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An Old Scourge Returns.

Measles cases are on the


rise as growing numbers of families forgo immunization
Reported In the first four months of this year, 64 confirmed cases of measles were reported in
Measles Cases the U.S., scattered across 11 hot spots. This is the most by this date for any year since
U.S., in thousands 2001; 54 cases had links to other countries, and only one of the 64 patients had been
800
vaccinated. The outbreaks in Arizona and San Diego can be traced to travel to and
¤šyo from Switzerland, where many people choose not to be vaccinated.
Peak year:
763,094 cases;
552 deaths
É| Measles cases in the U.S., Jan. 1 to April 25, 2008
700
Milwaukee County, Wis.
Missaukee County, Mich.
New York City
Pittsburgh, Pa.
600

|
|
ÔÔ
¤ ¤
¤
500 Chicago
¤
Nassau
County, N.Y.

Los Angeles ¤ Fairfax, Va.


400 San Diego ¤¤
¤y
¤šÉÏ Pima
First measles County,
vaccine licensed Ariz. Honolulu
300
Ï

200 Percentage of kindergarten children


exempted from vaccinations for
0% 0.1% 1.1% 2.1% 3.1% 4.1% 5.1%
religious or philosophical reasons* to to to to to to
1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 5.9%
This chart represents only reported
100 cases of measles; before the
advent of a vaccine, actual
incidence of the disease is
ÔååÉ
estimated to have been as high as
55 cases
3 million to 4 million cases per year
0
’50 ’54 ’58 ’62 ’66 ’70 ’74 ’78 ’82 ’86 ’90 ’94 ’98 ’02 ’06
18 months or older

Recommended
12 to 15 months
12 to 23 months
15 to 18 months
6 to 18 months

Childhood
11 to 12 years
1 to 2 months

4 to 6 years

Immunization
2 months
4 months
6 months

6 months

Schedule
or older
At birth

Vaccine Doses Protects against


j¬?͉͉ÄË 3 Hepatitis B (chronic inflammation of the liver)
0?+ 5 Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (whooping cough)
‰M 4 Infections of the blood, brain (meningitis), joints, inner ears or lungs (pneumonia)
+‰ 4 Polio
+
7È 4 Infections of the blood, brain (meningitis), joints, inner ears or lungs (pneumonia)
-Í?܉ÁÖÄ 3 Rotavirus (diarrhea and vomiting)
™wÖj™ã? 2† Flu and complications
- 2 Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles)
7?Á‰Wj? 2 Chicken pox
j¬?͉͉ÄË 2 Hepatitis A (inflammation of the liver)
0a?¬ 1 Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (whooping cough)

7| 1 Infections of the blood, brain (meningitis), joints or lungs (pneumonia)
+7 3 Human papillomavirus (females only)
A child can safely receive all vaccines recommended for a particular age during one visit. Combination vaccines can be used to reduce the number of injections.
*State-reported data compiled by the CDC/National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Immunization Services Division, Assessment Branch †One dose yearly thereafter Source: CDC