take comfort in knowing
great care is there when you need it.

medexpress.com

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LANCASTER | 4 Rohrerstown Road | Corner of Columbia Avenue

LOCAL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

The Gossip Corner
Coffee beat

could be more coffeehouses “with rock star
edge.”

Morgan’s return

Joey Kramer

A rock ’n’ roll-themed
coffee shop owned by
Aerosmith’s drummer
is on schedule to open
in the spring. The Sun
Chronicle reports Joey
Kramer’s Rockin’ &
Roastin’ Cafe is expected to open its doors in
April. It will be located in North Attleborough, Massachusetts,
about 40 miles outside
of Boston. Aerosmith
formed in Boston in
1971. Kramer has said
the 1,500-square-foot
facility will serve up organic coffee with a rock
‘n’ roll ambiance. The
cafe will feature Kramer’s drum kit and other
Aerosmith
memorabilia. Kramer’s business partner, Frank
Cimler, says Kramer
already has a line of
organic coffee. They
say the shop is a way to
branch out into retail
and is the first of what

Tracy Morgan

Tracy Morgan may
soon be returning to
regular television work
at the FX network. FX
announced at the Television Critics Association winter meeting in
Pasadena,
California,
Saturday that Morgan
will develop and star in
a comedy pilot about
a career criminal trying to make it back into
society after 15 years in
prison. Jordan Peele
of Comedy Central’s
“Key and Peele” is a cowriter of the show’s pilot. Morgan, the former
“30 Rock” and “Saturday
Night Live” comic, was
seriously hurt in a New
Jersey highway crash in
June 2014 and has been
getting back to work in
recent months after a
long recuperation.

Tabby has gone from
surviving to thriving
MJ MEINZER

Squish’s story of adversity overcome makes this
medium-sized, brown
tabby cat a fan favorite
at the Pet Pantry of Lancaster County.
Our young furry friend
was unlucky enough to
have been hit by a car.
After the accident, he
experienced some mild
problems with his hindquarters. Now, months
after treatment, they appear to be resolved.
Squish was also diagnosed with entropion,
a genetic condition in
which a portion of the

HS720ASA

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LancasterHonda.com
2350 Dairy Rd. • 898.0100

cost vaccine clinics: for
cats only, Saturday, Jan.
23; and for dogs only, Saturday, Jan. 30. Distemper
and rabies vaccines will
be $10 each, cash only,
with no appointment
needed. Clinic hours are
9 a.m. to noon both days.
For more information,
visit petpantrylc.org.

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Please read the owner’s manual before operating your Honda Power Equipment and never use in an enclosed or partially enclosed area where you could be exposed to odorless, poisonous carbon monoxide.
2015 American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Celebrate your family in LNP’s special

NLY
NOW O

$

30

TRIBUTE

Commemorate Mother’s Day with your photo in this keepsake
edition of LNP! Filled with photos of Lancaster County mothers
and their children, this special section is sure to steal your heart.

For a reduced rate of $30*, you get:
❥ A photo session with one of the talented
local photographers listed below
❥ Insertion in this special publication,
published on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8
❥ A special keepsake to return to year after year!

n 1916: The Professional Golfers’ Association of America

had its beginnings as department store magnate Rodman
Wanamaker hosted a luncheon of pro and amateur golfers
in New York City. (The PGA of America was formally
established on April 10, 1916.)

n 1929: The cartoon character Popeye the Sailor made his
debut in the “Thimble Theatre” comic strip.

Already have a photo in mind? Surprise mom on her
special day by using your own, non-professional
photo…we accept those too**!

n 1945: Soviet and Polish forces liberated Warsaw

during World War II; Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg,
credited with saving tens of thousands of Jews,
disappeared in Hungary while in Soviet custody.

Start a Mother’s Day tradition!
Call 717-291-8800 or email
advertising@LNPnews.com for a
submission form and more information.

n 1950: The Great Brink’s Robbery took place as seven

masked men held up a Brink’s garage in Boston, stealing
$1.2 million in cash and $1.5 million in checks and money
orders. (Although the entire gang was caught, only part of
the loot was recovered.)

n 1961: President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivered

Deadline for photo submission
is Friday, March 18.

his farewell address in which he warned against “the
acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or
unsought, by the military-industrial complex.”

Transform your body
without surgery!

*This includes your sitting (if using a participating professional photographer) and insertion into
the newspaper. The sitting is for mothers and children only. Additional sittings may be charged by
photographer. Re-shoots are subject to additional fees. Minimum package price may apply.
**Please note that non-professional photos may not reproduce in the same fashion as a photo from
a professional photographer.

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Most credit cards acce
pted.
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WENDELL L. FUNK, M.D.
Lancaster’s Experienced
Cosmetic Plastic Surgeon

lite adoption room inside
That Fish Place/That Pet
Place, 237 Centerville
Road.
The nonprofit Pet Pantry works to help avoid
the surrendering of family pets due to the lack
of resources to feed and
care for them.
Pet Pantry will run low-

Hurry Limited Supplies!

n Actress Betty White is

Rutherford B. Hayes, died in Fremont, Ohio, at age
70. Hawaii’s monarchy was overthrown as a group of
businessmen and sugar planters forced Queen Lili’uokalani
to abdicate.

CASEY KREIDER | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Squish is a 2½-year-old male tabby available for adoption through Pet Pantry of Lancaster County.

Winter Warriors!

699

n Jan. 17, 1893: The 19th president of the United States,

eyelid is inverted or folded inward. After two surgeries and two rounds of
treatment with different
ointments, this issue too
has been overcome.
A highly affectionate
and fairly relaxed feline,
Squish — an estimated
2½ years old — still has a
yen to play. He enjoys the
company of other cats,
playing with them when
they come near.
Happy and lithe, Squish
is simply biding his time
until he finds his forever
home.
You can visit Squish
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. today at Pet Pantry’s satel-

LANCASTER CARES

BIRTHDAYS

TODAY IN HISTORY

2015

230 Harrisburg Ave., Suite 7, Lancaster, PA 17603
www.funkfreezesfat.com • 717-299-9551

B15

PET OF THE WEEK

NOW $

94. Former FCC chairman
Newton N. Minow is 90. Actor
James Earl Jones is 85. Talk
show host Maury Povich is
77. International Boxing Hall
of Famer Muhammad Ali is
Betty White
74. Actress Jane Elliot (TV:
“General Hospital”) is 69. Singer
Steve Earle is 61. Singer Susanna Hoffs (The Bangles) is
57. Actor-comedian Jim Carrey is 54. Actor Denis O’Hare
is 54. First lady Michelle Obama is 52. Singer Shabba
Ranks is 50. Electronic music DJ Tiesto is 47. Rapper Kid
Rock is 45. Actor Freddy Rodriguez is 41. Actress-singer
Zooey Deschanel is 36. Professional dancer Maksim
Chmerkovskiy (TV: “Dancing with the Stars”) is 36. Singer
Ray J is 35. Actor Diogo Morgado is 35. DJ/singer Calvin
Harris is 32. Folk-rock musician Jeremiah Fraites is 30.
Actress Kathrine Herzer (TV: “Madam Secretary”) is 19.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

A Reflection by Sherry
www.areflectionbysherry.com
AKRON | (717) 380-3103

Captured by Missi Photography
capturedbymissiphotography.com
STEVENS/EPHRATA | (717) 228-8750

Amanda Murry Photography
www.amandamurry.com
LANCASTER | (717) 371-4524

Cindy Frey Photography
www.cindyfreyphotography.com
LANCASTER | (717) 808-1091

amm Photography
ammphotography.zenfolio.com
QUARRYVILLE | (717) 715-7025

DB Photography
www.dbphotography25.com
LANCASTER | (717) 799-3317

Annie Sharp Photography
www.anniesharp.com
STRASBURG | (717) 587-7432

Erica McBride Photography
ericamcbridephotography.com
LITITZ | (717) 333-1436

Beth Cardwell Photography
www.bethcardwell.com
LANCASTER | (717) 392-4541

Erin Lyn Photography
www.erinlynphotography.com
LANCASTER | (717) 419-4448

Bethany Green Photography
bethanygreenphotography.com
STRASBURG | (717) 715-6332

Evelyn Rivera Photography
& Photo Booths
facebook.com/evelynriveraphotography
447 S. PRINCE ST | LANCASTER
(727) 520-2925

Blessed Images Photography
www.blessedimages.net
LANCASTER | (484) 515-7821
BnC Memories Photography
www.bncmemories.com
ADAMSTOWN | (717) 449-1029

Fly Away Home Photography
www.flyawayhomephotography.com
LEOLA | (717) 940-2346
Free Your Mind Photography
www.freeyourmindphotography.info
LITITZ | (717) 875-7605

Gabrielle Mappone Photography
www.gabriellemappone.com
HONEY BROOK & LANCASTER
(215) 519-8317
GeorJean Photography
www.georjean.com
LANCASTER | (717) 569-7663
Heather A. Johnson Photography
www.hajphotography.com
LITITZ | (717) 468-0198
Huddle Images
www.huddleimages.com
LANCASTER | (717) 656-2500
John Martin Photography
www.johnmartinphotography.com
STRASBURG | (717) 344-2613
Krotzer Photography
www.krotzerphoto.com
LANCASTER | (718) 314-2777
Lulubelle Photography
www.lulubellephotography.com
EPHRATA | (717) 682-1961
M Reed Photography
www.mreedphotography.com
MARIETTA | (717) 314-3009

Mily Photography
www.milyphoto.com
LANCASTER | (717) 443-5125
M. Swinehart Photography
mswinehartphotography.vpweb.com
LANCASTER | (717) 989-1556
Photography by Kaylyn
www.photographybykaylyn.com
EPHRATA | (717) 945-3391
Precious Image Photography
www.preciousimagephoto.com
LANCASTER | (717) 940-2294
Sharpshooters Photography LLC
sharpshootersphotographyllc.com
NEW HOLLAND | (717) 629-3687
Tin Star Moments, LLC
www.tinstarmoments.com
LITITZ | (610) 996-7550
When in Rome
Photography by Shelly
wheninromephotographybyshelly.com
LANDISVILLE | (717) 799-2804

B16

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Celebrations

717.291.4957
celebrations@lnpnews.com
www.lancasteronline.com

Anniversaries

Engagements
KilpatrickRossi

WatersSterling

WhislerRizzo

DavisZimmerman

RuhlBryant

Jessica Rossi and Michael Kilpatrick have
become engaged.
She is the daughter
of Donald and Donna
Rossi of Lititz. A graduate of Manheim Township High School, Shippensburg
University,
and Temple University
Graduate School, she is
an Occupational Therapist at Cora Services in
Philadelphia.
He is the son of Mark
and Elizabeth Kilpatrick
of Lancaster. A graduate
of Manheim Township
High School and Shippensburg
University,
he is a Senior Materials Planner at Preferred
Sands in Radnor.
A July 2016 wedding is
planned.

Mr. and Mrs. Donald
Sterling,
Lancaster,
happily announce the
engagement of their
daughter, Megan Owen
Sterling, to Brian William Waters, son of Mr.
and Mrs. William Waters, Lancaster.
The bride-to-be is a
2007 graduate of Hempfield High School. She
received her Allied Sciences degree in Mortuary Science from CCBC,
Catonsville, MD, in 2011.
She is a Funeral Director with Finkenbinder
Family Funeral Homes.
The groom-to-be is a
2004 graduate of Hempfield High School. He is
employed by RR Donnelley Financial, Lancaster.
A May 2016 wedding is
planned.

Joseph and Laura Rizzo, of Mountville, are
pleased to announce
the engagement of their
daughter, Natalie Rizzo,
to Michael Whisler, son
of Jeffery and Lucille
Whisler, of Lebanon.
Natalie graduated from
Hempfield High School
in 2009 and is a 2014
graduate of Millersville
Univeristy of Pennsylvania. She is a special
education teacher in
the Manheim Township
School District. Michael
is a 2010 graduate of
Lebanon Catholic High
School. He is also a 2014
graduate of Millersville
University and is currently employed as an
operations manager at
the Penn State Hershey
Medical Center. They
were engaged at the top
of Mount Washington in
Pittsburgh, PA and will
be married in August
2016 in Lancaster, PA.

Darrell and Sue Zimmerman, of Ronks, are
pleased to announce
the engagement of their
daughter, Amanda Zimmerman to Brandon
Davis, son of Robert and
Bonnie Davis of Mechanicsburg.
Amanda is a graduate
of Lancaster Mennonite
High School and Widener University. She went
on to receive her doctorate in physical therapy
from Widener University.
Brandon is a graduate
of Cumberland Valley
High School and Lehigh
University, where he
went on to receive his
M.S. in electrical engineering.
They currently work
and reside in Phoenix,
Arizona.
An April 2016 wedding
is planned.

Ms. Katherine Bryant
and Mr. Geoffrey Ruhl
happily announce their
engagement. Katherine
is the daughter of Patrick and Beth Bryant,
Manheim. She is a 2014
graduate of Manheim
Central High School
and a 2015 graduate
of Lancaster School of
Massage.
Katherine
is employed by Chiropractic First, Lititz, as a
licensed massage therapist.
Geoffrey is the son of
J. Kenneth and Tammy
Kline, Jr., Manheim.
He is a 2011 graduate of
Manheim Central High
School. He served in the
US Marine Corp from
2012-2015,
stationed
in Okinawa, Japan and
San Diego, CA. He is
employed by Lift Inc.,
Mount Joy.
Katherine and Geoffrey will be celebrating
their marriage at Lauxmont Farms, Wrightsville, in July 2016.

Once in awhile,
Right in the middle of an ordinary life,
Love gives us a fairy tale.
Anonymous

Achenbach’s Pastries, Inc.
We take pride in producing wedding
cakes that are delicious to eat and
masterpieces to view!
375 East Main Street • Leola
717.656.6671
Oregon Dairy
Stunning, custom-made cakes. Perfect for
your occasion. From traditional, to
contemporary, to extravagant,
to whimsical—we’ll create a cake that
you and your guests will remember for
years to come!
2900 Oregon Pike • Lititz
717.656.2856

Country Threads by Gail
Quality new and lovingly worn gowns
194 Doe Run Road • Manheim
717.665.3711
Patricia’s Bridal Elegance
Patricia’s Bridal Elegance is a premier
bridal boutique that offers designer gowns,
customer gowns, redesigning heirloom
gowns, dressing the bride,
and wedding day service.
309 West King Street • Lancaster
717.397.7664
Sonia Rose
Your grandmother’s broach, your
mother’s train… any piece of jewelry,
lace or fabric can be transformed into a
one-of-a-kind bridal handbag for yourself
or for your entire wedding party!
50 N. Queen St. • Lancaster
717.394.3700

Harvey’s Main Street BBQ
Whether you’re planning a special event or
wedding reception, our award-winning recipes,
fresh, onsite grilling and homemade sides will
make your next event an enjoyably memorable
experience for all of your guests.
304 E Main St • Mount Joy
717.653.4224
Hess’s BBQ
Your complete cratering service!
2635 Willow Street Pike • Willow Street
717.464.3374

PRiMA Theatre
Live Entertainment and Lighting services for your
big day! Wherever and whatever you’re up to,
PRiMA is ready for you!
19 N. Prince St. • Lancaster
717.327.5124

Wedding Errands of Lancaster
“You have the fun, we’ll do the run!”
Weddings and other celebrations.
www.weddingerrandslancaster.com
717.842.0093

Wilbur Chocolate
Chocolate filled favor boxes and
wedding themed chocolate molds
48 N. Broad Street • Lititz
717.626.3249

Flower & Home Marketplace
Thousands of Silk and Fresh Flowers
for Every Occasion! Weddings,
Showers, Memorials, Entertaining,
and Everyday Decorating
196 Broad Street • Blue Ball
717.351.0015
Heather House
The Finest Floral Arrangements, Backed by
Prompt & Friendly Service!
903 Nissley Rd. (next to Wiley’s) ∙ Lancaster
717.459.3023
www.heatherhouseflowers.com

A Tea Affair
A Perfect Place for your Bridal Shower
6 Sturgis Lane ∙ Lititz
717.626.1776

Neffsville Flower Shoppe
Flower Designs
from Ceremony to Reception
2700 Lititz Pike • Lancaster
717.569.1801
www.neffsvilleflowershop.com

CR Lapps
Catering for All Your Events!
Weddings, Picnics, Party Trays, Etc.
101 Fite Way • Quarryville
717.786.1768
Enck’s Custom Catering
Celebrating is our business! Catering
for all occasions. Call about our
Banquet & Conference Center
244 Granite Run Dr. • Lancaster
717.569.7000

All weddings are similar,
but every marriage is different.
~ John Berger

The Registry at Boscov’s
When you register, you’ll receive
Exactly What you Want
and get Fabulous Perks too!!
giftregistry.boscovs.com
1.800.284.8155

Sugar Plums & Tea
Plan your special occasion with us.
Bridal Shower ∙ Baby Shower
Anniversary ∙ Birthday
403 Bank Barn Lane • Lancaster
717.394.9166
www.sugarplumsandtea.com

Contact Celebrations:

Petals with Style
Dedicated to providing the
freshest flowers and custom design
of the highest quality, Petals with
Style never fails to surprise and impress.
117 S West End Ave • Lancaster
717.392.4000

Classic Estate Jewelry
The best place to find your wedding jewelry
1818 Columbia Ave. • Lancaster
717.291.6007

American Sleep Center
High quality and affordable beds and
mattresses
1957 Fruitville Pike • Lancaster
717.560.0660

Exceptional Weddings
Performing Ceremonies throughout Lancaster
& Chester Counties.
New Holland • 717.419.7579
www.exceptionalweddings.org

Lancaster Elks Lodge #134
For all Your Special Events Needs!
For Event info email
elksvenue@gmail.com
219 N. Duke Street • Lancaster
717.397.7704
www.lancasterelks134.com

Creative Interpretations Photography
Capturing the Beauty of Your Day
80 Tia Circle • Mount Joy
717.405.1481

Lancaster Marriott
at Penn Square
We now Pronounce your Wedding
Breathtaking!
Downtown Lancaster
717.239.1600

Acorn Farms
We offer indoor & outdoor catering for
weddings, corporate events, picnics, and
other events in Lancaster, York, Harrisburg,
and surrounding areas.
3141 Mount Joy Road • Mount Joy
717.653.6182

Double Tree Resort
Lancaster Willow Valley
Wedding Day Elegance in an
All-inclusive, Stunningingly Beautiful Setting
2416 Willow Street Pike • Lancaster
800.369.9877
www.doubletreelancaster.com

Wyndridge Farm
Weddings, Celebrations, Gatherings
& Events. Where you celebrate
Life - Live Crafty!
885 Pleasant Ave.,• Dallastown,
717-244-9900
www.wyndridge.com

Galen Hall Restaurant,
Banquet & Golf Course
Elegant Dining at Affordable Prices
645 N. Galen Hall Rd. • Wernersville
610.678.5424
www.galenhallgc.com
Rock Ford Plantation
“The Lancaster Estate of Revolutionary
War General Edward Hand”
881 Rockford Road • Lancaster
717.799.8751 ~ Nancy
weddingsatrockford@gmail.com
www.rockfordplantation.org
The Iris Club
Weddings, Parties, Dances
and More at Affordable Prices
323 N. Duke Street • Lancaster
717.394.7811
John Wright Restaurant
The River Room
Beautiful Setting Along
the Susquehanna River
North Front Street • Wrightsville
Call Adrienne Zorn @ 717.252.0416
www.johnwrightrestaurant.com

Farmer 68th

Stoudt’s Bier Garden
Our Reception Hall offers a one of a kind
space for your wedding.
2800 N. Reading Road • Adamstown
717.484.4386
Union Meeting House
Make your next event special!
80 N. Waterford Ave. • Marietta
717.426.4089
mariettafundraising@hotmail.com

Four Seasons Golf Course
Creating Truly Memorable Moments; Perfect
Setting for Wedding Receptions, Rehearsal
Dinners, Anniversary Parties
949 Church Street • Landisville
717.898.0536
www.4seasonsbanquets.com

Dissingers Celebrate
Golden Anniversary...
Randy and Millie (Denison) Dissinger, of Manheim, celebrate their
50th wedding anniversary. They were married
on January 15, 1966 at
Salem United Church of
Christ in Columbia, PA.
Randy retired from a
long career in hydraulic and pneumatic sales.
Millie is retired from
over 27 years of service
at the Manheim Central
School District. Randy
enjoys gardening and
exercising while Millie enjoys reading and
quilting. They both take
pleasure in visiting with
friends and family.
They are the parents
of three children: Corry Dissinger, husband
of Kirsten Zug, Lititz;
Dana, wife of Jack Davis, Nottingham; and
Leigh Ann, wife of Travis Rohrer, Lititz. The
Dissingers have 7 grandchildren.

Pheasant Run Farm Bed & Breakfast
The Pheasant Room has exposed stone walls
and opens to a brick terrace that overlooks
the “barnyard” rose garden and the white
pergola in the meadow.
200 Marticville Rd • Lancaster
717.872.0991

Country Barn Weddings
Two Restored Barns with Three
Venues & Seating for up to 400
Guests! Climate Controlled.
Featuring Farm to Fork Catering!
211 South Donnerville Rd.
Lancaster • 717.872.1554
countrybarnwedding.com

Fireside Tavern
Our Grand ballroom and picturesque
grounds provide the ideal setting for your
wedding ceremony and reception. We can
make your special day the most memorable
day of your life.
1500 Historic Dr • Strasburg
717.687.7979

Dissinger 50th

Kelly Reber, Realtor
Kingsway Realty
1770 Oregon Pike • Lancaster
717.569.8701

JB Hostetter and Sons Inc
Everything you need for a Happy Reception
1225 West Main St. • Mount Joy
717.653.1841
Rental World
All Your Needs For Your Special Day
2662 Columbia Ave. • Lancaster
717.397.3663
www.rentalworldpa.com

Envy Studio
Our upscale urban-chic studio’s artistically
driven staff uses the buzz of the city as
inspiration to create red-carpet looks for hair,
nails and wedding styles that your friends will
envy!
24 W. King St. • Lancaster
717.435.9343
Lancaster School
of Cosmetology
Pamper Your Bridal Party
50 Ranck Ave. • Lancaster
717.299.0200

Elite Coach
Nostalgic 20 Passenger Trolley &
25-56 Passenger Coaches, Perfect for Guest
Transportation
1685 W. Main Street • Ephrata • 800.722.6206
www.elitecoach.com

For more information or to advertise on this page, please contact 717.291.8800 or email advertising@LNPnews.com

Mr. and Mrs. C. Richard Farmer of Lancaster
celebrated their 68th
wedding anniversary.
They were married in
St. John’s Episcopal
Church, Lancaster, by
the Rev. Canon Heber
W. Becker.
Mr. Farmer retired as
Director of Salary Administration for Armstrong World Industries.
The Farmers have 2
children and 2 grandchildren. Dr. C. R.
Farmer and Dr. Daniel
H. Nissley of Lancaster were parents of the
Farmers.

Announce life's
milestones in
Celebrations
Let your extended family in
on the big secret: You're happily
engaged!
Tell your old schoolmates that
you finally married that special
someone.
Share the excitement of your big
anniversary!
Go to www.lancasteronline.com/
celebrations/create to place your
special announcement.

Life without love is like
a tree without blossom
and fruit
~ Khalil Gibran

LIVING

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Inspections
Continued from B2

Darrenkamps at Willow
Valley, 106 Willow Valley
Square, follow-up, Jan.
4. Hot dogs were held at
125 degrees, rather than
135 degrees or above as
required; repeat violation.
Items discarded.
Doe Run Elementary
on Gramby, 123 Gramby
Road, Manheim, Jan. 4. No
violations.
Kings Grocery, 1044
N. Georgetown Road,
Paradise, follow-up, Jan. 4.
No violations.
Manheim Central Senior
High School, 400 Adele
Ave., Manheim, Jan. 4. No
violations.
Miesse Candy, 118 N. Water
St., Suite 102, Jan. 4. No
violations.
New China House, 721 S.
Broad St., Lititz, Type 2

follow-up, Jan. 4. Bean
sprouts, pork fried wontons
and cooked egg held at
room temperature rather
than at 41 degrees or under.
Internal temperature of eggs
and wontons measured 60
to 64 degrees; discarded.
Sprouts, still below 41,
placed back in refrigeration.
Food in walk-in freezer
found stored in plastic
shopping bags rather than
in a plastic container or new
single-use bag.
Pequea Valley Sportsman
Association, 195 Rawlinsville
Road, Willow Street, Jan. 4.
No violations.
Route 66 Restaurant,
45 W. Liberty St., Jan.
4. Facility does not
have procedures for
employees to follow
when responding to an
event involving vomitus
or fecal matter discharge
onto surfaces within the
facility. Commercially
processed, refrigerated,

ready-to-eat, time/
temperature-controlledfor-safety food, located in
reach-in cooler and small
cooling unit in front, and
held more than 24 hours,
is not being marked with
date it was opened. Person
in charge does not have
adequate knowledge of
food safety in this food
facility as evidenced by this
noncompliant inspection.
The person in charge has
failed in managerial duties in
ensuring food safety in this
facility. A working container
of weed killer was stored
next to food, equipment
and single-service articles
in back storage area.
Detergent and Pine-Sol
stored with coffee filters
and above single-service
items in back storage room.
Chemicals (paint primer)
stored in cabinet under soda
machine, on shelving above
and with food, utensils
and equipment. A food
employee certification is
displayed but individual
is no longer employed by
the food establishment.
An employee is scheduled
to take test Jan. 28. Food
employees in food prep

area not wearing a beard
cover. Raw chicken stored
on top of pork in reachin cooling unit. Raw shell
eggs stored above beef in
reach-in cooler. Ice cream
scoop stored in water from
night before. Sanitizer
buckets used for wiping
food contact surfaces are
not present in food facility.
Hamburgers served raw or
undercooked at customer’s
request; however, a written
consumer advisory (on
menu, table tent or placard)
is not provided to consumer.
Excessive ice on True Freezer
in back prep area, indicating
doors are not closing
properly. Inside of lid to
chest freezer in basement
is broken and not
connected to freezer door.
Temperature-measuring
device for ensuring proper
temperature of equipment
is not available or readily
accessible in any of the
cooling equipment. Food
facility has test strips that
are bleached out and
nonreactive. Black residue
on soda nozzles. Heavy
accumulation of soil and
food debris on container
for cut fries. Old food

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

residue on food grater in
back food prep area. Heavy
grease buildup around
fryer. Old food splatter on
milkshake mixer. Old food
residue and debris under
meat slicer. Old food residue
and grease inside convection
oven. Single-service gloves
stored on floor in back
storage area. Employee
dumping wastewater into the
designated hand-wash sink
in food prep area. Women’s
toilet room not provided with
covered waste receptacle for
sanitary napkins. Lights are
not shielded or shatterproof
over back food prep area.
Back door and side door
of food facility have gaps
and do not protect against
entry of insects, rodents and
other animals. Employee
clothing stored with food
equipment. Paper towel
dispenser empty at handwash sink in food prep area
and in women’s restroom.
Ceiling tiles missing in back
food prep area and need
to be replaced. Excessive
trash on floor of women’s
restroom. Mops not being
hung to air-dry. Insect
webbing in back storage
area.

Waffle
Continued from B1

5
Generations
Celebrated

The family of Rabieth
(Tootie) McEllhenney
celebrated 5 generations. Shown in the
photo, back row from
left to right, are Brenda M. Leed (greatgrandmother), Alicia
D. Land Solis (mother)
and Stacy L. LandMoore (grandmother), front row Rabieth
(Tootie) McEllhenney
( great-great-grandmother) holding Sofia
I. Solis.

Stoltzfus 5
Generations

Celebrating 5 generations are seated on left
Great-Great Grandfather Omar Stoltzfus,
standing Great Grandmother Barbara Riehl
and Grandfather Dean
Riehl. Seated on right
is Brittany Riehl-Winters. In the middle is
fifth generation Aiden
Winters.

For high school
sports coverage

LancSports.com

Having a
wedding,
shower,
or party?
www.LancasterCountyWinery.com
or 717-464-3555

After college, he
worked as a credit
analyst at Protective
Life Insurance Co. He
then traded and monitored the credit quality
of a $3 billion corporate bond portfolio at
Jefferson-Pilot before
landing his dream job
at the money management firm.
However, he lost his
job in a wave of layoffs
after months of experiencing the financial
crisis firsthand.
“I like to say that
my experience was
about as visceral as
you can get, because
you’re dealing with the
people that lost all the
money,” Adams says.
“You’re either on the
phone with them or
you’re upstairs in the
trading desk watching
everything implode.
You have a front-row
seat to the meltdown.”
Adams says he knew
that he needed to take
a break from the business world.
“I was just emotionally spent,” Adams
says. “I was drained. I
couldn’t keep sort of
apologizing to our clients for our atrocious
performance. You just
saw the whole system
breaking, and I needed
to get away from it.”
Adams realized he
had a gift for writing
when he put together
an annual Christmas
letter to send to friends
and family. By the second year, the piece had
strayed away from the
usual family update.
“It got to be more
about Jimmy’s sort of
general ruminations
more than, ‘Here’s
what we’re doing, and
here’s what we did last
year,’ “ Adams says.
“That was more fun for
me, to sort of ponder
things out loud rather
than just providing a
travel log.”
When he took a job at
the waffle restaurant,
he also immersed himself in economic history. Adams estimates he
read 40 books on the
topic during that time.

B17

Stiegel Elementary School,
3 S. Hazel St., Manheim, Jan.
4. Hair not fully restrained by
hat or net (loose hair outside
hats).
Sunrise Grocery, 103
Rosedale Road, Christiana,
change of owner, Jan. 4. No
violations.
Tres Hermanos Mexican
Grill, 79 E. Main St., Mount
Joy, follow-up, Jan. 4.
Beans held at 131 degrees,
on steam table, rather than
135 degrees or above as
required. Several chipped
and broken floor tiles in food
prep area.
Turkey Hill No. 241, 2000
Lincoln Highway E., followup, Jan. 4. No violations.
Turkey Hill No. 253, 1501
Manheim Pike, follow-up,
Jan. 4. Paper and wrapper
debris under shelves inside
walk-in freezer.
Weis Markets No. 049,
740 S. Broad St., Lititz,
complaint, Jan. 4. No
violations.

He knew he wasn’t interested in trying to dissect what caused the
financial crisis of 2008.
There were already plenty of books on the subject, and he didn’t want
to relive his experience.
Adams’ interest was more
about getting back to the
basics of economics, particularly the 19th-century
interpretations of economic theories — something he believes was
convoluted over time and
isn’t taught in modern
textbooks.
“To me, it was this irony
that we have the truth and
we sort of lost it because
of these seductive ideas
of being able to manage
everything through these
government levers,” Adams says.
While studying, he
found himself drawing
parallels to economic
concepts and conversations with his restaurant
co-workers.
“The cook would say
something, and that
would trigger a thought,”
Adams says. “I’m like, ‘Oh
my gosh, I just read this a
day or two ago. John Stuart Mill said something
very similar to that in
1853.’ ’’
The first edition of
“Waffle Street” was published in 2010. His publisher was friends with
McAlpin, who had a connection to producer Brad
Johnson. The rest of the
team came together in a
similar way.
Adams says he came to
terms with the fact that
the movie would be different from the book,
but that it ended up being “pretty close” to reality. He got to work side
by side with Lafferty and
Glover to prepare them
for a boxing scene.
Adams, who now works
as a senior research analyst at an investment advisory firm in Lancaster
(he can’t say which one),
isn’t quite done with the
movie business. He’s currently working on a project with McAlpin about a
lacrosse player.
“I never envisioned myself really doing this, but
you sort of get the bug,”
Adams says. “If life gives
you this great chance, I
think you’re supposed to
run with it.”

5

$ 88

6

$ 99

per pound

per pound

Jumbo Snow Crab Clusters or
21-25 ct Raw Shrimp

cut
in-store
daily!

Choice
Bone-In
Strip Steaks

sam

sam

e it

em

e it

onl

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Swift Premium Boneless Pork Chops or
SAVINGS PACK Weis Quality Sausage

em

sam
y

per pound

Perdue Fit & Easy - per lb;
Fast Fixin Family Chicken - 56 ounce

per pound

Broccoli
oli Crowns
Crowns, Extra Large VVine Ripe
Toma
Tomatoes, Sweet Onions or Red Loose Onions

sam

e it

onl

1

$ 49

em

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onl

Strawberries - 16 oz; Blueberries - 6 oz;
Blackberries - 5.6 oz

ore

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more!

3

onl

Freshh Express Italian, American, Fancy Gr
Greens or
Veggie Lovers- 7 to 12 oz; Grape Tomatoes - 10 oz

buy m

Harvestland
Antibiotic Free
Ground Chicken

em

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m

per pound

$ 99

4 $11

Olivia’s
Salads

all others $3.99

5 ounce

when you buy 4!

2 $7

Canada Dry, Sunkist, A&W or
7UP - 8 or 12 ct 12 ounce
y more

bu
VE
SA
more!

Selected Lay’s Family Size
Potato Chips - 10 or 10.5 oz

1

$ 99hableflporwice!
y more

bu
VE
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more!

Pepsi
Products

5 $5

Weis Quality
Shredded
Cheese - 6 or 8 oz

VE
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more!

11 to 12 ounce
y more

bu
VE
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more!

Marie Callendar’s or
Healthy Choice
Entrees - 5.8 to 19 oz

all others 75¢

y more

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more!

Freschetta Pizza

20.28 to 30.88 oz
excludes Gluten Free

4

$ 99

you
wheuny 2
b

Progresso Traditional Soup
18.5 or 19 ounce

Turkey Hill
Ice Cream - 48 oz

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SA
more!

excludes All Natural

2 $5

all others $3.00

when you buy 2!

Nature Valley Granola
ranolaa Ba
Bars
Bars
6.7 to 8.94 ounce

when you buy 2!

Betty Crocker Potatoes
otatoes
ess or
or
Starkist Tuna - 2.6 to 5.6 ounce

4.77 1.87 1.77 77

see store for more details

$

LIMIT 6
OF EACH

$

12

49

Selected Angry
Orchard Hard Cider
6 count
12 ounce

$

Quality & Savings on the above items through
Wednesday, January 20, 2016.
DOUBLE COUPONS EVERYDAY see store for details • visit us at
www.weismarkets.com or connect with us on

11

49

Corona or
Corona Light
12 count
12 ounce

¢

LIMIT 6

BEER CAFE

THE

$

2
FREE!

all others $5.50

all others $2.50

$

WE GUARANTEE THE LOWEST PRICE IN THE AREA!
If a local competitor advertises any of our tagged LOWEST PRICE GUARANTEE items at a lower price, we
will give you DOUBLE THE DIFFERENCE with purchase.

Budweiser or
Bug Light

all others $2.49

14.5 to 15.25 ounce

when you buy 10!

when you buy 5!

S
e;
Spam - 12 ounce;
Dinty Moore Stew -20 ounce

Weis Quality Beans,
Tomatoes or Vegetables

10 $5

5 $10

2 $4

Cutie Clementines
nes
3 pound bag

12 count
12 ounce

ore
buy m

when you buy 4!

Eight O’Clock Coffee

when you buy 3!

when you buy 5!

1

$ 69

11.25 to 12.25 ounce

all others $2.99

all others $1.25

Good Health Half Naked
Popcorn - 4 ounce

1

$ 99

2 liter

La Famiglia Del Grosso
Pasta Sauce- 26 ounce

Keebler Chips Deluxe, Sandies,
Simply Made or Oatmeal
Cookies - 6 to 14.8 ounce

Selected General Mills Cereal

At your Ephrata, Lititz & Red Rose
Commons , Lancaster Weis Markets!

16

$

LIMIT 6 OF EACH

49

Selected
New Belgium
6 count
12 ounce

11

$

49

Deals good only at these participating locations.

Lancaster - Chelsea Square - Manor Shopping Center - 1603 Lincoln Highway East - Red Rose Commons, 1700 Fruitville Pike
• 1400 Stony Battery Road • Elizabethtown - 1629 South Market St. • Ephrata - 331 North Reading Road
• Mount Joy - 441 West Main St. • Manheim - Manheim Shopping Center • Willow Street - Kendig Square • Columbia - Route 462 •
Gap - 5360 Lincoln Highway • Lititz - 740 South Broad Street
We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not responsible for typographical or pictorial errors.

is
Look outftohr
Friday

9AM - 9PM

2
FRIDAY, JANUARY 2

Fantastic Friday from 9AM to 9PM Friday, JANUARY 15 ONLY.

Sports

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

C

n SEND STORY TIPS & INFO TO: CHRIS OTTO, 291-8662, COTTO@LNPNEWS.COM

Crush is
back with O’s
Report: Davis resigns with
the Baltimore Orioles
for 7 years, $161 million
k Page C5

ALSO INSIDE: CLASSIFIEDS

NFL PLAYOFFS

MIKE GROSS
PENN STATE FOOTBALL

Franklin
deserves
more time
to recruit
and rebuild

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kansas City Chiefs free safety Husain Abdullah (39) pushes New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) out of bounds short of the goal
line in the first half Saturday in Foxborough, Mass.

Patriots hold off Chiefs, 27-20
Pats advance to 5th straight AFC title game
JIMMY GOLEN
AP SPORTS WRITER

FOXBOROUGH,
Mass.
— The Patriots’ late-season
slump didn’t mean much
when the playoffs came to
New England. Kansas City’s
11-game winning streak mattered even less.
With Rob Gronkowski and
Julian Edelman coming back
from injuries to help Tom
Brady return to his Super Bowl
MVP form, the Patriots earned
a spot in the AFC title game for
the fifth year in a row, beating
the Chiefs 27-20 on Saturday.
“It’s pretty special to get
back to another AFC championship game,” said Brady, who
will play for the conference
title for the 10th time in his ca-

reer. “It’s pretty cool. It’s hard
to do, man. You’ve got to grind
throughout the entire year.
There’s only four teams playing next week and we’re one of
them. That game means a lot.”
The Patriots (13-4) are trying
to become the first team to win
back-to-back NFL titles since
they did it in 2003-04. But
first they will meet the winner
of today’s game between the
Steelers and Broncos for a spot
in Super Bowl 50.
The defending champions
would play in Denver on Jan.
24 if the Broncos win, or at
home if it’s the Steelers.
“You can’t take it for granted because everybody knows
how hard it is to get there,”
said Edelman, who was side-

LATE GAME
At press time, the Arizona
Cardinals led the Green Bay
Packers, 17-13, in the fourth
quarter of their NFC divisional
playoff game. For the result, go
to LancasterOnline.com.

MORE COVERAGE
n Preview of today’s Seahawks-

Panthers divisional playoff game,
Page C6
n Fantasy football: Dan Massey
recaps this season’s wide
receivers, Page C6
n Paula Wolf: Eagles’ new coach
will have lowered expectations,
Page C6
n Former Colts, Ravens coach
Ted Marchibroda dies, Page C7

lined with a broken foot when
the Patriots lost four of their
last six regular-season games.
“We didn’t do too well down

the stretch and we were playing
against a team that won 11 games
in a row.
“We didn’t worry about what’s
happened in the past or what’s
going to happen in the future.”
Brady threw for two touchdowns to Gronkowski and
sneaked in for another just one
play after diving for the pylon after a 10-yard scramble that was
his longest postseason run in
nine years. Brady took a helmet
in the back as his body — but not
the ball — cleared the goal line.
“Anytime the Clydesdale gets
running, the crowd goes crazy,”
Edelman said.
After spending the last two
weeks recovering from knee and
back injuries, Gronkowski caught
seven passes for 83 yards, including touchdowns from 8 and 16
yards out. Gronkowski also rePATRIOTS, page C7

AFC DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS

Broncos vow not to overlook Steelers
Denver took a banged-up Colts team lightly last
year and lost; players focused on Pittsburgh
ARNIE STAPLETON

AP PRO FOOTBALL WRITER

DENVER — The Pittsburgh
Steelers stagger into Denver
with an ailing Ben Roethlisberger, who won’t have his
leading rusher or his top receiver against the league’s best
defense today.
So what?
The Steelers (11-6) are deep
even without All-Pro receiver
Antonio Brown (concussion)
and running back DeAngelo
Williams (foot), and the Broncos insist Big Ben can go deep

even with a sprained throwing
shoulder.
The Broncos (12-4) swear
they won’t make the same mistake they did last year, either.
They were in this situation a
year ago, coming off a bye and
facing a banged-up opponent
who was a big underdog.
Indianapolis 24, Denver 13.
“I think we were focused on
New England,” cornerback
Aqib Talib said. “We just knew
we were going to tear Andrew
Luck and the Colts, get them
up out of here and get ready to

ON THE AIR
n Who: Pittsburgh Steelers
(11-6) vs. Denver Broncos
(12-4)

n When: today, 4:30 p.m.
n Where: Sports Authority
Field at Mile High, Denver

n TV: CBS

go to New England. So, when I
look back on last year, there was
a lot of, ‘Next week when we go
to New England we’ve got to
play Gronk like this.’ There was
a bunch of future talk when we
didn’t even get the Colts yet.”
The Broncos believe the

coaching staff wasn’t dialed in
either, as coordinators Jack
Del Rio and Adam Gase were
interviewing for head coaching jobs, and John Fox let it be
known even before kickoff that
Chicago was his kind of town.
“I don’t think we had all-theway focus,” cornerback Chris
Harris Jr. said. “Everybody had
their minds set on trying to get
paid, coaches were trying to
leave and go get head coaching
jobs. So, I mean, we had a lot
of scrambling and stuff going
on last year. I think this year
everybody’s more focused. Everybody’s bought in.”
Nobody’s thinking about the
STEELERS, page C7

Starting at 12:01 a.m.
Friday, Quinn Nordin
had a sleepover at his
house.
With a 52-year-old
man.
It’s not as creepy as
it … well, I’ll leave that
to you.
Nordin is the top
ranked high-school
placekicker in the
country. He is from
Michigan. His Twitter
page is topped with
a picture of Nordin
and another recruit
in Michigan’s football
locker room. His private kicking coach is a
Michigan alumnus.
Michigan coach Jim
Harbaugh was Nordin’s
sleepover pal. Harbaugh kind of talked
himself into it. He arrived at Nordin’s home
one minute after midnight, because Friday
marked the beginning
of the NCAA-mandated recruiting contact
period.
Harbaugh vowed to
spend the night with
Nordin and his family. He said he’d drive
Nordin to Ann Arbor
after breakfast or, if his
parents insisted, drive
Nordin to school and
spend the day there,
actually attending all
Nordin’s classes.
Said he’d sleep on the
floor, if that’s what it
took.
Nordin warned Harbaugh that he had Penn
State stuff all over his
room.
Harbaugh said he’d
help Nordin take the
stuff down.
That’s right, despite
all of the above, Nordin
is a Penn State verbal
commit. He had a
face-time visit with
Penn State coaches
last week, and will
visit Happy Valley next
weekend.
Which is why I am
about to rise in defense, sort of, of James
Franklin.
It’s not entirely clear
that Franklin needs
defending, just two
years into a contract
that ends in 2019 and
will pay him well over
$4 million annually.
But it is entirely clear
that after two sevenwin seasons, Franklin’s
honeymoon is over.

FRANKLIN, page C5

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

As Reimer rebounds, so does MU
Marauders’ senior guard has
been big part of team’s success

KEVIN FREEMAN

KFREEMAN@LNPNEWS.COM

SUBMITTED

Millersville University women’s basketball player Shelby
Reimer has recovered from two torn ACLs during her
basketball career.

Shelby Reimer has
achieved a certain balance when it comes to
playing basketball.
The Millersville University red-shirt senior
point guard has managed to blend toughness
with the ability to keep
things light — funny, her

coach might say — in
helping the Marauders
to a bounce-back year in
the Pennsylvania State
Athletic Conference.
She has been around
basketball for a long
time. Both her mother
and father played basketball in high school
and both coached the
game.
Her
mother

served as the Penn State
Altoona women’s basketball coach for a time.
Reimer’s older sister
Sam owns the career
scoring record at Altoona
High School and at Edinboro University. Reimer
wasn’t old enough to
play on the same teams
as Sam but did play with
her sister Sara.
“I learned a lot from
Sam, just watching her,’’
Shelby Reimer said. “She
was a gamer. She could

figure things out. Whatever defense was thrown
at her, she was going to
score. She had a great
basketball IQ.’’
Perhaps Reimer was
able to bounce back from
two — yes, two —torn
ACL injuries because
she comes from strong
basketball stock. She
tore the ACL in her left
knee in high school and
then again as a freshman
at Millersville.

REIMER, page C3

C2

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

SPORTS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SPORTS ON TV
COLLEGE MEN’S BASKETBALL
American at Army
Creighton at DePaul
Michigan State at Wisconsin

2pm

George Mason at Saint Louis

NBCSN

3pm

S. Illinois at Drake

ESPNU

4pm

Michigan at Iowa

BTN

4:30pm

Virginia at Florida State

ESPNU

6:30pm

Oregon State at Utah

ESPNU

8:30pm

NETWORK

TIME

BTN

12pm

ESPNU

12pm

FSN, ROOT

12:30pm

FS2

1pm

MASN

1pm

SEC

1pm

ESPN2

1:30pm

BTN

2pm

ESPNU

2pm

Missouri at Arkansas

SEC

3pm

Holy Cross at Lehigh

MASN

3pm

Baylor at Texas

ESPN2

3:30pm

Saint Joseph’s at Fordham

CBSSN

4pm

SEC

5pm

CBSSN

6pm

NETWORK

TIME

Latin America Amateur Championship,
final round

ESPN2

11:30am

PGA Tour, Sony Open, final round

GOLF

6pm

NETWORK

TIME

UFC Fight Night, preliminaries

FS1

8pm

UFC Fight Night,
Dominick Cruz vs. T.J. Dillashaw

FS1

10pm

NETWORK

TIME

NFC Divisional playoff, Seattle at Carolina

FOX

1pm

AFC Divisional playoff, Pittsburgh at Denver

CBS

4:30pm

NHL

NETWORK

TIME

Carolina at Pittsburgh

ROOT

3pm

Philadelphia at Detroit

NBCSN

7:30pm

NETWORK

TIME

Premier League,
Manchester United at Liverpool

NBCSN

9am

Premier League, Arsenal at Stoke City

NBCSN

11:15am

NETWORK

TIME

ESPN2

7pm

Seton Hall at Georgetown
High Point at Campbell
Auburn at Kentucky
Texas A&M at South Carolina
Purdue at Ohio State
East Carolina at South Florida

Georgia at Alabama
Davidson at VCU

GOLF

STAFF REPORT

SPORTS@LNPNEWS.COM

Andrew Simpson of York was the overall winner of
the Sierra Club-Lancaster Group’s sixth annual Polar
Bear 5K Trail Run/Hike, held Saturday morning in
Lancaster County Central Park.
Simpson finished the race in 18:56:34.
The second- and third-place finishers of the race
were, respectively, Amos King of Lancaster (19:03:33)
and Eddie Pantoja of Avondale (19:08:74).
Finishing first among women was Jodi Heikkinen
of Leola (23:26:75). Second was Rosemary Tuzzino
of Lancaster (24:08:80), and taking third place was
Bonnie Stoeckl of Pequea (24:41:66).
A total of 217 people participated in the race (out of
268 registered) including both runners and hikers.
The top under-10 finishers were Mya Grace Paparo
and Andrew Scrivano.
The top 70-and-over finisher was Juan Carro of
Landisville, with an excellent time of 27:26.69.
Approximately 80 to 100 volunteers were on hand

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS

NFL

to handle race-day activities, and scores of
spectators also viewed the run.
There also were 63 dogs of all breeds and sizes
participating.
The first-place dog was Jake, owned by Tim
Schuler. Jake was followed by Monty (owned by
Kevin Casey) and Katie (owned by Jodi Heikkinen).

1pm
1:30pm

Miami at North Carolina

HUMANS, CANINES
HIT CENTRAL PARK
FOR POLAR BEAR 5K

12pm

FS1
CBS

George Washington at Duquesne

LOCAL RUNNING

CBSSN

CBSSN

Northwestern at Maryland

ROBERT DEVONSHIRE JR. | LNP CORRESPONDENT PHOTOS

TIME

UConn at Houston

COLLEGE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Above, runners and their dogs take off at the start of the Polar Bear 5K Saturday morning in Lancaster Central Park. Below, Otis gets warmed up to run his first 5K along with owner Steph Weiser of Columbia.

NETWORK

SOCCER

TENNIS
Australian Open, first round

NHL ROUNDUP

Rangers down Flyers in shootout
Zuccarello, Lundqvist lead New York over Philadelphia, winning 3-2
Mats
Zuccarello
scored in a shootout
and Henrik Lundqvist
reached 20 wins for the
11th straight season,
leading the New York
Rangers to a 3-2 victory
over the Philadelphia
Flyers on Saturday.
Chris Kreider and J.T.
Miller scored in regulation for the Rangers.
Brayden Schenn and
Wayne
Simmonds
scored for Philadelphia,
which had won four
straight overall and six
in a row on home ice.
Lundqvist improved
to 20-12-4. He is the
only goaltender in NHL
history to have won
20 games in each of
his first 11 seasons and
joins Martin Brodeur
and Tony Esposito as
the only goalies who
have won 20 games in
11 straight seasons over
the course of their careers.
Lundqvist
stopped
Shayne Gostisbehere
and Claude Giroux in
the shootout, and Jakub
Voracek shot wide of the
net. Lundqvist finished
with 36 saves.
Philadelphia had the
best chances to win it in
overtime, but Lundqvist
saved
Gostisbehere’s
slap shot with a minute
left and then stopped
Matt Read’s chance
from point-blank range
14 seconds later.
Lundqvist
showed
why he’s had so much
success in a stellar second period when he
stopped all 11 Philadelphia shots, including
several excellent scoring chances.
The Rangers goalie
denied Voracek from
close range midway

BEARS WIN
Hershey won the shootout to record a 4-3 victory
over visiting Springfield on Saturday night in front
of 10,568 at Giant Center.
Hershey goalie Dan Ellis was dandy in the shootout,
stopping four of Springfield’s five shots.
Hershey earned the win via shootout goals by
Connor Carrick and Christian Djoos.
Hershey had forced overtime on Chris Bourque’s
third-period power-play goal, his 18th of the season,
which brought the Bears back from a 3-2 deficit.
Hershey’s first two goals were by Riley Barber, his
sixth and seventh of the season.
The Bears host Springfield again at 5 p.m. today.

through the period and
then used his blocker
to stop a Voracek blast
from the right circle 30
seconds later.
And he made a great
save on Giroux from
right in front of the
crease with 6:46 left
before denying Gostisbehere on a breakaway
with 1:03 to play in the
period.
Kreider put the Rangers ahead 2-1 with the
lone goal of the second
period, finishing a 2-on1 from close range after
a nifty backhanded pass
from Rick Nash 4:49
into the period.
Simmonds’
powerplay tally with 9:27 remaining in the third
period tied it at 2. Voracek set up the goal with
a great pass across the
crease, and Simmonds
one-timed it home for
his 12th goal of the season to snap Philadelphia’s 0-for-12 skid on
the man-advantage.
Philadelphia opened
the scoring four minutes into the game on
Schenn’s 10th goal of
the season. Sean Couturier passed the puck
across the crease to a
wide-open Schenn, who
wristed it into the open

net.
Devils 2, Coyotes 0:
Cory Schneider stopped
38 shots for his third
shutout of the season,
leading New Jersey over
Arizona.
Schneider, who was
selected as an All-Star
for the first time in his
career, is 12-6-2 in 20
starts on the road this
season.
Senators 5, Kings 3:
Mika Zibanejad scored a
tiebreaking power-play
goal with 6:50 to play,
and Ottawa roared back
from a two-goal deficit
in the third period for a
victory over Los Angeles.
Vincent
Lecavalier
scored his first goal for
the Kings. The veteran
center’s goal was the
412th of his NHL career,
but his first since joining
the Kings in a trade with
Philadelphia last week.
Lecavalier plans to retire this summer, but
he’s fitting in well as Los
Angeles’ third-line center, playing the Kings’
two-way style and excelling on faceoffs.
Sabres 4, Nationals 1: Evander Kane
had a goal and an assist,
Chad Johsnon stopped
33 shots, and Buffalo

beat Washington to
hand Capitals goalie
Braden Holtby a rare
loss.
Marcus
Johansson ruined Johnson’s
shutout bid 2:54 into
the third period with
an unassisted goal.
Washington center
and former Flyers
captain Mike Richards played his first
game since the Kings
terminated his contract this summer
after a border arrest
for possession of a
controlled substance.
Blue Jackets 2,
Avalanche 1: Jack
Johnson scored with
1:07 left off Avalanche forward Cody
McLeod’s skate to
give Columbus a victory over Colorado.
Blues 4, Canadiens 3: Jori Lehtera
scored 2:04 into
overtime, Brian Elliott made a careerhigh 46 saves and St.
Louis beat Montreal.
Ty Rattie tied the
game with 5:25 left
for St. Louis, and
Robby Fabbri and
Paul Stastny also
scored. The Blues
have won three of
four after enduring
a five-game losing
streak.
Bruins 3, Maple
Leafs 2: Brad Marchand scored with 47
seconds left in the
third period to lift
Boston over Toronto.
Patrice
Bergeron
scored twice for Boston and Tuukka Rask
finished with 26 saves
as the Bruins extended Toronto’s losing
streak to five straight.
SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

NBA ROUNDUP

Philadelphia routs
Portland, 114-89
Okafor, 76ers snap four-game streak
Jahlil Okafor had 25
points and 10 rebounds
to help the Philadelphia
76ers snap a four-game
losing streak with a 114-89
rout of the Portland Trail
Blazers on Saturday night.
Richaun Holmes added
17 points off the bench
and Ish Smith and Robert Covington scored
16 apiece for the Sixers,
who enjoyed a rare blowout victory. They improved to 5-37 with their
most lopsided win of the
season.
Damian Lillard scored
14 points to lead the Blazers, who dropped to 18-25
as their three-game winning streak ended. C.J.
McCollum finished with
13 and Mason Plumlee
and Miles Leonard had 12
apiece.
Portland, in the midst of
a three-game East Coast
swing, looked flat from the
opening tip.
Okafor torched the Blazers for 10 points in the
first four minutes and 17
in the first quarter — as
many as the entire Portland team. With a mixture
of post moves and jumpers, the rookie center only
missed one of his nine
shot attempts in the opening quarter to help Philly
take a 29-17 lead.
The Sixers extended
their lead to 22 with 7:45
left in the second quarter
on a Covington transition
3-pointer, moments after
a Nerlens Noel block on
the other end. Covington hit another three less
than two minutes later to
put Philly up 25 and the
Sixers went into halftime
with a comfortable 68-43

advantage after Smith hit
a runner right before the
buzzer.
Pistons 113, Warriors 95: Kentavious
Caldwell-Pope held his
own against Stephen
Curry for most of the
night, scoring 20 points
as Detroit handed Golden State its second loss in
three games.
Much of the pregame
talk centered around
how well Caldwell-Pope
might be able to defend
Curry. The Golden State
star scored 38 points, but
Caldwell-Pope gave the
Pistons a boost offensively.
Bucks 105, Hornets
92: Khris Middleton
scored 24 points on 11-of16 shooting, and Milwaukee beat Charlotte.
Greg Monroe had 19
points and 10 rebounds
for Milwaukee, and Giannis
Antetokounmpo
finished with 14 points
and 11 boards. Jabari Parker scored 15 points.
Hawks 114, Nets 86:
Paul Millsap scored 21
points and went past
10,000 for his career, leading Atlanta to a dominant
second half that carried
the Hawks past Brooklyn.
Celtics 119, Wizards
117: Jae Crowder scored
on a go-ahead layup with
3.9 seconds left off a pass
from Marcus Smart and
Boston outlasted Washington for a victory.
Isaiah Thomas scored
32 points to lead the Celtics, who won their third
straight and snapped a
three-game skid on the
road.

SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

SPORTS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Wildcats hold off Hoyas
When the shots weren’t
falling and things were
getting tense for No.
6 Villanova, coach Jay
Wright turned to his upperclassmen who have
been through it all. They
didn’t disappoint him.
Junior guard Josh Hart
scored 15 points and
grabbed 12 rebounds for
his fourth double-double
of the season, and senior
Ryan Arcidiacono scored
nine of his 15 points in
the final minutes as the
Wildcats survived a scare
to beat Georgetown 5550 on Saturday for their
21st consecutive Big East
victory.
Villanova went 5:39
between field goals in
the second half and had
just one in the final 8
minutes. The Wildcats
got tough on defense and
made free throws to pull
away.
“That’s how you have
to win on the road,” said.
“That’s how you’ve got
to gut it out. It’s just not
going to be pretty in this
league.”
Villanova (16-2, 6-0)
might win ugly, but it
gets the job done in conference play. Its last Big
East loss came Jan. 19,
2015, at Verizon Center,
which proved to be a hostile environment again
Saturday.
Wright
downplayed
the Big East streak, but
it says something about
Villanova’s consistency.
“It just means we’ve
come to play every single
game that we’ve played,”
said Arcidiacono, who
made seven of his eight
free throws. “We’re not
really focused on if we’re
undefeated or if we’re
3-3 or 4-2 or anything
like that. That just means
we’ve come to play every
single time.”
The Wildcats had to
come to play against
Georgetown (11-7, 4-2),
which stayed in the
game despite a rash of
mistakes, foul trouble
and ice-cold shooting.
D’Vauntes Smith-Rivera
had 15 points for the
Hoyas and Isaac Copeland added 11, including
a big 3-pointer late in the
second half.
Villanova
freshman
Mikal Bridges held
Smith-Rivera to just five
points in the second half

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Georgetown center Jessie Govan, left, is covered by
Villanova forward Darryl Reynolds during the first half
Saturday in Washington, D.C.

and 6-of-14 shooting for
the game.
Kansas 70, TCU 63:
Wayne Selden Jr. scored
11 points, Carlton Bragg
and Cheick Diallo provided a lift off the bench,
and No. 1 Kansas slogged
past the Horned Frogs
(9-8, 1-4).
Bragg had 10 points,
as did Perry Ellis and
Devonte Graham. Diallo
had nine points and nine
rebounds to help the
Jayhawks (15-2, 4-1 Big
12) bounce back from a
loss at West Virginia.
Maryland 100, Ohio
State 65: Robert Carter
Jr. scored a career-high
25 points, Rasheed Sulaimon added a seasonbest 22 and No. 3 Maryland bounced back from
its first Big Ten loss of
the season.
Diamond Stone scored
15 points for the Terrapins (16-2, 5-1), who
moved on from a defeat
at Michigan by reaching
the 100-point mark for
the first time since 2012.
Keita Bates-Diop had
15 points for Ohio State
(12-7, 4-2).
North Carolina 67,
North Carolina State
55: Kennedy Meeks
scored 18 of his 23 points
after halftime to help No.
5 North Carolina pull
away.

Joel Berry II added 14
points for the Tar Heels
(16-2), who improved to
5-0 in the Atlantic Coast
Conference for the first
time since the 2000-01
season.
Xavier 74, Marquette
66: Trevon Bluiett had
18 points and No. 7 Xavier used a 21-0 burst in
the first half to seize control.
James Farr had 16
points and a career-high
19 rebounds while Edmond Sumner, returning
from a concussion, added
15 points for the Musketeers (16-1, 4-1 Big East).
Clemson 76, Miami
65: Jaron Blossomgame
scored 25 points and
Clemson defeated a
third straight ranked opponent for the first time
in program history.
The Tigers (12-6, 5-1
Atlantic Coast Conference) have won five in a
row overall, including a
victory at Syracuse and
home wins over No. 21
Louisville, No. 9 Duke
and Miami (13-3, 2-2).
Davon Reed scored 17
for the No. 8 Hurricanes,
who led 57-51 with about
7 minutes left.
Notre Dame 95, Duke
91: Bonzie Colson scored
a career-high 31 points
and grabbed 11 rebounds
to lead Notre Dame past

No. 9 Duke.
Demetrius Jackson
added 24 points and
Steve Vasturia finished
with 22 as the Fighting Irish (12-5, 3-2
Atlantic Coast Conference) beat Duke for
the fourth time in five
tries.
Freshman Luke Kennard had 30 points and
Brandon Ingram added 25 for the Blue Devils (14-4, 3-2), who have
lost two straight for the
first time this season.
Pittsburgh 84, Boston College 61: Jamel
Artis scored 22 points
and No. 20 Pittsburgh
recovered from a forgettable loss at No. 21
Louisville.
Michael Young had 13
points, five rebounds
and nine assists for
the Panthers (15-2, 4-1
Atlantic Coast Conference).
Temple 67, Cincinnati 65, (2OT): Jaylen
Bond scored on a putback with 20.2 seconds
left in the second overtime for the Owls (9-7,
4-2 American),
Cincinnati’s
Gary
Clark stripped the ball
from Josh Brown as
he went up for a shot
in the lane and the ball
was tipped out to Obi
Enechionyia on the
left wing. Enechionyia
just got off a shot that
grazed the rim as the
shot clock expired.
The ball dropped into
Bond’s hands for the
easy putback.

Women
UConn 104, Temple
49: Breanna Stewart
had 22 points, 10 rebounds and five blocks
to lead No. 1 UConn.
Katie Lou Samuelson
added career-highs of
21 points and six assists.
It was only the second home game of the
season for the Huskies
at their on-campus facility, their first since
a 91-81 win over Notre
Dame Dec. 5.
UConn (16-0, 6-0
AAC) has won 53
straight games, one
behind Louisiana Tech
(1980-82) for the third
longest winning streak
all-time.
SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

Reimer: Guard shows toughness
Continued from C1

Some people might
have gotten a message
with the second tear
that, maybe, their energies should go in a different direction.
“A lot of people asked
me that but that was
never my thought,’’
she said. “I wanted to
play (at Millersville)
and prove myself. I was
going to do whatever
I needed to do to get
back on the floor, to be
an asset in whatever
role was given to me.’’
So, she worked hard
during rehab, stayed
close to her teammates
and just stayed as active as she could in the
game, knowing she
would get back onto the
floor eventually.

‘Having fun
this year’
“Shelby has a lot of
mental
toughness,’’
said MU coach Mary
Fleig. “That says it all.
I have been so hard on
her. To see her growth
in the five years, physically and mentally ... I
think she took a great
approach over the summer. This is the best

Shelby
Reimer

shape she has been in.
She just has a great demeanor in that she is
having fun this year.’’
A product of the
first torn ACL was Reimer’s development of
a 3-point shot. She tore
the ACL in high school
while taking the ball
to the basket, so she
got a bit skittish about
heading into the paint
and started to take aim
from beyond the arc.
On
Wednesday,
Reimer made four
3-pointers in helping
the Marauders to a 7241 win over Bloomsburg at Pucillo Gym.
She headed into Saturday’s game against University of the Sciences
with 33 treys made and
a .327 average from
outside the arc.
“Shelby needed that
game (against Bloom),’’
Fleig said. “She was
frustrated the last two
games (shooting a combined 2 for 12 on 3s).

After practice, I got (assistant coach) Robby
Rowe to shoot with her.
She needed reps because she was short on
her shots.’’
Reimer’s ability to be
a leader was needed on
short notice last season
when leading scorer
Carly Gallagher was
sidelined with a seasonending injury.
“Shelby handled it
well,’’ said teammate
Yasmin Cooper. “Somebody had to step up.
When Carly got hurt,
we needed that from
Shelby and she provided
it for us.’’

Getting back
on track
Millersville
missed
the playoffs for the first
time in 20 seasons last
season but appear to
be on their back to the
postseason. The Marauders evened their
conference record at
6-6 with the win over
Bloomsburg and have
won nine games overall,
two short of last season’s total.
There are 11 games
remaining, however, including a game at West

Chester on Wednesday.
Upon graduation, Reimer hopes to enter the
state police academy.
The criminology and
sociology major has already taken the oral and
written exams for acceptance into the academy.
But going forward, she
doesn’t think she can
leave basketball behind.
“I thinking I’m always going to have to
be around the game because I have so much
passion for it,’’ she said.
“I can definitely see
myself coaching somewhere.’’
Odds
are,
she’ll
achieve her goals. She
has vaulted every hurdle on her journey to
this point and seems to
be in a good place.
Prior to the game
against
Bloomsburg,
Fleig was talking to
Huskies coach Bill
Cleary, who is in his
eighth season. He’s seen
Reimer’s progression,
year by year.
“Bill said, ‘I would
never have thought
(Shelby) could do what
she’s doing right now,’ ‘’
Fleig said. “I said, ‘That’s
the kind of kid she is.’ ‘’

C3

Local digest
TRACK AND FIELD
n Franklin & Marshall competed at the Kutztown

Collegiate Invitational on Friday. The event featured
teams from Division I and Division II and was a non-team
scoring invitatonal.
Logan Lewis took first out of 37 participants in the shot
put with a distance of 12’-3.50”. Brad Krell’s 50.91 in the
400-meter placed him sixth in the event.
Rebecca Swisher picked up her second gold in the
indoor season with a first-place finish in the pole vault at
12’-3.50”.
F&M returns to action Saturday, when the Diplomats
travel to Princeton for the Tiger Open.

SQUASH
n In Hartford, Conn., the No. 10 Franklin & Marshall men
battled in a number of matches but ultimately came
up short, dropping a 9-0 contest against No. 1 Trinity
College on Saturday. The Diplomats fell to 3-5 on the
year, while the Bantams kept on rolling at 9-0.

n In Hartford, Conn., the No. 15 Franklin & Marshall

women’s team dropped a 9-0 match against No. 6 Trinity
College on Saturday. On the season, the Diplomats’ fell
to 2-5, while the Bantams improved to 6-1.

COLLEGE WRESTLING

Diplomats beaten
by No. 8 Lehigh
STAFF REPORT

SPORTS@LNPNEWS.COM

Franklin & Marshall’s
wrestling team battled
Eastern Intercollegiate
Wrestling Association
foe No. 8 Lehigh early,
but could not overcome
one of the nation’s top
teams, falling by a 40-6
score on Saturday afternoon at the Mayser
Center.
The
Diplomats
dropped to 3-8, 0-4
EIWA with the defeat,
while the Mountain
Hawks improved to 101, 5-0.
Heading into 149,
F&M held a 6-5 advantage after a thrilling
4-1 decision from Scott
Stevens (133) in the
tiebreaker and key 2-1
decision from No. 15
Rick Durso over No. 18
Randy Cruz at 141.
Stevens held a 1-0
lead heading into the
third before Lehigh’s
Drew Somers sent the
bout into overtime
with a late escape. In
the tiebreaker, Stevens
picked up an escape of
his own before registering a clutch takedown
to hold the advantage.
Somers was unable to
escape Stevens’ grasp in
the final tiebreaker period as the Diplomats’
133-pound grappler delivered his team three
points.
In the most widely
anticipated matchup
of the day, Durso faced
off against the EIWA’s
defending champion
at 141 and the nation’s
No. 18 wrestler, Randy

Cruz. Durso struck first
in the second period,
recording an acrobatic
reversal after choosing
bottom to start the frame
to grab the 2-0 lead. Cruz
chose bottom to start the
third and was awarded
an escape in the early
going, but was unable to
put any more points on
the scoreboard.
But the Mountain
Hawks went on a tear
from that point on, winning the final seven
bouts by a 35-0 margin
en route to the 34-point
victory.
“Shorty” Hitchcock
Classic:
Meanwhile,
F&M sent a handful of
wrestlers to compete at
the 13th annual “Shorty”
Hitchcock Classic, hosted by Millersville on Saturday.
Paddy Quinlan had
the most success of any
Diplomat on the day,
taking part in a brutal
141-pound bracket that
featured some of the
top grapplers in the nation and coming away
with a 3-2 mark. Quinlan opened action with
a 12-6 decision over Navy’s Patrick McLaughlin,
before dropping down to
the wrestlebacks with an
8-2 loss against Cornell’s
Mary Grey.
F&M’s
sophomore
141-pounder responded
in consolations with
back-to-back pins over
Millersville’s
Tommy
Nulty (2:00) and Virginia’s Sam Krivus (4:15),
but had his afternoon
come to a close with a
9-5 loss.

Thursday:

Home &
Garden

Tips & trends for every home

It’s back! The Eagle
Cam Returns!

One of our most popular features returns! And
as a welcome addition for viewers, this year’s
cameras have sound! To see what the birds are
up to, visit LancasterOnline.com/EagleCam.
Brought to you by

C4

SPORTS

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

F&M 82,
WASHINGTON 72

WEST YORK 54, PENN MANOR 36

Comets stumble
vs. the Bulldogs
ANTHONY BURKHART
LNP CORRESPONDENT

On Saturday night, the
Penn Manor boys played
their third game in four
days — and it showed,
on both the floor and
ultimately on the scoreboard.
West York played an
intense game, forcing a
pressing defense on the
Comets and running
the floor on offense. The
result was a lopsided
Bulldogs win, 54-36, in a
non-league contest.
Darian McCauley’s 20
points led West York (5-7
overall), while teammate
Josh Bailey added 16.
The Bulldogs jumped
out to a quick 12-4 lead
in the first quarter, aided
by a 9-2 run. Penn Manor (6-10 overall) didn’t
help its cause by turning
the ball over seven times
in the opening quarter,
an issue that plagued
the Comets much of the
game.
“We got out to a slow
start, we weren’t as intense as (West York), and
it kind of set the tone for
us,” Penn Manor head
coach Larry Bellew said.
“We’ve played a lot of
game recently without
much rest or practice,
and it just didn’t end up
well for us tonight.”
Nick Lord and Cameron Lovett scored eight
points apiece to lead
Penn Manor.
Turning point: The
third quarter as a whole

doomed Penn Manor.
The Comets turned
the ball over eight
times and managed to
take four shots in the
quarter, while only
one of them went in.
West York outscored
Penn Manor 10-2 in
the third quarter, and
led 37-23 by the end of
it to put the game out
of reach for good.
Star of the game:
McCauley was mostly
unstoppable all night.
The 6-foot-2 forward
was a dominant force
inside, scoring 20
points and mostly doing it at will.
“We saw him on
tape and knew he was
going to be trouble,”
Bellew said. “We did
what we could and
made
adjustments
to defend him and
rebound, but he’s a
strong kit and a very
good high school
player.”
Quote of the night:
“We didn’t match
their intensity tonight, and you’re
going to have a lot
of trouble winning
games when you’re
out-hustled like we
were tonight,” Bellew
said.
Key
statistic:
Penn Manor turned
the ball over 25 times
on the night, many
of which turned into
fast-break points for
West York.

GOLF

Snedeker, Blair
tied in Sony Open
Brandt Snedeker and
Zac Blair shared the lead
after the third round of
the Sony Open on Saturday at Waialae Country
Club in Honolulu.
Blair, who shot a 6-under 64, and Snedeker
(66) are at 16-under par.
Kevin Kisner (66) is
third at 15 under, one
ahead of Si Woo Kim
(65).
Fabian Gomez (65) is
alone in fifth place, at 12
under.
EurAsia Cup: Captain’s picks Lee Westwood and Ian Poulter
won their matches again
Saturday to help Europe take a 9-3 lead over
Asia in the EurAsia Cup
at Glenmarie in Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia.
Europe took 4½ of six
points in foursomes after
also earning 4½ points
Friday in the opening
fourball matches. Westwood and Matthew Fitzpatrick beat Anirban La-

hiri and Wu Ashun 5
and 4, and Poulter and
Danny Willett topped
Byeong-hun An and
Thongchai Jaidee 3
and 2.
Joburg
Open:
South Africa’s Zander
Lombard shot a 7-under 65 for a share of
the third-round lead
with
countryman
Haydn Porteous (68)
and England’s Anthony Wall (68) in the
European Tour event
in Johannesburg.
Diamond Resorts:
Former tennis player
Mardy Fish won the
Diamond Resorts Invitational in Windermere, Florida, easily holding off former
pitcher Rick Rhoden
in the modified Stableford event for celebrity athletes and
entertainers.
Fish, 34, a left-hander, earned $100,000.
SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

STAY UP TO DATE:

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Dips
climb
to 13-2

Glenn Robinson
passes Bobby
Knight on alltime coaching
victories list
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SPORTS@LNPNEWS.COM

SUBMITTED

Hall of Honor: Lancaster Catholic High School welcomed Ryan Purvis, left, and Katie
Hayek into its Hall of Honor on Friday evening. During his time as a Crusader, Purvis
(Class of 2004) earned seven varsity letters in two sports: football (three) and
basketball (four). He was a three-season Section Three all-star tight end and punter;
in his final season at LCHS, he was also named a Section Three all-star defensive
end. Purvis was also the starting center for the 2003 PIAA championship basketball
team. Hayek (Class of 2002) received seven varsity letters in two sports: soccer
(three) and basketball (four). She started as a guard all four years on the basketball
team, finishing with 1,510 points. As a senior, she averaged 23 points, four rebounds,
four assists and three steals per game. As team captain in her senior year, Hayek led
the Crusaders to Section Three, L-L League and District Three Class AAA titles.
LOCAL COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Forjan paces Blue Jays
STAFF REPORT

ished with a game-high
15 points.
Morrisville 77, Lancaster Bible 70: The
Chargers dropped to 7-3
and 5-1 in the NEAC with
Saturday’s road loss. Aubrey Folger led Lancaster Bible with 22 points,
while Katy Stover added
18.
Haley Kilmartin paced
Morrisville with 30
points.
Franklin & Marshall
59, Washington 42: In
Chestertown, Maryland,
the Diplomats outscored
Washington 22-4 in the
third quarter en route to
an emphatic Centennial
Conference win. The
Diplomats improved to
4-11 (3-6 CC) while the
Shorewomen fell to 3-10
(0-7).
Anajha Burnett totaled
19 points. Haley Pilone
had 15 and Erica Brown 14.

SPORTS@LNPNEWS.COM

Rachel Forjan kept her
torrid scoring stretch going with a career-high 29
points in the Elizabethtown College women’s
basketball team’s 66-44
win over Goucher in
Landmark Conference
play Saturday afternoon
at Thompson Gymnasium.
Forjan’s game-high 29
came on 10 made field
goals, including six treys.
Emily Martin registered
double-double No. 9
with 17 points and 11 rebounds.
Forjan hit a three for
the first points of the
game 41 seconds into the
game and Elizabethtown
(9-5, 5-3 Landmark)
never relinquished the
lead from there on out.
Millersville
71,
USciences 53: The host
Marauders (10-6) turned
to their defense to clinch
Saturday’s win after
trailing by six points in
the closing moments of
the first half.
Aunjel Van Brakle and
Aunjel Robinson fin-

Men
Lancaster Bible 97,
Morrisville State 66:
Kurt Keltner scored 25
points as the Chargers
remained unbeaten (12-

0, 6-0 NEAC) with
Saturday’s road victory.
Bryce Williams added 24 points for Lancaster Bible, while
Dondre Perry and CJ
Dunston chipped in
14 points apiece.
Williams made six
3-pointers and Keltner drained four from
that distance. Keltner
and Herbie Brown
had seven rebounds
apiece.
Goucher
100,
Elizabethtown 69:
Blue Jays senior point
guard Matt Lane
handed out a careerhigh eight assists,
but it wasn’t enough
to slow down Kevin
Miles-led Goucher,
which collected its
second straight victory and sent E-town
(2-14) to its ninth
straight defeat at
Thompson Gymnasium Saturday afternoon.
Lane had four assists in each half, surpassing his former career high of seven.

L-L BOYS’ BASKETBALL

Assessing Mules’ big win
Q&A with Solanco coach Scott Long after victory over McCaskey
JOHN WALK

JWALK@LNPNEWS.COM

The Solanco boys’
basketball team pulled
the upset over McCaskey, 67-64, on Friday
night.
Solanco’s Dylan Hastings and McCaskey’s
Kobe Gantz each had
a game-high 25 points.
Solanco’s Demond Kreider (15 points) and
McCaskey’s Randolph
Speller (20 points) also
finished in double-figures scoring.
Solanco coach Scott
Long had the following
thoughts on the Mules’
big victory during a
phone interview on Friday night.
What was the feeling for the team
coming into Friday’s
game?
“We know McCaskey
is good. We know they’re
more talented than us.
We just felt like we believed if we executed
our game plan that we
could compete. We tell
our kids not necessarily
who the most talented
team is. We executed
well. We didn’t give up
too many boards. And
we didn’t take too many
catch-and-shoot threes.

We were patient for the
most part.”
Dylan Hastings obviously your best
player, but by his
standards he had
been relatively quiet
scoring-wise the last
few games. He obviously stepped back up
when he needed to tonight?
“The last few games
teams have doubled him
or have been very physical with him. The box
score may not show it
but he’s still very effective. He’s averaging four
or five assists. We’ve had
guys to step up due to
Dylan stepping up and
getting some looks. Tonight he got some good
looks but he got on the
boards. He probably
had 8 to 10 points off of
offensive rebounds.”
You headed into the
fourth quarter up 4943. How were your
players’ feeling at
that point?
“We try not to think
win or lose or results.
We’re focused on possessions. It’s cliche to
say that. But in the moment we were focused
on not turning the ball
over. We were up four

with a few minutes
left. We wanted to be
patient, to take a shot
and not pass the ball
around for three minutes. And defensively
get back and not give
them anything good.
Even though I think we
played our best game
they still had a shot at
the end. We were up six
with a minute to go and
(McCaskey’s Randolph)
Speller hit a three. I
thought (McCaskey’s)
Kobe (Gantz) had a
good look at the end and
just missed it.”
Coming into Friday,
you guys were 2-5 in
games decided by less
than 10 points. How’s
it feel to win one of
these tight games
against this caliber of
an opponent?
“It feels good. I’m
just happy for my kids
and my seniors that
they can see their hard
work pay off. We talk all
the time about process
and hard times they
go through finally paying off. It’s good to see
a triple-overtime loss
to Hempfield and an
overtime loss to Garden
Spot finally pay off for
us.”

The No. 17 Franklin
& Marshall men’s basketball team picked up
its sixth straight victory with an 82-72 victory over Washington in
Centennial Conference
action on Saturday afternoon at the Cain Athletic
Center in Chestertown,
Maryland.
F&M improved to 13-2
(8-0 CC), and the Shoremen fell to 2-11 (0-7 CC).
Glenn
Robinson
picked up career-win No.
903 and passed Bobby
Knight for the third spot
on the NCAA coaching
victory list.
Robinson trails only
Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski
(1,032) and Philadelphia
University’s Herb Magee
(1,023) in NCAA victories, as all three coaches
lead their respective divisions in wins.

45th season

Robinson is currently
in his 45th season at the
helm of the Franklin &
Marshall basketball program.
Washington
started
out with a 12-10 lead five
minutes into the game in
a tightly contested opening segment.
F&M hit another gear
and went on a 12-0 run
with two 3-pointers
from Hunter Eggers, and
the Diplomats went up
22-12 at 12:27.
F&M held at least a sixpoint edge the remainder of the half and went
into the break with a 4334 lead.
F&M went up by 18
points, 56-38, on a Lior
Levy free throw at 14:36
before the Shoremen answered and came within
12 at 12:57.

Free throws

The Diplomats held
a double-digit lead until the Shoremen came
within eight point, but
F&M responded with
a 7-1 spurt and put the
game out of reach from
the line in the final two
minutes of action.
Cedric Moune finished
with a double-double,
hauling in 10 boards and
shooting 9 for 11 for 19
points.
Brandon Federici had
19 points and Eggers finished with 18 points and
seven rebounds.
Jared Wright and Kevin Beins both chipped in
eight off the bench.
Joey Shelton led all
scorers with 20 points
and 14 rebounds, and
Dave Knox had 16 for
Shoremen.
James Drury also finished in double-figures
with 14 points.
Franklin & Marshall
returns to action on
Wednesday, when the
Diplomats travel to Gettysburg for an 8 p.m.
game.
The Diplomats then
return home to face McDaniel for a contest at 3
p.m. Saturday.

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LancasterOnline

SPORTS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Don’t look at the draw

Williams not worried about injury, or what lies ahead
JOHN PYE

AP SPORTS WRITER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MLB NOTEBOOK

AP sources: Chris Davis,
Baltimore reach deal
Slugger agrees to 7-year, $161M contract with Orioles
form. I try not to let myself look too far ahead.
If I did that, it would be
a lot harder the last few
days and take some joy
away.”
The Orioles were his
most aggressive suitor,
offering a seven-year
deal last month. Since
coming to the Orioles
in a July 2011 trade with
Texas, Davis has been a
sensational run producer and a positive force in
the clubhouse.
Washington makes
some deals: Stephen
Strasburg and the Washington Nationals agreed
Friday to a $10.4 million
contract for next season,
avoiding arbitration.
The Nationals also
reached deals with infielders Danny Espinosa
and Anthony Rendon, and
outfielder Ben Revere.
Kansas City signs
Kennedy: The Royals
and pitcher Ian Kennedy
agreed to a $70 million,
five-year deal Saturday
that includes an opt-out
after the first two years, a
person familiar with the

situation told The Associated Press.
The person spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the contract will
not be completed until
the 31-year-old righthander passes a physical.
Kennedy went 9-15
with a 4.28 ERA for the
San Diego Padres last
season. He is four years
removed from a 21-win
season with the Arizona
Diamondbacks and has
also pitched for the New
York Yankees during his
nine-year career.
Phillies Hellickson
reaches $7M deal:
Right-hander
Jeremy
Hellickson agreed to
terms on a $7 million,
one-year contract with
the Philadelphia Phillies
on Friday to avoid salary
arbitration.
The 28-year-old pitcher
is coming off a 9-12 season in which he posted
a 4.62 ERA in 27 starts
and threw 146 innings for
Arizona. He was traded by
the Diamondbacks to the
Phillies in November.
SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

Franklin: Recruiting win
Continued from C1

The rumblings go
beyond playcalling or
scheme. You’ve heard
them.
He’s all glitz, no substance. Like a celebrity
chef who never goes in
the kitchen, he’d rather
perform than coach.
The endless enthusiasm, the glad-handing,
the catch-phrases …
he’d probably change
to fancy uniforms, if he
could get away with it.
He’s just not one of us.
Nittany Nation wants
to win big. It also wants
the world to believe it
wants much more.
“It’s probably emphasized here with our staff
and our fans and our
alumni more place than
I’ve ever been,’’ Franklin
said in October. “People
want it all. What I mean
by that is it’s not a winat-all-costs place. This is
a place that truly values
our guys getting a real
education and worldclass education.
“They want to see our
guys making a positive
impact in the community. They also want to
see our guys being successful on the field, and
they really don’t want to
give up one for the other.
They want them all.”
That’s what they say.
When the games are
being played, they want
to win.
If you are to understand college football,

C5

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

In this October 2015 file photo, Orioles’ Chris Davis follows through batting against
the Yankees. Multiple people with knowledge of the situation say Davis has agreed to
a seven-year, $161 million contract with the Baltimore Orioles, pending a physical. The
people spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Saturday because the
Orioles have not announced the transaction.

Chris Davis and the
Orioles are together
again.
Multiple people with
knowledge of the situation say Davis has agreed
to a seven-year, $161 million contract with Baltimore, pending a physical.
The people spoke to
The Associated Press on
condition of anonymity Saturday because
the Orioles have not announced the transaction.
The 29-year-old Davis has been with Baltimore since 2011. He hit a
major-league leading 47
home runs and amassed
117 RBIs last year.
Davis became a free
agent after the 2015 season, and he wondered
aloud during the final
week whether his time in
Baltimore was up.
“I’m trying not to reminisce too much just yet,”
he said. “I definitely
want to enjoy these last
few games, just kind of
take everything in, being
around these guys, playing in front of our fans,
and wearing this uni-

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

you must understand
this first, last and in
between: People are in
mad, passionate love
with this stuff, and they
really, really, really want
to win.
By all evidence, accounts and appearances,
the program has never
been in better shape
in terms of academics,
community involvement
and off-field conduct.
In terms of winning,
recruiting is the most
important thing college
football coaches do.
Barring some big hits
between now and National Signing Day next
month, Penn State’s 2016
class will finish in the top
10-15 nationally by guru
consensus. In context,
that’s almost a miracle.
Joe Paterno was a
great recruiter, and Bill
O’Brien was surprisingly
good at it (although a
couple offensive linemen would have been
nice).
But recruiting is a
much different deal than
it was even five years
ago. Glitz and flash and
show-biz and big media
win the day.
“It’s crunch time, this
is very serious stuff and
the coaches realize that,
they’re coming to play
and bringing their all,”
Nordin told the Detroit
Free Press last week,
sounding like he was
working with an English-to-coaching-cliches

dictionary.
What the kid implies
isn’t that recruiting is a
big part of the game, but
that it is its own game,
a fierce, noisy battle
against larger-than-life
figures like Harbaugh.
Even Franklin’s critics
admit he’s great at it.
Given the waters Penn
State swims in, less than
great won’t be enough.
He needs more time.
That’s so obvious it feels
banal to have to say it,
but it’s not even the
key point, in Franklin’s
defense.
Saquon Barkley, the
brilliant freshman running back, was committed to Rutgers a little
over a year ago. Then
Franklin reportedly got
one-on-one with him,
and simply wouldn’t
take no for an answer.
One serious meeting is
all it took.
So Nordin comes to visit
next weekend. Lavert
Hill, a big-time DB from
Detroit who flipped from
Penn State to Michigan
a couple months back,
was at Penn State this
weekend.
If you’re a Penn State
fan, who do you want
stating your case to
those kids, Franklin or
“one of us?”

n Mike Gross covers Penn

State football for LNP. Reach
him at mgross@lnpnews.
com. Follow him on Twitter @
MikeGrossLNP.

MELBOURNE, Australia — Injury? What
injury? The draw?
Don’t mention the
draw.
Six-time Australian
Open champion Serena Williams worked
her way through the
pre-Grand Slam rituals on Saturday, practicing on the center
court at Melbourne
Park, and fielding
questions about the
inflammation in her
left knee that restricted her preparations,
and about a tough
road to another title.
After a tough opener
against Camila Giorgi,
the highest ranked of
the unseeded players in the women’s
draw, Williams may
have to face former
No. 1-ranked Caroline Wozniacki in
the fourth round and
No. 5-ranked Maria
Sharapova in a quarterfinal match that

would feature last year’s
finalists.
“I don’t really ever
look at the draw, so I
would appreciate it if
you didn’t mention it.
Thank you,” she said,
shutting down talk of
another
showdown
with Sharapova.
Both players withdrew
from tournaments in the
first week of the season,
with Williams playing
just one set in the Hopman Cup — her first
competitive outing since
her pursuit of the calendar-year Grand Slam
ended in a semifinal loss
at the U.S. Open — and
Sharapova
withdrawing before her opening
match at the Brisbane
International because of
a sore left forearm.
On Saturday, two days
before her opening
match, Williams said she
felt “a little tired” because she’d been doing so
much work, hosing down
speculation that she was
struggling during her
hitting session earlier in

the morning. In terms
of training, she’s not just
working at 100 percent,
she said, “I’m at 120, 130
percent right now.”
She has won 21 major
titles, including the Australian and French Opens
and Wimbledon in 2015.
She doesn’t expect injury
to be a problem.
“It’s actually really fine.
I don’t have any inflammation anymore,” she
said. “It’s just that I just
needed some time to get
over that little hump.”
Sharapova
has
a
first-round match Nao
Hibino of Japan. Unlike Williams, she does
look further ahead in
the draw —even if she
doesn’t mention names.
“I know who’s here,” she
said. “It’s no secret who
you’re going to be playing.”
Despite feeling good
in practice, Sharapova
said, it’s a lack of matches
rather than any kind of
superstition which prevents her looking too far
ahead.

MEN’S TENNIS

Federer: Djokovic earns a star
Includes Murray and Nadal in the men’s ‘Big Four’
DENNIS PASSA
AP SPORTS WRITER

MELBOURNE, Australia — Roger Federer
says the so-called Big
Four in men’s tennis
— he, Novak Djokovic,
Andy Murray and Rafael Nadal — still exists,
with one possible notation and an addition.
“Novak deserves like
a little star next to his
name right now because he’s been doing
extremely well,” Federer said Saturday.
The
Australian
Open begins Monday with Djokovic set
to defend his 2015
crown and aim for
title No. 6 at Melbourne Park. Last
year, Djokovic won
27 of his 28 matches
in Grand Slam tournaments, capturing
three majors and finishing runner-up to
Stan Wawrinka at the
French Open.
That
run
left
Djokovic
unques-

tionably as No. 1, with
Murray second, Federer
No. 3, Wawrinka ranked
fourth and Nadal, after a
series of injuries, back to
a spot in the top five.
Order restored, says
Federer.
“Who’s had the most
success? The top five
guys really, with Stan,
you know, Murray, myself, Novak and Rafa,”
Federer, who plays his
first-round match Monday. “Now the rankings
are back to more normal
again after Rafa’s worked
his way back up.”
Djokovic, in the same
half of the draw as Federer, will open his defense
against Chung Hyeon of
South Korea and, if results
go with rankings, could
meet No. 7 Kei Nishikori
in the quarterfinals and
Federer in the semis.
Federer, who has won
four Australian titles
among his 17 majors,
opens against Nikoloz
Basilashvili of Georgia,
and possibly Alexandr

Dolgopolov in the second and No. 27 Grigor
Dimitrov in the third.
No 2-ranked Murray
will open against Alexander Zverev of Germany
and, in the same half of
the draw, 2014 champion
Wawrinka takes on Dmitry Tursonov.
Nadal, who could meet
Wawrinka in the quarterfinals, opens with a
tough encounter against
fellow Spaniard and
2009 Australian Open
semifinalist Fernando
Verdasco. Nadal beat
Verdasco in an epic fivesetter that year and went
on to win the title.
“Not a lucky first
round, I think, for me.
For him either,” Nadal
said Saturday. “Will be a
tough match.”
Asked to reflect on the
2009 result, Nadal said:
“Obvious that that match
gave me the chance to
win the only Australian
Open that I won. That
was an unforgettable
memory for me.”

Paula & Tyler
Weekday Mornings 5am-9am

Listen live now: WXCYFM.com or
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C6

NFL

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NFC DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS

Panthers seek
redemption in
playoff rematch
Seattle ousted Carolina last season
STEVE REED

ON THE AIR

CHARLOTTE, N.C. —
Carolina Panthers coach
Ron Rivera says the Seattle Seahawks are starting
to feel a little like a division opponent.
The teams will meet
for the sixth time in four
years and for the second
straight season in the
NFC divisional playoffs
today. The Seahawks
have won four of the
previous five matchups,
including a 31-17 playoff
victory last year in Seattle.
But this time it’s a little
different.
Not only will the game
be played in Charlotte,
where the top-seeded
Panthers (15-1) have
won 11 straight, but the
Seahawks face a Carolina team that’s more
confident and battledtested.
Some of that stems
from Carolina’s 27-23
win over the two-time
defending NFC champions in Week 6 when Cam
Newton connected on a
26-yard touchdown pass
to tight end Greg Olsen
with 32 seconds left.
The Panthers say that
win helped jumpstart
their 14-0 start this season and gave them confidence they could beat
the best.
“It was just a matter of
getting over that hump,”
said cornerback Josh
Norman.

n Who: Seattle Seahawks

AP SPORTS WRITER

Mirror images
It led Panthers safety
Roman Harper to declare this week: “We are
the better team.”
In many ways, the Seahawks and Panthers
are mirror images of one
another, which may help
explain why the last five
games have come down
to the wire.
They both have dynamic quarterbacks who
can make plays with
their arms and their feet;
strong running games
led by powerful, bruising backs; and defenses
that excel at keeping the
opposition out of the end
zone.
But the most intriguing matchup may be
Carolina’s No. 1 scoring
offense against Seattle’s
defense, which has allowed the fewest points
in the league.
Newton became the
first QB in league history
to throw for 35 touchdown passes and run for
10 scores in a season.
He’ll face a defense loaded with playmakers.
“This is the most diversified offense that we
see, and the dynamics of
what Cam is able to do
and the way that they’re
willing to run with him
makes this a really difficult offense to prepare
for,” Seattle coach Pete

PAULA WOLF
WHEELCHAIR QUARTERBACK

Tough
challenges, low
expectations
to confront
Pederson
So the Eagles (apparently) finally settled
on Kansas City Chiefs

at Carolina Panthers
n When: 1 p.m. today
n Where: Bank of America
Stadium, Charlotte, N.C.
n TV: Fox

Carroll said. “You’ve
seen everybody have
trouble with it all year
long, so we’ll see if we
can keep it down and try
to keep the score within
reach and see if we have
a chance.”
Things to watch in
the Seahawks-Panthers
playoff game:
Now boarding: After
last week’s sudden turn
when Marshawn Lynch
ended up not making
the trip to Minnesota,
all indications are “Beast
Mode” will be back
against the Panthers. If
Lynch plays, it will be his
first action since Week
10 against Arizona prior
to having abdominal
surgery. Lynch was a full
participant in practice
for the second straight
week.
Carolina did an adequate job slowing down
Lynch in the first meeting, holding him to 54
yards on 17 carries and
no run longer than 17
yards. In seven career
games versus Carolina
as a member of the Seahawks, Lynch has never
rushed for more than 89
yards.
Stewart’s conditioning: Meanwhile, Panthers running back Jonathan Stewart makes his
return after missing the
last three games with a
foot injury. Coach Ron
Rivera said Stewart’s
foot is not a problem, but
is a little concerned over
his conditioning. Stewart, who averaged 18.6
carries per game in 13
games, said he’ll be just
fine and will do “whatever it takes” to be effective.
Stunning Sundays:
The Seahawks have done
their fans little favor by
playing cardiac playoff
games on Sundays. Since
the 2012 season, the Seahawks have played seven postseason games on
Sundays. Five have been
decided in the closing
seconds, including last
Sunday’s victory over
Minnesota. That stretch
includes two NFC championship game victories
and, of course, last season’s Super Bowl loss to
New England.
Wagner playing: Seahawks middle linebacker Bobby Wagner didn’t
play in the first meeting
with Carolina and he
could be a major factor
today. It was only game
Wagner missed this season. He finished the season with 114 tackles and
he gives Seattle another
playmaker on defense.

offensive coordinator
Doug Pederson as their
new head coach.
This whole search has
looked like something
out of the Keystone
Kops, with the nadir being former Giants’ head
coach Tom Coughlin
withdrawing his name
from consideration.
I actually preferred
Pederson to Coughlin,
but it’s still embarrassing when a candidate
does that, because it
reflects poorly on the
organization.
The bottom line, how-

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Steelers’ Antonio Brown, shown after making a catch against the Bengals, was the top receiver for fantasy owners.

DAN MASSEY
FANTASY SPORTS

These
receivers were
a great catch
for owners
in 2015
In light of the
decline in output by
NFL running backs
discussed last week,
one may conclude
that aerial production
around the league has
increased, and indeed
it has. The 2015 season represented the
fifth successive year
of record per-team,
per-game averages of passing yards.
Somewhat surprisingly, however, wide
receivers have been
fairly immune from
the upswing in the
passing game.
Looking at the 20
seasons immediately
preceding 2015, an
average of 20 wide receivers reached 1,000
yards per season.
This year’s total of 22
is hardly out of line.
Because of the large
number of receivers
who rack up yardage,
the key to identifying
valuable fantasy receivers is recognizing
those who regularly
perform well.
Of the 21 receivers that gained 1,000
yards in 2014, just
11 of them — slightly
over half — were able
to replicate the feat in
2015. The average receiving yards of these
21 men plummeted
from 1,264 in 2014 to
973 in 2015.
A good portion of
this decline is due to
injury, yet yardage
per game from this
group dropped, too.
Jordy Nelson and
Kelvin Benjamin
missed all season, and
of the other 19 receivers in the sample, 12
had fewer yards per
game in 2015 than
2014.
Fantasy owners

ever, is that the Eagles
aren’t the most desired
destination right now
for any head coach, and
the impression (right or
wrong) is that the club
“settled” for Pederson,
who wasn’t interviewed
by any other teams.
I keep reminding myself, though, that Andy
Reid only interviewed
with the Birds before he
got the job in Philadelphia and wasn’t considered a hot commodity.
Still, the sum total of
my knowledge about
Pederson until his

who depend on those
receivers who have
shown consistent ability
will generally have more
success. Seven of the 11
receivers to hit 1,000
yards in each of the last
two seasons finished
among the top 12 in fantasy points in 2015.
Here are the dozen
best fantasy receivers
in 2015 in standardscoring leagues: 1.
Antonio Brown, 246;
2. Julio Jones, 233; 3.
Brandon Marshall, 230;
4. Allen Robinson, 224;
5. Odell Beckham 223;
6. DeAndre Hopkins,
220; 7. Doug Baldwin,
191; 8. A.J. Green, 188;
9. Calvin Johnson, 173;
10. Eric Decker, 173; 11.
Larry Fitzgerald, 172; 12.
Brandin Cooks, 170.
Jarvis Landry and DeMaryius Thomas move
up to ninth and 11th,
respectively, in pointper-reception leagues,
with Decker and Cooks
falling outside the top
12.
These point totals
indicate that the highest-scoring receiver
outscored the most
prolific running back
of 2015. The last time
that happened was 1993,
when Jerry Rice slipped
past Emmitt Smith by
four points, due largely
to Smith’s two-game
contract holdout.
Combining backs and
receivers in 2015, six of
the top 10 scorers were
wide receivers, which
is even more incredible
than a receiver leading
all non-quarterbacks in
fantasy scoring. The upheaval in fantasy leaders
means that, although a
top running back is still
very valuable because
of his scarcity, wide
receivers are going to
comprise much of the
late first round and a
substantial part of the
second round in 2016
drafts.
Making an argument
for the top pick in the
fall is Brown, who struggled a bit early on before
setting a record with 84
catches in the final eight
games of a season. The
previous standard was
74 second-half catches.
In 2014, Brown didn’t
have any bad games;
this year, he offset his

duds with two monster
games, including 17for-284 (and 22 rushing
yards) against Oakland
and 16-for-189 versus
Denver.
Julio Jones led the
league in receiving yards
and displayed remarkable reliability throughout the year, amassing 10
games with at least nine
catches and tying Marvin Harrison’s record for
the most such games in
any single season.
Catch percentage,
the ratio of receptions
to targets, is a good
indicator of receiving
prowess. Since target
data were initially
tracked in 1992, 11
players have had 100
catches in a season and
caught 70 percent of
passes thrown to them.
The two who did it this
season were Brown (for
the second consecutive
year) and Fitzgerald.
Fitzgerald had three
straight sub-par years,
so having Carson Palmer
under center all year
was a boon for him, as
the veteran receiver set
a career-high with 109
catches. Fitzgerald is
too far past his prime to
overcome poor quarterback play, but he is a viable WR2 in 2016 as long
as Palmer is healthy.
Brandon Marshall also
enjoyed a nice bounceback campaign in his
first season in New York.
A scenery change often
suits Marshall nicely.

name was first linked
to the Eagles’ coaching vacancy was that he
quarterbacked the team
to a 2-7 record in 1999
before rookie Donovan
McNabb took over.
But after reading some
articles on Pederson,
including Kansas City
players’ perspective on
him, I do feel a bit better
about the choice.
I’m sure achieving an
NFL head coaching position is a dream of his,
although I don’t envy
the situation he finds
himself in.

There were rumors the
Eagles told candidates
they had to keep certain
assistant coaches, so I’m
not even certain Pederson will get to pick his
entire staff.
And what kind of influence, if any, will he be
allowed over personnel?
Also, he’ll be left
without a starting
quarterback should Sam
Bradford decide to leave
via free agency.
Chip Kelly faced a ton
of questions, too, when
he took over three years
ago, but the contrast is

Texans’ DeAndre Hopkins, catching a pass against the Titans, was No. 6 among wide receivers in fantasy football.

His yardage decreased
every year in Denver, beginning with his second
season after starting a
single game as a rookie.
His receptions and yardage diminished every
year in Chicago, and he
only played two season in Miami, with his
second being marginally
better.
Not counting his
rookie year, he averages
102 and 1,282 in first
full season with a team.
Those marks drop to 93
and 1,186 in subsequent
seasons. Owners should
expect a bit of a regression from Marshall in
2016, especially since
he is unlikely to score 14
touchdowns again.
Among the receivers
who stayed healthy all
year, the biggest disappointment was Randall
Cobb, who mustered
three measly 50-yard
games after Week 3.
With Jordy Nelson
injured, Cobb faced opponents’ best cover men,
and it translated to his
worst catch percentage
ever. He had caught 73.5
percent of his targets
over the course his
career before notching
a lowly 61.2 percent this
year. If Nelson is back
in 2016, owners can nab
Cobb at a reasonably low
cost.

n Dan Massey’s fantasy
sports column appears in
LNP each Sunday. Reach him
at dmassey@lnpnews.com.

hard to miss.
There was plenty of
excitement among the
fanbase at the Kelly hire.
With Pederson, on the
other hand, the expectations of the Eagles faithful can hardly get much
lower.
So welcome back to
Philadelphia, Doug.
And good luck, because
you’re really going to
need it.

n Paula Wolf works in sports

at LNP. Email her at pwolf@
lnpnews.com. She also tweets
at @PaulaWolfLNP.

FOOTBALL

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

C7

NFL NEWS

Former Colts, Ravens
head coach dies at 84
Ted Marchibroda is the only man to
have coached both Baltimore franchises
INDIANAPOLIS — Former
NFL coach Ted Marchibroda
charmed players with his
soft-spoken personality and
his innovative concepts.
Fans appreciated his downto-earth descriptions and his
ability to win games.
On Saturday, the NFL lost
one of its great innovators.
After confirming the death
with his family, the Indianapolis Colts announced that
Marchibroda died at age 84.
He coached the Colts twice
— for five years in Baltimore
and four years in Indianapolis
— and is the only man to have
coached both Baltimore franchises, the Colts and Ravens.
He was probably one of the
few who could have been accepted by both communities
after the Colts’ move from
Baltimore, too.
“Ted was as humble as they
come, and he represented
the Colts and our community
with class both off the field
and on,” Indianapolis owner
Jim Irsay said in a statement.
“He was beloved by many, and
will be sorely missed.”
Marchibroda was a masterful coach.
He accepted the Baltimore
Colts’ job in 1975 and immediately led them to three
consecutive AFC East titles.
He lost that job after the 1979
season, but his career was still
taking off.
Marchibroda
bounced
around the NFL for nearly a
decade as an assistant with
the Chicago Bears, the Detroit Lions and Philadelphia
Eagles. In 1987, he was hired
by Marv Levy in Buffalo,
which is where Marchibroda
introduced the groundbreaking K-Gun offense. The Bills
used that version of the nohuddle offense to win four
straight AFC championships
— and the principles are still
used in today’s more modern
offenses.
In 1992, the Colts, now in
Indy, gave Marchibroda a second chance and he again had
instant success. The Colts
went 9-7 in his first season,
after going 1-15 in 1991, and
in 1995, Marchibroda nearly

Steelers
Continued from C1

AFC championship this time.
“Not a drop of overlooking
guys,” Talib said. “Not a drop
of that.”
Broncos receiver Demaryius
Thomas, whose 80-yard TD
in overtime was the dagger
the last time these teams met
in the playoffs four years ago,
said, “All we’re worried about
now is the Steelers.”
And there are plenty of good
story lines for this matchup:
Primed passer: Peyton
Manning’s teammates say the
five-time MVP looks like his
old self — maybe even better —
as he gets set for his first start
in 64 days.
“Eighteen is a little more
amped up, to be honest,” C.J.
Anderson said.
That could be because
Manning has acknowledged
this playoff run could be it
for him.
Brock Osweiler started the
last seven games for Denver
while Manning was sidelined with a left foot injury,
but Manning’s epic cameo
against San Diego secured
the AFC’s top seed and
earned him the starting gig
again.
“I think he’s looked great,”
tight end Virgil Green said.
“He’s been throwing the ball
very accurately, putting a lot
of oomph on the ball, throwing the ball deep, short,
medium. ... So, I think he’s
looked like the Hall of Fame
Peyton he’s always looked
like.”
Replacing A.B.: Brown is
out with a concussion courtesy
of Cincinnati linebacker Vontaze Burfict, but with Marta-

pulled off a seemingly impossible run through the playoffs
by leading the Colts to wins
at San Diego and Kansas City
before losing at Pittsburgh after Jim Harbaugh’s Hail Mary
pass fell incomplete on the
game’s final play.
Marchibroda went 71-58 in
nine seasons with the Colts
and 2-4 in the playoffs. He
was the first head coach inducted into Indy’s Ring of
Honor.
In 1996, Marchibroda returned to Baltimore, this
time to lead the Ravens, becoming their first head coach.
There, he was not as successful, going 14-31-1 in three
seasons, but he was just as
appreciated by those in the
locker room and around the
organization.
He returned to Indianapolis
in 1999 and spent the next seven seasons working the Colts’
radio broadcasts, where he became a fan favorite.
Marchibroda’s legacy goes
far deeper than wins and
losses.
In 1975, he hired Bill Belichick as an assistant for $25 per
week. In 1953, Marchibroda
was Pittsburgh’s first-round
draft pick, No. 5 overall.
But the promising young
quarterback served in the
Army in 1954, and when he returned in 1955 had to beat out
John Unitas for a roster spot.
Marchibroda won that battle but never played another
down after 1957.
Titans hire Mike Mularkey as head coach: The
Tennessee Titans are keeping Mike Mularkey as their
coach.
The man who handled the
final nine games after the
team fired Ken Whisenhunt
this season was chosen Saturday, just hours after the Titans wrapped up their fourth
and final interview for the job.
The last NFL team with a
head coach position to fill
chose not to wait around for
more candidates, instead joining the other six teams who
all decided to hire offensive
coaches for their openings.
SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

vis Bryant, Heath Miller and
Markus Wheaton combining
for 163 catches and 14 TDs,
the Steelers are confident
they’ll carry on just fine.
“We’ve got great wideouts,”
rookie Sammie Coates said.
“We’re going to go out there
this weekend without our
lead dog and we’re going to
fill in his shoes and make the
plays we know we’ve got to
make.”
Payback time? The Broncos are still smarting from
their 34-27 loss at Pittsburgh
last month when Roethlisberger capitalized on Denver’s dearth of safeties, and
Steelers center Cody Wallace
speared David Bruton Jr.
That drew a flag and a fine
but no suspension, and the
Broncos promised Wallace
would pay the price next
time they saw him.
“It’s not going to be anything
as far as cheap or anything,”
Stewart said. “We’re going to
get them between the lines,
between the plays, the whistle. So, I mean, he’s going to be
sore after the game.”
Mother & child reunion:
Demaryius Thomas’ mother
will see him play in person
for the first time today.
Katina Smith was released
from federal prison last summer when President Barack
Obama commuted her sentence on drug trafficking
charges. Smith went to a
halfway house in Georgia and
then home, but was restricted
from traveling until now.
“I’ll be excited, she’ll be excited,” said Thomas, whose
mother and grandmother
were arrested and incarcerated when he was 11 years old
and he had to go live with an
uncle.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski (87) celebrates his first touchdown against the Kansas
City Chiefs Saturday in Foxborough, Mass.

Patriots: Brady scores 3 TDs
Patriots 27, Chiefs 20

Continued from C1

covered an onside kick after
Kansas City cut the deficit to
27-20 with just over one minute left.
Danny Amendola had two
catches for 18 yards as he
worked his way back from a
knee injury.
“It’s just great to have those
guys back,” Gronkowski
said. “They’re hard workers,
they’re great players. The
chemistry was clicking tonight.”
Alex Smith completed 29 of
50 passes for 246 yards and
one touchdown for Kansas
City (12-6). The Chiefs had
won 11 consecutive games,
including a 30-0 victory over
Houston in the wild-card
round last week for their first
playoff victory since 1993.
In the meantime, the Patriots have won 24 postseason
games.
“It gives us a great example of where we need to be,”
Chiefs coach Andy Reid said.
“So, this is a good experience
for us. That’s the way we’ll
take it. We’ll learn from our
mistakes.
“I’m proud of my guys,
man. They battled like crazy
this year, but came up a little
short. We’ll be a better team
for it next year.”
Brady led New England
to a score on the opening
drive, throwing 11 straight
passes and completing eight
— the last an 8-yard score to
Gronkowski. The Chiefs then
made it to the Patriots 16, but
settled for a field goal.
After trading punts twice,
the Patriots started on their
when Amendola was flagged
for a helmet-first hit to coverage man Jamell Fleming.
The drive was in danger of
stalling at the Kansas City 35
when Chiefs linebacker Dezman Moses hit Brady late and
was called for roughing the
passer.
The stadium erupted in
cheers of “Brady!” — just as it
had four months ago when the
four-time Super Bowl champion returned from his looming
“Deflategate” suspension to
play in the season opener.
Four plays later, unable to
find an open receiver, Brady
took off for the corner of the
end zone. The Chiefs man-

New England Patriots defensive
end Rob Ninkovich (50) and New
England Patriots safety Patrick
Chung (23) tackle Kansas City
Chiefs wide receiver Frankie
Hammond (85).

aged to keep him out, but on
the next snap, Brady leaned
forward and reached into the
end zone to make it 14-3.
“I thought I could try to
make it. We were close. Not
close enough, but we got in
on the next play,” said Brady,
who shrugged off the two big
hits on that drive. “It’s football
season, so there’s bumps and
bruises, but you’ve got to fight
through those.”
Patriots defensive lineman
Chandler Jones also had a big
play to finish an odd week in
which he left his home reeking of marijuana and showed
up shirtless and confused at
the local police station. Jones
apologized on Thursday, and
coach Bill Belichick kept him
in the starting lineup.
That left Jones in position to
force Knile Davis’ fumble on
Kansas City’s first possession
of the second half, stopping
the Chiefs as they drove into
New England territory for the
sixth straight time. Brady added another touchdown pass to
Gronkowski to make it 21-6.
Smith finally got the Chiefs
into the end zone when he hit
Albert Wilson on a 10-yard
pass that made it 21-13 with 2
minutes left in the third quarter. Kansas City made it 2720 with just over one minute
left in the game on Charcandrick West’s 1-yard run, but
Gronkowski smothered the
onside kick attempt to protect
the lead.
NOTES: The Patriots are
18-4 all-time in the playoffs at

Kansas City..................3 3 7 7— 20
New England...............7 7 7 6— 27
First Quarter
NE—Gronkowski 8 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 10:23.
KC—FG Santos 34, 1:52.
Second Quarter
NE—Brady 1 run (Gostkowski kick), 3:23.
KC—FG Santos 32, :12.
Third Quarter
NE—Gronkowski 16 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 8:24.
KC—A.Wilson 10 pass from A.Smith (Santos
kick), 2:12.
Fourth Quarter
NE—FG Gostkowski 40, 14:46.
NE—FG Gostkowski 32, 10:20.
KC—West 1 run (Santos kick), 1:13.
A—66,829.

KC
NE
First downs..................................27
21
Total Net Yards...........................378
340
Rushes-yards....................... 32-135
14-38
Passing.......................................243
302
Punt Returns............................ 2-27
1-22
Kickoff Returns........................ 3-90
1-26
Interceptions Ret........................0-0
0-0
Comp-Att-Int.......................29-50-0 28-42-0
Sacked-Yards Lost.......................1-3
0-0
Punts..................................... 3-35.7
3-42.0
Fumbles-Lost..............................1-1
0-0
Penalties-Yards........................ 5-40
6-24
Time of Possession................ 37:51
22:09
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Kansas City, West 17-61,
A.Smith 9-44, Davis 6-30. New England,
S.Jackson 6-16, Edelman 1-11, Brady 6-6,
White 1-5.
PASSING—Kansas City, A.Smith 29-50-0246. New England, Brady 28-42-0-302.
RECEIVING—Kansas City, Kelce 6-23,
A.Wilson 5-57, Conley 5-33, Avant 4-69, Maclin 2-23, West 2-15, Davis 2-13, Harris 1-10,
Hammond Jr. 1-2, Sherman 1-1. New England,
Edelman 10-100, Gronkowski 7-83, LaFell 3-6,
K.Martin 2-57, White 2-39, Amendola 2-18,
S.Jackson 1-2, Bolden 1-(minus 3).
MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

NFL PLAYOFFS
Wild Card

Kansas City 30............................. Houston 0
Pittsburgh 18......................... Cincinnati 16
Seattle 10................................ Minnesota 9
Green Bay 35...................... Washington 18
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 16
New England 27................... Kansas City 20
Green Bay at Arizona.............................. (n)
Today, Jan. 17
Seattle at Carolina..... 1:05 p.m. (FOX)
Pittsburgh at Denver. 4:30 p.m. (CBS)

Conference Championships

Sunday, Jan. 24
AFC
Pittsburgh-Denver winner vs. New England.
3:05 p.m. (CBS)
NFC.................................... 6:40 p.m. (FOX)

Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 7
At Santa Clara, Calif., 6:30 p.m. (CBS)

Gillette Stadium. ... Belichick
reached the conference title
game for the 10th time, tied
with Tom Landry for most alltime. The five straight conference title games ties the 197377 Oakland Raiders for the
most in NFL history. It’s New
England’s 12th conference title game overall.

Kansas City Chiefs
fan Chris Wilhelm,
left, of Lancaster,
and New England
Patriots fan Mike
Ross, right, of South
Hamilton, Mass.,
spend time tailgating in the parking lot of Gillette
Stadium before an
NFL divisional playoff football game
between the New
England Patriots
and the Kansas City
Chiefs, Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

C8

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

C9

Outdoors
Slow season for duck hunters

Calendar
The Outdoors Calendar items
below are just a few of the
activities this week from
throughout Lancaster County and
beyond. To read the full calendar
online, go to bit.ly/calendarjan16.
To submit calendar items, email:
preilly@lnpnews.com; call 5753039; or send to Ad Crable, PO
Box 1328, Lancaster, PA 176081328.

TODAY
n CLAY SHOOT: Atglen

P.J. REILLY | STAFF WRITER PHOTOS

The migration of waterfowl through Pennsylvania has been slow this year, frustrating local duck and goose hunters, but recent cold
weather could bring in more birds. Duck season closed Thursday in Pennsylvania’s South Zone, which covers Lancaster County. However, there’s still two more weeks of goose hunting left.

Late-arriving cold weather keeps waterfowl north of area

P.J. REILLY
LNP OUTDOORS WRITER

T

he memes posted by Pennsylvania waterfowl hunters this season have been
priceless.
I recently saw one on social media
depicting a full box of waterfowling
shotgun shells, with the words written over it — “I’m conserving ammo
by hunting Pennsylvania this year.”
Another photo showed an empty
stretch of water, accompanied by the
sentence, “My view from the blind
would be awesome if there were any
ducks around.”
By all accounts, it has been a slow
season for duck and goose hunters
in the Mid-Atlantic states, including
Pennsylvania.
It seems we can thank El Nino for
that.
We’ve only really had winter temperatures within the past two weeks.
The cold temperatures have
pushed ducks and geese south from
Canada and New York, but it seems
it’s too little, too late.
Duck season in Pennsylvania’s
South Zone, which includes Lancaster County, ended Thursday. In
the North Zone, it closed Jan. 7.
Canada geese are open in the
Atlantic Population Zone — which

covers most of Lancaster County and
the rest of Southeast Pennsylvania —
until Jan. 30, so there’s still time for the
honker hunting to heat up.
In the Resident Population Zone,
which includes a sliver of far western
Lancaster County and counties to the
west and north, the season is closed
now, but will open Feb. 1 for the entire
month. That looks like it might offer the
best hunting of the year.
Ducks Unlimited tracks hunter reports of waterfowl migrations through
the season. On Jan. 6, the organization
posted a notice saying ducks and geese
were just beginning to move south from
Ontario, Quebec and northern New
York, due to single-digit temperatures
locking up open water.
“I don’t remember a year this far
behind, migration-wise,” Rusty Hallock,
an Eastern Shore (Maryland) pro-staff
member with Field Prove Calls, told
Ducks Unlimited. “Normally at a few of
my spots you’d see thousands of birds.
This morning, there wasn’t a goose in
the field.”
Biologists have told me in the past that
ducks and geese in the Atlantic Flyway
don’t necessarily have to migrate south
if they’ve got plenty of open water and
food in the North. That seems to be the
case this year.
I do most of my goose hunting in
western and southern Chester County.
I’ve been watching the same flocks for
weeks, without any significant change in
numbers.
The birds that are around seem to be
residents. They’re big, they’re wary of

decoy spreads, and they aren’t driven to
feed.
We’ve hunted flocks in fields the birds
were hitting regularly. When we hunted,
the birds circled us a few times, and then
moved on.
We’ve gotten a few, but it hasn’t been a
banner season.
That seems to be the story across the
Mid-Atlantic.
Hallock told Ducks Unlimited that his
hunters usually bag 250-300 Canadas
per season from his best blind near
Chestertown, Maryland. As of Jan. 6,
they’d shot 11 total. And all of them were
shot on one day.
Hunters in several places across
Pennsylvania, including Wrightsville,
Elizabethtown and Lancaster, reported
to Ducks Unlimited on Jan. 11 that the
numbers of ducks and geese seemed to
be low, but building.
Hopefully, the snow and frigid temperatures Tuesday and Wednesday pushed
enough ducks south for guys to get in a
decent day of hunting Thursday.
Local goose hunters have a little more
time to benefit from winter’s late arrival.
If I were a betting man, though, I’d
wager the biggest concentrations of
ducks and geese will arrive to Lancaster
County in February.
After we’ve cleaned and stowed our
shotguns for the year.

n P.J. Reilly is an LNP outdoors writer. Email
him at preilly@lnpnews.com.

Sportsmen’s sporting clays shoot
from 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; $12. The
club is on Creek Road, west of
Atglen, in Sadsbury Township,
Lancaster County.
n 3-D SHOOT: Palmyra
Sportsman’s 30-target 3-D shoot
from 7 a.m.-1 p.m.; $9 for adults.
The club is at 410 Sportsman
Road, Annville.
n HIKE: Hike 12 miles with
Lancaster Hiking Club on the
Gettysburg-Bridle Trail. Car pool
at 8 a.m. from the corner of Race
and Buchanan avenues.
n HIKE: Hike 6 miles through
Lancaster County Central Park
with Lancaster Hiking Club. Car
pool at 1:15 p.m. from the corner
of Race and Buchanan avenues.

MONDAY
n TRAP SHOOT: Paradise

Sportsman’s Association practice
trap shoot from 5-7 p.m.; $4. Take
Route 741 east from Strasburg;
right on Belmont Road.

TUESDAY
n TRAP SHOOT: Southern

Lancaster County FarmerSportsmen’s practice trap shoot
from 1-8:30 p.m.; $4. Take Route
272 south to Buck; left on Route
372; left on Hollow Road.
n INDOOR RANGE OPEN: Fox
Harbor Archer Club’s indoor
range open from 6-9 p.m.; $5
per person; $10 per family. Take
Route 30 west; right on Prospect
Road; left on Indian Head Road.

WEDNESDAY
n ARCHERY SHOOT: Mount Joy

Sportsmen’s indoor 3-D archery
shoot from 5-8 p.m.; $10 for
adults; $5 for kids 12-16; free for
kids under 12. Take Route 283
west; left on Route 772; right on
Old Market Street.
n CLAYS SHOOT: Atglen
Sportsmen’s sporting clays shoot
begins at 5 p.m. $5.50. The club
is on Creek Road, Sadsbury
Township.
n TRAP SHOOT: Adamstown
Rod & Gun Club’s trap shoot
under the lights begins at 5 p.m.;
$3. The club is at 563 Willow St.,
Reinholds.
n TRAP SHOOT: Columbia Fish
& Game’s trap shoot from 6-8
p.m. Take Route 30 west; right on
Prospect Road; left on Fairview
Road.

FRIDAY

MUDDY RUN

Deer count is set for today
Annual event starts at 1 p.m. in southern Lancaster County
P.J. REILLY

PREILLY@LNPNEWS.COM

The next best thing to hunting deer is
watching them.
Today, you can have the chance to see
lots of deer by helping with the annual deer
count at Muddy Run Recreation Park in
southern Lancaster County.
Park officials count the deer inside the
park’s fenced 800 acres every year around
this time in January, just to get a sense of
whether the herd is growing or shrinking.
Individual annual counts are not as important as tracking numbers over the long
term. In recent years, it has been hovering
around 500.

If you’ve never participated in the count,
what you’ll do is walk in a line with other
counters through a section of park, and
count every deer you see to your right or
left, depending on what the leader wants.
Sure, some deer get counted more than
once, but it’s a pretty good system.
The count is set to begin at 1 p.m. Meet in
front of the snack bar in the park, which is
at 172 Bethesda Church Road West, Holtwood.
Be prepared to do a lot of walking through
woods and heavy brush. The count is held
rain or shine.
For information, call the park office at
284-5863.

n 3-D SHOOT: Hemlock Archery

Club’s indoor 3-D shoot from 4-9
p.m.; $8 for adults; free for kids
12 and under. Take Route 72 north
over turnpike; right on Spring Hill
Lane.

SATURDAY
n TACTICAL SHOOT: Manheim

Sportsmen’s tactical shoot on
the indoor range begins at 10
a.m. Register from 8-9:30 a.m.
The club is at 552 Oak Tree Road,
Manheim.

JAN. 24
n 3-D SHOOT: Big Buck Archery
Club’s 30-target 3-D shoot from
7 a.m.-1 p.m.; $9. The club is on
Miller Road in Hummelstown.

JAN. 31
n BLOCK SHOOT: Manheim

Sportsmen’s block shoot from 1-3
p.m. The club is at 552 Oak Tree
Road, Manheim.

SKIING

Overcoming poor visibility, Svindal wins ‘tricky’ World Cup downhill
Norwegian, and overall standings leader, acknowledges his luck that he raced before fog and snow slowed racers
GRAHAM DUNBAR
AP SPORTS WRITER

WENGEN,
Switzerland — Aksel Lund Svindal was due some good
luck and a win on the historic Lauberhorn hill. He
got both on Saturday.
Svindal won a tricky
World Cup downhill in
challenging weather on
Saturday, finally winning Switzerland’s classic Alpine ski race at the

10th attempt to retake
the overall standings
lead.
The
Norwegian
stunned the appreciative
crowd of 22,000 by being
1.52 seconds faster than
early leader Klaus Kroell of Austria down the
shortened 2.7-kilometer
course.
Only Hannes Reichelt
came close, racing immediately after Svin-

dal and just .19 seconds
slower, pushing teammate Kroell into third.
No one racing after
Svindal and Reichelt had
a chance as fog rolled
in, and snow slowed the
course.
“I have had some bad
luck in Wengen before,”
said Svindal, the dominant downhill racer of
this generation whose
first eight visits here left

him far from victory. “It
was good to have some
good luck.”
Still, it was far from
easy after the sunshine
highlighting a fast racing
line for No. 4 starter Kroell was long gone when
the top two finishers
overcame poor visibility
as Nos. 18 and 19.
“How many races do
you have in you where
you are able to go to that

extreme? Not many,”
said Svindal, who has
won four of the five
downhills this season.
Svindal earned his 100
race points that lifted
him 15 ahead of Marcel
Hirscher, the four-time
defending
champion
from Austria. Hirscher
does not race downhill,
and starts among the
favorites in the slalom
today.

Norway has swept
the three-race Wengen
meeting so far after
Kjetil Jansrud edged
Svindal for victory in
the combined on Friday.
With 11 World Cup
wins for Norwegian men
this season, in just 18
races, the Nordic nation
matched its all-time Alpine season record with
two months left.

SPORTS

C10 SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE

Dramatic 3-3 draw for Chelsea and Everton

Leader Leicester also draws with last-place Aston Villa; Arsenal can reclaim top spot by drawing at Stoke today
ROB HARRIS

AP SPORTS WRITER

LONDON — In an
English Premier League
campaign about restoring pride at Chelsea, the
fallen champions still
ensure their games cannot be ignored. It’s not
just fascination with
watching a wealthy team
in decline.
On Saturday, a dreary
opening 45 minutes
against Everton made
way for a thrilling second half that started
with John Terry’s own

goal and ended with the
captain scoring in the
right net in the eighth
minute of stoppage time
to clinch a 3-3 draw.
Even Chelsea manager
Guus Hiddink — unbeaten since replacing
the fired Jose Mourinho
last month — accepted
Terry was offside when
he flicked the ball past
goalkeeper Tim Howard
in stoppage time.
Everton manager Roberto Martinez was aggrieved that the referee
played an additional min-

Lancaster scene
If your organization wishes to have an item in the
LANCASTER SCENE column of the LNP Sunday sports
print section, as well as its weekly online listings, send
a note to the LNP sports department, P.O. Box 1328,
Lancaster, PA 17608. Items can run for up to three
consecutive weeks and will not be repeated after that
period. The email address is sports@lnpnews.com. The
fax number is 481-7327. Items must be mailed, faxed or
emailed by Thursday to be included in the column.

ATHLETIC
TRAINING
Speed and Agility Training
will be held Wednesday
and Friday evenings in
January from 5:30 to
6:30 p.m. for four weeks.
The sessions are led by
a certified strength and
conditioning specialist
with workouts designed
to improve coordination,
linear speed, agility,
reaction time, conditioning,
power and basic strength
for all sports. The cost is
$95 per athlete. For more
information or to register
contact tina.rocksports@
gmail.com or visit
rocksportspa.com.
Sports Performance
Strength and Power
Training, custom-designed
based on sport, age
and gender and led by
a certified strength and
conditioning specialist, is
available by appointment
for individuals or teams/
groups. For more
information or to schedule
contact brian.rocksports@
gmail.com.

BASEBALL
Rock Sports is running
its Arm Strengthening
and Training Program in
January and February. All
baseball players in grades
6-12 looking to develop
arm strength and improve
overall throwing speed
and power are encouraged
to register. Led by Jeff
Swarr, the program and
runs twice a week for four
weeks each month. Cost
is $125 per single month
or, if registering for both
January and February,
$100 per month. For more
information or to register
contact tina.rocksports@
gmail.com or visit
rocksportspa.com.
The Hempfield Youth
Association’s online
registration is currently
open for Spring 2016
intramural baseball.
Registration closes Feb. 13.
Visit www.hyasports.com
to register and for program
details.
St. Joseph Catholic Club
will hold signups and
uniform fittings for boys
ages 7 to 12 on Jan. 23
from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in
the gym at 410 St. Joseph
St., Lancaster. Practice
starts in the gym in March,
and season runs from April
20 to June 25. Coaches
are needed also. For more
information, call Alan
Walsh at 344-4851.
Manheim VFW and
Manheim Lions will hold
their final 2016 travel
baseball registration Jan.
17 from 2 to 4 p.m. The
registration is for ages 7
thru 14, covering the 8U,
10U, 12U and 14U spring
teams. The registration
will be held at Keystone
Baseball Academy, 662
Ditz Drive, Manheim, in
the downstairs conference
room.
Keystone State Baseball
& Softball Academy, 662
Ditz Drive, Manheim will be
hosting Rawlings 2016 Bat
Line Demo Day on Feb. 13
and 14 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Space will be available for
players to test the bats. For
questions, contact 665-0901.

BASKETBALL
The Knights of Columbus
Council 6810 will hold a
free-throw championship
from 1 to 5 p.m. Jan.
17 at St. Leo the Great
School, 2427 Marietta
Ave., Lancaster. All boys
and girls ages 9 to 14 may
participate by showing
proof of age (e.g., copy
of birth certificate) and
written parental consent.
A participant’s age
category is based on age
as of Jan. 1. Contestants
register at the door by
filling in a brief entry form.
Contestants receive a
certificate of participation.
Winners receive a winner’s
certificate and wall plaque
or trophy, and move on to
district, regional and state
competition. International
champs are named by KofC
HQ based on scores from
state-level contests. For
more info call/text George
Elko at 203-6210 or email
gmelko@comcast.net.
The Pennsylvania Lady
Rens are seeking female
basketball players in
Central Pennsylvania for
the upcoming AAU season.
Open tryouts will be held
at Linden Hall School in
Lititz on two dates. On Jan.
24, grades 5-6 will try out
from 2:30 to 4 p.m., and
grades 7-8 from 4-5:30
p.m. On Feb. 7, grades 9-10
will try out from 1 to 2:30
p.m., grades 5-6 from 2:30
to 4 p.m. and grades 7-8
from 4 to 5:30 p.m. For
more information, email
rensbasketball@gmail.com
or call 538-6122. Register
at leaguelineup.com/
allsportsrens.
Richardson Hoops will hold
tryouts for its “The Future”
girls’ AAU and showcase
basketball teams for grades
3-9. Tryout dates are
Jan. 17, 24 and 31 at Body
Zone Sports and Wellness
Center. For more info, go
to richardsonhoops.com or
contact Shaun Richardson
at 484-663-3750.

BLOCK SHOOT
Gentlemen MC Sportsmen
are having a block shoot
on Jan. 24 from 1 to 5 p.m.
at their clubhouse, 937
Lancaster Pike, just south
of Buck Motorsports Park
on Route 272. 12-gauge
only. No one under 12
years of age. For more
information, call Mike at
344-7587.

CHEERLEADING
Manheim Township Youth
Cheerleading is looking
for coaches for its 2016
season. Coaches will
need clearances that will
be provided by MTYFA.
Contact Crystal Weaver at
crraiders40@comcast.net
or 669-3178.

COACHING
OPENINGS
Hempfield Rugby Club/
Penn Legacy Rugby Club
has an opening for a boys’
U15 coach. Coaching
assistants are available
for this existing program.
Contact Curt Walter
at 629-8938 for more
information.
Lancaster Mennonite

ute of injury time when
seven had been indicated
on the fourth official’s
board just after Ramiro
Funes Mori made it 3-2 in
the 90th minute. Everton
led through Terry’s own
goal and Kevin Mirallas’
strike on the turn before
Diego Costa and Cesc Fabregas scored for Chelsea.
“There is an understandable feeling of disappointment in having
to drop two points in a
game that we had to play
seven minutes of injury
time with the last ac-

tion happening in seven
minutes and 51 seconds,”
Martinez said.
The result has no impact on the title race
or relegation. There is
no realistic prospect
of Chelsea — six points
above the drop zone
in 14th place — being
sucked into danger,
while Everton is 11th.
The surprise leader
once again was Leicester,
the team that was battling
relegation a year ago.
And yet Saturday represented a missed oppor-

tunity for the team led by
former Chelsea manager
Claudio Ranieri. By drawing 1-1 with bottom-place
Aston Villa after Shinji
Okazaki’s opener was canceled out by Rudy Gestede, Leicester is only on
top by a point.
Arsenal can reclaim
top spot by just drawing
at Stoke today. Between
Leicester and Arsenal is
ever-present Manchester City.
Sergio Aguero, twice,
and Fabian Delph and David Sivla scored to power

City to a 4-0 rout of Crystal Palace. For the first
time in 28 years, Palace is
without a win, or goal, in
its last five league games.
There was a pair of significant wins, however,
for struggling teams.
Bournemouth halted a
four-match winless run
with a 3-0 victory over
Norwich that was completed by $17 million
record signing Benik
Afobe, a recent recruit
for the newcomers, after
goals from Dan Gosling
and Charlie Daniels.

School has openings for
the following coaching
positions: varsity assistant
boys’ lacrosse coach, JV
boys’ volleyball head coach,
JV softball head coach,
JV baseball head coach,
varsity girls’ volleyball
head coach. Interested and
qualified persons should
send a resume and letter of
interest via email to Jared
Yoder, Athletic Director,
Lancaster Mennonite
School, at yoderja@
lancastermennonite.org.
Elco has several openings
openings for 2016,
including junior high track
coach and JV baseball
coach (spring season), and
junior high football coaches
and JV girls’ soccer coach
(fall season). Interested
individuals should contact
Athletic Director Douglas
M. Bohannon at Eastern
Lebanon County School
District, 180 Elco Drive,
Myerstown, PA 17067, or
by email at dbohannon@
elcosd.org.
Penn Manor High School
is accepting applications
for a head high school
golf coach for Fall 2016.
Send resumes to: Jeff
Roth, Athletic Director,
Penn Manor High School,
P.O. Box 1001, Millersville,
PA 17551, call 872-9520 x
1367, or email Jeff.Roth@
pennmanor.net.
Cocalico School District
is accepting applications
for a high school assistant
boys’ volleyball coach
(application deadline Jan.
22) and a high school
assistant girls’ softball
coach (application
deadline Jan. 29). The
positions will begin for
the 2016 spring season.
Acts 34, 114 and 151
clearances required.
Applicants should submit
a letter of interest and
resume to Cocalico
School District, Attention:
Whitney Seltzer, Director
of Athletics, 800 South
4th St., P.O. Box 800,
Denver, PA 17517. Any
questions, contact the
athletic office at 336-1438.
St. Joseph Catholic Club is
in need of coaches for its
youth baseball and softball
teams. If you would like
to help teach children the
fundamentals of the game,
call Bill Souders at 2844074.
Derry Township School
District (Hershey High
School) is looking for an
assistant varsity boys’
lacrosse coach. Applicants
should email a letter of
interest and resume to
Scott Govern, Athletic
Director, sgovern@hershey.
k12.pa.us no later than Feb.
3. Act 34, 151, 114, 126 and
168 certifications/forms
required prior to selection.
The Lampeter-Strasburg
Athletic Department has
vacancies for a varsity
boys’ soccer head coach,
a varsity girls’ soccer head
coach and a junior high
girls’ soccer assistant coach.
Qualified candidates should
have previous playing and/
or coaching experience.
Interested candidates should
submit a letter of interest,
resume, clearances (PA
criminal, PA child abuse, FBI
criminal), and references
to: Branden Lippy, Director
of Athletics, LampeterStrasburg School District,
PO Box 428, Lampeter, PA
17537. Positions open until
filled. EOE.

Tickets may be purchased
in advance in the cafeteria
lobby at the high school
between 6 and 7 p.m. on
Jan. 19 and 21.

PA 17022. Registration is on
a first-come, first-served
basis.
Hempfield Rec Center,
950 Church St., Landisville,
offers instructional,
group exercise and
sports programs for
all ages. Opportunities
include aquatics, fitness,
lifeguarding, personal
training, sport-specific
training, tennis, wellness
and special events. For
more information, visit
hempfieldrec.com or call
898-3102.
Lampeter-Strasburg
YMCA, 800 Village
Road, West Lampeter
Township, offers a variety
of leagues and programs.
Call 464-4000 or visit
lancasterymca.org.
Lancaster Family YMCA
offers a wide variety of
youth and adult sports
programs, including
basketball, roller hockey,
soccer and more. For
more information, visit
lancasterymca.org or
contact Ron Stief, sports
director, at rstief@
lancasterymca.org or 4644000, ext. 1212.
Lancaster Rec offers
instructional, exercise and
recreational programs. Call
392-2115, ext. 147, or visit
lancasterrec.org.
Lititz recCenter offers a
variety of programs for
all ages including sports,
fitness, wellness, aquatics
and special events. For
more information visit
lititzrec.com or call 6265096.
Manheim Township
Recreation Department
offers a selection of sports
leagues and programs. Call
290-7180, ext. 3100, or visit
manheimtownship.org.
Masonic Life Center,
Elizabethtown, has fitness
programs, pool classes and
swim times. For details,
visit masonicvillagespa.
org (click on Elizabethtown
under “Location”).
Southern End Community
Association — SECA — in
Quarryville, offers a wide
variety of recreational,
exercise, sports programs
and leagues. Call 806-0123
or see secarec.org.
YMCA at New Holland,
123 N. Shirk Road, offers
personal fitness class and
programs, swim instruction,
league and a wide variety
of programs for youth,
adult and seniors. Visit
lancasterymca.org.
Town Square Health Club
in Manheim offers land and
water exercise activities.
Call Haley Brumbach at
664-6306.

Sunday morning trail runs
can also be found on the
club website, lrrclub.org.

FOOTBALL
BANQUET
The annual Manheim
Central football banquet
will take place at 3 p.m.
at Enck’s Banquet Center
south of Manheim on Jan.
31. The public is invited.

GUN SHOW
The Lancaster Muzzle
Loading Rifle Association
will hold its 57th annual
gun show Jan. 30 and 31
at the Lancaster Farm and
Home Center, 1383 Arcadia
Road, Lancaster. The show,
featuring more than 100
tables, will run 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Jan. 30 and 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Jan. 31. A donation of
$5 is requested. For more
information, call 368-4653.

GYMNASTICS
GEARS is holding classes
for girls and boys ages 6-12
on Thursdays from Feb. 4
through March 17. Class A
for Beginners is from 6:45
to 7:45 p.m., and Class B
for Intermediate/Advanced
is from 7:45 to 8:45 p.m.
Classes are at the GEARS
Community Center, 70 S.
Poplar St., Elizabethtown.
To register or for more
information, go online at
GetIntoGEARS.org or call
367-0355.

LACROSSE
Manheim Township Boys’
Lacrosse registration
is now open for boys
in grades 2 through 8.
Registration can be done
online at townshiplacrosse.
com. Details regarding
teams, equipment handout,
and schedules can be
found on the website.
Registration for the spring
season also includes Winter
Skills sessions at Lanco
Fieldhouse.

LIFEGUARDING
Central Park Swimming
Pool needs certified
lifeguards for the 2016
summer season. The
Lancaster County
Department of Parks &
Recreation is accepting
applications for various
lifeguarding positions
for this summer. For
more information visit
lancastercountyparks.org
or web.co.lancaster.pa.us/
Jobs.aspx?CID=98.

REC CENTERS
Brightside Opportunity
Center, at 515 Hershey Ave.,
Lancaster, offers a variety
of programs for all ages,
and a diverse population.
Yoga, a nutritionist,
fitness, personal trainers,
basketball, Zumba and Soul
line dancing are among
the available programs. To
register call 509-1342 or
come in.
Ephrata Rec Center,
130 S. Academy Drive,
offers a wide variety of
programs for all ages
including sports, fitness,
wellness, aquatics and
special events. The center
is holding an Open House
through Jan. 17. New
members will have startup
fee waived, receive a free
gift, and be entered into
drawings to win a 13-week
group fitness class and
locker rental for a year.
For more information visit
ephratarec.com or call
738-1167.
Greater Elizabethtown Area
Recreation & Community
Services offers programs
and activities for all ages.
Registration is accepted
online at GetintoGEARS.org,
by phone (367-0355) or fax
(367-4138) with a Visa or
MasterCard credit card, and
by walk-in or mail-in at 600
E. High St., Elizabethtown,

RUGBY
Spring rugby registration
is now open for Hempfield
Rugby Club/Penn Legacy
Rugby Club. Open to
boys and girls in grades
7-12. Contact Curt Walter
at 629-8938 or visit
pennlegacy.org/rugbyfc.
html

RUNNING
The Lancaster Road
Runners Club invites
runners of all ages and
abilities to participate in
its spring fun runs, held
throughout the area every
Tuesday evening at 6:30
p.m. The club will meet at
Long’s Park in Lancaster
through the remaining
winter months. Enter the
park via the Bluebird Drive
entrance from Harrisburg
Pike, and follow to the first
parking area on the right.
For more information,
contact Steve at 2013173. Information about
Thursday evening and

SEMINARS
Coaches Time Out, a
seminar designed to
help coaches with the
skills needed to balance
their jobs and other
responsibilities, will be held
Jan. 22-24 at DoubleTree
at DoubleTree Resort by
Hilton Hotel Lancaster.
There will be national
speakers to discuss topics
such as faith, family and
finances. Cost is $175 per
coach or $225 per couple.
For more information, go
to coachestimeout.org.

SENIOR GAMES
The 2016 Senior Indoor
Games will be held at
LANCO Fieldhouse on
Feb. 23-25. The games are
open to all athletes who
are ages 55 and older as of
Feb. 23. Many sports will
be played over the three
days, including running,
throwing, badminton, bocce,
horseshoes, cornhole toss,
target golf, foul shots,
penalty kicks and more.
To register call LANCO
Fieldhouse at 560-0717, or
go to lancofieldhouse.com
and click on Sports/Special
Events.

SKIING
Lancaster Ski Club will
hold a membership Meet
& Greet from 7 to 9 p.m.
Jan. 21 at Tellus 360, 24
E. King St., Lancaster, on
the second floor behind
the Tig Caleb Lounge.
Guests are welcome, and
first-time members get
$5 off their membership.
For more information,
visit lancasterskiclub.net,
find Lancaster Ski Club
on Facebook, or call Brian
Leatherman at (646) 5848161.

SOFTBALL
Franklin & Marshall will
conduct its All-Skills
Softball Clinic from 9
a.m. to noon Feb. 21. For
more information, visit
fandmsoftballcamps.com.
Manetas Park (formerly
Zinn’s Park) is accepting
teams for the men’s slow
pitch softball weeknight
league. For more
information, contact Mike
Shenk at 203-7420.
St. Joseph Catholic Club
will hold signups and
uniform fittings for girls
ages 6 to 15 from 11 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. Jan. 23, in
the gym at 410 St. Joseph
St., Lancaster. Practice
starts in the gym in March
and the season runs
from April 25 to June 18.
Coaches are also needed.
For information call Bill
Souders at 284-4074.

VOLLEYBALL
GEARS is accepting teams
for its Winter 2016 Church
Coed Sixes Volleyball
League, scheduled to
begin Feb. 8 and conclude
in early May. Interested
teams should submit a
roster and registration fee
no later than Jan. 29 to
be included. Games will
be on Mondays between
6:30 and 9:30 p.m. at the
Daubert Gym, GEARS
Community Center Gym
and Elizabethtown Area
Middle School Gym. The
league is a 10-match
season with playoffs.
League fee is $200 per
team. For additional
information visit
GetintoGEARS.org or call
John Myers at 367-0355.

BOWLING

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

BARRY DECKER
ROLL ’EM

PM’s Fisher
continues
family
tradition
Fresh off a championship in the Lisa Bowman
Adult/Junior Tournament last month, Nick
Fisher will continue
to put his two-handed
approach to work on
the lanes with his Penn
Manor High School
team.
Capturing that tourney title with Comets
coach Neal Vital, the
duo led throughout the
event.
But Fisher, a junior, is
not new to winning.
He also notched the
2014 Leisure Lanes
Adult/Junior Tourney
championship with his
father, Ed Fisher.
“It was a great feeling,
winning with my dad,”
the younger Fisher said.
Family success in the
sport has been a tradition, as he is proud to
proclaim.
“My two sisters and
I all qualified for PIAA
bowling championships,” he said, noting that eldest sister
Kelly, now a Mountville
Elementary School
teacher, was a member
of the first Penn Manor
girls’ team, which went
to states in 2003.
Meanwhile, sister
Shaylyn, now a student
at Elizabethtown College, was a member of
the Comets squad that
finished second in the
2014 PIAA team championships.
And Nick Fisher’s
Comets boys’ team finished fourth at the state
tourney last season.
This season, Fisher
also captured the Lancaster Junior Doubles
Tourney title with Manheim Township grad
John Mertz.
Background: The son
of Ed and Sharon Fisher
is employed part-time
by Stauffer’s.
Leagues/averages:
High school, 208; Leisure Saturday Morning,
203.

High scores: Single,
289; series, 739.
Greatest moment
in the sport: Finishing
fourth in 2014-15 PIAA
Team Championships.
Achievements: 2014
PJBT champion.
Favorite bowling
center: Leisure Lanes.
Person who’s taught
Fisher the most: His
father, who has, he said,
“pushed him to excel.”
His excitement for
high school bowling is
heightened by: Team
tournaments, hard
work, and teammates
supporting each other.
Bowling has helped
Fisher: Handle pressure situations.
Interest in the sport
began: When he was 6
years old, in the Leisure
Lanes Junior Bowling
League.
Secret to success:
Staying focused.
Other bowlers would
describe him as: A
quiet, but competitive
bowler.
Long-term goal: Bowl
a 300 and 800.
People would be
most surprised to
learn that he: Qualified
for states like his two
sisters did.
When he’s not bowling you will find him:
Working.
The persons who
he admires are: Jarvis
Landry, a professional
football player for
the Miami Dolphins,
and pro bowler Jason
Belmonte. Both, Fisher
says, “strive to be their
best.”
Extra-curricular activity: Indoor soccer.

n Send the names of any

bowlers you would recommend for the column to LNP
correspondent Barry Decker
at deckrunner@aol.com, or
call 786-2620.

ALLEY NOTES
Perfect games were rolled by
Merle Burkhart Jr. at Leisure
Lanes, Terry Martin at Dutch
Lanes and Win Randler and Ryan
Lightner at Clearview Lanes.
A near-perfect game was rolled
by Cole Snavely at Dutch Lanes.
High series (800, men; 700,
women) were rolled by Merle
Burkhart Jr. (814) at Leisure
Lanes and Shayne Beck (809) at
Dutch Lanes.

HIGH SCORES
CLEARVIEW LANES

Men: Rory Shiffler 729, Terry
Kauffman 680, Jeff Gibble
677, Larry Radle 647, Tony

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

C11

489 (Sparklers); Karyn King
448 (Jewels); Robyn Graham
686, Dennett Rittenhouse 676,
Lorraine Deibler 601 (Myers Auto
Body Ladies).
Mixed: Brian Hess 720, Brandi
Whitmyer 557 (Zodiac); Ken
Olson 725, Kimberlee Smith
540 (Turtle); Bryan Lorah 694,
Codi Fishel 554 (AM Ind); Bob
Kilheffer 682, Karen Staats
600 (Mix Nuts); Henny Boyles
644, Sandy Wisler 479 (Leisure
Times); Jason McMellen 635,
Ashley Shirk 524 (Southern
End); Rick Benedick 682,
Linda DeHaven 510 (BCA);
Steve Salamh 659, Deb Kling
525 (Tuesday Misery); Bryan
Enge 712, Deb Hatfield 586
(Wednesday Mix); Frank
Woerner 630, Donna Kurtz 517
(Thursday Mix); Brent Shaw 663,
Michelle Myers 491 (Roses and
Thorns); Dennis Shufflebottom
718, Karen Clark 521 (Derr’s Mix);
Merle Burkhart Jr. 300 814, Jane
Danese 554 (Friday Mixers).

BARRY DECKER | LNP CORRESPONDENT

Penn Manor junior Nick Fisher, who employs an unusual two-handed approach, has followed his father and sisters to success in bowling.
Shiffler 639, Gary Keck 636,
Walt Haubenreisser 626, Gary
High 613, Tyler Seiverling 596,
Denny Noll 591, Tim Hanna
574, John Helman 565, Paul
Stubenrauch 526, Bob Hartman
522 (Sportsmen); Mike Sheeler
722, Tony Becker 688, Ricky
Winner 669, Jeff Becker 665,
Ced Yates 630, Marv Rote 625,
Jim Rosborough 618, Joseph
Carlo 609, Jon Lee 605, Brian
Harman 586, Larry Kibler Sr.
571 (Monday Hdcp); Chris Stum
709, Brent Fortney 690, Jim
Ritzman 680, Tim Livingston
666, Skip Eichelberger 665,
Tom Lappe 637, Gary Reed 600,
George Keyes 576 (Majors); Ryan
Lightner 300-768, Bob Lightner
725, Bob Miller 720, Win Randler
300-719, Walt Haubenreisser
672, Bill Lease 672, Kevin Eyster
672, Nick Borrell 641, Don Bailey
640, Ken Hoerner 632, Art
Reisinger 612, Gary Reven 607,
Wayne Conrad 555, Dave Novak
523 (Businessmen).
Women: Katrina Martin 634,
Shannon Lee 572, Kathy Miller
518, Terri Lee 496, Bobbi Griffith
461, Stacy Parsons 458, Ashleigh
Nolan 424, Heather Kreiser 416,
Cora Reese 381 (Pinbelles); Lisa
Farwell 642, Beth Garman 634,
Sherry Margucci 611, Karen Clark
566 (Majors).
Mixed: Sam Weber Jr. 649,
Charlie George Jr. 578, Robin
Baker 573, Kevin Darco 549,
Deb Whitebuffalo 503, Bobbi
Griffith 454, John Groff Jr. 441,
Matt Hood 418 (Mixed Outlaws);
Steve Decker 664, Shirlee
Waugh 627, Bill Lease 605, Dave
Whitebuffalo 590, Matt Decker
310 (Crackers); Bob Hartman
552, Gail Vanderwerf 500, Ryan
Gibson 438, Kirsten Thomas
352 (Monday Mixed); George
Keyton 557, Jason Mills 517, Cole
Eagleton 512, Tytus McGarvey
474, Tom Taylor 424 (Rookies).
Seniors: Lindy Condran 656,
Larry Condran 550, Rich Oliver
518, Harry Hershey 451, Jean
Condran 429 (Early Birds); Walt
Haubenreisser 655, Harry Grove
600, Art Ackerson 583, Lee
Young 571, Patrice Burkhardt
445, John Sweeney 399, Arlene
Chodkowski 324 (Community
Seniors); Jeff Stum 682, Lindy
Condran 623, Dale Hilsher 596,

Bob Hartman 543, Bob Smith
514, Rich Oliver 513, Galen
Benner 500, Jim Shank 497,
Ken Bleiler 493, Dale Shank
475, Don Engle 452, Tom Farley
450, Sandy Leach 441, Rich
Worrell 435, Denise Formisano
388, Linda Farley 387 (Tuesday
Seniors); Parke King 674, John
Jarrett 647, John Erney 627, Dick
Mutzabaugh 625 (Kraft Funeral
Home Seniors).
Juniors: Kolby Bennett 692,
Brittany Ritzman 647, Mitchell
Hoffmaster 643, Olivia Farwell
643, Kayla Halbleib 631, Alexis
Lee 606, Logan Hoover 594
(American).

222 DUTCH LANES

Men: Shayne Beck 809, Terry
Martin 300-768, Dave Gerhart
749 (Lancaster County Travel);
Keith Sholly 697, Jamie Arment
693, Trever Habecker 682
(Lancaster North End); Sandy
Snook 667, Randy Haldeman
600, Doug Crawford 600 (New
Holland Men); Brian Kachel 749,
Mike Lewis 745, Scott Canfield
741 (Commercial ); Lance Horst
738, Andy Bobetsky 713, Brian
Kachel 709, Industrial/Service).
Women: Denise Woodworth
705, Janice Meckley 616, Pat
Schappell 525 (Ephrata Ladies);
Bert Myers 514, Lynda Boysel
468, Mary Hale 438 (New
Holland Ladies).
Mixed: Chadd Rudy 735, Jim
Dinicola 709, Dave Zimmerman
696, Trista Kreider 632, Kristin
Brill 622, Janice Meckley 597
(Ephrata Mixed); Devon Kurtz
604, James Boyce 563, Kerwin
Mertz 523, Vanessa Garman 550,
Terri Andrew 483, Brenda Fetter
421 (Simply Everything); Perry
Lorah 577, Leroy Claar 552, Don
Rineer 547, Sue Keith 457, Joy
Good 404 (Eohrata Church);
Rick Ober Sr 650, Walt Bowman
616, Bill Blackshire Jr. 588,
Lori Werner 411, Linda George
409, Jennifer Wolf 385 (Friday
Night Mixed); Rick Yocum Jr.
594, Tom Bingeman 542, Carl
Patterson 536, Mary Lepera
420, Lisa Snyder 366, Lori Smith
222 (NorthEnd Mixed); Mike
Hillworth 651, Jason Plum 607,
Carl Weaver 575, Amanda White
545, Cristine Plum 538, Maria
Hillworth 527 (Sunday Night

Mixed); Barry Wanner 713, Dave
Detrick 710, Brandi Whitmyer
649, Donna Pannebecker 627,
Heather Klink 614 (Brownstown
Mixed).
Seniors: Harry Charlesen 652,
Bill Rosenberger 598, Bob Landis
Jr. 592, (Tuesday Seniors);
Ken Olson 634, Jim Shober
579, Tom Sullivan 541, Carol
Stephan 557, Dottie Johnson 487,
Marilyn Woods 471 (Young At
Heart); Lois Ostertag 473, Linda
Basciano 458, Joanne Bowman
418 (Friendship League); Jack
Stauffer 507, Grant Peifer 453,
Earl Redner 307, Karen Redner
499, Millie Peifer 412, June
Turnbull 411 (DutchMaids/Men);
Shaun Chubb 643, Steve McGraw
627, John Horsey 583, Doris
Wells 531, Barbara McGraw 499,
Linda Peachey 491 (Thursday
Seniors).
Juniors: Austin Barilar 714, Jared
Bigley 683, Cole Snavely 682,
Cameron Zwally 672, Lee Enck
664, Dominik Bouman 663, Ben
White 652, Tyrus Current 601,
Katelyn Martin 617, Paige Boyd
615 (Senior Division); Cody
Sciscione 512, Brady Wiggins
496, Matt Iseman 477, Jennifer
Sensenig 441, Tessa Pasker 409,
Emily Omundsen 395 (Co-Ed);
Rebekah Omundsen 261, Bryce
Carvell 333, Nick Sweigart 318
(Zoo); Landen Shugarts 191,
Brooklynn Carvell 197, Khloe
Rivera 177, Sarah Rivera 155
(Bumpers).

LEISURE LANES

Men: Brian Brooks 761, Scott
Canfield 728, Mike Frey 714
(AMF Ind); Durbin Fisher 775
(Lancaster Archery Supply);
Ed Johnston 721, Terry Murray
717, Ron Deiter 715 (Tuesday
Men); Bob Fasnacht 734, Scott
Kinkaid 692, Bob Allison 683
(Indoor World); John Mertz
Jr. 717, Donnie Smith 713, EJ
Farwell 706 (Lancaster County
Travel); Rick Miller 663 (Leisure
Lanes Classic); Preston Karr 600
(Millersville Men); Neal Vital 718,
Denny Rittenhouse Jr. 710, Kevin
Hackman 707, Dave Kennedy
689, John Gravely 687, Alex
Palmer 686 (Conestoga Ind).
Women: Deb Weaver 571
(Precious Gems); Susie Bailey

Seniors: Jim Morrow 522, Gayle
Tannen 444 (Manor North);
Al Avery 491, Fran Rowe 499
(Woodcrest); Dick Holton
524, Mary Kilheffer 473 (Early
Birds); Mike Conner 634, John
Erney 631, Dennis Bushong
624, Richard Kleckner 592,
Denny Rittenhouse Sr. 587,
Ralph Kurtz 587, Harold Waltz
586, Champ Bauer 586, Cindy
Bonham 607, Paulette Ghee 535,
Linda Bowman 533, Charlaine
Jones 517, Glenda Carper 502
(Tuesday Seniors); Richard
Kuehne 540, Jane Gardner 457
(Lakes Campus); Bob Kilheffer
644, Champ Bauer 625, Jack
Huber 623, Lou Danese 607,
Mike Conner 600, Dave Nieman
596, Tom Bair 580, Harold Waltz
580, Joan Nieman 531 (Thursday
Seniors); Ron Bearley 580, Dorris
Smith 435 (Millersville Seniors).

ROCKY SPRINGS LANES
Men: Damar Been 753, Adam
Steller 687, Dennis Hagel 685,
Cameron Rishell 683, Roger
Harvey Sr. 658, Rob Yingst 651
(Garden Spot Men).
Women: Linda Goodling 663,
Cindy McLaughlin 597 (Retail
Ladies).
Mixed: Jim Brubaker 754, Joey
Breen 708, Justin Hertzler 701,
Justin Heiney 686, Keith Coble
652, Robin Heiney 644 (Friday
Night Thunder); Zach Keen 657
(General Contractors 657).
Seniors: Kevin Riley 683, Linda
Goodling 640, Merle Farmer
581, Les Greenwalt 557, Tom
Reed 555, James Reel 554,
Jerry Thomas 554, Joy Corey
518 (Thursday Seniors); Bob
Brubaker 639, Dave Simmons
620, Ken Yoder 559, Sigh Hoover
555, Brenda Collins 547, Brenda
Plantholt 496, Chick Long 451
(Bob Rudisill Seniors); Charlie
Rhoades 556, Beverly Wimer
497, Joanne Dissinger 467, Cindy
Kendig 464 (Swingin’ Seniors);
Kevin Riley 659, Jim Barrett 610,
Chris Jackson 516 (Monday AM
Trio); Tanya Beakes 493 (Nickel
Mine Ladies).
Juniors: Jacob Whitton 468,
Emalee Getz 403, Cameron Getz
379, Brent Cox 342, Mikayla
Geyyer 321 (Tuesday Juniors);
Adam Lee 579, Angel Almodovar
528, Mark Smith Jr. 524, Ryan
Ankrim 504, Julee Getz 501,
Anthony Clare 487, Ian Nieves
464, Kylee Clare 380, Logan
Witman 290, Corinne Smith 280,
Logan Gochenaur 263, Matthew
Lopez 249, Kasinda Mack 236
(Saturday Juniors).

SPECIAL OLYMPICS

Cheers, enthusiasm at county bowling tourney
Special Olympics competitors and volunteers turned out for event at 222 Dutch Lanes on Saturday
BARRY DECKER

classmates words: “It’s
fulfilling to watch the
Special Olympians enjoy each frame. I will remember their reactions
always.”
Like any other Special
Olympics event, participants began with an
Olympic torch and the
creed, this year led by
Caitlin Stafford of Reinholds and Charles Groff
of Millersville.

LNP CORRESPONDENT

The high-fives were
as contagious as the excitement over strikes,
as the 120 competitors
practiced their creed
— “Let me win, but if I
cannot win, let me be
brave in the attempt” —
at the Lancaster County
Special Olympics Bowling Tournament at 222
Dutch Lanes on Saturday.
None was prouder
than Katie Burns, of
Manheim
Township,
who competes in the
sports of bocce, skiing
and equestrian, in addition to bowling.
“This sport gives her
confidence in her life and
in her work,” said her father, Phillip Burns.
Dutch Lanes coach and
assistant county Special Olympics manager,
Marty Turner, said the
coaches will learn next
week which athletes
have qualified for the
sectional tournament in
Allentown at the end of
March.
She added that qualifiers are based on Sat-

Positive event
BARRY DECKER | LNP CORRESPONDENT PHOTOS

Charles Groff, of Millersville, and Caitlin Stafford, of Reinholds, carried the symbolic torch in opening ceremonies
during the 2016 Lancaster County Special Olympics
Bowling Tournament at 222 Dutch Lanes on Saturday.
For more photos, see lancasteronline.com.

urday’s results and state
requirements.
“Usually about 20 athletes qualify from the
different average classifications,” Turner said.
“They then can qualify
for the PA state tournament in June at the sectional tourney.”
Even though not every
roll produced that elusive strike, the athletes,
parents, friends and vol-

unteers were caught up
in the excitement, which
included 25 Warwick
School District National
Honor Society members,
who helped at the event.
“I love the enthusiasm,” Warwick senior
Amanda Kindt said.
“The athletes are amazing, and I feel an honor
to be part of it.”
Brianna Baer, a Warwick senior, echoed her

The Special Olympians
compete in their sports
for many years, and their
parents are pleased with
the results.
Sarah Miller’s mother,
Kim Miller said, “My
daughter competed for
14 years, and looks forward to the event to see
friends who extend a
positive hand of encouragement.”
Suzy Good noted that
her daughter, Kaitlyn
Good, reaches for the
stars in all her sports —
soccer, tennis and bowling.
“She has qualified for
states, but hopes to roll

a 200 and earn a trip to
the world games,” Suzy
Good said.
Bonnie Stafford, mother of Caitlin Stafford,
noted that this event is
about more than winning: “It’s about taking the big steps in life
skills, to be independent,
which the Special Olympics help to develop.”
Her daughter has competed for 18 years in the
sports, and intends to
continue for a long time.
Volunteer Cathy Enck,
of Akron, said the event
brings families together
to cheer and applaud the
Special Olympians.
This was the case for
first-time competitors
Conor Ulrich and Kylie Fake, who were supported on the lanes by
Conor’s father, Jamie Ulrich, and Kylie’s grandmother, Liz Ingold. They
were applauded by a host
of family cheerleaders.
“It’s all about looking
at their smiling faces,
seeing them have fun,
the
companionship
that they gain, and their
interaction with each
other and the Warwick

Kylie Fake, of Ephrata, with
the help of grandmother
Liz Ingold, participates
in the Lancaster County
Special Olympics Bowling
Tournament for the first
time Saturday.

students,” said Bob Lopez, 30-year Special
Olympics volunteer, who
speaks about the group
to schools and community organizations.
When the tournament
concluded, all of the participants had shown the
essence of the Special
Olympics motto, and,
for their efforts, were
awarded ribbons.

C12

SPORTS

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

AUTO RACING

Gearing
up for
NASCAR
season
DAVID SCOTT

THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER

With the NASCAR season
nearing its start — Speedweeks
at Daytona are just a month
away — here are five burning
questions for 2016 (next week,
five more):
Q. How will the new aerodynamic package be received?
Well, we won’t know until
after Daytona, since the lowdownforce setup won’t be
used at superspeedways. But
there will be a lot of curiosity about the package when it
makes its debut at Atlanta in
the season’s second race. Drivers loved the package when it
was tested last season at Kentucky and Darlington, with
passing and handling coming
much more into play.
Q. Who’s that new voice in
the television booth?
Why, it’s Jeff Gordon, who
retired last season at (nearly)
the top of the sport. Gordon
will join Mike Joy and Darrell Waltrip at Fox after coming close to winning the 2015
championship (falling short
at Homestead in the last race
of the season). Rick Hendrick,
for whom Gordon drove for 23
seasons, has said it won’t sink
in for him that Gordon has
retired until he goes to Daytona and doesn’t see Gordon’s
name above the door of the No.
24 Chevy.
Q. So what becomes of
that car?
Chase Elliott, who won the
2014 Xfinity championship,
takes over for Gordon at Hendrick Motorsports. Given his
pedigree and the equipment
he’ll be driving, Elliott, 20, the
son of hall-of-famer Bill Elliott, will be under significant
pressure to perform well.
Q. What’s in store for Tony
Stewart in 2016?
Stewart is retiring as a Cup
driver after the season, and, although he has said he wants to
be able to race in other series,
will focus on his ownership
duties at Stewart-Haas Racing
in the future. One immediate
goal for Stewart: to win his first
Daytona 500 in his last chance
to do so. He’d at least like to
win another race, something
he hasn’t done since 2013.
Q. Can Kyle Busch repeat?
There’s no reason to think
Busch can’t win his second
Cup championship in a row.
He made the Chase last season
despite having run in 11 fewer
races than his competition after breaking his leg and foot
in a season-opening wreck at
Daytona. After a career filled
with bad luck and poor performances in the Chase, he finally
figured out how to succeed in
the playoffs. That’s not something he’ll forget how to do.

INVESTIGATION

Stewart, heckler
in confrontation

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Police
are investigating after an offduty officer heckled NASCAR
star Tony Stewart and was
confronted by the driver.
The confrontation happened
Friday night at the weeklong
Chili Bowl dirt-track racing
event at the Tulsa Expo Center.
The heckler was Cpl. Kyle
Hess with the sheriff’s office,
the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office said.
Cellphone videos from fans
posted online shortly afterward show Stewart and the fan
locking hands and engaging in
heated conversation.
Sheriff’s Deputy Justin
Green said that after looking
at the video he doubts charges
will be filed against the Stewart or Hess.
“Of course, there may be
other details that are still out
there other than that video,”
he said.
Stewart works on the event’s
track preparation.

RECREATIONAL
SWIMMING
Ephrata Tidal Waves 540,
East Pennsboro Aquatic Club 476
Ephrata Results
BOYS
8 & younger
25 Freestyle — 2. C. Rennix, 3. I. Schneider.
25 Breaststroke — 2. K. Lagaspi.
25 Backstroke — 2. N. King, 3. C. Rennix.
25 Butterfly — 2. C. Rennix, 3. I. Schneider.
50 Freestyle — 1. I. Schneider, 3. N. King.
100 Freestyle Relay — A: 2. Ephrata (I.
Schneider, R.J. Dominey, C. Rennix, K. Legaspi).
9-10
50 Freestyle — 3. L. Kimbel.
50 Breaststroke — 2. A. Weaver.
50 Backstroke — 1. L. Kimbel, 3. B. Bear.
50 Butterfly — 1. B. Siple, 3. L. Kimbel
100 Freestyle — 1. B. Siple, 2. A. Weaver.
100 IM — 1. B. Sipel, 2. A. Weaver.
200 Freestyle Relay — A: 1. Ephrata (L.
Kimbel, A. Weaver, R. Bear, B. Siple); B: 2.
Ephrata (E. Mentzer, C. Johnson-Null, T. Lorditch, K. Garcia).
11-12
50 Freestyle — 1. O. Campbell, 2. N. Kimmel, 3. R. Sabol.
50 Breaststroke — 1. T. McGillian, 2. N.
Young, 3. C. McSparran.
50 Backstroke — 1. O. Campbell, 2. R.
Brubaker, 3. C. McSparran.
50 Butterfly — 1. N. Kimmel, 2. C. McSparran, 3. N. Young.
100 Freestyle — 1. O. Campbell, 2. R. Brubaker, 3. C. McSparran.
100 IM — 1. T. McGillan, 3. C. Schwanger.
200 Medley Relay — A: 1. Ephrata (R.
Brubaker, T. McGillian, O. Campbell, N. Kimmel); B: 2. Ephrata (C. Schwanger, N. Young,
C. McSparran, R. Sabol).
11-18
200 Freestyle — 2. T. McGillian.
13-14
50 Freestyle — 1. A. Zimmerman.
100 Breaststoke — 2. P. Miller.
100 Freestyle — 2. P. Miller.
100 Backstroke — 2. P. Miller.
100 Butterfly — 1. A. Zimmerman.
200 IM — 1. K. Farrow, 2. A. Zimmerman.
GIRLS
8 & younger
25 Freestyle — 2. L. Lutz, 3. K. Brass.
25 Breaststroke — 2. B. Burkholder, 3. H.
Eby.
25 Backstroke — 1. B. Burkholder, 2. A.
Musser, 3. K. Brass.
25 Butterfly — 2. L. Lutz, 3. A. Musser.
50 Freestyle — 2. L. Lutz, 3. O. Archibald.
100 IM — 1. B. Burkholder.
100 Freestyle Relay — A: 1. Ephrata (B.
Burkholder, K. Brass, O. Archibald, L. Lutz);
B: 3. Ephrata (G. Schwambach, A. Zimmerman, A. Musser, C. Burkholder).
9-10
50 Freestyle — 2. K. Christopher, 3. E.
Kingston.
50 Breaststroke — 3. K. Barshinger.
50 Backstroke — 2. K. Barshinger.
50 Butterfly — 2. O. Beard, 3. T. Roth.
100 Freestyle — 1. O. Beard, 2. K.
Barshinger.
100 IM — 3. E. Kingston.
200 Freestyle Relay — A: 1. Ephrata
(M. Martin, K. Christopher, S. Brass, K.
Barshinger); B: 3. Ephrata (O. Beard, D.
Yocum-Pringle, E. Rennix, E. Kingston).
11-12
50 Freestyle — 1. A. Fedorshak.
50 Breaststroke — 3. L. Hocker.
50 Backstroke — 2. A. Fedorshak.
50 Butterfly — 3. J. Nolt.
100 Freestyle — 1. A. Fedorshak, 3. J.
Moyer.
100 IM — 2. J. Moyer, 3. K. Eby.
200 Medley Relay — A: 1. Ephrata (A. Fedorshak, E. Huber, J. Nolt, L. Hocker); B: 2.
Ephrata (S. Siemion, M. Murphy, J. Moyer,
S. Ehrhart); C: 3. Ephrata (J. Pauley, K. Eby,
A. Kwiatkowski, A. Hovan).
11-18
200 Freestyle — 1. M. Campbell, 2. E.
Mendenhall.
13-14
50 Freestyle — 3. E. Mendenhall,.
100 Freestyle — 2. M. Campbell, 3. L.
Weaver.
100 Breaststroke — 1. L. Weaver.
100 Backstroke — 2. L. Weaver, 3. E. Mendenhall.
100 Butterfly — 3. A. Weaver.
200 IM — 2. M. Campbell, 3. A. Weaver.
200 Medley Relay — A: 2. Ephrata (L.
Weaver, M. Campbell, E. Mendenhall, A.
Weaver).
15-18
50 Freestyle — 1. B. Fisher, 2. E. McCombs.
100 Freestyle — 1. A. Zimmerman, 2. E.
McCombs.
100 Breaststroke — 1. B. Fisher, 2. V. McCombs.
100 Backstroke — 1. A. Zimmerman, 3. V.
McCombs.
100 Butterfly — 1. A. Zimmer, 2. E. McCombs, 3. B. Fisher.
200 IM — 1. E. McCombs.
200 Medley Relay — A: 1. Ephrata (A.
Zimmeman, V. McCombs, E. McCombs, B.
Fisher).

SCHOLASTIC
SWIMMING
BOYS
L-L LEAGUE
Section One

League
Overall

W L T W L T
Hempfield................. 2 0 0 6 0 0
Warwick.................... 3 0 0 6 0 0
Cedar Crest............... 2 1 0 5 2 0
Manheim Twp.......... 1 1 0 5 1 0
McCaskey................. 0 3 0 2 3 0
Penn Manor.............. 0 3 0 2 4 0
Section Two

W L T W L T
Conestoga Valley...... 3 0 0 4 1 0
Elizabethtown........... 2 1 0 2 4 0
Lanc. Catholic........... 2 1 0 2 4 0
Cocalico.................... 1 1 0 2 4 0
Lamp.-Strasburg....... 1 1 0 1 5 0
Ephrata..................... 0 2 0 0 5 0
Manheim Central...... 0 3 0 0 6 0
GIRLS
L-L LEAGUE
Section One

League
Overall

W L T W L T
Manheim Twp.......... 2 0 0 6 0 0
Hempfield................. 2 0 0 6 0 0
Cedar Crest............... 2 1 0 6 1 0
Warwick.................... 2 1 0 5 1 0
Penn Manor.............. 0 3 0 3 3 0
McCaskey................. 0 3 0 1 4 0
Section Two

W L T W L T
Cocalico.................... 2 0 0 3 3 0
Elizabethtown........... 2 1 0 2 4 0
Lanc. Catholic........... 2 1 0 2 4 0
Lamp.-Strasburg....... 1 1 0 2 4 0
Ephrata..................... 1 2 0 1 4 0
Conestoga Valley...... 1 2 0 1 4 0
Manheim Central...... 0 3 0 0 6 0

HORSE RACING
PENN NATIONAL RESULTS

1st—$14,300,5 1/2f
3-Sweet Liam (Otero W.)...... 4.80,3.60,2.80
4-True Belief (Gonzalez E.)............ 9.60,3.60
9-Durendal (Potts C.)............................ 3.00
Also Ran: Bear’s Pegasus, Gotsum Goldust, Revival Plus, Cosmic Crash, Old Key
West, Celoso, A Little Extra, Monba Jam-

ba. Race Time: 1:06.36. Exacta (3-4) Paid
$20.60; Superfecta (3-4-9-6) Paid $24.80;
Trifecta (3-4-9) Paid $32.05.
2nd—$20,000,6f
4-Ritzy Lass (Rodriguez A.).... 5.20,3.80,3.20
2-Fit for a Ball (Salgado A.)....... 15.80,11.60
1-Green Bay (Whitney D.)..................... 8.00
Also Ran: Little Juliann, Woodland Babe,
Glitch Girl, Lil Miss Sassy, Sterlings America, Party Rock. Race Time: 1:12.28. Daily
Double (3-4) Paid $16.80; Exacta (4-2) Paid
$32.30; Superfecta (4-2-1-9) Paid $99.77;
Trifecta (4-2-1) Paid $95.60.
3rd—$20,900,6f
10-Royal George (Whitney).... 3.20,2.20,2.10
6-Shazam (Cora D.)....................... 2.80,2.40
4-Youreoutoforder (Castillo A.)............. 3.20
Also Ran: Bridle Me, Arson Andy, Shar’s
Dancer, Coral Island, Blazin Drama, Andy’s
Special, Tocatchathief. Race Time: 1:13.54.
Daily Double (4-10) Paid $11.40; Exacta
(10-6) Paid $2.90; Superfecta (10-6-4-7)
Paid $12.64; Trifecta (10-6-4) Paid $4.05;
Pic 3 (3-4-10) Paid $7.00.
4th—$14,300,1m
5-Nin’s Thermometer (Cnnr)... 7.80,5.20,3.20
3-Kwanzaa Cat (Garcia F.)........... 20.60,3.40
10-Majestic Hope (Otero W.)................ 2.60
Also Ran: Demographic Trend, King Cyrus,
Gold Man, Loveshackled, Canal Street,
Big Bad Ike. Late Scratches: Limmey, Mizzen the Action, Tom Cat Allie. Race Time:
1:38.92. Daily Double (10-5) Paid $14.20;
Exacta (5-3) Paid $47.40; Superfecta (5-310-6) Paid $121.71; Trifecta (5-3-10) Paid
$94.05; Pic 3 (4-10-5) Paid $14.10; Pic 4 (34-10-5) Paid $33.40.
5th—$28,500,1m
6-Quite a Vengeance (Cora).... 12.00,6.00,4.60
3-Whata Moose (Pinero F.)....... 27.00,13.80
7-Southern Kisses (Berrios J.)............... 5.00
Also Ran: Surf’s Up, Better Luck, Doctor Action, Joe Boo Kelly, Ebullience. Race
Time: 1:42.07. Daily Double (5-6) Paid
$93.80; Exacta (6-3) Paid $209.20; Superfecta (6-3-7-2) Paid $1,742.60; Trifecta
(6-3-7) Paid $679.00; Pic 3 (10-5-6) Paid
$36.45.
6th—$11,400,1m70yds
4-Big Apple Brit (Conner)..... 19.60,8.00,3.20
3-Briteliteinthecity (Hernandez)..... 7.60,3.80
1-Wils Reward (Castillo A.)................... 3.00
Also Ran: Sortano, Mr. Mostly, Barney
Rebel (IRE), Arc Above, My Little Jet. Late
Scratches: War Hitch. Race Time: 1:45.32.
Daily Double (6-4) Paid $173.00; Exacta (43) Paid $50.40; Superfecta (4-3-1-7) Paid
$68.41; Trifecta (4-3-1) Paid $81.85; Pic 3
(5-6-4) Paid $216.45.
7th—$14,300,5 1/2f
1-It Doesnt End Well (Rdrgz)......6.20,2.40,2.20
5-Charon’s Obol (Wolfsont A.)...... 2.20,2.10
4-Well Played (Whitney D.).................. 2.20
Also Ran: Sunny Weather, Call Me Mr. G.,
Notion in Motion. Late Scratches: Zeal Genius, Awesome Dixie. Race Time: 1:06.49.
Daily Double (4-1) Paid $44.00; Exacta (1-5)
Paid $5.70; Superfecta (1-5-4-3) Paid $3.40;
Trifecta (1-5-4) Paid $4.35; Pic 3 (6-4-1) Paid
$111.35.

OFF-TRACK WAGERING

Following is a list of tracks and post times
for today’s off-track wagering at Penn National’s Lancaster Off-Track site:
GB2-Kelso..................................... 7:40 a.m.
IR1-Leopardstown........................ 7:50 a.m.
GB1-Kempton Park............................ 8 a.m.
Yonkers....................................... 11:15 a.m.
Aqueduct.................................... 12:20 p.m.
Laurel Park.................................. 12:25 p.m.
Gulfstream.................................. 12:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay.................................. 12:35 p.m.
Miami Valley................................. 2:05 p.m.
Fair Grounds................................. 2:25 p.m.
Oaklawn Park................................ 2:30 p.m.
Turfway Park................................. 2:30 p.m.
Turf Paradise................................. 2:40 p.m.
Sunland Park................................. 2:45 p.m.
Santa Anita................................... 3:30 p.m.
Golden Gate................................. 3:45 p.m.
Dover Downs................................ 5:30 p.m.
Pompano...................................... 7:30 p.m.
Cal Expo........................................ 7:40 p.m.
Hawthorne H................................ 8:20 p.m.
Australia A.................................... 9:15 p.m.
Australia B.................................... 9:30 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
CHICAGO BULLS — Recalled F-C Cristiano
Felicio from Canton (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS — Named Leslie
Frazier secondary coach, Joe Cullen defensive line coach and Scott Cohen coaching
assistant/opponent analysis. Announced
cornerbacks coach Matt Weiss will become
the linebackers coach.
TENNESSEE TITANS — Named Mike Mularkey coach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS — Traded LW Carl
Hagelin to Pittsburgh for LW David Perron
and D Adam Clendening.
DALLAS STARS — Loaned D Jamie Oleksiak to Texas (AHL) on a conditioning assignment.
LOS ANGELES KINGS — Agreed to terms
with C Anze Kopitar on an eight-year contract.
American Hockey League
SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE — Recalled F
Alex Belzile from Fort Wayne (ECHL).
ECHL
ECHL — Suspended Evansville’s Vincent
Dunn one game for his actions during a Jan.
15 game at Toledo. Suspended Wichita’s
Erick Lizon indefinitely and fined him an
undisclosed amount for his actions during
a Jan. 15 game at Utah.
SOCCER
National Premier Soccer League
CORINTHIANS FC SA — Named Benjamin
Galindo coach.
COLLEGE
OREGON — Named Brady Hoke defensive coordinator.
UTAH STATE — Named David Kotulski
linebackers coach.
UTEP — Named Tom Mason defensive
coordinator.

GOLF
JOBURG OPEN LEADING SCORES
Saturday
At Royal Johannesburg and Kensington
Golf Club
Johannesburg
Purse: $978,310
e-East Course: 7,677 yards, par-72
w-West Course: 7,228 yards, par-71
Third Round
A. Wall, England........... 65w-67e-68e—200
Z. Lombard, S. Africa..... 71e-64w-65e—200
H. Porteous, S. Africa.... 66e-66w-68e—200
R. McGowan, England.... 67e-62w-73e—202
J. Blaauw, S. Africa........ 66w-69e-67e—202
P. Dunne, Ireland.......... 71e-63w-68e—202
D. Im, USA..................... 69e-68w-65e—202
J. Hugo, S. Africa........... 67e-65w-71e—203
J. Walters, S. Africa....... 65e-69w-69e—203
B. Akesson, Sweden...... 70e-64w-70e—204
R. West, S. Africa.......... 68e-69w-67e—204
F. Aguilar, Chile............. 67e-65w-73e—205
M. Siem, Germany........ 66w-70e-69e—205
A. Haindl, S. Africa........ 72e-64w-69e—205
J. Carlsson, Sweden...... 66e-67w-73e—206
T. Fisher Jr., S. Africa..... 67w-70e-69e—206
M. Williams, Zimbabwe... 65w-70e-71e—206
Also
E. Els, S. Africa.............. 70w-70e-68e—208

CONESTOGA

HOLE-IN-ONE — Cass Gieniec recorded
his seventh ace on the 140-yard, par-3 11th
hole, using a 4-hybrid.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida..........44 26 13 5 57 118 98
Detroit..........44 23 14 7 53 110 114
Boston..........44 23 16 5 51 133 116
Tampa Bay....44 23 17 4 50 116 106
Montreal.......45 23 18 4 50 126 113
Ottawa..........45 21 18 6 48 125 138
Buffalo..........45 18 23 4 40 105 122
Toronto.........43 16 20 7 39 108 122
Metropolitan Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Washington...44 33 8 3 69 144 95
N.Y. Rangers....44 24 15 5 53 127 115
N.Y. Islanders...44 24 15 5 53 122 110
New Jersey....46 22 19 5 49 101 110
Carolina........46 20 18 8 48 111 124
Pittsburgh.....43 20 16 7 47 103 108
Philadelphia...42 19 15 8 46 96 113
Columbus.....46 17 25 4 38 116 146
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago.........47 30 13 4 64 135 108
Dallas............45 29 12 4 62 151 120
St. Louis........48 26 15 7 59 121 121
Minnesota....44 22 14 8 52 113 103
Colorado.......46 22 21 3 47 129 129
Nashville.......44 19 17 8 46 113 123
Winnipeg......45 21 21 3 45 118 129
Pacific Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Los Angeles....43 27 13 3 57 115 97
Arizona.........44 22 17 5 49 122 133
San Jose........42 22 18 2 46 120 114
Vancouver.....45 18 17 10 46 109 126
Anaheim.......43 19 17 7 45 86 102
Calgary..........42 20 20 2 42 115 129
Edmonton.....45 17 23 5 39 109 133
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss.
Friday’s Games
Boston 4....................................... Buffalo 1
Chicago 4..................................... Toronto 1
Vancouver 3........................ Carolina 2 (OT)
Tampa Bay 5.................... Pittsburgh 4 (OT)
Winnipeg 1............................. Minnesota 0
Anaheim 4...................................... Dallas 2
Saturday’s Games
N.Y. Rangers 3............... Philadelphia 2 (SO)
New Jersey 2................................ Arizona 0
Ottawa 5................................ Los Angeles 3
Boston 3...................................... Toronto 2
Buffalo 4............................... Washington 1
Columbus 2................................ Colorado 1
St. Louis 4.......................... Montreal 3 (OT)
Minnesota at Nashville............................(n)
Calgary at Edmonton...............................(n)
Dallas at San Jose....................................(n)
Sunday’s Games
Carolina at Pittsburgh....................... 3 p.m.
Vancouver at N.Y. Islanders............... 4 p.m.
Florida at Tampa Bay........................ 5 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Washington.............. 5 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago......................... 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit................ 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Anaheim................... 9 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Edmonton at Florida.................... 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis....................... 8 p.m.
Colorado at Winnipeg....................... 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Arizona............................. 9 p.m.
Ottawa at San Jose.................... 10:30 p.m.

Rangers 3, Flyers 2

N.Y. Rangers......................1 1 0 0— 3
Philadelphia.....................1 0 1 0— 2
N.Y. Rangers won shootout 1-0
First Period—1, Philadelphia, Schenn 10
(Couturier, Raffl), 3:58. 2, N.Y. Rangers, Miller 9 (McDonagh, Lundqvist), 16:08 (pp).
Second Period—3, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 7
(Nash, Stepan), 4:49.
Third Period—4, Philadelphia, Simmonds
12 (Voracek, Giroux), 10:33 (pp).
Overtime—None.
Shootout—N.Y. Rangers 1 (Zuccarello G,
Boyle NG), Philadelphia 0 (Gostisbehere
NG, Giroux NG, Voracek NG).
Shots on Goal—N.Y. Rangers 16-4-9-2—
31. Philadelphia 12-11-10-3—36.
Goalies—N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist. Philadelphia, Mason. A—19,843 (19,537).
T—2:36.

Blue Jackets 2, Avalanche 1

Colorado............................... 0 1 0— 1
Columbus.............................. 1 0 1— 2
First Period—1, Columbus, Dubinsky 9
(Murray, Jones), :58.
Second Period—2, Colorado, Wagner 4
(Iginla, Bigras), 6:02.
Third Period—3, Columbus, J.Johnson 6
(Goloubef, Saad), 18:53.
Shots on Goal—Colorado 6-13-11—30.
Columbus 5-6-10—21.
Goalies—Colorado, Pickard. Columbus,
Korpisalo. A—17,776 (18,144). T—2:28.

Sabres 4, Capitals 1

Washington........................... 0 0 1— 1
Buffalo.................................. 2 2 0— 4
First Period—1, Buffalo, Varone 1 (Ristolainen, Bogosian), 10:30. 2, Buffalo,
Schaller 1, 16:00 (sh).
Second Period—3, Buffalo, Kane 9
(R.O’Reilly, Reinhart), 7:14. 4, Buffalo, Franson 4 (Kane, Bogosian), 15:37 (pp).
Third Period—5, Washington, Johansson
11 (Chimera), 2:54.
Shots on Goal—Washington 7-15-12—
34. Buffalo 8-15-6—29.
Goalies—Washington, Holtby, Grubauer.
Buffalo, Johnson. A—19,070 (19,070).
T—2:28.

Devils 2, Coyotes 0

New Jersey............................ 1 0 1— 2
Arizona.................................. 0 0 0— 0
First Period—1, New Jersey, Boucher 1
(Stempniak, Zajac), 3:52.
Second Period—None.
Third Period—2, New Jersey, Palmieri 18
(Blandisi, Larsson), :18.
Shots on Goal—New Jersey 8-5-3—16.
Arizona 10-15-13—38.
Goalies—New Jersey, Schneider. Arizona,
Lindback. A—11,745 (17,125). T—2:25.

Senators 5, Kings 3

Ottawa.................................. 0 1 4— 5
Los Angeles........................... 1 1 1— 3
First Period—1, Los Angeles, Carter 13
(Toffoli, Muzzin), 18:37.
Second Period—2, Los Angeles, Lecavalier 1 (Carter, Ehrhoff), 7:48 (pp). 3, Ottawa,
Chiasson 3 (Lazar), 11:34.
Third Period—4, Los Angeles, Toffoli 21
(Lucic, Kopitar), 3:05. 5, Ottawa, Ryan 14
(Zibanejad, Karlsson), 8:08. 6, Ottawa,
Pageau 10, 8:34. 7, Ottawa, Zibanejad 9
(Ryan, Ceci), 13:10 (pp). 8, Ottawa, Borowiecki 1 (Pageau), 19:46 (en).
Missed Penalty Shot—Toffoli, LA, 14:32
second.
Shots on Goal—Ottawa 7-5-11—23. Los
Angeles 8-18-7—33.
Goalies—Ottawa, Anderson. Los Angeles,
Quick. A—18,230 (18,230). T—2:29.

Bruins 3, Maple Leafs 2

Toronto................................. 1 1 0— 2
Boston................................... 1 1 1— 3
First Period—1, Boston, Bergeron 16
(Krug, K.Miller), :45. 2, Toronto, Komarov
16 (Kadri, Phaneuf), 4:31.
Second Period—3, Boston, Bergeron 17
(Chara, Trotman), :39. 4, Toronto, Matthias
4 (Bozak), 17:16.
Third Period—5, Boston, Marchand 16,
19:13.
Shots on Goal—Toronto 13-8-8—29. Boston 18-13-14—45.
Goalies—Toronto, Bernier. Boston, Rask.
A—17,565 (17,565). T—2:41.

BOWLING
CLEARVIEW
JUNIORS
Logan Hoover................ 170-267-269—706
Mitchell Hoffmaster...... 246-227-187—660
Alaina Telenko............... 156-219-147—522
Alexis Lee....................... 182-167-161—510

Katelyn Garman............. 145-182-177—504

DUTCH
ZOO
Nick Sweigart................... 94-130-109—333
Jocelyn Sweigart.............. 104-118-74—296
COED
Matt Iseman.................. 150-198-211—559
Brady Wiggins................ 199-191-165—555
Nathan Barnica.............. 161-129-172—462
Tess Pasker..................... 139-110-144—393
Isabella Folts.................... 90-127-104—321
Haley Jack.......................... 87-120-94—301
SENIOR
Allison Kresko................ 236-246-173—655
Paige Boyd..................... 215-227-182—624
Tony Lutz....................... 222-204-177—603

LEISURE
BANTAM/PREP
Cameron Getz................ 104-134-127—365
Christopher Hull................ 93-89-152—334
Kayla Wasche................... 101-99-103—303
Aidan Sofillas................... 70-111-110—291
JUNIORS
Tyler Miller.................... 227-178-161—566
AnnaBelle Allison........... 164-181-179—524
Adam Overly.................. 172-189-158—519
MAJORS
John Mertz III................. 209-216-257—682
Nick Fisher..................... 218-218-218—654
Tyler Gardner................. 254-171-191—616
Shawn Mertz................. 203-182-221—606
Nick Mease.................... 200-222-184—606
Austin Allison................. 194-180-219—593
Tyler Lappa.................... 253-171-156—580
Cassie Hatfield............... 182-188-189—559
Emily Scheurich............. 138-137-202—477

AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division

W L OL SL Pct Pts GF GA
W-B/Scran.... 28 9 0 1 .750 57 129 83
Portland........ 22 13 1 0 .625 45 117 93
Hershey........ 21 13 1 5 .600 48 124 123
Providence.... 17 15 5 1 .526 40 109 112
Bridgeport.... 19 18 2 1 .513 41 101 109
Hartford........ 18 19 2 0 .487 38 93 112
Lehigh Val..... 17 21 2 1 .451 37 110 114
Springfield.... 14 21 1 2 .408 31 93 122
North Division

W L OL SL Pct Pts GF GA
Toronto......... 31 7 2 0 .800 64 154 94
Albany........... 23 9 5 0 .689 51 107 81
Utica............. 18 15 3 3 .538 42 112 109
St. John’s....... 16 14 5 3 .526 40 111 126
Syracuse....... 17 15 6 1 .526 41 101 110
Rochester..... 18 18 2 1 .500 39 94 125
Binghamton... 15 20 3 0 .434 33 109 123
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division

W L OL SL Pct Pts GF GA
Rockford....... 22 10 2 3 .662 49 108 98
Gr. Rapids..... 23 12 0 1 .653 47 112 86
Charlotte....... 23 12 1 1 .649 48 116 106
Milwaukee.... 24 13 2 0 .641 50 110 104
Lake Erie....... 19 13 3 3 .579 44 100 103
Chicago......... 17 16 1 2 .514 37 104 100
Manitoba...... 11 20 2 3 .375 27 75 117
Iowa................ 9 25 2 3 .295 23 78 121
Pacific Division

W L OL SL Pct Pts GF GA
Ontario......... 20 9 2 1 .672 43 86 65
San Jose........ 18 10 3 3 .618 42 100 99
Texas............. 20 14 3 3 .575 46 153 138
San Diego...... 17 15 1 1 .529 36 89 101
San Antonio... 16 16 7 0 .500 39 110 121
Bakersfield.... 14 14 2 2 .500 32 91 94
Stockton....... 13 15 1 2 .468 29 91 98
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a
win., one point for an overtime or shootout
loss.
Saturday’s Games
Charlotte 3........................ Manitoba 2 (OT)
Toronto 6................................... St. John’s 3
Utica 1................................... Albany 0 (OT)
Hershey 4............................... Springfield 3
Syracuse 4.......................... W-B/Scranton 2
Portland 3............................... Bridgeport 1
Rochester 2........................... Binghamton 1
Hartford 2........................... Lehigh Valley 1
San Jose at Iowa......................................(n)
Stockton at Rockford...............................(n)
Milwaukee at San Antonio......................(n)
Lake Erie at Chicago.................................(n)
Bakersfield at Ontario..............................(n)
Texas at San Diego...................................(n)
Sunday’s Games
Toronto at St. John’s.................... 2:30 p.m.
Portland at Providence................ 3:05 p.m.
Chicago at Grand Rapids................... 4 p.m.
Springfield at Hershey...................... 5 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Bridgeport.............. 5 p.m.
Manitoba at Charlotte................. 5:30 p.m.
Stockton at Iowa............................... 6 p.m.
Texas at Ontario................................ 6 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Lake Erie at Rockford........................ 2 p.m.
Hartford at Providence................ 3:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Rochester................. 3:05 p.m.
Bakersfield at San Jose................ 4:15 p.m.

Bears 4, Falcons 3 (SO)

Springfield........................1 2 0 0— 3
Hershey............................1 1 1 0— 4
1st Period-1, Hershey, Barber 6 (Boyd,
Leach), 10:05. 2, Springfield, Grant 7 17:46
(PP). Penalties-Bowey Her (interference),
11:34; Cunningham Spr (boarding), 12:28;
Barber Her (hooking), 16:44; Bowey Her
(boarding), 19:21.
2nd Period-3, Hershey, Barber 7 (Bowey,
Djoos), 4:38 (PP). 4, Springfield, Carey 12
(Cunningham, Grant), 9:52. 5, Springfield,
Thomas 9 (Jeffrey, Grant), 18:47 (PP).
Penalties-Grant Spr (delay of game), 2:54;
Barber Her (hooking), 17:47; Bourque Her
(slashing), 19:18.
3rd Period-6, Hershey, Bourque 18 (Barber, Brown), 12:53 (PP). Penalties-Grant Spr
(holding), 11:28.
OT Period- No Scoring. Penalties-No Penalties
Shootout - Springfield 1 (Carey NG, Cunningham NG, Thomas NG, Jeffrey G, Monardo NG), Hershey 2 (Bourque NG, Boyd
NG, Gazley NG, Carrick G, Djoos G).
Shots on Goal-Springfield 13-15-6-2-036. Hershey 17-8-7-3-1-36.
Power Play Opportunities-Springfield 2 of
5; Hershey 2 of 3.
Goalies-Springfield, Langhamer 1-2-1 (35
shots-32 saves). Hershey, Ellis 12-6-2 (36
shots-33 saves).
A-10,568

GYMNASTICS
PRESTIGE

HILLS MARYLAND CLASSIC

At Hyattsville, MD
Friday
LEVEL SIX
Child A
A. Lopez — beam, 9.5, 3rd. T. Peters —
floor, 9.575, 1st; all-around, 37.275, 2nd.
Junior A
E. Oriel — bars, 8.95, 3rd; beam, 9.375,
2nd; floor, 9.5, 2nd; all-around, 36.975,
2nd. M. Heintzelman — beam, 9.275, 3rd;
all-around, 36.625, 3rd.
Junior B
M. Karpathios — beam, 9.550, 2nd.
Saturday
LEVEL NINE
Session 9
Junior A
E. Leese — vault 9.1, 1st; floor 9.4, 1st,
all-around 35.9, 2nd.
Senior B
B. Reitnauer — floor 9.275, 1st.
Session 10
Junior A
A. Nikolaus — floor 9.2, 3rd. S. Sober —
vault 9.15, 3rd; all-around 35.575, 3rd. E.
Cesarone — beam 9.3, 3rd.

SCOREBOARD

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SPORTS SLATE
SQUASH
COLLEGIATE MEN
Franklin & Marshall vs. Middlebury at
Williams, 11 a.m.
Franklin & Marshall at Williams, 2 p.m.
COLLEGIATE WOMEN
Franklin & Marshall vs. Middlebury at
Williams, 11 a.m.
Franklin & Marshall at Williams, 2 p.m.

WRESTLING
SCHOLASTIC
NONLEAGUE
Solanco at Council Rock So., TBD

NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division

W
L Pct GB
Toronto.......................25 15 .625 —
Boston........................22 19 .537 31-w
New York....................20 21 .488 51-w
Brooklyn.....................11 30 .268 141-w
Philadelphia..................5 37 .119 21
Southeast Division

W
L Pct GB
Atlanta........................24 17 .585 —
Miami.........................23 17 .575
1-w
Orlando......................20 19 .513
3
Washington................19 20 .487
4
Charlotte.....................18 22 .450 51-w
Central Division

W
L Pct GB
Cleveland....................28 10 .737 —
Chicago.......................23 16 .590 51-w
Indiana........................22 18 .550
7
Detroit........................22 18 .550
7
Milwaukee..................18 25 .419 121-w
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division

W
L Pct GB
San Antonio................35
6 .854 —
Dallas..........................23 18 .561 12
Memphis....................22 19 .537 13
Houston......................21 20 .512 14
New Orleans...............13 26 .333 21
Northwest Division

W
L Pct GB
Oklahoma City............29 12 .707 —
Utah............................17 22 .436 11
Portland......................18 25 .419 12
Denver........................15 25 .375 131-w
Minnesota..................12 29 .293 17
Pacific Division

W
L Pct GB
Golden State...............37
4 .902 —
L.A. Clippers................26 13 .667 10
Sacramento................16 23 .410 20
Phoenix.......................13 28 .317 24
L.A. Lakers.....................9 32 .220 28
Friday’s Games
Oklahoma City 113............... Minnesota 93
Washington 118...................... Indiana 104
Portland 116.......................... Brooklyn 104
Boston 117.............................. Phoenix 103
Dallas 83.................................... Chicago 77
New Orleans 109.................. Charlotte 107
Milwaukee 108................. Atlanta 101 (OT)
Miami 98.................................... Denver 95
Cleveland 91............................. Houston 77
Saturday’s Games
Milwaukee 105....................... Charlotte 92
Philadelphia 114....................... Portland 89
Detroit 113........................ Golden State 95
Boston 119....................... Washington 117
Atlanta 114.............................. Brooklyn 86
New York at Memphis.............................(n)
L.A. Lakers at Utah...................................(n)
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers.....................(n)
Sunday’s Games
Phoenix at Minnesota................. 3:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio....................... 7 p.m.
Miami at Oklahoma City................... 7 p.m.
Indiana at Denver............................. 8 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Lakers................. 9:30 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Philadelphia at New York.................. 1 p.m.
Portland at Washington.................... 2 p.m.
Utah at Charlotte.............................. 2 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis............ 2:30 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit........................ 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Atlanta............................ 5 p.m.
Brooklyn at Toronto..................... 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at Cleveland................ 8 p.m.
Boston at Dallas........................... 8:30 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Clippers............ 10:30 p.m.

76ers 114, Trail Blazers 89
PORTLAND (89)
Aminu 1-5 0-0 2, Vonleh 3-5 3-4 9, Plumlee
4-7 4-7 12, Lillard 4-18 5-6 14, McCollum 6-18
0-2 13, Leonard 6-11 0-0 14, Davis 3-4 3-3 9,
Crabbe 1-4 0-0 2, Harkless 1-3 0-0 2, Henderson 4-7 0-0 9, Frazier 1-3 1-2 3, Connaughton
0-2 0-0 0. Totals 34-87 16-24 89.
PHILADELPHIA (114)
Sampson 1-4 1-2 3, Noel 2-4 0-0 4, Okafor
12-16 1-4 25, Smith 6-9 4-6 16, Canaan 5-10
2-3 14, Holmes 5-9 6-7 17, Covington 5-12 2-2
16, Thompson 1-5 0-0 3, McConnell 3-4 1-2
8, Marshall 2-3 0-0 5, Landry 0-0 3-4 3. Totals
42-76 20-30 114.
Portland.................. 17 26 19 27— 89
Philadelphia............ 29 39 22 24— 114
3-Point Goals—Portland 5-29 (Leonard 2-6,
Henderson 1-2, Lillard 1-6, McCollum 1-6,
Vonleh 0-1, Crabbe 0-1, Harkless 0-1, Aminu
0-2, Connaughton 0-2, Frazier 0-2), Philadelphia 10-23 (Covington 4-10, Canaan 2-5,
McConnell 1-1, Marshall 1-1, Thompson 1-3,
Holmes 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—
Portland 48 (Leonard 7), Philadelphia 57
(Okafor 10). Assists—Portland 17 (Frazier 5),
Philadelphia 27 (McConnell 7). Total Fouls—
Portland 22, Philadelphia 25. A—15,698
(20,318).

Bucks 105, Hornets 92
MILWAUKEE (105)
Antetokounmpo 4-10 6-6 14, Parker 7-9
1-2 15, Monroe 7-9 5-6 19, Carter-Williams
3-8 2-2 9, Middleton 11-16 2-2 24, Henson
2-4 2-4 6, Bayless 1-5 0-0 3, Vaughn 2-4 2-2 8,
O’Bryant 1-6 2-2 4, Copeland 1-1 0-0 3, Plumlee 0-0 0-0 0, Ennis 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-72 2226 105.
CHARLOTTE (92)
Hairston 4-10 2-4 11, Williams 5-11 2-2 14,
Zeller 2-6 2-2 6, Walker 4-14 2-2 12, Batum
2-10 1-2 6, Kaminsky 5-12 0-0 12, Lin 6-13 3-4
15, Roberts 1-2 2-2 4, Hawes 3-7 1-2 7, Harrison 0-0 0-0 0, Daniels 1-1 0-0 3, Hansbrough
0-1 2-2 2. Totals 33-87 17-22 92.
Milwaukee.............. 19 33 32 21— 105
Charlotte................. 29 19 23 21— 92
3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 5-12 (Vaughn
2-3, Copeland 1-1, Carter-Williams 1-2, Bayless 1-3, Antetokounmpo 0-1, Middleton 0-2),
Charlotte 9-36 (Williams 2-6, Kaminsky 2-6,
Walker 2-7, Daniels 1-1, Hairston 1-5, Batum
1-5, Hansbrough 0-1, Hawes 0-2, Lin 0-3).
Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Milwaukee
54 (Antetokounmpo 11), Charlotte 42 (Hawes
9). Assists—Milwaukee 23 (Bayless 6), Charlotte 27 (Batum 9). Total Fouls—Milwaukee
15, Charlotte 20. A—18,288 (19,077).

Celtics 119, Wizards 117
BOSTON (119)
Crowder 9-18 2-3 22, Johnson 2-3 3-4 7,
Sullinger 6-10 2-2 14, Thomas 6-14 15-16 32,
Bradley 4-13 0-0 9, Smart 4-9 5-5 13, Turner
2-5 2-2 6, Olynyk 4-9 2-2 11, Zeller 0-2 0-0 0,
Jerebko 2-5 1-2 5. Totals 39-88 32-36 119.
WASHINGTON (117)
Oubre Jr. 4-11 1-1 10, Dudley 6-12 1-2 15,
Gortat 9-14 0-0 18, Wall 12-25 11-13 36, Temple 2-8 7-7 12, Nene 2-4 3-4 7, Sessions 3-6
2-2 9, Neal 2-9 6-7 10, Blair 0-0 0-0 0. Totals
40-89 31-36 117.
Boston..................... 24 30 29 36— 119
Washington............. 31 30 25 31— 117
3-Point Goals—Boston 9-29 (Thomas 5-7,
Crowder 2-5, Olynyk 1-4, Bradley 1-6, Jerebko
0-2, Sullinger 0-2, Smart 0-3), Washington
6-22 (Dudley 2-6, Sessions 1-1, Wall 1-2,
Oubre Jr. 1-4, Temple 1-5, Neal 0-4). Fouled
Out—Sullinger, Dudley. Rebounds—Boston
51 (Sullinger 9), Washington 56 (Gortat 11).

Assists—Boston 27 (Crowder 6), Washington
25 (Wall 13). Total Fouls—Boston 25, Washington 27. Technicals—Crowder. A—20,356
(20,308).

Hawks 114, Nets 86
BROOKLYN (86)
Johnson 5-9 1-1 14, Young 8-12 2-4 18, Lopez 4-10 2-3 10, Sloan 1-5 2-2 4, Ellington 4-9
0-0 9, Larkin 2-7 0-0 5, Robinson 2-6 0-0 4,
Bogdanovic 3-8 1-1 7, Karasev 0-0 2-2 2, Bargnani 3-5 0-0 6, Brown 1-5 1-2 4, Reed 1-2 1-4
3. Totals 34-78 12-19 86.
ATLANTA (114)
Bazemore 6-9 0-0 15, Millsap 8-13 4-6 21,
Horford 5-9 0-0 10, Teague 4-8 3-4 12, Korver
1-6 1-1 3, Sefolosha 2-3 3-4 7, Splitter 4-5 2-2
10, Schroder 6-9 1-1 15, Scott 1-5 2-2 5, Hardaway Jr. 4-5 0-0 8, Muscala 1-2 0-0 2, Holiday
0-2 0-0 0, Mack 2-3 2-4 6. Totals 44-79 18-24
114.
Brooklyn.................. 23 25 20 18— 86
Atlanta.................... 27 28 29 30— 114
3-Point Goals—Brooklyn 6-20 (Johnson 3-4,
Larkin 1-3, Brown 1-3, Ellington 1-4, Bargnani
0-1, Sloan 0-2, Bogdanovic 0-3), Atlanta 8-29
(Bazemore 3-6, Schroder 2-4, Millsap 1-2,
Scott 1-3, Teague 1-4, Hardaway Jr. 0-1, Sefolosha 0-1, Horford 0-2, Holiday 0-2, Korver
0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Brooklyn 44 (Young 7), Atlanta 48 (Schroder, Millsap
6). Assists—Brooklyn 22 (Sloan 12), Atlanta
34 (Schroder 10). Total Fouls—Brooklyn 17,
Atlanta 20. Technicals—Bogdanovic, Brooklyn defensive three second, Atlanta defensive
three second 2. A—17,052 (18,729).

Pistons 113, Warriors 95
GOLDEN STATE (95)
Barnes 2-11 0-0 5, Green 1-7 2-4 5, Bogut
3-5 0-0 6, Curry 13-26 5-6 38, K.Thompson
8-18 7-8 24, Iguodala 0-3 0-0 0, Ezeli 4-8 2-4
10, Livingston 2-7 1-1 5, Barbosa 1-7 0-0 2,
Rush 0-1 0-0 0, Clark 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 34-94
17-23 95.
DETROIT (113)
Morris 6-14 3-4 16, Ilyasova 4-8 0-0 10,
Drummond 6-20 2-6 14, Jackson 9-20 1-4 20,
Caldwell-Pope 9-16 1-2 20, Johnson 3-7 1-1 8,
Jennings 1-5 0-0 2, Baynes 6-6 0-0 12, Tolliver
1-3 3-3 5, Blake 2-2 0-0 6. Totals 47-101 11-20
113.
Golden State........... 30 19 25 21— 95
Detroit.................... 27 38 20 28— 113
3-Point Goals—Golden State 10-26 (Curry
7-15, Green 1-1, Barnes 1-2, K.Thompson 1-5,
Rush 0-1, Barbosa 0-2), Detroit 8-23 (Blake
2-2, Ilyasova 2-2, Johnson 1-2, Jackson 1-4,
Morris 1-4, Caldwell-Pope 1-5, Jennings 0-2,
Tolliver 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—
Golden State 58 (Ezeli 10), Detroit 71 (Drummond 21). Assists—Golden State 18 (Green
9), Detroit 22 (Jackson 8). Total Fouls—Golden State 16, Detroit 22. Technicals—Curry,
Green, Golden State Bench. A—21,584
(22,076).

MEN’S
BASKETBALL
SATURDAY’S SCORES
EAST
Adelphi 77................. S. New Hampshire 72
Buffalo 74....................... Cent. Michigan 61
Catholic 73................................ Scranton 62
Clarkson 84.......................William Smith 70
Colgate 84..................................Bucknell 73
Columbia 74................................Cornell 70
Drew 76.............................Susquehanna 74
Duquesne 95.................St. Bonaventure 88
Edinboro 61....................Pitt.-Johnstown 59
Farmingdale 70................................Sage 51
F&M 82...................... Washington (Md.) 72
Grove City 68...................................Thiel 59
Holy Family 83............ Wilmington (Del.) 55
Houghton 91................................... Utica 83
James Madison 86...............Hofstra 82 (OT)
LIU Brooklyn 79............................Bryant 61
Lehigh 87................................Holy Cross 66
Mass.-Lowell 95.................... UMBC 89 (OT)
Mount St. Mary’s 82.......St. Francis (Pa.) 72
Navy 87.....................................Lafayette 61
Northeastern 69...................... Delaware 60
Old Westbury 72.......................Purchase 55
Pittsburgh 84.................. Boston College 61
Rhode Island 73.......................... La Salle 62
Robert Morris 64...... Fairleigh Dickinson 58
Saint Joseph’s 80......................Fordham 55
Sciences (Pa.) 77.................Chestnut Hill 66
Seton Hall 81........................ Providence 72
St. Francis Brooklyn 85.......Sacred Heart 67
Stockton 87.................................... Kean 54
Stony Brook 80..............New Hampshire 50
Temple 67......................Cincinnati 65 (2OT)
Towson 69.................................... Drexel 50
Vermont 83................................Hartford 68
Villanova 55........................ Georgetown 50
Wagner 70......................................CCSU 48
William Paterson 81...........College of NJ 76
Yale 77..........................................Brown 68
SOUTH
Alabama A&M 80..........Alabama St. 75 (OT
Alcorn St. 93........................MVSU 87 (3OT)
Asbury 76..................... Indiana-Kokomo 58
Auburn 75.................................Kentucky 70
Barton 85........................Belmont Abbey 71
Bellarmine 81.............................. Quincy 79
Belmont 76...........................Austin Peay 58
Berea 83.................................. Hiwassee 75
Bethel (Tenn.) 107......... Brewton-Parker 86
Carson-Newman 88....................... Coker 73
Charleston Southern 82........... Campbell 75
Chattanooga 94.............................. ETSU 84
Clayton St. 87...............................Flagler 73
Clemson 76................................... Miami 65
Cleveland St. 70................... N. Kentucky 65
Coastal Carolina 71.................High Point 68
Coastal Georgia 61.... Martin Methodist 60 (OT)
Coppin St. 62............ Bethune-Cookman 54
Cumberlands 78.................St. Catharine 58
Davidson 86................................. UMass 74
Elon 65.......................Coll. of Charleston 64
FAU 63............................. Louisiana Tech 61
Florida 80............................... Mississippi 71
Florida A&M 72.....................Morgan St. 65
Florida Gulf Coast 85.............SC-Upstate 56
Freed-Hardeman 80..... Missouri Baptist 68
Georgetown (Ky.) 80... Lindsey Wilson 77 (OT)
Georgia Southern 66.....Louisiana-Monroe 51
Grambling St. 66.................. Prairie View 63
Guilford 81.......................... Shenandoah 69
Hampden-Sydney 69.....Washington & Lee 63
Hampton 79................................NC A&T 62
Harvard 69..................................Howard 61
Houston Baptist 73.............New Orleans 69
Incarnate Word 75...............SE Louisiana 71
Jacksonville 76......................... Lipscomb 73
Jacksonville St. 82................... UT Martin 60
Johnson C. Smith 81........ Fayetteville St. 77
King (Tenn.) 114...........................Erskine 45
Lane 81..........................LeMoyne-Owen 78
Lee 98......................................... Shorter 83
Louisiana-Lafayette 87...........Georgia St. 54
Maryland 100.............................Ohio St. 65
McNeese St. 72............Sam Houston St. 68
Memphis 71...................... South Florida 56
Mercer 70.......................... Wofford 69 (OT)
Middle Tennessee 64........ Old Dominion 61
Milligan 77........................... St. Andrews 70
NJIT 71........................................ Stetson 59
Norfolk St. 88......................... NC Central 79
North Carolina 67......................NC State 55
North Florida 93................Kennesaw St. 78
Notre Dame 95............................... Duke 91
Pfeiffer 87........................... Mount Olive 71
Pikeville 81....................... Campbellsville 67
Presbyterian 69..........................Radford 68
Reinhardt 103................................ Bryan 98
Rhodes 66...................................Hendrix 60
Roanoke 91..................Randolph-Macon 85
SC State 90.......................... Delaware St. 79
Samford 84........................... W. Carolina 68
Savannah St. 68.........Md.-Eastern Shore 61
Sewanee 77..................................Centre 52
South Alabama 88......Texas-Arlington 85 (OT)
South Carolina 81..................... Missouri 72
Southern Miss. 66............................. FIU 60
Spalding 76................................Webster 67
Syracuse 83......................... Wake Forest 55
Tenn. Wesleyan 76.......Truett McConnell 46
Tennessee 80....................Mississippi St. 75
Texas A&M 79.............................Georgia 45
Texas Southern 71................. Jackson St. 65
The Citadel 89.............................Furman 86
Troy 66.......................................Texas St. 57
UAB 74..................................... Charlotte 72
UCF 89................................East Carolina 69
UNC Asheville 75............ Gardner-Webb 69
UNC Wilmington 97..William & Mary 94 (OT)

VCU 94............................ Richmond 89 (OT)
Vanderbilt 71............................ Alabama 63
Virginia Tech 78..................Georgia Tech 77
Winston-Salem 75...........St. Augustine’s 56
Winthrop 74................................ Liberty 58
MIDWEST
Albion 65......................................Adrian 62
Alma 86.........................................Calvin 64
Augustana (Ill.) 71....................Carthage 63
Augustana (SD) 95............. Minn. Duluth 66
Ball St. 48........................... Miami (Ohio) 46
Bethany Lutheran 77....... Crown (Minn.) 69
Bethel (Ind.) 71................... Spring Arbor 55
Bethel (Minn.) 104....................Hamline 66
Bowling Green 84.................E. Michigan 79
Butler 78.................................. St. John’s 58
Carleton 64....................... Gustavus 53 (OT)
Columbia (Mo.) 74.......... William Woods 59
Concordia (Moor.) 79.....Macalester 74 (OT)
Concordia (St.P.) 72............... Bemidji St. 60
Davenport 96.........................Marygrove 66
E. Illinois 84...............Morehead St. 82 (OT)
E. Nazarene 79.............. W. New England 68
Ferris St. 96.......................... N. Michigan 79
Grand Valley St. 64.......... Michigan Tech 53
Grand View 77............................... Baker 72
Hope 74.......................................... Trine 51
IPFW 106...........Nebraska-Omaha 101 (OT)
IUPUI 76......................................Denver 61
Ind.-South Bend 85.........Cardinal Stritch 66
Indiana 70.............................. Minnesota 63
Indiana Tech 70....... Michigan-Dearborn 57
Iowa St. 76.............................. Kansas St. 63
Kansas 70..........................................TCU 63
Kent St. 89.......................................Ohio 82
Lakeland 100............................ Rockford 92
Loyola of Chicago 51................... N. Iowa 41
Madonna 79....................... Cornerstone 78
Milwaukee 87........................ Ill.-Chicago 62
Minn. St.-Mankato 78...Minn.-Crookston 72
Minn. St.-Moorhead 115........ SW Minn.St. 82
Minn.-Morris 100............. Martin Luther 76
Minot St. 63...........................Winona St. 46
Missouri St. 61............................ Bradley 42
Montana 65.......................North Dakota 61
N. Dakota St. 68.................. S. Dakota St. 57
Nebraska 78.................................. Illinois 67
North Central (Minn.) 76..... St. Scholastica 71
Northern St. (SD) 73...............Sioux Falls 68
Northwestern (Minn.) 87......Wis.-Superior 78
Northwood (Mich.) 94.......Saginaw Valley St. 84
Oakland 86.................................. Detroit 82
Ohio Dominican 88..........Wayne (Mich.) 64
Olivet 79................................Kalamazoo 72
Oral Roberts 77....................... W. Illinois 68
Park 95......................Hannibal-LaGrange 87
Ripon 86........................Monmouth (Ill.) 72
SIU-Edwardsville 67..............E. Kentucky 65
Siena Heights 68..............Lawrence Tech 56
St. Cloud St. 108............... Wayne (Neb.) 74
St. John’s (Minn.) 91................ Augsburg 68
St. Thomas (Minn.) 91... St. Mary’s (Minn.) 61
Upper Iowa 73................................Mary 66
Valparaiso 85..........................Green Bay 70
W. Michigan 83........................ N. Illinois 69
William Penn 81........... Benedictine (Ill.) 68
Wis.-La Crosse 72......... Wis.-Whitewater 70
Wis.-Oshkosh 64............Wis.-Stevens Pt. 59
Wis.-Platteville 66........... Wis.-Stout 62 (OT)
Wis.-River Falls 78........... Wis.-Eau Claire 66
Wright St. 81...................Youngstown St. 45
Xavier 74................................ Marquette 66
Maranatha Baptist at Great Lakes Christian, ccd.
SOUTHWEST
Appalachian St. 86...............Arkansas St. 72
Baylor 63................................Texas Tech 60
Dallas Baptist 95......Oklahoma Christian 60
Lamar 86......................Northwestern St. 82
Marshall 94.......................................Rice 90
Oklahoma 70..................... West Virginia 68
Stephen F. Austin 97.... Abilene Christian 62
Texas 74.............................Oklahoma St. 69
Texas A&M-CC 76..................Nicholls St. 71
Texas Rio Grande Valley 71........... UMKC 66
UTSA 71..........................................UTEP 67
W. Kentucky 81.................... North Texas 76
FAR WEST
E. Washington 96....................N. Arizona 73
Fresno St. 81.........................San Jose St. 74
Gonzaga 88............................. San Diego 52
Grand Canyon 99.................. Utah Valley 88
N. Colorado 78.....................Montana St. 76
Pepperdine 98...................San Francisco 84
Portland 84.......................................BYU 81
UC Irvine 61................ UC Santa Barbara 52
Utah St. 96...........................Colorado St. 92
Washington 89...................... Arizona St. 85
Wyoming 70....................... New Mexico 68

WOMEN’S
BASKETBALL
SATURDAY’S SCORES
EAST
Adelphi 72................. S. New Hampshire 68
Akron 69...................................... Buffalo 61
Albany (NY) 64.............................. Maine 59
Army 52...............................American U. 42
Bryant 63............................ LIU Brooklyn 55
Bucknell 71................................... Colgate 5
CCSU 62......................................Wagner 52
Cornell 66................................ Columbia 59
Drew 68.............................Susquehanna 59
Fairfield 59.............................Manhattan 57
Fairleigh Dickinson 83.......Robert Morris 68
F&M 59...................... Washington (Md.) 42
Grove City 67...................................Thiel 45
Hartford 51............................... Vermont 47
Holy Family 93............ Wilmington (Del.) 78
Houghton 68................................... Utica 62
Loyola (Md.) 63.......................Boston U. 54
Navy 65............................. Lafayette 58 (OT)
Old Westbury 82..................Purchase St. 57
Pitt.-Johnstown 80....................Edinboro 65
Rhode Island 72.......................... La Salle 61
Richmond 74............................... UMass 68
Sacred Heart 68.......St. Francis Brooklyn 51
Sage 74............................... Farmingdale 51
St. Bonaventure 70..........George Mason 55
St. Francis (Pa.) 87.......Mount St. Mary’s 57
St. Michael’s 65...................Post (Conn.) 60
Stockton 60.................................... Kean 54
Stony Brook 63..............New Hampshire 54
UConn 104...................................Temple 49
UMBC 68............................Mass.-Lowell 44
West Virginia 72.......................... Kansas 35
Yale 81..........................................Brown 54
SOUTH
Alabama St. 86................Alabama A&M 50
Alcorn St. 81................................. MVSU 66
Asbury 87..................... Indiana-Kokomo 57
Augusta 79......................... Columbus St. 72
Belmont 88...........................Austin Peay 82
Belmont Abbey 68....................... Barton 66
Berea 83.................................. Hiwassee 75
Bethel (Tenn.) 75........... Brewton-Parker 60
Bethune-Cookman 69............Coppin St. 56
Bryan 68..................................Reinhardt 66
Campbellsville 67...................... Pikeville 54
Carson-Newman 88....................... Coker 49
Chattanooga 72...........UNC-Greensboro 61
Claflin 58................................. Spring Hill 42
Clayton St. 70...............................Flagler 58
Coastal Carolina 73....Charleston Southern 62
Coastal Georgia 52.....Martin Methodist 48
ETSU 74................................ W. Carolina 62
Emory & Henry 79.......Randolph-Macon 61
Erskine 75............................ King (Tenn.) 70
Fayetteville St. 68........Johnson C. Smith 59
Florida Gulf Coast 54.............SC-Upstate 43
Freed-Hardeman 87..... Missouri Baptist 53
Furman 70................................. Wofford 61
Gardner-Webb 58.............UNC Asheville 56
Grambling St. 69.......... Prairie View 66 (OT)
Hampton 55................................NC A&T 52
Hendrix 51.................................. Rhodes 38
Houston Baptist 71.............New Orleans 51
Incarnate Word 70...............SE Louisiana 66
Jacksonville 81......................... Lipscomb 51
Kennesaw St. 70................North Florida 55
Lee 64......................................... Shorter 48
Liberty 77................................ Winthrop 61
Limestone 91............................Converse 54
Lindsey Wilson 64........Georgetown (Ky.) 52
Louisiana Tech 65............................. FAU 62
Louisiana-Lafayette 77...........Georgia St. 57
Louisiana-Monroe 50.....Georgia Southern 49
Loyola NO 67............................ Faulkner 57
Marshall 81.......................................Rice 52
McNeese St. 82............Sam Houston St. 79
Mercer 63..................................Samford 60
Morgan St. 67..................... Florida A&M 62
NC Central 63........................ Norfolk St. 62
Old Dominion 61....... Middle Tennessee 58
Quincy 83.............................. Bellarmine 75
Radford 79..............................Longwood 67
SC State 61.......................... Delaware St. 48
SE Missouri 60............... Tennessee Tech 57

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Savannah St. 60.........Md.-Eastern Shore 42
Sewanee 58..................................Centre 47
Shaw 75................................ Livingstone 72
South Alabama 59..........Texas-Arlington 55
Southern Miss. 82............................. FIU 55
Spalding 58................................Webster 56
Stetson 60........................................NJIT 55
Tenn. Wesleyan 70...... Truett-McConnell 60
Tennessee St. 69.................... Murray St. 58
Texas Southern 62................. Jackson St. 36
Troy 112.....................................Texas St. 79
UAB 75..................................... Charlotte 57
UT Martin 63...................Jacksonville St. 53
Virginia Union 84................... Virginia St. 68
W. Kentucky 65.................... North Texas 53
Winston-Salem 74...........St. Augustine’s 41
MIDWEST
Albion 76......................................Adrian 65
Augustana (Ill.) 56....................Carthage 51
Augustana (SD) 79............. Minn. Duluth 60
Baker 80................................Grand View 61
Ball St. 67.........................Bowling Green 56
Bethany Lutheran 68....... Crown (Minn.) 51
Bethel (Minn.) 104....................Hamline 66
Cardinal Stritch 66.........Ind.-South Bend 49
Carleton 64...............................Gustavus 53
Central Methodist 87............. Graceland 56
Cleveland St. 75..............Youngstown St. 68
Columbia (Mo.) 77.......... William Woods 54
Concordia (St.P) 83................ Bemidji St. 76
Cornerstone 66........................Madonna 53
Davenport 127.......................Marygrove 52
Detroit 66............................ N. Kentucky 65
E. Michigan 72............................ Kent St. 51
E. Nazarene 76.............. W. New England 61
Grand Valley St. 68.......... Michigan Tech 57
Green Bay 64......................... Ill.-Chicago 22
Hillsdale 82.................. Lake Superior St. 57
Hope 104...............................Kalamazoo 64
IUPUI 67.............................N. Dakota St. 44
Indiana Tech 83....... Michigan-Dearborn 49
Judson 65................................... Viterbo 52
Kansas St. 58.....................................TCU 49
Lakeland 83.............................. Rockford 42
Lawrence Tech 72..............Siena Heights 57
Macalester 74............ Concordia (Moor.) 66
Marantha Baptist 59...................... Grace 56
Marian (Wis.) 68............. Dominican (Ill.) 60
Martin Luther 56............... Minn.-Morris 50
Mary 63................................Upper Iowa 50
Michigan St. 80................................Iowa 73
Milwaukee 82.........................Valparaiso 60
Minn. St. (Moorhead) 75........... SW Minn. St. 45
Monmouth (Ill.) 72........................ Ripon 68
Morehead St. 85....................... E. Illinois 77
N. Michigan 79......................... Ferris St. 64
Nebraska 65................................ Rutgers 54
New Mexico St. 70.................Chicago St. 60
Northland 74............................Finlandia 66
Northwestern Ohio 71.......Concordia (Mich.) 65
Ohio 86................... Cent. Michigan 84 (OT)
Ohio Dominican 111......Wayne (Mich.) 106
S. Illinois 74..............................Evansville 56
SIU-Edwardsville 89..............E. Kentucky 74
Saginaw Valley St. 76.Northwood (Mich.) 71
Saint Louis 70..............................Dayton 56
Sioux Falls 82...............Northern St. (SD) 65
St. Benedict 63........................ Augsburg 56
St. Olaf 79...........................St. Catherine 69
St. Scholastica 64..North Central (Minn.) 54
St. Thomas (Minn.) 91.......St. Mary’s (Minn.) 61
Texas Rio Grande Valley 62........... UMKC 53
Toledo 66................................. N. Illinois 59
UCF 80.................................... Cincinnati 60
W. Michigan 80.................. Miami (Ohio) 66
Wayne (Neb.) 87.................. St. Cloud St. 77
Winona St. 98.......................... Minot St. 57
Wis.-Oshkosh 60............Wis.-Stevens Pt. 46
Wis.-River Falls 71........... Wis.-Eau Claire 62
Wis.-Superior 60..........Northwestern (Minn.) 50
Wis.-Whitewater 79.......... Wis.-LaCrosse 47
Wright St. 77.............................. Oakland 72
SOUTHWEST
Abilene Christian 85....Stephen F. Austin 70
Arkansas St. 83.............. Appalachian St. 60
Nicholls St. 64.......... Texas A&M-CC 62 (OT)
Northwestern St. 73..................... Lamar 51
Oklahoma St. 73.....................Oklahoma 42
Oral Roberts 61.............................. IPFW 59
SMU 58.................................... Memphis 49
Southern U. 78................ Ark.-Pine Bluff 61
Tulane 71........................................ Tulsa 47
FAR WEST
BYU 78.......................................Portland 66
Boise St. 75........................ San Diego St. 45
CS Bakersfield 76......................... Seattle 68
Cal Poly 51.....................Cal St.-Fullerton 46
Colorado St. 69.......................... Utah St. 49
Fresno St. 59.........................San Jose St. 54
Grand Canyon 61.................. Utah Valley 53
Idaho St. 71..........................Portland St. 70
Long Beach St. 71.....................UC Irvine 65
Montana St. 66.................... N. Colorado 58
North Dakota 61.......................Montana 59
Saint Mary’s (Cal) 82..................... Pacific 73
San Diego 63..............................Gonzaga 54
San Francisco 81...................Pepperdine 74
Santa Clara 57...........Loyola Marymount 56
UC Santa Barbara 65.........CS Northridge 49
UNLV 58.................................... Air Force 56
Weber St. 77................... Sacramento St. 66
Wyoming 66....................... New Mexico 48

BOYS’
BASKETBALL
L-L LEAGUE
Section One

League

W L
Cedar Crest..................10 1
McCaskey......................9 2
Hempfield......................8 3
Manheim Township.......6 5
Penn Manor...................3 8
Warwick.........................2 9
Section Two

League

W L
Lebanon.........................8 3
Conestoga Valley...........7 4
Garden Spot..................5 6
Solanco..........................4 7
Elizabethtown................2 9
Ephrata..........................2 9
Section Three

League

W L
Lamp.-Strasburg..........10 1
Elco................................9 2
Cocalico.........................9 2
Manheim Central...........8 3
Donegal.........................5 6
N. Lebanon....................2 9
Section Four

League

W L
Lanc. Catholic................8 3
Lanc. Mennonite...........6 5
Pequea Valley................3 8
Ann.-Cleona...................3 8
Columbia.......................3 8
Leb. Catholic..................0 11
TRI VALLEY

C13

3-Point Goals — L. Beers 2, I. Beers 1; D.
London 3, J. Mayo 1. Fouled Out — J. Ray.
JV Score: L-S 54, Octorara 18

Northern Lebanon 63, Hamburg 42

NORTHERN LEBANON (63)
B. Fellows 5 1-1 14, M. Daub 3 4-4 10, C.
Light 3 4-5 10, A. Yeager 4 0-0 10, I. Bicher
4 0-0 8, N. Gingrich 3 0-0 6, S. Reese 1 1-2
3, Celleri 1 0-0 2, A. Jenkins 0 0-0 0, P. Lum
0 0-0 0, Biever 0 0-0 0, B. Light 0 0-1 0, C.
Weaner 0 0-0 0. Totals 24 10-13 63.
HAMBURG (42)
Q. Nabozny 4 1-2 9, C. Evangalista 2 3-4 8,
L. Adams 2 1-2 6, R. Adams 1 3-4 6, Conrad
1 0-0 3, Hauck 1 1-1 3, J. Lesher 1 0-0 2, J.
Barr 1 0-0 2, Greenawald 0 1-2 1, Hartman
0 1-2 1, T. Graham 0 0-0 0, Missimer 0 0-0
0. Totals 13 11-17 42.
Northern Leb........... 15 12 18 18— 63
Hamburg................. 11 8 11 12— 42
3-Point Goals — B. Fellows 3, A. Yeager
2; L. Adams 1, Conrad 1, C. Evangalista 1, R.
Adams 1. Fouled Out — None.
JV Score: Hamburg 39, NL 32

GIRLS’
BASKETBALL
NONLEAGUE

Pine Grove 35, Annville-Cleona 28

PINE GROVE (35)
Kauffman 2 3-4 7, R. Edge 2 3-4 7, M.
Edge 2 2-6 6, C. Conrad 1 3-3 5, C. Conrad
2 0-0 5, Boyer 1 1-3 3, F. Shiffer 0 2-2 2, F.
Sieva 0 0-0 0, Mabry 0 0-0 0. Totals 10 1422 35.
ANNVILLE-CLEONA (28)
M. Bachman 3 2-3 10, C. Inman 2 2-4 6,
M. Singer 2 0-0 5, M. Zimmerman 1 2-2 4,
A. Hayes 1 0-0 3, H. Fischer 0 0-0 0, S. Inman 0 0-0 0. Totals 9 6-9 28.
Pine Grove................. 9 6 10 10— 35
Annville-Cleona......... 3 7 8 10— 28
3-Point Goals — C. Conrad 1; M. Bachman 2, A. Hayes 1, M. Singer 1. Fouled Out
— None.

Northern Lebanon 49, Hamburg 27

NORTHERN LEBANON (49)
Z. Zerman 9 1-1 21, M. Brandt 5 3-6 13, L.
Voight 3 2-2 8, C. Ray 1 3-4 5, A. Kintzer 1
0-0 2, J. Wentling 0 0-0 0, R. Lessing 0 0-0 0,
I. Smith 0 0-0 0. Totals 19 9-13 49.
HAMBURG (27)
E. Lutz 7 0-0 15, A. Bashore 2 0-0 6, P.
Lesher 2 0-0 4, O. Essig 1 0-0 2, I. Caruso 0
0-0 0, H. Gerner 0 0-0 0, S. Buchfeller 0 0-0
0. Totals 12 0-0 27.
Northern Leb........... 12 12 9 16— 49
Hamburg................. 10 7 8 2— 27
3-Point Goals — Z. Zerman 2; A. Bashore
2, E. Lutz 1. Fouled Out — None.

Linden Hall 51, Chr. School of York 21

CHRISTIAN SCHOOL OF YORK (21)
K. Butler 2 8-15 14, H. Martin 2 1-4 5, K.
Larson 1 0-2 2, B. Tschopp 0 0-2 0, R. Strate
0 0-0 0, N. Shelton 0 0-0 0. Totals 5 9-23 21.
LINDEN HALL (51)
D. McCloud 5 0-0 11, A. Miller 4 1-2 9, T.
Phillips 4 0-0 8, S. Parker 2 1-2 5, S. Kauffman 2 0-0 4, X. Chhodon 2 0-0 4, O. Makinde 2 0-0 4, K. Moragne 1 0-4 2, L. Adewole 1 0-0 2, S. Thorpe 1 0-0 2. Totals 24
2-8 51.
Chr. School of York..... 5 4 5 7— 21
Linden Hall.............. 10 12 17 12— 51
3-Point Goals — Butler 2; McCloud 1.
Fouled Out — None.

SCHOLASTIC
WRESTLING
Hempfield 55, Ephrata 11

220—D. Strausbaugh, H, p. A. Wagner, :41.
285—Z. Thomas, H, by forfeit.
106—A. Jones, E, by forfeit.
113—J. Loose, H, d. C. Terry, 12-4.
120—B. Loperfido, H, by forfeit.
126—Graham, H, by forfeit.
132—L. Granbois, H, by forfeit.
138—A. Kline, H, by forfeit.
145—E. Brown, H, p. C. Brandt, 5:26.
152—T. Mentzer, E, t.f. C. Carr, 15-0, 5:25.
160—R. del Villar, H, d. J. Zahm, 2-1.
170—Hudgins-Bowman, H, by forfeit.

THOMAS HECKER MEMORIAL DUALS
At Garden Spot
First Round

Avon Grove 42, Garden Spot 36

120—J. Armstrong, AG, by forfeit.
126—C. Schilling, GS, p. J. Bosio, :30.
132—G. Clark, GS, p. P. Jarrett, 3:15.
138—M. Martin, GS, by forfeit.
145—T. Marburger, GS, d. K. Edwards, 3-1.
152—N. Smucker, GS, d. A. Hoferer, 8-4.
160—D. Swarr, GS, p. G. Boyd, :54.
170—J. Moran, AG, p. T. Fischer, 1:58.
182—C. Norris, GS, p. A. Garcia-Camacho, :36.
195—B. Peck, AG, p. B. Sabasino, 1:55.
220—J. Walls, AG, p. D. Jefferis, 1:42.
285—V. Walls, AG, by forfeit.
106—J. Howard, AG, p. M. Skiles, :47.
113—J. Greco, AG, by forfeit.

Central Dauphin 66, Garden Spot 7

Overall
W L
14 2
11 4
11 5
8 8
6 9
4 13
Overall
W L
11 5
12 5
8 7
8 9
4 12
3 12
Overall
W L
14 1
14 2
13 3
11 4
6 10
5 11
Overall
W L
9 7
7 9
5 11
5 12
6 10
2 13

Juniata 64, Lancaster Country Day 37

JUNIATA (64)
T. Clark 1 2-2 16, J. Mingle 3 4-4 13, A.
White 2 0-0 10, B. Clark 4 0-0 8, J. Parson 4
0-2 8, B. Leonard 2 0-0 4, A. Zendt 0 0-0 0.
Totals 17 7-10 64.
LANCASTER COUNTRY DAY (37)
T. Eynon 2 2-2 15, S. Frick 1 2-4 4, P. Price
2 0-0 4, L. Walling 2 0-0 4, T. Cody 2 0-0 4, A.
Burke 0 0-0 3, S. Maley 0 3-4 3, A. Williams
0 0-0 0, W. Lisk 0-0 0, J. Starzyk 0-0 0, D. Izzo
0-0 0, F. Rangel 0-0 0, J. Adler 0-0 0, B. Fry
0-0 0, K. Lojewski 0-0 0. Totals 9 7-10 37.
Juniata.................... 14 17 22 9— 64
Lanc. Country Day..... 6 14 8 9— 37
3-Point Goals — T. Clark 4, A. White 2, J.
Mingle; T. Eynon 3, A. Burke. Fouled Out —
None.
NONLEAGUE

Lampeter-Strasburg 55, Octorara 53

LAMPETER-STRASBURG (55)
M. Achille 4 3-4 11, C. Brown 4 1-1 9, L.
Beers 3 0-0 8, J. Boynton 4 0-2 8, B. Sandberg 4 0-1 8, D. Metz 3 0-1 6, I. Beers 1 0-0
3, J. Groff 0 2-2 2, L. Miller 0 0-0 0. Totals
23 6-11 55.
OCTORARA (53)
J. Ray 5 6-8 16, C. Ray 5 3-6 13, D. London
5 0-0 13, J. Dickinson 2 0-0 4, S. Pugh 2 0-0
4, J. Mayo 1 0-0 3. Totals 20 9-14 53.
Lampeter-Stras........ 16 11 11 17— 55
Octorara.................. 16 16 15 6— 53

126—T. White, CD, t.f. C. Schilling, 17-1, 4:29.
132—A. Wert, CD, m.d. G. Clark, 9-0.
138—J. Stoaks, CD, p. M. Martin, 1:02.
145—T. Marburger, GS, d. C. Sellen, 9-2.
152—S. Light, CD, d. D. Swarr, 5-4.
160—P. Petrina, CD, p. N. Smucker, 1:03.
170—K. Eason, CD, p. T. Fischer, :45.
182—C. Norris, GS, t.f. M. Talbot, 15-0, 4:09.
195—H. Neilson, CD, p. B. Sabasino, 1:19.
220—J. Marrero, CD, p. D. Jefferis, :25.
285—E. Childs, CD, by forfeit.
106—M. Arch, CD, p. M. Skiles, 1:05.
113—C. Wright, CD, by forfeit.
120—J. Cherry, CD, by forfeit.

Archbish. Wood 44, Garden Spot 26

145 — T. Marburger, GS, d. A. Gillick, 3-2.
152 — M. Palage, AW, d. N. Smucker, 10-2.
160 — D. Swarr, GS, by forfeit.
170 — T. Fischer, GS, by forfeit.
182 — C. Norris, GS, t.f. H. Green, 20-4, 3:50.
195 — B. Sabasino, GS, by forfeit.
220 — C. Bishop, AW, d. D. Jefferis, 5-2.
285 — J. Barish, AW, by forfeit.
103 — M. Shaffer, AW, p. M. Skiles, 1:31.
113 — B. Kinkaide, AW, by forfeit.
120 — S. Veneziale, AW, by forfeit.
126 — A. Shaffer, AW, m.d. C. Schilling, 9-1.
132 — Z. Shaffer, AW, d. M. Martin, 9-5.
138 — B. Yoos, AW, p. G. Clark, 5:02.

Upper Darby 30, Garden Spot 30

152—B. Swarr, GS, d. M. Livingston, 7-2.
160—K. Kamandusa, UD, m.d. N. Smucker, 19-10.
170—A. Covington, UD, d. T. Fischer, 3-1.
182—C. Norris, GS, by forfeit.
195—B. Kennerly, UD, p. B. Sabasino, 1:15.
220—D. Jefferis, GS, p. D. Daniels, 2:08.
285—P. Augustine, UD, by forfeit.
106—A. Logiurato, UD, p. M. Skiles, 2:58.
113—J. Mejias, UD, by forfeit.
120—T. Rife, UD, by forfeit.
126—C. Schilling, GS, p. N. Venuti, 2:54.
132—G. Clark, GS, d. DePhilipo, 3-2.
138—C. Cronin, UD, p. M. Martin, 2:14.
145—T. Marburger, GS, p. S. Singh, 2:18.
FIRST ROUND TEAM SCORES
1. Central Dauphin 256, 2. Downington
East 216, 3. Upper Darby 152, 4. Emmaus
147, 5. Upper Perkiomen 123, 6. LaSalle
College 122, 7. Archbishop Wood 104,
8. Garden Spot 99, 9. Avon Grove 94, 10.
Souderton 84.
Championship Round

Garden Spot 50, Souderton 27

106—M. Skiles, GS, p. C. Crawford, 1:20.
113—A. Harrison, SH, by forfeit.
120—C. Trowbridge, SH, by forfeit.
126—B. Bach, SH, d. C. Schilling, 5-0.
132—G. Clark, GS, t.f. C. Ragusa, 17-2, 6:00.
138—M. Martin, GS, d. T. Mokluf, 12-8.
145—T. Marburger, GS, p. B. Stolfi, 1:08.
152—N. Smucker, GS, p. N. Kessler, :32.
160—B. Swarr, GS, p. J. Baker, 1:03.
195—B. Sabasino, GS, by forfeit.
220—D. Jefferis, GS, p. J. Kwortnik, 1:00.
285—P. Stolfi, SH, by forfeit.
CUMULATIVE TEAM SCORES
1. Central Dauphin 304, 2. Downington
East 231, 3. Upper Darby 196, 4. Emmaus
189, 5. LaSalle College 168, 6. Garden Spot
149, 7. Upper Perkiomen 144, 8. Archbishop Wood 143, 9. Avon Grove 118, 10.
Souderton 111.

C14

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Lancaster Weather
TODAY

MONDAY

36°
17°

TUESDAY

26°
13°

REGION

24HOUR TEMPERATURE RECORD

LANCASTER
Some sun, then clouds today. High
34 to 38. Winds southwest 4-8
mph. Partly cloudy tonight with a
snow shower. Low 15 to 19. Winds
west 7-14 mph.

40°
30°
12 AM 3

6

9 NOON 3

6

9 12 AM

Lancaster statistics through 7 p.m. at
Millersville University Weather Station

Brownstown
Columbia
County Park
Ephrata
Flory Mill
Manheim
Mount Joy
Smoketown
Truce

Below
Flood

5.91
39.18

11.09
9.82

3.85
2.16

Wind: W 6-12 mph

Bradford
26/7

500

NATION

Scranton
32/15

Harrisburg
38/19

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Winnipeg
-8/-22

Atlanta
48/29

El Paso
61/33
Houston
56/37

Chihuahua
63/28

Jan 23 Jan 31

Feb 8 Feb 15

T-storms

For up-to-the-minute weather, visit

LancasterOnline.com AccuWeather® Forecast

-10s

Rain

Showers

-0s

Washington
41/23

Kansas City
14/1

Los Angeles
69/52

TODAY
MON
Sunrise
7:25 a.m. 7:24 a.m.
Sunset
5:06 p.m. 5:07 p.m.
Moonrise 12:06 p.m. 12:47 p.m.
Moonset
12:45 a.m. 1:52 a.m.
Full
Last
New
First

New York
39/24

Detroit
Chicago 22/9
6/-4

Denver
39/25

0s

Snow

10s

Montreal
19/15

Toronto
25/11

Minneapolis
-4/-14

Billings
25/18

San Francisco
59/54

Flurries

Ice

30s

Cold Front

40s

50s

60s

Warm Front
70s

80s

100s

2016 FORD FUSION
N SE

M ..................................$23,855
MSRP
HHONDRU DISCOUNT ............ -$1,610
RRetail Trade-In Assistance Cash .. -$2,000
Competitive
C
Lease Rebate ..... -$500

† LEASE FOR

$189

STK#16F335

† LEASE FOR

$129

YOUR PRICE
47
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2015 FORD FOCUS SE
STK#15F853

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STK#16F188

Anchorage
Atlanta
Atlantic City
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Cleveland
Chicago
Charlotte
Dallas
Denver
Harrisburg
Honolulu
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Salt Lake City
San Francisco
Wash., D.C.

MON

Hi/Lo/W

28/22/sf
48/29/s
39/26/c
39/23/c
36/27/pc
26/10/sn
25/10/sn
6/-4/pc
46/27/pc
55/33/pc
39/25/c
38/19/pc
82/65/pc
60/43/s
69/52/pc
42/14/pc
55/41/s
39/24/c
69/42/r
40/24/c
68/46/s
32/8/sf
40/29/c
59/54/r
41/23/c

29/24/pc
40/21/s
29/18/pc
28/14/pc
30/15/sn
18/8/sf
15/10/sf
9/0/pc
40/18/s
52/41/pc
50/27/s
27/14/pc
82/66/s
64/42/pc
66/54/c
29/13/s
57/40/s
30/18/pc
62/39/s
31/18/pc
71/46/pc
15/7/sf
39/29/r
59/53/r
29/16/pc

High:
Low:

82° at Naples, FL
-26° at Rugby, ND

Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

MANHEIM

Factory Rebate....................... -$500
Competitive Lease Rebate ..... -$500

$29,495

Lancaster

665-3551

17
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2015 FORD

MSRP ..................................$25,885
HONDRU DISCOUNT .............-$1,138
Factory Rebate.....................-$1,500
Ford Credit Bonus ................-$1,000
CCompetitive Lease Rebate ......-$500

CMAX SE
STK#15F871

40 MPG’s

YOUR PRICE

$21,747

YOUR PRICE

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110s

YOUR PRICE

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FORD F150 CREW/C 4X4
STK#15F850

34
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TODAY

Hi/Lo/W

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2016 FORD EXPLORER MSRP
HONDRU DISCOUNT ............ -$1,335

**36 mo
**36 mo
$0 Security Deposit
$0 Security Deposit
$2,599 Due At Signing
$3,000 Due At Signing
Tax, Tags, License & $134 Doc fee extra Tax, Tags, License & $134 Doc fee extra

$16,945

0
21
10
12
30
25
11
2
14
20
14
17
20
18
31
17
3
18
17

NATION

Mt. Joy

$20,395

YOUR PRICE

12-36
23-35
24-24
25-25
24-48
12-36
24-48
020-34
24-24
14-24
21-27
24-40
18-36
30-30
31-45
6-12
23-28
16-20

E-TOWN

YOUR PRICE

29
AVAILABLE

**36 mo
$0 Security Deposit
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Tax, Tags, License & $134 Doc fee extra

MSRP ..................................$21,070
HONDRU DISCOUNT .............-$1,375
Fa
Factory Rebate.....................-$3,000
Trade Assist ............................-$750
Tra

$119

MSRP ..................................$25,140
HONDRU DISCOUNT ............ -$1,710
Retail Trade-In Assistance Cash .. -$2,000
Competitive Lease Rebate ..... -$500

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

Source: OnTheSnow.com

Harrisburg

NOBODY BE ATS OUR DE AL
STK#16F068

Alpine Mtn.
Bear Creek Mtn.
Big Boulder
Blue Knob
Blue Mountain
Camelback Mtn.
Canaan Valley
Eagle Rock
Hidden Valley
Jack Frost
Liberty
Roundtop Mtn.
Seven Springs
Shawnee Mtn.
Snowshoe Mtn.
Timberline
Tussey Mtn.
Whitetail
Wisp

For the 48 contiguous states
Stationary Front

90s

HONDRUAUTO.COM

2016 FORD ESCAPE
CAPE

New Trails
Base Snow Open

SATURDAY EXTREMES

Miami
78/55

Monterrey
66/37

20s

SKI REPORT
Resort

Seattle
51/42

SUN AND MOON

7.15
——

Mostly cloudy, snow
showers possible
Wind: WSW 7-14 mph

Williamsport
Punxsutawney
35/16
Wilkes-Barre
30/9
34/17
State College
33/12

On Jan. 17, 1817, St. Elmo’s Fire
flashed during a storm in Vermont
and Massachusetts.

Levels as of 7:00 a.m. yesterday
Feet

Wind: WNW 4-8 mph

HISTORY

RIVER STAGES
Susquehanna
at Harrisburg
at Marietta
Conestoga
at Lancaster
at Conestoga

300

Source: Pennsylvania Department of
Environmental Protection

Source: Lancaster County Emergency
Management Agency

POP: 35%

New York City
Allentown
39/24
Pittsburgh
38/20
32/8
Philadelphia
Lancaster
40/24
Hagerstown
36/17
York
Morgantown
38/17
36/20 Wilmington
33/8
Martinsburg
Baltimore 39/21
Atlantic City
39/16
39/23
39/26
Washington
Cape
May
Forecasts and
41/23
37/25
graphics provided by
Rehoboth Beach
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures
AccuWeather, Inc.
are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.
©2016
39/25

0-50: Good. 51-100: Moderate. 101-150: Unhealthy
for sensitive groups. 151-200: Unhealthy. 201-300:
Very unhealthy. 301-500: Hazardous.

0.55”
0.51”
0.47”
0.51”
0.63”
N.A.
0.55”
N.A.
N.A.

POP: 20%

Wind: WNW 7-14 mph

Altoona
34/10

Yesterday’s readings
Main Pollutant
Particulates
Particulates
39
Ozone
32

Total precipitation for the 24-hour
period ending 7 p.m. yesterday

POP: 10%
Mostly cloudy

Butler
31/8

Today’s forecast

PRECIPITATION

37°
24°

Times of sun and clouds

Oil City
29/10

AIR QUALITY

Source: www.atmos.millersville.edu/~wic

37°
23°

POP: Probability of Precipitation

POCONOS
Mostly cloudy today. High 27 to
31. A flurry or heavier squall with
little or no accumulation tonight.

0 50 100 150 200

37°
21°

Thickening clouds

Erie
28/14

DELAWAREMARYLAND
Some sun today. A bit of snow in
the south and at the Delaware
coast; a flurry in central parts. High
28 to 41.

TEMPERATURE
Lancaster
49°/38°
Ephrata
50°/38°
New Holland
50°/39°
Lancaster (last year)
40°/19°
Normals for the day
38°/22°
Year to date high
60° on Jan. 10
Year to date low
10° on Jan. 6
PRECIPITATION
24 hours ending 7 p.m.
0.47”
Month to date
1.51”
Normal month to date
1.60”
Month to date departure
-0.09
Year to date
1.51”
Normal year to date
1.60”
Year to date departure
-0.09
Greatest Jan. total
8.12” (1979)
Least Jan. total
0.13” (1981)

POP: 5%

Mostly sunny with a cold
wind
Wind: WNW 12-25 mph

ALMANAC
50°

32°
19°

POP: 0%

Clouds and sun with a
flurry; colder
Wind: WNW 12-25 mph

Some sunshine giving way
to clouds
Wind: WNW 4-8 mph

WEDNESDAY

26°
17°

POP: 40%

POP: 5%

Today’s weather brought to you by: HONDRUAUTO.COM
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Money

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D

n SEND STORY TIPS & INFO TO: TIM MEKEEL, 481-6030, TMEKEEL@LNPNEWS.COM

ALSO INSIDE: BUSINESS

RELOCATION

MICHELLE SINGLETARY
THE COLOR OF MONEY

To achieve
financial
goals, let it go
WASHINGTON — At
the beginning of the
year, we often talk about
the new things we want
to see happen in our
lives.
When it comes to your
finances, you might
promise to save more or
spend less. You may now
have a plan to reduce
your debt.
But what causes so
many people to fail at
their financial goals?
They can’t change and
move forward because
they haven’t faced their
past. This January, I
want to challenge you
to do something to help
keep your New Year’s
resolutions.
Let it go.
The reason you can’t
keep your financial
resolutions can usually
be traced to the issues,
resentments or childhood memories you just
can’t release.
Many of you will have
to dig deep to get to the
root of your problems.
Or, if you can’t figure
them out, seek counseling.
So, what do you need
to let go?
I’ll start.
As readers of this
column know, my
grandmother Big Mama
raised me. And although
she was a master at
handling her money, she
worried about making
ends meet. I get why she
worried. She was raising
five grandchildren on a
nurse’s aide’s salary, and
she had a husband who
had a drinking problem.
Not all of his paycheck
made it home any given
pay week.
Despite the challenges,
Big Mama managed to
pay all her bills — on
time, all the time. But
she verbalized her
money worries — all the
time.
Big Mama passed on to
me her skills as a money
manager. I also inherited her spirit of worry.
I’ve been working on
this worry thing and
nearly have it beat. Yet
it still lingers in the back
of my mind. My husband
and I faithfully save for
the luxuries we want,
but when it comes time
to spend, I fret. I become
anxious about spending
what we’ve saved. I can
hear my grandmother
say, “You just never
know what’s going to
happen.”
What if I lose my job?
What if my husband
loses his job? What if
one of us gets sick and
can’t work? I have a fair
amount of what-ifs to
keep me worried.
But in 2016, I’ve got
a strategy to beat the
worry. I’ve promised
myself to let it go.
I don’t have to replay
the scenes from childhood of my grandmother
searching bars in downtown Baltimore for my
grandfather before he
drank away his salary.
That was her worry, not
mine.
I’m not the 10-year-old
girl who cried because
she had to wear really
cheap off-brand sneak-

SINGLETARY, page D6

A STEP TOWARD EXPANSION

BLAINE T. SHAHAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Crystal and Matt Carper stand inside their Irish dance studio in Akron. They are building a new studio in Brownstown.

Irish dance school to relocate to site of former Brownstown Restaurant
TIM MEKEEL

HOOLEY
SCHOOL OF
IRISH DANCE

TMEKEEL@LNPNEWS.COM

Crystal Carper remembers
watching the Irish music
and dance show Riverdance
on television 21 years ago,
when she was 9.
“I thought it was the neatest thing I ever saw. From
that day, I was begging to
take Irish dance lessons,”
she recalled.
But the school nearest her
Rothsville home was in Delaware, a 1-hour, 40-minute
drive one way that her parents deemed too far.
So she waited until an Irish
dance school opened closer
to her home. Three years
later, she got her wish when
a school opened in Harrisburg, a more manageable
destination.
“My parents still weren’t
thrilled, but after talking about an hour and 40
minutes, 50 minutes sure
seemed a lot better,” Carper
said.
That memory stayed with
Carper.
She decided to make Irish
dance classes more accessible locally by opening Hooley School of Irish Dance in
Neffsville in 2009.
And Carper kept on that
path. The next year, she

n Future site:

Brownstown.
n Future facility’s size:
4,200 square feet.
n Future facility’s cost:
$750,000.
This is a rendering of the new Hooley School of Irish Dance.

doubled the school’s space
by moving it to Akron.
Now, the 150-student
school is on the verge of
nearly doubling its space
again by moving to Brownstown.
Carper and her husband,
Matt, are embarking on a
$750,000 project to build a
new school on the former
site of the Brownstown Restaurant — a site that’s been
vacant for 10 years.
As a project of that magnitude suggests, Carper is confident that Irish dance will
keep rising in popularity.
“Some people do it because
they have Irish heritage,”
said Carper. “But more and
more, we’re finding people
do it to get exercise, meet
great people and work toward goals.”

More space
The Carpers’ venture will
relocate the school from a
leased
2,400-square-foot
space at 240 N. Seventh St.,
Akron, to 4,200 square feet
at 1 S. State St. (Route 772),
Brownstown.
Construction is expected to
begin by the end of January,
with Apex Structures of New
Holland as the project’s general contractor. A June opening is planned.
“Irish dance is such a neat
activity for children,’’ Carper
said. “We have people coming from all over the county
and from surrounding counties. So I see a lot of opportunity for growth.”
Carper and her sister Angelina Press, both certified
Irish dance teachers, could

be joined in the new building
by several of their students
who are high school seniors
and eager to begin teaching.
Hooley teaches male and
female students ages 4 and
up.
“Half of my students take
classes just for fun exercise and the other half are
competitive,” Carper said.
“Sometimes students start
out just doing it recreationally, but eventually try their
first competition and realize
those are a lot of fun too.”
Hooley’s competitive dancers have made their mark.
Most recently, Carper had
six students qualify for the
2015 national championships in Providence, Rhode
Island, last July.
Twelve Hooley students
IRISH DANCE, page D6

Rutter’s opens at site of former Stauffers in Leola
RUTTER’S
n Address:

370 W. Main
St., Leola.
n Hours: 24
hours, daily.
n Phone: 5568635.
n Online:
rutters.com.

CHAD UMBLE
WHAT’S IN STORE

Rutter’s has moved deeper into
Lancaster County with the opening
of a 7,500-square-foot store along
Route 23 in Leola.
The Rutter’s at 370 W. Main St.
was built on the spot of the former
Stauffers of Kissel Hill grocery
store, which closed in 2005.
The Stauffers building was torn
down for the Rutter’s.
The new store features a made-toorder menu that includes pastrami
sandwiches and BBQ short ribs. It
WHAT’S IN STORE, page D2

DAN MARSCHKA | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A new Rutter’s store has opened along Route 23 in Leola.

D2

MONEY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

What’s in Store: Pizzeria moves
Continued from D1

also has a large “grab-n-go”
cooler with sandwiches and
salads as well as a coffee bar and
smoothie machines.
A seating area inside has room
for 35 people and features a
television and a fireplace. It is
separated from the main store by
a half-wall.
Outside there are 16 fueling
stations as well as three diesel
fueling stations in the back for
trucks.
The store is open 24 hours
daily and will operate with 40
employees.
A spokeswoman declined to
estimate the cost.
The Leola store is the 62nd for
York-based Rutter’s, which has
stores in Mountville and Marietta as well as plans for one in
Strasburg.

Willow Street
Caruso’s moves

Susquehanna Glass
closes factory store

Move it Studio opens
outside Lititz

Susquehanna Glass has closed
its factory store in Columbia as it
considers adding a retail location
elsewhere in town.
Company president Walter
Rowen said that with the firm’s
wholesale business expanding,
it was harder to justify using factory space for the retail shop.
While many locals knew where
the store was, Rowen said its
off-the-beaten-path location in
Columbia made it hard to attract
retail customers.
The factory store at the 731
Avenue H factory once spanned
6,000 square feet, but was just
700 square feet when it closed
earlier this month, Rowen said.
Customers who used to visit
the store should call the factory
to place their orders, Rowen said.

Move it Studio has opened outside Lititz in the Village Shoppes
at Brighton.
The 1,000-square-foot studio
at 1180 Erbs Quarry Road offers
barre fitness classes, which blend
ballet movements with Pilates
and yoga-inspired stretching.
The studio offers two classes a
day during the week with some
specialty classes on Saturday, including pre-natal workshops and
classes that includes babies.
The studio is the second for
Marie Cleaves Rothaker. She
has the other one in downtown
Lancaster at 19 E. King St., above
Subway. She has four other
instructors.

SUSQUEHANNA GLASS

The Caruso’s Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria in Willow Street
has moved across the street to a
bigger space.
Caruso’s, which has been in
Willow Street for 22 years, just
opened at 2933 Willow Street
Pike, the former home of Conn’s
Sports Center. Caruso’s had
previously been at 2956 Willow
Street Pike.
The new, 3,000-square-foot
restaurant has seating for
around 65, making it nearly
three times the size of the old
Caruso’s.
With the move, it also has
expanded its menu, adding more
pasta dinners and other items to
a lineup that includes pizza, subs
and stromboli.
The restaurant has around 10
employees, adding several with
the move.
Owner Marcello Caruso bought
the building in January 2015 for
$475,000 and spent the last year
renovating it for the restaurant.
He declined to estimate the cost
of the work.
Caruso also owns the Caruso’s
restaurant in Quarryville. The
other Caruso’s restaurants in
Lancaster County are owned by
his family members and operated independently.

CARUSO’S ITALIAN
RESTAURANT
n Address: 2933 Willow Street Pike,
Willow Street.

n Hours: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday

through Thursday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, noon-9:30 p.m.
Sunday.

n Phone: 464-6464.
n Online: carusospizzeria.com/
willowstreet.

MOVE IT STUDIO
n Address: 1180 Erbs Quarry Road,
Lititz.

n Address: 731 Avenue H, Columbia

n Phone: 925-9970.
n Online: moveitstudio.com,

n Phone: 684-2155.
n Online: susquehannaglass.com.

Sprint store moves

.

Ephrata toy store to
close
After operating nearly 10
years in Ephrata, The Fun-est
Toy Store Ever! will close later
this month.
The independent toy store
opened April 2006 in downtown Ephrata and operated for
years in the former Sprecher
Hardware building at 24 E.
Main St.
In early 2015, the store moved
to the Cloister Shopping Center
on the outskirts of town at 108
N. Reading Road. It carries a
variety of specialty toys, games
and gifts.
In a post on the store’s
Facebook page, owner Melissa
Palermo-Spero said she did
everything she could to keep
the store open but personal
circumstances forced her hand.
Palermo-Spero said the store,
which has five employees, will
close before the last week of
January.
For about a year, PalermoSpero operated a smaller,
second toy store in The
Brickerville House Specialty
Shoppes north of Lititz at
Route 322 and 501. That store
closed over the summer.

FUN-EST TOY STORE
EVER!
n Address: 108 N. Reading Road.
n Phone: 708-3000
n Online: facebook.com/
FunestToyStore

facebook.com/moveitlanc.

A Sprint store has opened
along Centerville Road in East
Hempfield Township, taking a
space in the Centerville Square
shopping center anchored by
Giant.
The store at 570 Centerville
Road had previously been down
the road in the Woods Edge Plaza
at 112 S. Centerville Road.
The store sells Sprint products,
including phones and tablets,
while also offering service and
repairs. It is a franchise store
owned by Marcos Maestre. He
has four employees.

SPRINT STORE
n Address: 570 Centerville Road,
Lancaster.

n Phone: 945-6726.
n Hours: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday
through Friday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m.
Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday.

Subway closes along
Route 30
The Subway restaurant that
opened last summer along Route
30 next to an IHOP restaurant
has closed.
The sandwich shop franchise
at 2319 Lincoln Highway East
was owned by David Stewart and
his wife, Maggie, along with their
son Ben. Stewart said the restaurant closed because of low sales.

n Lancaster County Apple Corps, a Macintosh user

group, 7:15 p.m. at Locust Grove Mennonite School, 2257
Old Philadelphia Pike. Information: http://cs.millersville.
edu/~ekatz/lcac/.

Friday, Jan 22
n Free executive lecture series at Elizbethtown

College, 11 a.m. in the M&M Mars Room of the Leffler
Chapel and Performance Center. Speaker: Joe Boylan,

Christopher
Patterson

Matthew A.
Oas

Erick
Hardwick

Kimberly
Blessing

Andrea
Becker

n Christopher M.

Patterson and Matthew A.
Oas have joined the law
firm of Pyfer Reese Straub
Gray & Farhat.
Patterson, of Lancaster,
has become of counsel,
representing clients
against all types of
criminal charges. He
previously had his own
practice.
A graduate of McCaskey
High School, he has a
bachelor’s degree from
University of Notre Dame
and a law degree from
University of Baltimore
School of Law.
Oas, of Lancaster, has
become an associate
attorney. He specializes
in consumer, family
and immigration law,
including asylum cases. He
previously worked at Chan,
Cheuvront & Associates.
Oas holds a bachelor’s
degree from West Chester
University and a law
degree from Penn State
University’s Dickinson
School of Law.

n Mennonite Home

Communities has
promoted Kimberly
Blessing to vice president
of human resources
and organizational
development.
Blessing, of Lancaster, was
hired in 2011 as director of
human resources. Before
that, she was director
of career services at YTI
Career Institute.
Blessing is a graduate
of Johnson & Wales
University.

R. Joseph
Rader

Jeremy
Freimark

n R. Joseph Rader,

principal and vice president
of EHD Advisory Services,
has earned the certified plan
fiduciary advisor designation
from the National
Association of Plan Advisors,
part of the American
Retirement Association.

n The Benecon Group

has hired Erick Hardwick
as director of corporate
accounting.
Hardwick, of Reading, is a
certified public accountant
who previously was a
technical accounting
manager with Penske
Truck Leasing. He holds
a bachelor’s degree from
Albright College and an
MBA from the University of
Phoenix.

n ConnectCare3 has hired

Andrea Becker as director
of client services.
Becker, of Lititz, most
recently was senior physician
marketing coordinator at
PinnacleHealth System.
She holds a bachelor’s
degree from Millersville
University and an MBA from
Elizabethtown College.

n Rainbow’s End Youth

Services has hired Jeremy
Freimark as program
director.
Freimark, of Mount Joy,
most recently had been a
missionary in the suburbs
of San Jose, Costa Rica.
Freimark holds a bachelor’s
degree from Eastern
Michigan University and is
pursuing a master’s degree
from Liberty University.

WHO TO EMAIL

“Who’s News,” featuring promotions, hirings and
certifications of management-level employees, appears each
Sunday. Mail your news with an optional high-resolution jpg
photo to businessnews@lnpnews.com. Mailing address is
LNP Business News, P.O. Box 1328, Lancaster, Pa., 17608-1328.
Our offices are at 8 W. King St., just west of Penn Square.

n What’s In Store, a roundup of

Lancaster County retail and restaurant
news, runs every Sunday. If you have
news tips, contact LNP staff writer
Chad Umble at 291-8718 or cumble@
lnpnews.com.

Calendar
Wednesday, Jan. 20

Who’s News

director of Human Resources with Berks Packing Co. Inc.
For information, contact Stephanie VanderMey at 3611982 or vandermeys@etown.edu.

Monday, Feb. 1
n Free public program on business longevity

among the Anabaptist communities of Lancaster,
7 p.m. at Stumptown Mennonite Church, 2813
Stumptown Road. Speakers: Ken Kauffman of
Kauffman’s Fruit Farm & Market and John Smucker of
Bird-in-Hand Corp.

If you’re
planning a family,
you should also
plan on how to
protect them.
Let us help you find the right life insurance for you and your growing family.
Whether it’s Term, Universal or Whole Life Insurance, we can help you make
the right selection to protect the ones you love most.

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Representing over 30 different companies to give you an Insurance Choice!

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717-872-7756 / www.martininsurance.com

Bankruptcies
Here is a list of Lancaster
County bankruptcies
recorded in U.S. Bankruptcy
Court, Eastern District of
Pennsylvania, Reading, Dec.
5-11.

Street. Chapter 13.

Felix C. Arroyo, 100 block
of Ruby Street. Chapter 7.

Bartosz and Tiffany M.
Ruzyllo, first block of
South Charlotte Street,
Manheim. Chapter 7.

Sara K. Saunders, 800
block of Fourth Street.
Chapter 7.
Sally J. Good, 300 block
of East Main Street, New
Holland. Chapter 13.
Sixto G. Rodriguez, 400
block of South Queen

Raymond E. Stewart Jr.,
200 block of Basswood
Drive. Chapter 7.

n Under Chapter 7 of the

U.S. Bankruptcy Code, a
debtor’s assets are liquidated to pay creditors. Under
Chapter 11, the debtor, often
a company, reorganizes and
may pay some creditors.
Under Chapter 13, a debtor
proposes a repayment plan.

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

D3

Technology
GADGETS

FLYING INTO
THE FUTURE
New drones follow you around,
or even take you places
RYAN NAKASHIMA
AP BUSINESS WRITER

LAS VEGAS — If you’re
used to thinking of
drones as a passing fad,
last week’s CES gadget
show should give you
second thoughts.
Tiny, self-piloted copters promise to buzzily
follow you around like
something out of a Neal
Stephenson cyberpunk
novel. New drones that
could find lost wilderness adventurers or help
them see out above treetops; others purport to
carry a human passenger
at the touch of a button.
None of this, of course,
will be happening overnight. Limited battery
life means that many
commercial
models
can’t fly for more than
about 20 minutes at best.
Manufacturers haven’t
yet figured out the best
way to keep many tiny
drones where they ought
to be, given that GPS positioning sucks too much

KIM KOMANDO
CYBER SPEAK

The 3 biggest
security
threats of 2016
You can hardly look
at tech news without seeing reports of
viruses, Trojans, data
breaches, ransomware,
remote hacking, ATM
skimmers and plenty
of other threats to your
money and information.
According to security
company Kaspersky,
34.2 percent of computer users experienced at
least one Web attack in
2015. More than 750,000
computers were infected
with ransomware, with
a steady increase every
quarter.
Statistics like this can
seem overwhelming.
Fortunately, most of the
threats break down into
a few categories that
you can guard against.
Today, I’m going to take
a look at what are shaping up to be the biggest
threats you’ll need to
worry about in 2016, and
give you some tips for
how to stay safe.

Data breaches
OK, this threat isn’t
a new one. In fact, it’s
been at the top of everyone’s watch list since the
massive Target breach
at the end of 2013, which
exposed information
on up to 110 million
customers. However,
the nature of this threat
is going to be shifting in
2016.
Breaches at major
retailers where hackers
steal payment information are going to continue for the foreseeable
future. Hotels are the
target of choice at the
moment with Hilton,
Starwood and others
experiencing attacks
in 2015. However, as

power for their minuscule batteries. Obstacle
avoidance systems that
would let small drones
pilot themselves are still
under development. And
looming over the entire
field are new government rules intended to
keep people safe, but
which may also slow innovation.

Rapid expansion
So far, none of those
obstacles are slowing
down an industry that
appears to be in full
lift-off. The Consumer
Technology Association
estimates that U.S. consumer drone spending
will more than double to
$953 million next year.
ABI Research believes
the global market for
drones will hit $8.4 billion in 2018, with users
ranging from the military and oil companies
to farmers, journalists,
and backyard tinkerers.

more retailers switch to
point-of-sale terminals
that work with the EMV
chips in the latest credit
and debit cards, and
people start using mobile payment systems,
hackers should move on
to easier targets.
The growing worry
for 2016 is medical data
breaches. In 2015, more
than 100 million patient
records were exposed,
with the majority coming from the Anthem
Insurance hack earlier
in the year. That trend
is going to continue as
hospitals, insurance providers and other medical services struggle to
get a handle on digital
security. To be fair, it’s a
problem they’ve never
had to deal with before,
but that’s small comfort when your medical
records are being sold on
the black market.
Speaking of the black
market, another reason
hackers are going to
focus on medical information is money. The
black market is flooded
with stolen financial and
personal information,
which means your identity is selling for a few
bucks, if even that.
Medical information
is in shorter supply, so
hackers can sell it for
more. Plus, most people
now know to keep an eye
on their credit and bank
statements for signs
of fraud. However, few
people keep an eye on
their medical insurance,
which means that hackers can get more use out
of your information before they’re discovered.
Besides medical data
breaches, you’re going
to see breaches in other
industries you wouldn’t
expect to find them,
such as the toy industry.
For example, a recent
breach at VTech, a toy
manufacturer, exposed
information on more
than 200,000 children,
including their names,
addresses and even
photos. A data breach
at Hello Kitty exposed
information on 3.3 mil-

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

The Fleye drone is demonstrated Jan. 7 at the CES gadget show in Las Vegas; inset, the
Ehang 184 autonomous aerial vehicle is unveiled Jan. 6.

As drone capabilities
continue to grow, drones
may become a massmarket product for average consumers in about
three years, says Patrick
Moorhead,
principal
analyst of research firm
Moor Insights & Strategy.
“You should be able to
get a drone that can effectively follow you, not
run into things, and find
things on its own,” he
says. “That’s pretty cool.”
That’s assuming, of
course, that you’re not
commuting to work in
one. At CES, Chinese
manufacturer
Ehang
Inc. unveiled a large
drone that it said can
carry a human passen-

ger at speeds of up to 60
miles an hour. The fourarmed quadcopter has
been on more than 100
flights, mostly in wooded
areas of Guangzhou, according to Chief Marketing Officer Derrick
Xiong. Some — he didn’t
say how many — have
carried a human passenger.
Federal aviation regulators declined to comment on Ehang’s humancarrying drone, saying
the company hasn’t submitted any proposal to
authorities. The Federal
Aviation Administration
advised an Ehang representative at the show to
contact its unmanned
aircraft system office.

Smaller models

lion users.
Newer high-tech toys
that store information
about kids and interact
with them, like “Hello
Barbie,” could reveal a
lot to hackers. So, before
you buy a high-tech toy
or let your child use an
online site, see what information it asks for that
could be stolen one day.

concern since a virus
called CryptoLocker
arrived at the end of
2013. However, it is still
a serious threat and
getting worse every year,
especially since hackers
can now get it for free to
modify as creatively as
they want.
As you probably know,
ransomware encrypts
your files so you can’t
open them, and the only
way to get them back is
to pay a ransom. Even
the FBI is advising victims to pay if they want

their files back.
Ransomware isn’t just
a worry for individual
computers. It can lock
up files on a network,
which means one infection can bring down
an entire company. It’s
also possible to get it on
smartphones and tablets
via a malicious text,
email or app.
Fortunately, it isn’t all
doom and gloom. Ransomware still needs your
help to install. If you
avoid falling for phishing
emails with malicious

Ransomware
Just like data breaches,
ransomware isn’t a new
thing. It’s been a serious

In contrast with the
bigger drones, smaller
ones were also on display.
On the small drone front,
Kickstarter-funded Fleye envisions its camerabearing flying sphere as a
kind of personal videographer that follows you
around street corners;
you’ll be able to switch
between settings such as
“selfie,” “panorama” and
“virtual tripod.” And because it’s encased in what
looks like a lightweight
football helmet, its propellers pose less risk to
bystanders.
“Instead of doing collision detection and
avoidance, we just make

Lock it in while

sure if it collides, it won’t
hurt,” says CEO Laurent
Eschenauer.
Toy drone maker Spin
Master Inc. showed off
an
augmented-reality
game in which kids use a
real-life drone to rescue
tiny virtual people, put
out fires and fight aliens.
In essence, they’re interacting with a virtual
world overlaid on the
real world; they can see
the virtual elements on
a tablet they’re using to
control the drone.
Robolink Inc. wants
you to learn how to
program using its “CoDrone,” a flying electronics kit you can instruct
to jump off a table into
someone’s hand with a
simple line of code. CEO
Hansol Hong describes
the educational product
as “where Khan Academy
meets drone.”

New safety rules

With the potential for
millions of new flying
objects buzzing around
the country in coming
years, the FAA is working on new drone-safety
rules. By this spring,
the agency plans to unveil regulations to allow
streamlined approval of
commercial drone uses,
instead of the case-bycase system it uses now.
Last month, the FAA
began requiring registration for drones weighing between about half a
pound and 55 pounds.

links or downloads, you
can keep ransomware off
your machine.
You can also take the
precaution of backing
up your computer files
regularly. That way, if
your files do get locked,
you can wipe your drive
and restore your files.

Browser plug-ins
Britain’s Ofcom recently found that adults
spend an average of 20
hours a week online,

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D4

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

MANAGING YOUR MONEY,
WORK AND SUCCESS
Copyright © 2015 The New York Times

Talking Points
Have Friends, Live Longer
Having friends is good for your
physical health, and the benefits
appear to start early in life, according to a new study. Researchers used data from health surveys
of more than 14,000 Americans
from adolescence to old age.
They measured social connections — in romantic relationships,
with family and friends, and by
participation in religious and
social organizations. A lower score
was associated with higher levels
of C-reactive protein, a measure
of general inflammation, higher
blood pressure, higher body mass
index and larger waist circumference.

STUART GOLDENBERG

Funny Ads for Super Bowl
For this year’s Super Bowl,
marketers want to have fun
again. After last year’s somber
ads — particularly a Nationwide Insurance commercial that
featured a child who turned out
to be dead and elicited criticism
online — some advertisers have
already said they plan to rely on
humor and heartwarming stories
during the game on Feb. 7. On its
“Crash the Super Bowl” website,
Doritos is asking people to pick
their favorite consumer-generated
ad from among three spots and the
winner will air during the game.

Venture Capitalists Retreat
Venture capitalists pulled back
from making new bets at the end
of last year. In the fourth quarter
of 2015, the amount of money
funding private companies fell 30
percent from the previous quarter,
to $27.3 billion, according to a
report from the research firm CB
Insights. Deal-making dropped
13 percent over the same time
period to 1,743 transactions. In
2015, venture funding peaked in
the third quarter at $38.7 billion.
In total, funding for all of 2015
hit $128.7 billion, nearly as much
money as was deployed in 2013
and 2014 combined, the data
showed.

Newspapers Go Nonprofit
H.F. Lenfest, the owner of The
Philadelphia Inquirer, The Philadelphia Daily News and Philly.
com, announced on Jan. 12 that he
had donated the
publications to
a newly formed
nonprofit journalism institute,
The Institute for
Journalism in
MATT ROURKE/
New Media. The
ASSOCIATED PRESS
publications will
run independently. “My goal is to
ensure that the journalism traditionally provided by the printed
newspapers is given a new life and
prolonged, while new media formats for its distribution are being
developed,” Mr. Lenfest said.

An I.P.O. Can Power a Start-Up
TECHNOLOGY

FARHAD MANJOO

By going public, unicorns
can gain credibility and
focus on their business.
In early 2014, when the cloud storage company Box filed for an initial public offering, many on Wall
Street looked at its numbers and
laughed. Box’s revenues were
soaring, but its losses were growing and executives did not anticipate making a profit for years.
When Box eventually went
public last January — after raising another round of private
funds to delay its I.P.O. — its stock
price briefly surged but has since
lost about 40 percent of its value.
The company reported that in
the third fiscal quarter, it again
increased sales, and it projected
slightly higher sales in 2016 than
it had previously expected.
Now, with a market valuation
of about $1.7 billion, Box is technically in league with the “unicorn” private companies valued
at more than a billion dollars —
but compared with some of those
highflying start-ups, it could be
mistaken for a pony. Dropbox,
a cloud storage competitor that
remains private, was valued
at about $10 billion in its last
fund-raising round.
To many, Box’s inauspicious
debut on the stock market serves
as a cautionary tale. While floating an I.P.O. was once seen as a
rite of passage in Silicon Valley, in
the last few years it has become
a much bemoaned annoyance.
Companies are waiting longer to
go public, and thanks to a surge
of money from hedge funds and
mutual funds, young companies
have been given resources to
stay private for years on end. Go
out to the public markets before
you’re bulletproof, the thinking
goes, and you’ll get crushed. No
one wants to be the next Etsy,

Hortonworks or Box, all of which
now trade below their I.P.O. price.
But what if Box gets the last
laugh? Despite the company’s languishing stock price, it’s possible
that a few years from now many
may look back on Box’s I.P.O. as
a masterly timed bit of corporate
strategy — an initially painful
move that ultimately rewarded
investors, improved employees’
financial stability, provided executives with independence from
private investors and pushed the
company to adopt a more structured path toward profitability.
We may also wonder why other
unicorns didn’t go public sooner.
Several unicorns have recently
discovered that taking money
from mutual funds and other
large investors brings surprising public scrutiny. The mutual
fund company Fidelity and others must regularly report assessments of their private-company
holdings, and lately they’ve calculated that start-ups like Snapchat and Dropbox are worth
less than what the funds paid for
them. Dropbox’s valuation, in
fact, may now be tied directly to
Box’s, since large investors look

Public companies avoid
the fickle nature of the
private markets.
at comparable public companies
to help determine the value of
their private investments.
By going public first, Box has
boxed in Dropbox’s horizons —
and if Dropbox ever goes public,
it’s going to have to explain why
investors should pay a premium
over its already public competitor.
(Dropbox declined to comment.)
The same logic applies to employees. If you’re an engineer
looking to work at a cloud storage
company, you could go to Dropbox, where you’ll receive stock
options at a lofty $10 billion valuation that you’ll have a hard time
turning into actual money. Or you

VICTOR J. BLUE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

PERFECT TIMING? An Etsy pop up shop in Times Square on April 16, the day

e-commerce website went public. I.P.O.s offer a steady source of funding.

can go to Box, in which you’ll get
shares at a relatively reasonable
valuation that can also be traded
on the public market.
“It’s great to be public,” said
Aaron Levie, Box’s chief executive, citing the unpredictability of
the private funding market.
While some tech founders are
concerned that public companies have to report earnings every quarter, spurring short-term
thinking, Mr. Levie said, “The
three-month timeline allows you
to create a strong internal rhythm
of hitting your goals and accomplishing what you set out to do.”
James Park, chief executive of
the wearable device maker Fitbit,
said his company’s public offering last June was beneficial. “It’s
given us a lot more visibility and
credibility and helped with recruiting,” he said. “It gave us currency in terms of cash and stock
to make acquisitions.”
Mr. Levie and Mr. Park are not
alone. Mark Zuckerberg, who delayed Facebook’s entrance into
the stock market for years, now
believes that going public made
the social network a better company. Facebook ramped up its
mobile ad business as a result of

pressure from public investors,
who were initially skeptical of the
company’s 2012 initial offering.
Facebook is now inching in on
Google in the race to become the
world’s largest mobile advertising
company, and the I.P.O. helped
force it to stake out that position.
Bill Gurley, a partner at the
venture capital firm Benchmark,
has drawn up an internal presentation outlining the advantages
of going public. He argues that
when businesses are hit with difficulties, public companies have
more options for weathering the
storm. The series of investments
that make up a typical start-up’s
fund-raising structure don’t do
well in adversity, Mr. Gurley said.
“When growth slows, it gets complicated and expensive to raise
any more money, and you hit this
downward spiral,” he said.
In contrast, public companies
can withstand long spells of skepticism. Amazon, Apple, Google,
Netflix and dozens of other tech
companies have gone through
fallow periods in which the world
doubted their long-term prospects. Those times were painful,
but as public companies each
managed to survive the downturn.

As Economy Recovers, Females Over 50 Are Left Behind
ECONOMY

PATRICIA COHEN

The signs of an improving economy were good enough to help
persuade the Federal Reserve to
raise interest rates. But the better
job market is not good enough to
land Chettie McAfee a job.
Laid off at the start of the recession from a diagnostic testing
firm in Seattle, Ms. McAfee, 58,
has not worked since 2007. “I’ve
been applying and applying and
applying,” said Ms. McAfee. At
interviews, she said, “They ask,
‘Why has it been so long?’ ”
At 5 percent, the jobless rate
may be close to what economists
consider full employment, but
that figure doesn’t capture the
millions of Americans who have
yet to regain their footing in the
workplace.
Ms. McAfee is part of a group
that has found the postrecession
landscape particularly difficult to
navigate: women over 50.
A new study on long-term unemployment from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis found that
the prospects for women over 50
darkened after the Great Reces-

CHRISTOPHER CAPOZZIELLO FOR THE NEW YORK
TIMES; LEFT, RUTH FREMSON/THE NEW YORK TIMES

STILL JOBLESS Chettie McAfee, 58,
left, hasn’t had a job since 2007. Lynn
Colafrancesco, 59, started looking for
work three years ago.

sion. In 2006-7, less than a quarter
of the unemployed in this group
had been out of work for more
than six months. By 2012-13, older
jobless women accounted for half
of the long-term unemployed.
“How long people take to find
a new job has been much longer
than in previous recessions,” said
Alexander Monge-Naranjo, an
author of the St. Louis Fed study.
“The natural question is, Why?”
When it comes to women over

50, one theory that makes sense
to Mr. Monge-Naranjo is that
those who dropped out of the labor force to take care of children
can’t easily get back in.
That has been Lynn Colafrancesco’s experience. Once a vice
president at a reinsurance company, Ms. Colafrancesco, now 59
and divorced, started looking for
a full-time job three years ago.
As soon as she mentioned that
she had taken off time to care for

children, she could see that she
had been summarily dismissed.
“Now I don’t even mention about
my kids,” Ms. Colafrancesco said.
“They don’t want to hear that.”
While older workers generally
have lower unemployment rates
than younger ones, those who
find themselves jobless tend to
find themselves stuck there for
longer. And women 55 and older
who lose a job have more trouble
than men getting another one, ac-

cording to Sara E. Rix, an analyst.
The type of occupations dominated by women may play a role.
“Public teacher employment is
still below what it was in 2007,”
said Elise Gould, senior economist
at the liberal Economic Policy Institute. “And that definitely disproportionately affects women.”
While unskilled workers are at
the greatest disadvantage, many
older women with impressive educational credentials and résumés
tell discouraging tales of being
turned down for job after job.
Julie Woodbury, a 57-year-old
Army veteran who lives in a suburb of Minneapolis, went back to
earn a doctorate in communications. “It’s extremely frustrating,”
Dr. Woodbury said. “I just can’t
find something permanent.” She is
not counted among the long-term
unemployed, but finds herself cycling on and off the jobless rolls, as
one short-term contract ends and
she waits for another to begin.
As for Ms. McAfee, she now
recognizes that it is all too easy
for almost anybody to fall over
the edge. “I did everything you’re
supposed to do,” she said. “Now
I’m on the other side of the rainbow, and it’s not pretty over here.”

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

D5

| THE NEW YORK TIMES

App Creates Brick-and-Mortar Buzz
SHOPPING

GLENN RIFKIN

Personalized alerts have
increased foot traffic and
sales in stores.
During a preholiday shopping
trip to New York, Lisa Libretto
received an alert on her iPhone:
an offer for a $25 discount on a
handbag that she had coveted on
the Vince Camuto website.
The alert pinged as she neared
the store entrance. And it cemented her decision: She would
buy the purse. But the timing was
no coincidence. An app she had
downloaded from ShopAdvisor
uses beacon technology, an addition to location-based marketing
in which digital sensors interact
with smartphones.
Ms. Libretto, 44, an artist and
stay-at-home mother with two
young sons, has embraced online
shopping. “My time is so short
that when I do get to shop, the
alerts are fantastic,” she said.
Despite the popularity of online
shopping, nearly 92 percent of retail sales are made at brick-andmortar locations, so a technology
that will help drive shoppers into
stores is certain to attract attention. And with the ubiquity of
smartphones, retailers and technology companies have spent
years trying to find ways to combine a shopper’s desires with innovative mobile apps to get consumers into stores.
ShopAdvisor, a four-year-old
company based in Massachusetts that specializes in creating
multichannel mobile shopping
platforms for media companies
and retail brands, has incorporat-

Escaping
Autopay
Purgatory
YOUR MONEY

ANN CARRNS
Consumers who agree to automatic withdrawals from their
bank accounts to pay for subscriptions, health club memberships, loans and the like may
sometimes hit roadblocks when
they try to stop the charges.
“It’s a big problem,” said Lauren Saunders, associate director with the National Consumer
Law Center. Banks are obligated
to help customers stop unwanted debits, she says, but they are
sometimes slow to do so.
Many companies — including
mortgage and student loan servicers, debt collectors and payday lenders — actively solicit approval from consumers for such
preauthorized debits, according
to the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
Often, consumers agree to such
payments for convenience or to
obtain a lower interest rate on a
loan, because some lenders offer
slightly better terms if borrowers agree to recurring monthly
debits. (Loan payments by automatic debits generally cannot be
required, but lenders can offer
incentives for borrowers to sign
up for them.)
In other cases, borrowers may
not realize that they have authorized an automatic renewal of a
loan and are surprised when a
payment is deducted, Ms. Saunders said. Consumers may end
up paying an overdraft fee if the
automatic debit results in overspending the account.
Consumers, the bureau’s di-

RICHARD PERRY/THE NEW YORK TIMES; SHOPADVISOR

SHORT OF TIME Lisa Libretto embraces online shopping, including the ShopAdvisor app and its beacon technology.

ed beacon technology in a novel
way. It uses data analytics that
filter a shopper’s preferences
and provide a way for retailers to
send personalized alerts to consumers who have downloaded a
brand’s app, offering discounts,
highlighting sales and providing
content that might sway a buying
decision.
Shoppers who have downloaded apps from various retailers
in the last three years have been
flooded with repetitious push
alerts that tend to be annoying.
“When you give people a marketing message about something
that they actually want, in a location where they can act on it,
that doesn’t feel like an ad or an
annoyance,” said Scott Cooper,
ShopAdvisor’s founder and president. “It feels like a service to
them. They tend to respond to it.”
The company’s revenues come
from fees paid by clients based

Q&A
¶ Are preauthorized debits
the same thing as online bill
payments?
Both methods let you pay a
financial obligation electronically, but they operate differently. When you schedule
recurring payments through
your bank’s online bill pay
service, you tell your bank
to send the payments for
you. With automatic debits,
you give a company or merchant your bank account
number and your permission
to withdraw payment from
your account on a recurring
schedule.
¶ Will I be charged a fee
for canceling an automatic
debit?
If you formally instruct your
bank to cancel an automatic
charge, the bank may impose
a “stop payment” fee — typically around $30 or $35 — as
it would if you canceled a paper check.

rector, Richard Cordray, said in a
prepared statement, should know
that they “have the right to stop
these charges at any time.”
First, call and write to the company making the withdrawals to
revoke your permission. Next,
call and write to your bank, telling it that you have revoked
authorization. The bureau has
posted on its website new sample
letters that you can use to write
to the company and to your bank.
To stop a scheduled payment,
you usually must give the bank
a “stop payment” order three
business days before the debit is
scheduled. If the bank asks you
for a written confirmation for an
order given over the phone, make
sure to send it within 14 days, and
include a copy of the letter you
sent to the company, revoking
your permission.

on the scale and frequency of the
campaigns. It also draws revenue
from retailers that subscribe to
its proximity marketing service.
When Elle, the popular women’s magazine, began planning
for its 30th anniversary last year,
it decided it had to do something
noteworthy in addition to its celebratory September issue. It connected with ShopAdvisor and in
August they started a program
called Shop Now. As part of the
campaign, Elle formed partnerships with such advertisers as
Guess, Levi’s and Vince Camuto,
and ShopAdvisor placed beacons
in more than 1,600 stores around
the United States.
ShopAdvisor created a mobile
app using beacon and geofencing technology for Elle readers,
who tend to be avid shoppers.
The geofence detects that an Elle
reader with the app is near, and
the beacon tracks that shopper’s

More Intimate Elder Care
RETIRING

CONSTANCE GUSTKE
Kay Larmor, 71, was in and out
of conventional nursing homes.
Then she found Green House
homes at Porter Hills, in Grand
Rapids, Mich., which is helping to
remake long-term care.
Each home houses only 10 elderly people, and each person
has a bedroom and a bathroom.
Ms. Larmor enjoys home-style
cooking like spaghetti with meatballs.
“This is my home,” Ms. Larmor
said. “And I feel cared for.”
For greater warmth and nurturing, seniors are turning to
small residences like Green
House, which is part of a complex
of senior housing and care options, and privately owned care
homes that are often unmarked
in residential neighborhoods.
They are usually newer, sometimes cheaper, and generally offer more customized care than
most nursing homes.
Nursing homes have received
plenty of criticism over the years.
They are regulated, but quality
varies widely. And even the best
ones are typically modeled after
hospitals, so aides often wear
scrubs and hallways can feel antiseptic. The ratio of residents to
aides can be high too, creating
more isolation for residents.
Dr. Bill Thomas, a Harvard-educated geriatrician, saw that
loneliness and isolation were big
problems in elder care. So he
helped found the Green House
project in 2003, which Porter
Hills uses as a model that is now
spreading around the country.
To ensure quality, Green House
homes are trademarked and
built to strict certifications.
“Green homes were developed
from a blank sheet of paper,” said
Scott Brown, director of outreach

at the Green House Project. The
results, he said, have been encouraging. Studies show that residents have higher-quality lives
and fewer hospital readmissions.
Green House operates 180 projects in 28 states; an additional
150 are in development. That
compares with about 15,700 nursing homes in the United States
housing 1.4 million people. At
Porter Hills, the costs are comparable to those of a good nursing
home, elder care specialists said.
A 30-day stay costs $10,230.
Another alternative is residential care, which typically costs
about half as much, according to
A Place for Mom, a referral for
senior care. Such homes are often
single-family homes adapted for
elder care. But not all are equal.
Lori Smetanka, director of the
National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center, said
that families needed to be careful
and ask a lot of questions.

Peggy Miller breathed a sigh of
relief when she put her husband,
Carl, who is in the late stages of
Alzheimer’s disease, in one of Our
Family Home’s residential care
homes that specializes in memory care in Dublin, Ohio.
“He was in assisted living for 12
days, and it was a total disaster,”
she said. Twenty-two patients
had only two caregivers. Now, he
lives at a ranch house. Two aides
care for five residents, Ms. Miller
said. Dinner is served at a dining
table. And Mr. Miller can put his
Ohio State memorabilia in his private room.
A warm environment was what
Evan DuBro said he was aiming
for when he founded Our Family
Home in 2007. Mr. DuBro’s grandparents had Alzheimer’s, and
they went to nursing homes that
were institutional, he said.
Mr. DuBro owns nine residential care homes in Ohio. His mother lived in one after her Alzheimer’s was diagnosed. “I’ve been
through three journeys of this
pain,” Mr. DuBro, 43, said. “Alzheimer’s care is expensive, lasts
a long time and is devastating for
families.”

So even though they may represent the ultimate in functionality
for a family of four or more, my
family buys a sport utility vehicle
instead. I admit it: We’re worried

about what everyone will think.
Most of us have
allowed other people to influence us
to the point that
we made financial
decisions
based
on their values instead of our own.
This can cause all
sorts of trouble in
our financial lives.
CARL RICHARDS
The solution is to
stop caring, which
is far easier said
than done. But I’ve had numerous
discussions over the last 10 years
with people who have gotten to
the point where they’ve simply
had enough. They say, “I’m sick

of living that life.”
They decide to sell everything,
downsize and live a simpler life.
That can be effective, but there
are less extreme ways to go about
it. The first thing we can do is to
be intentional about it.
Try this. Write down what’s important to you financially. Then
slowly try to align your actions
with your values. Not sure where
to start? Make a guess, base your
next buying decision on that and
see how it feels. It may take a few
tries to get comfortable.
The goal is to separate what we
want from what everyone else
wants. Only then can we start to
ignore the peer pressure we all
told ourselves we had left behind
in high school.

How to Avoid Spending
Money Like the Joneses
SKETCH GUY

CARL RICHARDS
Over the years, I’ve noticed that
moment when my children started caring about what other people think of them. One by one,
I’ve watched as the opinions of
others become a big deal in their
own decision-making.
As smart, mature adults, we
have a term for that: peer pressure. You know, that dumb thing

we all left behind in high school.
Except for one teeny, tiny problem. Graduation didn’t make us
immune to peer pressure. What
other people think of us continues
to affect the decisions we make.
One very obvious example is
what I call the Minivan Paradox.
On paper, minivans are awesome. They have tons of storage
space, many have sliding doors
on both sides and they get good
gas mileage for their size. The
only problem? They look goofy.

movements when she enters the
store. It also sets off push alerts
for that customer, suggesting
items like jeans that the customer has previously expressed
interest in, along with Elle magazine product reviews, top picks,
coupons and other personalized
marketing messages.
“If you get a generic jeans offer
from Guess, you are more likely
to disregard it or delete it,” said
Kevin O’Malley, Elle’s senior
vice president and publisher. “Of
course Guess will tell you they
are the best. But if we say those
skinny, low-rise jeans in this
model is one of our picks, that’s
an editorial endorsement and
brings third-party credibility and
authority to the alert.”
Mr. O’Malley said previous location-based marketing resulted
in less than 1 percent of smartphone users entering stores, a
disappointing result. After six

weeks of the Shop Now campaign, more than 8 percent of
those who received the app visited the stores, an increase retailers consider highly significant.
Leah Robert, executive vice
president of Vince Camuto, said
the Elle campaign was introduced
in 23 locations and within a week,
average sales per transaction
rose 30 percent. Not only were
new customers going into stores,
but regular customers were also
visiting more frequently.
“The number of transactions
per week almost doubled versus
a typical average week for us,”
Ms. Robert said.
Since the Elle pilot campaign
ended on October 1, 20 percent
of the same customers have, unprompted, returned to the stores
of the participating retailers, according to ShopAdvisor. Users
of its app who had been prompted to visit Vince Camuto stores
during the Elle program did so
32 percent more than customers
who did not use the app.
Privacy concerns loom as the
biggest challenge for companies
that contact smartphone users.
“Customers want to feel special,
but they don’t want to feel it’s too
Big Brother,” Ms. Robert said.
“We have to be personal but not
creepy.”
Part of the success of the Elle
campaign is ShopAdvisor’s ability to identify customers who have
shown serious interest in products using the company’s app.
“If you clicked on Vince Camuto
black pumps and got near a Vince
Camuto store, we can be superaggressive with you,” Mr. Cooper
said. “You are absolutely someone who wants that message. If
you have never shown any interest in that stuff at all, we leave
you alone. We don’t bother you.”

EMILY ROSE BENNETT FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

A WARM ENVIRONMENT Kay Larmor, 71, prefers Green House at Porter Hills

in Grand Rapids, Mich., to nursing homes. “I feel cared for,” she said.

Studies show that small
homes offer a better
quality of life.

D6

MONEY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Irish dance: Hooley school to expand in Brownstown
to courthouse records.
T&E Group then razed
the restaurant.
T&E Group is led by
local businessman Ernie Capizzi, an owner of
Ephrata-based apparel
company Meke Corp.
and former owner of
Skip’s Cutting.
Capizzi said he had
hoped to develop a bakery/cafe on the site, but
could not reach agreement with West Earl
Township on details, so
he opted to sell the land.
“It didn’t work out
for us,” Capizzi said.
“But I’m happy that two
young people will have
an opportunity there.”

Continued from D1

are expected to compete
in the 2016 nationals in
Orlando, Florida, this
July, said Carper, who
qualified for nationals
three times herself in her
youth.
Carper also will take
three Hooley students
to the 2016 world championships in Glasgow,
Scotland, in March.

10 years after
The Brownstown Restaurant closed in 2006
when the restaurant
operators sold the property to T&E Group for
$255,000,
according

The Carpers bought
the 0.74-acre property
for $260,000, courthouse records show.
Handling the transaction were Scott Bradbury of U.S. Commercial
Realty and Ken Carper
(Matt Carper’s cousin) of
ReMax Patriots.
Financing for the land
purchase and construction came from the Small
Business Administration’s 504 loan program
and Union Community
Bank.
EDC Finance, a Lancaster-based nonprofit
that assists businesses
in obtaining state and
federal support for eco-

Komando: Top 3 threats
Continued from D3

and most of that time is
spent in a Web browser.
So it’s no surprise that’s
where hackers are
focusing their efforts. If
they can find a flaw in
your browser, then they
just need you to visit
a malicious website to
slip a virus on to your
system.
2015 saw hackers
target a number of
browser weaknesses,
but by far the worst
was Adobe Flash, or
Adobe Animate as it’s
now being called. There
were times it seemed to
have an endless string
of emergency patches,
with at least three
instances in July and
four instances between
the end of September
and the beginning of
November.
Firefox even blocked
Flash for a time in July

to keep people safe. Because many online ads
use Flash, even legitimate sites could infect a
computer if hackers got
an ad network to run a
malicious ad.
While companies
are quickly moving
away from Flash/
Animate — Facebook
just switched its video
player to HTML5 —
Flash/Animate isn’t
going anywhere for a
while. In fact, just like
Java, which was the
security nightmare before it, Flash/Animate
could hang around on
computers for years
after people no longer
need it.
You can expect to see
plenty more attacks
against it this year. And
hackers are probably
already probing for the
next big hole in browser
security.

Keep an eye out
There are always new
threats out there, and
even we don’t know
which ones will suddenly explode. One to keep
an eye on is bootkits.
These are incredibly
hard viruses to detect
and remove, and they’ve
started showing up in
hacker toolkits.
Fortunately, right now
they’re delivered the
same way as any other
virus: phishing emails,
malicious downloads,
etc. As long as you pay
attention to what you
click, you should be OK.

n Kim Komando hosts the

nation’s largest talk radio
show about consumer
electronics, computers and
the Internet. Locally it can
be heard on WHP-AM 580,
Harrisburg, on Sundays from
7 to 10 p.m.

PENN
COLLEGE

®

96%

graduate placement rate

nomic development ventures, helped the Carpers get the loans.
“This project is a real
credit to Crystal’s hard
work,” said Randy Johnston, EDC Finance loan
officer. “We were really happy to help her increase her capacity and
fix her occupancy cost.”

Dance rooms
With the move, Hooley’s facility will increase
from a single dance
room in Akron to two in
Brownstown.
Later, the new building could be enlarged to
6,000 square feet, mak-

ing way for three more
dance rooms.
“For years, we drove
past (the restaurant site)
and said it would be such
a perfect location for us.
Then, about two years
ago, we started looking for a new location,”
Carper said.
“Then a year ago, we
saw it was for sale. We
couldn’t believe our
dream location was for
sale.”
Carper, a Millersville
University graduate in
English education and
former Pennsylvania Air
National Guard technical sergeant in emergency management, sees

several advantages to the
new address.
Besides allowing the
school’s enrollment to
increase and allowing
the Carpers to be owners
instead of renters, the
site is near the Brownstown exit of Route 222,
which many students already take to reach the
school’s Akron location.
So the new site will
shave about 10 minutes
off a trip to or from the
school for those students, Carper estimated.
“It’s about 2 miles
and several traffic lights
shorter,” she said.

Singletary: Let it go
Continued from D1

ers and listen to kids
tease her about it. I’m
not living below the
poverty line anymore
and likely won’t ever
have to. I may face tough
economic times but I’ve
got far more to fall back
on then my grandmother had.
Think hard, what’s
holding you back from
moving forward financially?
— Did you have an
impoverished childhood? Have you now
accumulated debt trying
to erase the memories of
not having enough?
— Did you live a silverspoon lifestyle as a child
but can’t sustain it now
because you don’t have
the same resources as
your parents?
— Growing up, did
you resent what others
had that you didn’t? Do
you now try to impress
people with things you
can’t afford?

— Did you watch your
parents fight about money? Have you taken their
issues into your marriage,
causing financial strain in
your relationship?
— Did you run up your
credit cards trying to
overcompensate for the
challenges of being a
single parent?
You’ve got to do the
work to figure out what’s
been your roadblock
to fixing your financial
situation. Why do you
have a sense of entitlement? Why can’t you
manage your money
properly? Why do you
dread spending what
you’ve saved?
To help on this journey, I have another suggestion. Choose a theme
song for your financial
resolution.
My theme song is an
obvious choice: “Let It
Go” from Disney’s “Frozen.” Here are the lyrics
I’ve latched onto for my
breakthrough:

Let it go, let it go
Can’t hold it back
anymore
Let it go, let it go
Turn away and slam
the door! ...
It’s funny how some
distance
Makes everything seem
small
And the fears that once
controlled me
Can’t get to me at all! ...
I’m never going back,
The past is in the past!
I’d love to hear the
songs you select to help
you end 2016 having
achieved your financial
resolutions. Send me
your selection, and why
you chose it, to colorofmoney@washpost.com.
Put “Let It Go” in the
subject line. I’d like to
share your stories.
Face the truth of your
past and you’ll free your
future.

n michelle.singletary
@washpost.com

There is NO sales
tax in PA on coins
and bullion!
2015

13

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Perspective

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

E

n CONTACT: SUZANNE CASSIDY, 291-8694, SCASSIDY@LNPNEWS.COM

ALSO INSIDE: GENERATION NEXT

KRISTEN HOUSER
SPECIAL TO LNP

As Cosby case
shows, victims need
time to seek justice
It is time for Pennsylvania
lawmakers to take the statute of
limitations restraints off and allow victims of sexual abuse to file
charges against their abuser at any
time.
The acts allegedly conducted
by actor and comedian Bill Cosby
— and countless others who have
abused their power, their celebrity
status or their influence in society to sexually abuse others — are
perfect examples of why we must
eliminate the civil and criminal
statute of limitations in sexual
assault-related cases.

Victims sometimes
need decades to even
admit the assault
occurred, let alone
come forward about
what is perhaps the
most traumatic physical
and psychological
betrayal a person can
experience.

TODD SPIDLE | EDITORIAL STAFF ARTIST

JOHN GERDY
SPECIAL TO LNP

Rape is the most underreported
crime: an estimated 63 percent of
sexual assaults are not reported to
police. People do not report sexual
assault for a variety of complicated reasons. Those who do come
forward often face scrutiny and
are met with disbelief — even more
so when the person who committed sexual violence is a person of
influence — despite the rate of false
reporting being consistently estimated at between 2 and 8 percent.
The uncomfortable fact is that
some people who are publicly
admired can and do commit sexual
violence. People often attribute
tremendous character and credibility to celebrities, and in turn,
trust them. The majority of sexual
violence is committed by people
whom survivors know and trust.
This means not just celebrities,
but people who do good work for
their communities, who are active
in their churches, and who are
respected business leaders.
Denial, shame and self-doubt
are all typical victim reactions to
being assaulted by a person who
was trusted. Sexual assault can
cause intense feelings of humiliation. Victims often feel terrified
of other people learning what has
been done to them; they fear they
will not be believed and that they
will be subjected to harassment.
Victims sometimes need decades to
even admit the assault occurred, let
alone come forward about what is
perhaps the most traumatic physical and psychological betrayal a
person can experience.
By the time survivors find the
strength to come forward, it often is
too late to find justice.
The 12-year criminal statute of
limitations in Pennsylvania bars
many survivors from having the
state bring charges against their
rapists. As such, it protects offenders and allows them to operate
without detection.
Prosecutors will always retain

HOUSER, page E4

n Kristen Houser is the chief public af-

fairs officer for the Pennsylvania Coalition
Against Rape and the National Sexual
Violence Resource Center.

The evidence is clear:
Tackle football is too risky for children
As the son of a high school football coach, a former college athletic
administrator and someone who
has written extensively on football’s role in our schools and culture, I’ve been around, observed,
contemplated and researched
the game for more than 50 years.
Naturally, I was very interested in
seeing “Concussion,” the recently
released movie starring Will
Smith.
Smith portrays Dr. Bennet Omalu, who discovered clear evidence
that professional football players
were susceptible to a progressive
degenerative brain disease —
chronic traumatic encephalopathy,
caused by repetitive blows to the
head — and chronicles his efforts
to alert the NFL and the rest of the

world regarding that link.
Given my deep familiarity with
the subject, the movie didn’t shed
much new light on the details of
football and brain damage. One
notable exception, however, had
more to do with how to explain the
link. In attempting to illustrate
the connection, Dr. Omalu used
as an example how a woodpecker
pounds its head repeatedly against
hard surfaces, yet does not damage
its brain. That is because nature
provided what amounts to a natural
“shock absorber” in the form of its
tongue, which wraps around its
brain upon each impact. Humans
do not have any equivalent shock
absorber, prompting Omalu to
declare in no uncertain terms that
man was not made to play football.

That statement crystallizes the debate over whether to allow children
to participate in football or whether
junior high and high schools should
continue to sponsor it.
This is really about anatomy and
the fact that you can’t fool Mother
Nature. Our brains, the organ that
makes us human, are simply not
designed for football. And no matter
how hard many well-meaning people
are attempting to make football
“suitably safe,” the fact is the forces
of nature and anatomy will prevail.
While the football industrial
complex’s public relations machine
is running full throttle in its effort to
convince parents that advancements
in equipment, diagnosis, testing, protocol and tackling techniques have
made the game safe, the cold, hard
truth is that these claims are being
made with little concrete, scientific
evidence to back them up.
GERDY, page E4

n John R. Gerdy is a former associate

commissioner of the Southeastern Conference, founder of Music For Everyone and
author of “Ball or Bands: Football vs. Music
as an Educational and Community Building
Investment.” He can be reached at
JohnGerdy@aol.com.

Covering King’s life, the
movement he bravely led
ASSOCIATED PRESS

In a new memoir, “My Time
with the Kings: A Reporter’s
Recollections of Martin,
Coretta and the Civil Rights
Movement,” retired Associated Press reporter Kathryn
Johnson describes civil rights
flashpoints she covered in the
1960s and details her close
relationship with the movement’s leader, the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr., and his family.
As the nation marks the
King holiday Monday, here
is an excerpt from Johnson’s
book, in which she recalls an
in-depth talk with King at his
dining room table with his wife
Coretta and, years later, her
last interview with him, shortly
before his assassination.

1964

On a fiercely cold winter
night in 1964, I was trudging

alongside the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as he led a group
of striking marchers at Scripto,
a pen- and pencil-manufacturing plant near downtown
Atlanta.
Bundled in a heavy coat, my
teeth chattering from the cold,
I asked King the usual questions: “How much pay raise are
they asking? Where are negotiations at this point? Do you
plan to continue striking?”
Scripto workers had walked
off the job, demanding equal
pay with whites for skilled and
nonskilled work. King sympathized with the strikers, many
of whom were members of
his church. The straggly little
group hurrying along the cold,
dark city street drew little media attention except from one
or two local TV reporters (and
myself, from the AP).
MLK, page E4

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this April 3, 1968, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
makes his last public appearance at the Mason Temple in
Memphis, Tenn.

E2

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Opinion

LNP | Founded 1794

FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE INTELLIGENCER JOURNAL/LANCASTER NEW ERA/SUNDAY NEWS

Beverly R. Steinman

Barbara Hough Roda

Robert M. Krasne

Suzanne Cassidy

Chairman Emeritus

Chairman of the Board

Executive Editor

Editor of the Opinion Page

Publishers: 1866-1917 Andrew Steinman | 1921-1962 J. Hale Steinman |
1921-1962 John F. Steinman (Co-Publisher) | 1963-1980 John F. Steinman |
2013- Robert M. Krasne

FOR THE LATEST UPDATES, GO TO LANCASTERONLINE.COM

In our words

Pennsylvanians need,
deserve full-year budget
THE ISSUE
State budget discussions in Harrisburg got so bad last week that the office
of Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf and the House Republican leadership
appeared to be at odds over whether they were at an impasse. They were
not seeing eye to eye on this basic question: Does Pennsylvania have or
does it still need a budget for the fiscal year that ends June 30?

The disagreement was almost surreal.
It concerned what had happened Dec. 29,
when the governor took a blue pen to the $30.3
billion budget sent to his desk six days earlier
by the Republican-controlled General Assembly.
Wolf’s action authorized $23.4 billion for
counties and state services and half-year funding for public schools but struck billions for
public schools, prisons and health care for the
poor. The goal was to keep pressure on lawmakers to come back in the new year and approve a budget agreement reached between
the governor and legislative leaders.
“It means that we have a budget in place — it
does,” House GOP spokesman Steve Miskin
told Mary Wilson, who covers the state Capitol
for WITF and other Pennsylvania public radio
stations, Thursday. “There’s a budget in place
right now.”
The governor’s office disagreed.
“That’s one of the more ridiculous things
I’ve heard,” Wolf spokesman Jeff Sheridan replied. “The Republican Legislature still has not
passed the revenue to pay for anything. The
general appropriations bill that they sent us
was half a billion dollars out of balance.”
That last part is where the disagreement really is.
Nobody is saying that six months of state
funding for K-12 public schools and the funding left for state prisons is good enough. And
House Republicans tried unsuccessfully Monday to pass bills to send state funds to Penn
State, Temple University, the University of
Pittsburgh, the University of Pennsylvania’s
veterinary school, the Pennsylvania College of
Technology and Lincoln University.
The GOP stance is that:
— Minus Wolf’s veto, Pennsylvania has a budget blueprint that will get it through June. Actually, this is the view on the GOP House side.
Senate GOP leaders see a need for “revenue
changes,” as spokeswoman Jennifer Kocher
put it Thursday.
— There are enough votes in the General Assembly to pass funding for higher education.
(Monday’s vote required a two-thirds majority,
against which nearly all Democrats united to
push for a full budget.)
— There is no agreement to boost taxes that
will pass either the House or the Senate.
— And Wolf is wrong to insist on the $30.8
billion “framework” agreement because, as
House GOP Whip Bryan Cutler, of Peach Bottom, put it: “It isn’t the governor’s money to be
holding onto and using as leverage to try and
get higher taxes.”
The governor and Democrats in the General
Assembly counter that:
— The GOP budget is not balanced. They
point to a news release from Standard & Poor’s

Rating Services that said the $30.3 billion GOP
budget “is, in our view, structurally unbalanced” and includes “a $500 million budget
gap for fiscal 2016 and (would leave) a $2 billion budget gap for fiscal 2017.”
— The governor and Republican leaders had
a $30.8 billion deal that had passed the Senate,
but House Speaker Mike Turzai, R-Allegheny
County, refused to put to a vote.
Both arguments have their merits and flaws.
The budget passed by the GOP-controlled
House, and later by the GOP-controlled Senate because House leaders had rejected any tax
increases and wouldn’t vote on it, was unbalanced. We take S&P’s word on that.
The House’s failure to vote on the Senatepassed budget agreed to with Gov. Wolf, however, is a little bit more complicated.
It goes to a failure — by GOP leaders and the
governor — to find the votes for the tax increases needed to pay for the $30.8 billion “framework” budget.
Wolf is right to want it funded honestly. And
we continue to stand with the governor in his
call for increased state funds for public schools
— for the sake of schoolchildren and property
taxpayers across Pennsylvania.
But finding the votes for the tax increases — a
boost in the state’s sales and use, personal income tax, or some combination of the two — is
essential to getting a balanced budget.
Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman, RCentre County, expressed confidence about
being able to round up the votes for a tax increase (which kind, he never said) as long as
pension reform was passed as well. Anti-tax
House Republicans — with the support of
Democrats who didn’t agree with the pension
bill — killed the Corman-Wolf pension deal.
Pennsylvania clearly does not have a budget
worthy of being called a responsible spending
plan.
Legislative leaders and the governor need
to work out an agreement and sell it to their
members.
As a first step, House leaders should permit
a vote on the $30.8 billion budget plan that
passed the Senate.
Then, if that passes, they should agree to take
on the essential responsibility of finding the
votes to pay for it.
The governor should get out to Republican
House districts and sell voters on the idea that
paying higher taxes is necessary. He doesn’t
need to convince them all, just enough to pass
a tax boost big enough to cover his $30.8 billion
deal with the Senate.
Pennsylvania deserves better. Both parties
need to get to work and put a full-year budget
in place before the next one is proposed by the
governor early next month.

FIND MORE ONLINE

bit.ly/PaImpasseDispute l bit.ly/SandPonPaBudget12-29-15

CHARLES
KRAUTHAMMER
THE WASHINGTON POST

State of the presidency?
It is demonstrably spent
WASHINGTON
— President Barack
Obama’s Tuesday night
address to Congress was
less about the state of the
union than the state of
the presidency. And the
state of this presidency is
spent.
The signs of intellectual exhaustion were everywhere. Consider just
three. After taking credit
for success in Syria,
raising American stature
abroad and prevailing
against the Islamic State
group — one claim more
surreal than the next
— Obama was forced
to repair to his most
well-worn talking point:
“If you doubt America’s
commitment — or mine
— to see that justice is
done, just ask Osama bin
Laden.”
Really? Five years later,
that’s all you’ve got?
Indeed, it is. What
else can Obama say?
Talk about Crimea? Cite
Yemen, Libya, Iraq, the
South China Sea, the
return of the Taliban?
“Surveys show our
standing around the
world is higher than
when I was elected
to this office,” Obama
boasted. Surveys, mind
you. As if superpower
influence is a Miss
Universe contest. As if
the world doesn’t see our
allies adrift, our enemies
on the march and our
sailors kneeling, hands
behind their heads, in
front of armed Iranians,
then forced to apologize
on camera. (And our secretary of state expressing appreciation to Iran
after their subsequent
release.)
On the domestic side,
Obama’s agenda was fairly short, in keeping with
his lame-duck status. It
was still startling when
he worked up a passion
for a great “new moonshot”: curing cancer.
Is there a more
hackneyed nationalgreatness cliche than
the idea that if we can
walk on the moon ... ?
Or a more hackneyed
facsimile of vision
than being “the nation
that cures cancer”? Do
Obama’s speechwriters
not know that it was
Richard Nixon who
first declared a war on
cancer — in 1971?
But to see just how
bare is the cupboard
of ideas of the nation’s
most vaunted liberal
visionary, we had to wait
for the stunning anachronism that was the
speech finale. It was
designed for inspiration
and uplift. And for some
liberal observers, it actually worked. They were
thrilled by the soaring
tones as Obama called
for, yes, a new politics — a
post-partisan spirit of
mutual understanding,
rational discourse and
respect for one’s opponents.
Why, it was hope and
change all over again.
You’d have thought we
were back in 2008 with
Obama’s moving, stirring

promise of a new and
higher politics that had
young people swooning
in the aisles and a TV
anchor thrilling up the
leg — and gave Obama
the White House.
Or even further back
to 2004, when Obama
electrified the nation
with his Democratic convention speech: “There’s
not a black America
and white America and
Latino America and
Asian America; there’s
the United States of
America.”
Tuesday night, Obama
did an undisguised, almost phrase-for-phrase
reprise of that old promise. Earnestly, he urged
us to “see ourselves not,
first and foremost, as
black or white, or Asian
or Latino, not as gay
or straight, immigrant
or native born, not as
Democrats or Republicans, but as Americans
first.”
On cue, various commentators were moved
by this sermon summoning our better angels.
Good grief. I can understand falling for this 12
years ago. But now? A
cheap self-quotation,
a rhetorical mulligan,
from a man who had two
presidential terms to act
on that transformative
vision and instead gave
us the most divisive,
partisan, tendentious
presidency since Nixon.
Rational discourse and
respect for one’s opponents? This is a man
who campaigned up
and down the country
throughout 2011 and
2012 saying that he cares
about posterity, Republicans only about power.
The man who accused
opponents of his Iran
treaty of “making common cause” with Iranians “chanting death to
America.”
The man who, after
Paul Ryan proposed a
courageous, controversial entitlement reform,
gave a presidential
address — with Ryan,
invited by the White
House, seated in the first
row — calling his ideas
un-American.
In a final touch of irony,
Obama included in his
wistful rediscovery of a
more elevated politics an
expression of reverence
for, of all things, how
“our founders distributed power between
... branches of government.” This after years
of repeatedly usurping
Congress’ legislative
power with unilateral
executive orders and
regulations on everything from criminal
justice to climate change
to immigration (already
halted by the courts).
There is wisdom to the
22nd Amendment. After
two terms, presidents are
spent. Nothing shows it
like a State of the Union
valedictory repeating
the hollow promises of
the yesteryear candidate
— as if the intervening
presidency had never
occurred.

n Charles Krauthammer is a columnist for The Washington
Post; Twitter: @krauthammer

OP-ED/LETTERS

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

ISMAIL SMITH-WADE-EL
SPECIAL TO LNP

If we had the will, we could help
refugees and this nation’s poor
I’ve written about the the need to
welcome refugees in this paper before
and don’t wish to belabor any previous
points. I accept that despite the fact
that refugees don’t present a realistic domestic security risk, despite
the consequences of not welcoming
them, despite the fact that directing
hatred and fear toward people fleeing
for their lives feeds into the wishes of
Islamic State group, some people just
aren’t going to be convinced.
I was heartened to see that, just after
the new year, so many people came out
to defend our county’s long practice of
welcoming refugees, over and despite
objections, because doing the right
thing is more important than being
afraid. Several groups and organizations throughout the area have volunteered their efforts and time, despite
those who would characterize them as
weak, or soft-hearted, as though caring
for other people is a bad thing.
On the other hand, I am quite worried by the apparent rise in crimes
targeting Muslims and, in more than

US Constitution open
to interpretation
Sen. Ted Cruz, a U.S. senator
from Texas who is running for
the Republican nomination
for president, is being questioned about his eligibility for
office because he was born in
Canada.
What does the Constitution
actually say? In Article II, Section 1, Clause No. 4: “No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United
States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall
be eligible to the Office of President.”
It goes on to say that a president must be at least age 35
and have resided in the U.S.for
at least 14 years.
In Sen. Cruz’s case, the
meaning of “natural born citizen’’ is the issue. This phrase
has been taken to mean a person born within the U.S. or a
territory of the U.S., or born to
parents who are citizens residing outside the U.S.
Sen. John McCain has said
that this is an issue to be
looked at; in President Barack
Obama’s case, it was scrutinized.
The lesson to be learned
here is that there is a great deal
of phrasing in the Constitution that is either very general
or confusingly vague.
Our Constitution is not a
rigid, inflexible document but
rather one subject to interpretation.
Dan Betz
East Cocalico Township

Teacher ‘Mrs. V’
left legacy of love
Many people may have noticed a long line of cars in funeral procession through the
southwest end of the city on
Jan. 9 and wondered if a VIP
had passed away. She would
not have said so herself but
Barbara Valavanes (“Barbara
Karpouzis Valavanes,” Obituaries, Jan. 7) was most definitely a very important person
to the thousands of people she
touched.
One may go online and read
the obituary of this amazing
woman and all she accomplished in her 90 years on this
Earth
(bit.ly/BarbaraValavanesObituary). As a child and
many times throughout her
life she faced hard times and
adversity but she worked hard
to turn it all around and always
pay it forward.
For more than 30 years she
taught English as a Second
Language to thousands of
students at McCaskey High
School. She went the extra
mile to help them and their
families acclimate and learn
about their new country and to
become citizens themselves.
They respectfully called her
“Mrs. V” but she was loved and
treated as a family member.
She was invited to weddings
and other special occasions

one case, Sikhs. A 68-year-old Sikh
man, in Fresno, California, was beaten
and bruised by assailants demanding
“Why are you here?” Two weeks before
Christmas, a mosque in Alameda
County, also in California, was targeted
for arson. Just after Thanksgiving, a
Muslim cab driver in Pittsburgh was
shot in the back by a passenger ranting
about Islamic State and Islam. In early
December, a man in New York confronted a Muslim woman at a bus stop,
calling her trash before assaulting her.
These attacks are horrifying and
criminal in obvious ways. They should
not have occurred, and I don’t think
any serious person disagrees with that.
But rhetoric that degrades Muslims,
or suggests somehow that they do not
belong in this country or cannot be a
part of our society, contributes to the
environment in which these crimes
occur.
It’s not my goal here to make anyone
other than the perpetrators criminally
liable, or to make criticism of Islam
verboten. I have never known what

is meant when someone tells me that
their religion, whatever religion it is,
is a “religion of peace.” Religions are belief systems, and thus open to criticism.
But the people who subscribe to those
religions should be judged on their own
merits and history, not those of the terrorists who would kill them if they had
the chance. To refuse refugees solely
because of the actions of other people
who share some portion of their beliefs
is philosophically no different than forbidding any Catholic from working in
the child care field because of the abuse
perpetrated by some priests.
I have heard, again and again, the argument that the United States cannot
afford to take in refugees because we
lack the money and resources to provide for them, and that offering them
support means that others — such as
this nation’s 50,000 homeless veterans
— won’t get it. I assume that all who
make this claim are actively invested in
preventing veteran homelessness.
But this is irrelevant. According to
the National Alliance to End Homelessness, there has been a 67 percent
decrease in the number of homeless
veterans between 2009 and 2014.
In Lancaster County, the number of
homeless veterans has reached what
those working in the field call “functionally zero.” This means that we have
the “capacity and infrastructure to
help more people than are entering the
system,” as Jennifer Koppel, director
of the County Coalition to End Homelessness, told LNP. Nationally, we’re

Letters to the editor

dent and research associate for the Mayor's
Commission to Combat Poverty.

Why disarm
only citizens?

Jesus’ crucifixion
a matter of history

I have a brilliant suggestion
for President Barack Obama.
Since he is so adamant in regard to gun control and regulations, I think it is only fair
for our president to show the
American public that he is really for gun control.
Require the Secret Service
— and any other federal employee who is authorized to
carry a weapon to protect the
president and his family —
to immediately turn in their
weapons at the nearest federal
armory, as there is no need for
weapons.
Sound goofy? It is goofy.
Why is the president’s life
and his family’s life more valuable or different than the average citizen’s life? As citizens,
we do not have any organizations or personal protection
other than our local police departments.
The way this country is going, under this administration,
I feel any law-abiding citizen
should have a weapon in his
home. Any law-abiding person
should be able to carry a weapon, with a weapons permit, for
protection on his person. This
is why the gun sales have skyrocketed.
As the saying goes — fight fire
with fire.
John L. Finger
Lancaster

I was interested to see the
column by Mohamed Kohia
(“Roles of Jesus and Mary in
Islam,” Perspective, Jan. 10)
detailing a Muslim view of
Jesus of Nazareth. I have no
quarrel with people sharing
their beliefs and I enjoy other
perspectives.
I do wonder how my
thoughts and ideas regarding
the true nature of Mohammed
would be received by Muslims
in this country. For me, the
Quran completely misses or
ignores the fact of Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection and
that there were many eyewitnesses to his death and many
more who saw him after he
rose again. All of this is to deny
his divine nature.
We all have the right to our
beliefs in this country and I
hope Mohamed Kohia will
find the truth one day.
David Hungerford
New Holland

address and telephone number for verification purposes. Letters
should be limited to 300 words and on topics that affect the public.
Writers are limited to one published letter every 14 days. Letters will
be edited for grammar, clarity and length. Material that has appeared
elsewhere and form letters are discouraged, and any detected will
not be published.
How to submit letters:
Email LancasterLetters@lnpnews.com
Fax 399-6507
Mail to Letters, c/o LNP, P.O. Box 1328,
Lancaster, PA 17608-1328

It’s time to return
to our moral compass

n Ismail Smith-Wade-El is a Lancaster resi-

make matters worse, young
people are being taught that
there is no absolute truth. No
wonder they think of morals
as something to be chosen, like
different flavors of ice cream.
History demonstrates that
nations that ignore or reject
God’s moral standards experience increasing civil problems.
The evidence can be heard or
read in our news daily. We cannot hire enough police to keep
a peaceful society.
Isn’t it time we returned to
our moral compass, the Bible?
Aaron D. Hoffman
Earl Township

n Letters to the editor are welcome. All letters must include an

Our challenge is to learn why
mass shootings are on the increase and stop this destruction of life.
But if we substitute mass
killings without bullets for
mass killings with bullets, is
there really any difference?
For example, we condone
the killing of innocent children in the womb of their
mothers, while we condemn
the mass murder of children
in a schoolhouse. How can we
condone murder in one case
and require prison time for
murder in the other case?
Seems we have some explaining to do to our children about
this double standard we’ve adopted! Consider all the murders and violence our children
are exposed to through media.
Whether we like it or not, such
images become riveted in their
minds. So how do children then
discern what is factual from
what is fantasy?
How has the evaluation of
right and wrong in the 21st
century become so twisted? President oversteps
I believe the moral compass his authority
that has sustained this country for centuries, namely the
Whether you are for more
Bible, is being neglected. To gun control or less, the recent

E3

making good progress on reducing
veteran homelessness, and locally, we
have the resources to provide for any
veterans who need them. In fact, there’s
no reason to believe that any veterans
will be homeless or denied a home because of refugees. Furthermore, while
I’m not naive enough to think that it’s
free of complication, there are many
more empty houses in this country than
there are homeless veterans, and we
could house them all. We could.
And what about all the people who
go hungry every night? According to
Feeding America, a national network of
food banks, 48.1 million Americans live
in food-insecure households. Surely
we cannot afford to support more
people with a hunger problem of that
magnitude, a gap that Feeding America
estimates would require $24 billion to
fill. But that organization also estimates
that we waste as much as 40 percent
of our food annually, an amount that
one U.S. Department of Agriculture
study values at $165 billion. So we have
enough food; we just waste 70 million
tons of it every year. Feeding everyone
is an unalloyed possibility.
The reality is simply this: If we cannot
“afford” to welcome Syrian refugees
into our country, it is not because of a
lack of material resources, but a lack of
social and character resources.
I think we have plenty of both.

actions of our president have
undermined our rights and
freedoms under the U.S. Constitution. With his recent gun
control executive orders, this
president is exercising powers of not only the executive
branch that he was elected
to lead but of the legislative
branch of our government.
The U.S. Constitution separated the powers of the three
branches of our government
to protect our freedom and
constitutional rights. His actions have diminished these
rights for you, me, our children, grandchildren and all
generations born hereafter.
The Founding Fathers were
strongly against any one person or group in the government having both executive
and legislative power, as this
would lead to a loss of freedom.
In justifying his recent actions, the president said that
since Congress had not taken
any sensible action (Congress
has taken action, just not the
actions the president wanted),
he would act. This is no different than Britain’s king violating the rule of law during our
colonial history.
Michael D. Spangler
Rapho Township

LETTER POLICY

throughout because her students never forgot her impact
— which could be witnessed by
the attendance of so many of
them at her funeral.
In attendance, too, alongside
her dear family, was another
large family of friends from
her beloved Annunciation
Greek Orthodox Church. Not
just mere friends, she made
each one of us feel special
with her warm smile, loving
eyes and constant words of
encouragement. We were so
blessed to have Thea (“aunt”
in Greek) Barbara in our lives.
During the eulogy, the priest
spoke of how she saw each and
every person as a child of God.
Therein lies her legacy, love
for all the people of the world.
Thank you, Mrs. Valavanes,
for your example of a life well
lived. May her memory and
her example be eternal.
Robin Roumeliotis
Warwick Township

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Presidential choices
not looking good
What a sad, scary and even
embarrassing position our nation is in right now. We’re preparing for a presidential election and look at our choices.
Although we don’t know for
sure, it’s looking like we’ll have
Donald Trump and Hillary
Clinton from which to choose.
What kind of choice is that?
Aside from his traits of being
arrogant and sometimes vulgar, Mr. Trump has no political
experience. His experience is

managing huge corporations/
businesses. Being president
calls for experience in governing and the ability to manage
our government and nation in
a manner other than in business boardroom. And the idea
of him in meetings with leaders of other countries and involving our national security is
a frightening thought indeed.
He makes promises and, when
asked how he intends to carry
these out, simply says he’ll get
the right people to take care
of things. I’d be anxious to see
who he would get to construct
the wall against Mexico with
Mexico paying for it!
And then we have Hillary, a
person with much experience
in government and working
with other world leaders. With
her pledges/promises come
plans and ideas of how she
would implement them. The
fact that Bill Clinton would
accompany her seems to be
somewhat of a drawback and
the continuing email problem
brings with it a sense of mistrust and doubt. And are we
ready for a female president
and, if so, is Hillary the right
woman for the job?
We’re left feeling like we
might have to choose between
the lesser of two evils. But it
is difficult to imagine having a
president who is quite clearly
used to uttering the phrase
“you’re fired!”
Connie A. Kirchner
Mount Joy Township

We should invest in
treating addiction

What has been done to curb
the great heroin and drug addiction? Nothing, in my humble opinion. Addicts get caught
and fined, and some but not
many go to rehabilitation centers. Rehabs are springing up
faster than new hospitals and
yet the problem continues.
Why? Because, if the person
with an addiction has no insurance, they get little or no
help. Everything is about money, not helping people. Case in
point: I am a recovering alcoholic and drug addict who has
been sober, a day at a time, for
42 years. Yes, 42 years. When
I was struggling to get sober, I
was in jail.
I had no insurance, and yet I
got help. Today, no insurance
means no help and that is nonsense. I have seen people at
Bowling Green treatment center have to leave before their
stay should have been over
because of no insurance. What
message does that send?
Addiction is a disease that
can be treated but not cured.
I am sick and tired of the politicians raking in the fines and
using the money for other
things. The state took in over
$10 million in DUI fines in
2010 and less than 1 percent
went back to counties for helping addicts.
Steve Vogel
Oxford

E4

PERSPECTIVE

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

Houser
Continued from E1

discretion regarding
whether or not to press
charges based on the
findings of an investigation. But today as the
public becomes more
informed about sexual
assault, and as actions
and interactions are
preserved through
technology, the ability to
build a strong case with
evidence many years old
can occur more often
than in the past.
Prosecutors reexamined statements
given by Cosby when
he was deposed for a
civil lawsuit brought in
2005 by former Temple
University employee
Andrea Constand. She
is one of more than 50

women who have come
forward to make allegations against Cosby.
Civil courts rely on
the preponderance of
evidence — it only has to
be plausible for a conviction —and defendants
can be compelled to take
the stand, where they
must testify under oath.
This oath becomes a
record, something that
may be admitted to a
criminal court. That’s
what happened in the
criminal case against
Cosby, which was
brought just weeks
before the statute of
limitations was set to
expire.
But with a two-year
civil statute of limitations for adult victims of

sexual assault, survivors in Pennsylvania
are often denied this
avenue to justice as
well. Child victims are
afforded time to bring
civil action until their
30th birthdays, but all
too frequently this, too,
cuts off access to justice,
as it can take decades
for a child to be ready to
confront what happened
to him or her.
Civil courts provide a
strong value to society
by exposing perpetrators who fall through the
cracks of the criminal
justice system due to the
lack of overwhelming
physical evidence. Thousands of perpetrators
live and work among the
general population, their
records spotless and
background checks clear
because there simply
isn’t enough evidence

to warrant an arrest,
let alone go to trial in a
criminal court.
Statutes of limitations
do not serve the best interests of survivors, and
they do not serve the
best interests of public
safety. These roadblocks
to justice serve no one
but perpetrators, allowing them to continue
their behavior virtually
unchecked. If ever there
was a case to eliminate
the statutes of limitations in sexual assault
cases — both criminal
and civil — it is staring
us in the face.
Even if statutes of
limitations have expired,
it is never too late to
get help. Help is available through rape crisis
centers throughout
Pennsylvania and across
the country, providing hope for victims of

Gerdy
Continued from E1

Even on the most basic of
issues, there is widespread
disagreement, an example
being how long a victim of a
concussion should be held out
of action. Is it a week? Two
weeks? A month? A season?
We simply do not know.
Further, all of the attention
being placed on concussions
is somewhat misguided.
Unquestionably, concussions
are extremely damaging to
the brain. However, the larger
issue is the brain damage
sustained by repeated subconcussive blows to the head.
Subconcussive blows clearly
rattle the brain, thus causing cumulative trauma and
damage, but not to the extent
where the negative impact is
immediately and outwardly
noticed.

The larger issue is the brain
damage sustained by repeated
subconcussive blows to the head.
Subconcussive blows clearly
rattle the brain, thus causing
cumulative trauma and damage.
It’s brain death by a million
cuts.
In other words, your child
could be slowly, methodically
damaging his brain without
showing any immediate signs
of doing so.
Until it is too late.
In short, while we have little
idea of the effectiveness of
various treatments and safety
measures, what is absolutely

TELL US WHAT
YOU THINK

MLK

Continued from E1

By sheer luck, that
assignment led to my
meeting later in the
privacy of the King
home and to my personal introduction to
his incredible gifts as an
orator.
King, ending the
freezing march at 11:15
p.m., told me, “This is
a dangerous section of
town. Let me escort you
to your car.”
When we reached my
car several blocks away,
I offered to drive him
home. At that time, the
Kings lived on nearby
Johnson Street.
As I stopped the car
to let King out, his wife,
Coretta, pregnant with
their last child, came to
the door and said,
“Come on in and have
some hot coffee. You’ll
warm up.” King led me
to a phone in his office,
and I quickly called in
my strike story.
I then joined the couple at their dining room
table, sipping coffee and
talking about what had
become known as the
Movement.
I’d long been impressed with King’s
personal magnetism and
flow of words at news
conferences, but sitting
at their table late that
night, I was struck by
his simple brilliance as a
leader. His ability to put
into words the longings,
the hopes and dreams of
his people, their anguish
and their cry for human
dignity, clearly was a
great gift.
After that night — although King was known
for never calling reporters by their first names
— he always called me

not in doubt is that playing
tackle football is damaging to
the brain. That is indisputable. The only question is the
extent of the damage.
So here’s the question: Why
are so many people fighting so
hard to deny the science and
promote suspect and unproven safety improvements
to continue to justify allowing children to play what is

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Actor and comedian Bill Cosby arrives for a court appearance in Elkins Park, Montgomery County on Dec. 30.

sexual assault, as well
as to impacted family
members, regardless of
how long ago the sexual
violence occurred.
There is healing for
survivors of sexual assault, and breaking the
silence is the first step.

clearly a brutal sport that has
been proven to cause brain
damage?
In deciding to allow a child
to participate, parents face a
balancing act deciding whether the dangers outweigh the
potential benefits of participation. That is difficult. But
there are many other sports
(including flag football) and
activities, such as band and
theater, that instill character traits such as discipline,
teamwork skills and personal
responsibility. Tackle football
does not have the market
cornered on teaching those
lessons and skills.
Meanwhile, we have age
limits and laws designed to
protect children from a host
of activities that have been
proven to be dangerous to
them, including smoking and
alcohol consumption. Workplace safety laws, for instance,
prohibit minors from operating certain kinds of equip-

Find your local rape
crisis center (1-888-7727227) for counseling and
advocacy. In Lancaster
County, please call the
YWCA Lancaster Sexual
Assault Prevention &
Counseling Center’s 24hour hotline: 392-7273.

ment.
So why is football not prohibited for children?
Just because your child
wants to play at the age of 12
or 14 does not mean you have
to let him. What would you
say, for example, if your child
came to you at that age and
stated, “I’d like to begin smoking cigarettes and dropping
acid”? With such certainty
regarding the link between
football and brain damage
and such uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of safety
measures and treatment, why
take the chance?
Ultimately, this is about
anatomy, child safety and
parental responsibility.
I’d strongly suggest that
every parent with a child playing football or interested in
playing football see the movie
“Concussion.” And afterward,
look in the mirror and ask
yourself, “Was my child made
to play football?”

Do you think children should be permitted to play tackle football? Weigh in with your thoughts in a letter to the
editor. Email letters to: LancasterLetters@lnpnews.com; send by fax to 399-6507; or mail to: Letters, c/o LNP,
P.O. Box 1328, Lancaster, PA 17608-1328. Or share your thoughts on LancasterOnline.com at:
n bit.ly/GerdyFootball

Kathryn.
King was to me a
young, well-educated
Baptist minister who
came out of the Jim
Crow churches of the
South preaching brotherhood and nonviolence.
But it was into a land
filled with violence.
Blacks were being
beaten, lynched and
terrorized by Ku Klux
Klansmen who drove
into their neighborhoods wearing their long
white robes and hooded
masks to frighten them.
King, too, had been
threatened — a bomb
had been thrown at his
home in Montgomery,
Alabama, and later in
Atlanta, Klan night riders had burned a cross in
his front yard.
It was 1:15 a.m. before
I left the King home, and
both King and Coretta
stood at the door waiting
until I drove off.
At home that morning, I took a breakfast
tray into the den so
that I could watch TV
news. When the Scripto
strike story came on,
my mother, spotting
me as the only white
person in the crowd and
walking alongside King,
questioning him, said,
“Honey, be careful. I’m
afraid someday someone’s going to try to kill
that man.”

1968

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

Clad in a neat, dark
suit and sitting comfortably in a swivel chair in
his office with its dingy
green walls and bare
floors, Martin Luther
King didn’t seem like the
revolutionary leader he
was.
I had no idea that this
would be my last interview with him — it was
in 1968, not long before
he was assassinated.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Retired Associated Press reporter Kathryn Johnson at her
home in Atlanta.

King had begun speaking of President Lyndon
Johnson’s Great Society — the president’s
lifelong dream to revitalize our big cities, protect
natural resources and
guarantee educational
opportunities for all. But
that great hope, King
told me, was being shot
down in the rice paddies
of Vietnam.
“A few years ago was a
shining moment in the
civil rights struggle,” he
said. “Then came the
buildup in Vietnam, and
I watched the program
broken as if it were an
idle plaything of a society gone mad with war.”
The nation’s focus was
on the war, and King’s
fierce distaste for it kept
recurring. “The war
must be stopped,” he
said.
Already, he had urged
every young man who
found the war “objectionable and unjust” to
file as a conscientious
objector ...
King told me he would
continue the struggle for
equality that had begun
in the black churches of
the South, but now he
had concluded that racism was only part of the
problem — that poverty
and the Vietnam War
were major parts of it.
His outspoken op-

position to the war was
raising fears among
civil rights leaders of a
stiffening white reaction. Some felt it was a
mistake to put the issues
of fighting for civil rights
together with opposition
to the war.
“We’ll build our shanties — literal brokendown shanties — to
dramatize and symbolize the day-to-day
conditions for the way
millions of people have
to live,” King said. ...
At this time, King and
the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference
had begun organizing a coalition of black
people, Hispanics and
poor whites for the Poor
People’s Campaign. His
plan was to deal with the
whole question of economic justice by taking
this squatter army of the
nation’s poor to the Mall
in Washington. There,
the tumble-down shanties would contrast with
the cherry blossoms
along the Potomac. ...
King then spoke of the
alternative to nonviolence, which he never
tired of repeating: “I’ve
been to the ghettos; I
know the resentments
will blow up if something is not done quickly.
We’re going all out to get
this nation to respond to

nonviolence. If it refuses
to do this, it will entitle
the Negro to so intensify
his anger that we will go
deeper and deeper into
chaos.”
While violence created outrage, televised
accounts of such events
also dramatized the injustice facing his people.
King used that strategy
in an effort to “shame
the nation into action.”
When he told me the
army of protesters in the
Poor People’s Campaign
was to invade “the very
seat of power,” I asked,
“How effective would
they be?”
He replied that he
had few illusions about
persuading Congress
to action. “Congress
sits there, recalcitrant,
a sickness upon them.
When you look at Congress, you see they are
never moved to act unless the nation gets them
to move. We never got
the civil rights bill until
we had Selma,” he said,
referring to the assault
on peaceful demonstrators in that Alabama
town.
“A new kind of Selma is
needed,” he said.
King told me he
had long weighed and
agonized over the risk of
such action, but he felt
the Poor People’s campaign was a “last-ditch
chance for nonviolence.”
I asked, “What about
the risk of a takeover by
extremists?”
King replied, “I am
convinced I can control
them. If we came to a
situation where our
actions were leading to
violence, I would call it
off.”
He began talking about
the enormous wealth of
America, which he felt
should be used through
tax policies to promote

chances of a decent life
for the poor ...
With his guiding
principle of nonviolent
action, King became
the symbol of the black
struggle. Their revolt
against oppression could
easily have gone in a
different, even deadly
direction. It did not,
thanks to King’s creed of
nonviolence.
More than any other
man, King was the voice
of the Movement. Yet, in
the heyday of the ’60s,
a great many others
helped change America.
Too little credit is given
to the women who were
crucial in the fight to
end segregation, as were
the many capable young
black ministers who
worked with King.
After King was killed,
two of his trusted
friends, Harry Belafonte,
the singer and activist,
and Stanley Levison, a
white lawyer and longtime adviser to King,
wrote, “Under his leadership millions of black
Americans emerged
from spiritual imprisonment, from fear, from
apathy, and took to the
streets to proclaim their
freedom.”
Those words echoed
what King himself once
said: “The real victory
was what this period
did to the psyche of the
black man. The greatness of this period was
that we armed ourselves
with dignity and selfrespect.”
After his death, some
whites — and a few
blacks — tried to transform him into merely
a dreamer. King was a
dreamer, all right, but he
was also a revolutionary.

OPINION

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

E5

Sunday Conversation
GEORGE WILL
THE WASHINGTON POST

Why Chris Christie could win
GOP nod and White House, too

If (Trump) wants to engage in personal attacks
from the past, that’s his prerogative. It’s been fair
game going back to the Republicans for some
years. They can do it again if they want to. … I
think it’s a dead end, (a) blind alley for them.
—­Hillary Clinton

DOYLE MCMANUS
LOS ANGELES TIMES

Sadly, Trump is right about
Bill Clinton’s sexual history
Is Bill Clinton’s sexual history fair
game in the 2016 campaign? Donald
Trump certainly thinks so.
“Hillary is an enabler,” he said in
one interview. “She’s married to an
abuser!” he said in another. “If she’s
going to play the woman card, it’s all
fair game,” he added.
The sad thing is, he’s right.
Hillary Clinton does play the
gender card, relentlessly. She has
frequently reminded voters that she
would be the first female president
and has cast herself as a champion of
women’s causes.
In September, at a college campus
in Iowa, she pledged to fight sexual
assault, saying: “I want to send a
message to all of the survivors. Don’t
let anyone silence your voice. You
have the right to be heard, the right
to be believed, and we are with you as
you go forward.”
Then she sent her husband, former
President Bill Clinton, onto the campaign trail. Although he’s now beloved
by millions, everyone knows he’s a
liability. He was impeached in 1998
after an illicit affair with a 22-year-old
White House intern, Monica Lewinsky. He was sued for sexual harassment
by a former Arkansas state employee,
Paula Jones (he settled with no acknowledgment of guilt). And he was
accused of rape by a former campaign
volunteer, Juanita Broaddrick; the
charge was never adjudicated because
Broaddrick waited 21 years before
making it.
Last month, a young woman at a
town meeting in New Hampshire
confronted Hillary Clinton about
those cases. If survivors have the
right to be believed, she asked, what
about Bill Clinton’s accusers?
The candidate looked stunned
for a moment, then answered: “I
would say that everybody should
be believed at first — until they are
disbelieved based on evidence.”
Is there a wide enough gap between
Hillary Clinton’s rhetoric and Bill
Clinton’s record to make this a legitimate issue in the campaign? Sure.
This isn’t about Bill Clinton’s philandering; voters decided what they
thought about that long ago. And it
would be grotesque to blame his wife
for sins he committed against her.
But it’s reasonable to ask whether
Bill Clinton, a public figure acting
as a surrogate for his wife, lived up
to her 2016 standards for treating
potential survivors of sexual abuse.
The answer is: He didn’t. Twenty

years ago, Bill Clinton and his associates did their best to discredit his
accusers. The pithiest, as usual, was
James Carville, who said of Paula
Jones: “If you drag a hundred-dollar
bill through a trailer park, you never
know what you’ll find.”
It’s reasonable, as well, to ask what
role Hillary Clinton played in those
cases. But on that count, the evidence
is thin.
She told a friend, Diane Blair, that
Monica Lewinsky was a “loony tune”
— but that was a private comment
that surfaced years later, not a public
slam. And at the time, Bill Clinton
had falsely assured her that Lewinsky was lying and that there had been
no sexual relationship.
As far as is known, Hillary Clinton
didn’t throw herself in the way of her
husband’s attack dogs. She didn’t speak
out in defense of his accusers. She
didn’t resign as first lady. She remained
doggedly loyal to her faithless husband
— often through gritted teeth.
Does that make her an “enabler”?
Suggesting, in effect, that Hillary
Clinton had a duty to desert her
husband is a pretty tough standard to
demand of any spouse.
Now, 20 years later, Clinton is pulling out the usual playbook: Insist that
there’s nothing here to see. Accuse
your critics of partisanship (perfectly
true, in this case). Argue that the campaign should focus on current problems, not old ones (also perfectly true).
And warn your opponents that they’ve
chosen the wrong strategy.
“If (Trump) wants to engage in
personal attacks from the past, that’s
his prerogative,” she said last Sunday.
“It’s been fair game going back to the
Republicans for some years. They can
do it again if they want to. … I think it’s
a dead end, (a) blind alley for them.”
But Trump, whose record as a
champion of women exists mostly
in his imagination, shows no sign of
relenting.
“I haven’t even started in on her
yet,” he bragged Monday.
And even if a more gentlemanly Republican wins the GOP nomination,
conservative activists are certain to
keep the questions alive.
Because Hillary Clinton is a
candidate, every part of her record
qualifies as fair game. And if she
continues to deploy her husband as
a spokesman, his record is fair game,
too. Sooner or later, Clinton needs to
confront the past, talk about it — and
then try to move on.

n Doyle McManus is the Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times.
Twitter: @DoyleMcManus

WASHINGTON — Iowa and New
Hampshire together have just 1.4
percent of the U.S. population, which
is actually why it is fine for them
to begin the presidential selection
process: Small states reward an underdog’s retail politics. Chris Christie
relishes such politics and has fresh
evidence that voters are enjoying his
enjoyment.
Speaking on Wednesday by phone
from his home away from home, New
Hampshire, he said: “People have remembered why they liked me in the
first place.” His saturation campaigning there has produced a 55-point
reversal of his favorable/unfavorable
rating in the Granite State, from 16
points more unfavorable than favorable to 39 points more favorable than
unfavorable. According to last week’s
Des Moines Register/Bloomberg
poll, Christie’s favorability number
in Iowa is 51 percent, up from 29
percent in August, when his unfavorability number was 59 percent.
Nationally, among all the Republican candidates, the ABC/Washington
Post poll finds Christie’s favorability
rating “most improved,” from 35
percent last spring to 53 percent
today. He gained among conservatives (23 points), among Republicans
generally (18) and independents (14).
The latter matters because, as David
W. Brady of Stanford and the Hoover
Institution wrote last week in The
Wall Street Journal:
“The arithmetic is pretty simple: 41
percent of voters in the 2012 presidential election described themselves as
moderates, and 29 percent as independents. Almost all Republicans (93 percent) and self-described conservatives
(82 percent) voted for Mitt Romney,
but that wasn’t enough. Even if Mr.
Romney had won every Republican
or conservative voter, it still wouldn’t
have been enough. Because there are
roughly 5 percent more Democrats
than Republicans, the GOP needs a
solid majority of independents to win
a national election. In 2012 Mitt Romney outpolled Barack Obama among
independents, 50 percent to 45 percent. But that didn’t take him across
the Electoral College finish line.”
Christie has won twice statewide in a
blue state that last voted for a Republican presidential candidate in 1988. He
correctly says no rival for the Republican nomination has been elected in
a state so inhospitable to Republicans.
In New Jersey, 48 percent of registered
voters are unaffiliated with either the
Democratic (32 percent) or Republican (20 percent) parties. Christie won
re-election with 60 percent of the vote,
including 57 percent of women, 51

percent of Hispanics and 21 percent of
African-Americans.
Christie might benefit from Donald
Trump’s caroms in this year’s political pinball machine. As Jeremy Carl
of the Hoover Institution argues in
National Review, Republicans cannot win with Trump or without his
supporters. Christie could be an alternative alpha persona, but without
the ignorance. (Check Trump on the
nuclear triad.) In 2012, Republicans
nominated a Northeastern blue-state
governor, with unsatisfactory results.
Christie, however, might be an unRomney, connecting viscerally with
voters — especially whites without
college educations — who in 2012
stayed away from the polls in droves.
Christie will campaign in Iowa for
nine days before the Feb. 1 caucuses.
If they yield a cloudy result — say, the
top four finishers clustered within
four points — New Hampshire will
become the scythe that reduces
the field. Christie plans to be “the
last governor standing” when, after
South Carolina at the latest, he
expects former Govs. Mike Huckabee
and Jeb Bush and current Gov. John
Kasich to join current and former
Govs. Scott Walker, Rick Perry,
Bobby Jindal, George Pataki and Jim
Gilmore on the sidelines.
As chairman of the Republican
Governors Association in 2014,
Christie campaigned frenetically, dispersing more than $100 million as 17
Republican governors were re-elected and seven new ones were elected.
So far, only four governors have endorsed candidates: Alabama’s Robert
Bentley supports Kasich, Arkansas’s
Asa Hutchinson supports Huckabee,
Maryland’s Larry Hogan and Maine’s
Paul LePage support Christie. So, 24
Republican governors, many of them
indebted to Christie and all of them
disposed to admire executives, have
political muscles to flex.
Ted Cruz and Trump are at last at
daggers drawn, the former saying the
latter has “New York values” — fighting words in most Republican circles
— and the latter saying the former is
not a natural born citizen. Republicans concerned about losing control
of the Senate already wonder whether
vulnerable GOP senators — Illinois’
Mark Kirk, Ohio’s Rob Portman, Pennsylvania’s Pat Toomey, Wisconsin’s
Ron Johnson, New Hampshire’s Kelly
Ayotte — want either Trump or Cruz at
the top of the ticket, or even campaigning in their states.
“I was not on the [debate] stage two
months ago,” Christie says. He expects to be at the center of the stage
at the Cleveland convention.

n George Will is a columnist for The Washington Post. Twitter: @GeorgeWill

Republicans cannot win with Trump or without his
supporters. Christie could be an alternative alpha
persona, but without the ignorance.

E6

LNP | LANCASTER, PA

SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 2016

generation

BY,
FOR
AND
ABOUT
TEENS

FRESH TAKES

FEED OF THE WEEK

Twitter:
@HolySiaFurler
n What started out as

a Sia parody account is
now a whip-smart series
of cultural commentary,
mostly critiquing or sharing
memes related to music
and entertainment. Though
she’s been preaching the
virtues of Lana Del Ray
a lot lately, you might
recognize her from a
recent thread in which she
described the typecasted
songs of modern artists
in droll one-liners. Five
Seconds of Summer, she
says, bases all of its songs
on a simple feeling of
stress: “We are so angry,
we are broken teens.”
Lorde has “punch my friend
in the face” embedded in
her lyrics, Miley Cyrus, “last
name Cyrus, first name
Miley.” At times you’ll wish
you could be as creative
as “Sia,” but the real kicker
lies in the fact that the
flaws she mocks in her
tweets are so apparent that
anyone should be able to
relate to them, or at least
appreciate them.
—Katie Weaver, 17

These looks from Target showcase some of the popular looks for this year, including ruffles, florals, layers and marled knits.

Fashion-forward looks
to get you through 2016

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The minimalist trend — and its “less is
more mantra” — defined trends in 2015,
with muted color patterns, clean lines
and simple shapes. Consider that a palate
cleanser for what’s to come in 2016.
Runways previewing 2016 collections
have dropped some not-so-subtle hints
that 2016 styles will be big and bold, albeit
feminine. Traditional springtime English
garden florals will get juxtaposed with
black lace for a grunge edge. Louis Vuitton
and Balmain shows are ruffling fashion,
with the lady-like detailing proving popular on dresses and blouses and skirts.
Here’s a preview of six trends in store for
2016.

Bold stripes
Stripes are a perennial fashion trend. But
the more common dainty Breton stripes
we see appear in spring are being usurped
by wide, colorful stripes. This structured
ponte top has nautical navy stripes that
are subtle in scale, but is popped with wider ribbons of lime for a fresh take on the
striped shirt staple.

Ruffle your wardrobe
From bold, all-over flamenco ruffles on
dresses to subtle ruffles at hemlines, the
feminine detail is a designer favorite for
2016. We love how the soft ruffles on the
sleeve and at the hemline transform this
shift dress into a unique, statement piece
that comes in sapphire, pine or black.

Jewelry that makes a
statement
A statement necklace has the superpower ability to transform an entire jeansand-T-shirt outfit or add a “wow” factor to
a shift dress. Anthropologie is one of our
favorite places to go shopping for unique,
statement pieces. We’re loving the Bainbridge Layer Necklace with mixed textures
and four strands of beads that harmoniously blend mixed metals, blue hues and
cream, marble-like stones.

Neat pleats
A little bit preppy, dainty, knife pleats
are re-emerging for 2016. Loft has a dar-

ling take on the trend with a pleated flippy
dress in burgundy with long sleeves and
a flattering drop waist. For a fashion-forward combo, combine burgundy with a
bold, azure blue accessory for an unexpected color palette.

Marled knits

‘How Taylor Swift Reversed
Female Opinion to Become
the Most Famous Pop Star
in the World’
on BuzzFeed
n You can love or hate her, but
Taylor Swift has spent the last
year cementing herself as a
cultural phenomenon, and it’s
worked. BuzzFeed UK staffer Ellie
Woodward charts Swift’s shocking
ascent to her “Shake it Off” goodgirl persona and the careful public
relations planning behind it. If
you’ve ever had a desire to live life
as Swift, the methods she uses to
change her appearance will seem
constraining after reading this eyeopening piece.
—Katie Weaver, 17

LISTEN

Moody florals
Floral patterns blossom every spring.
This year, they are less soft, more moody.
Find delicate florals mixed with lace details on blouses and dark backgrounds on
dresses. Have year-round flower power in
your wardrobe with the graphic floral hues
set on a black canvas with this short-sleeve
floral sheath dress. Wear with a black moto
jacket to give it extra edge.

WATCH

WEAR

Caleb
Benjamin
18, of Mountville
n Benjamin attends

‘No Type’
by Zayn Malik

n Zayn Malik went solo, and

amidst the whirlwind of outcry,
“No Type” was leaked by
Naughty Boy. Though the song
is just an old One Direction
track that never hit an album,
it does showcase Malik’s vocal
prowess and ability. The slow
soul feel of the music gives
us a taste of Malik’s personal
style, while the track’s vocals
showcase the scope of the
young artist’s capabilities.
His style is a far cry from the
synthetic, loop-heavy pop of
his former group.
—Caleb Weaver, 17

‘Creed’
n must see | don’t see | just rent

Ryan Coogler’s direction
brings the “Rocky” franchise
roaring back to life and
Sylvester Stallone gives an
emotional performance in
a riveting boxing film that
deserves to be seen.

Designers like Jason Wu and Michael Kors
have been previewing pretty marled knits in
their 2016 collections. Start the new year
off in style with a marled knit sweater dress
that’s classic, but chic. Polish off the look
with heeled booties and a jolt of color — like
a burgundy purse and swipe of lipstick.

THE LIST
READ

10-SECOND
MOVIE REVIEWS

‘Star Wars: The
Force Awakens’

in theaters
n Thirty years after the defeat
of the Galactic Empire, the
galaxy faces a new threat
from the evil Kylo Ren and the
First Order. When a defector
named Finn crash-lands on
a desert planet, he meets
Rey, a tough scavenger with
a top-secret map. They join
forces with Han Solo to make
sure the Resistance receives
the intelligence concerning the
whereabouts of Jedi Knight
Luke Skywalker. The amazing
graphics will denitely keep
viewers engaged.
—Sneha Mittal, 16

Naval Nuclear Power
School in Goose Creek,
South Carolina.

n His shirt is worn

in honor of a favorite
band.

n “I listen to a lot of

music, and I work out
a lot.”

n “I wear a lot of

black, white and gray,
because it all goes
together.”
—Ethan Sterenfeld, 17

‘The Hateful Eight’
n must see | don’t see | just rent

Fans of Quentin Tarantino
will surely love his latest
entry, replete with all of
the characteristic violence,
language and dialogue
you’ve come to expect from
the auteur.

—Damian Hondares, 20

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