You are on page 1of 8

Physics 51

Syllabus

Fall 2015

Mission Statement: Harvey Mudd College seeks to educate engineers, scientists and mathematicians well versed in all of these areas and in the humanities and social sciences so that they may
assume leadership in their fields with a clear understanding of the impact of their work on society.
Course Goals: Students who take this course should finish with a basic understanding of static and
dynamic electromagnetic systems, the classical and quantum behavior of light, and the importance
of electricity and magnetism in modern society. In addition, students should develop an increased
appreciation of the role mathematics plays in describing the physical world.
Successful students in this course will be able to:
Calculate fields and forces resulting from electric charge and current distributions
Work with the wave equation to describe the propagation of electromagnetic waves
Derive the interference and diffraction patterns of light using the fundamental principles of
quantum mechanics
Lectures: Tuesday and Thursday 8:109:25 am in Shanahan 1430.
Sections: Monday and Wednesday 8, 9, 10, 11 am, 1:15 pm. (There will be no recitation sections
held November 25, the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, but the homework will be collected in your
section instructors office.)
Course Instructors: J. Eckert, S. Gerbode, T. Lynn, G. Lyzenga, S. Nichols, J. Townsend.
Texts: Physics by Halliday, Resnick, and Krane, 5th Edition, Volume 2, available at Huntley
Bookstore and Quantum Optics by J. S. Townsend, available in the Physics Department office (Keck
1234) for $5. (The Townsend text is Chapter 1 of the Physics 52 textbook Quantum Physics: A
Fundamental Approach to Modern Physics. Some students may wish to purchase the full text at
Huntley.)
Homework: Problems will generally come from the texts; however, a few are attached to the syllabus (these problems are designated SUP). Students should write up problems neatly, beginning
with the problem statement. It is generally wise to use words as well as equations and diagrams so
that your writeup explains both the problem and your solution to a reader at your level.
All problems are due at the beginning of recitation section. In general, late homework will not
be graded without an acceptable reason; it is the students responsibility to contact the instructor
in advance for permission. In calculating the final homework grade, two homework scores will be
dropped so as to maximize each students score.
Solutions to the homework problems will be posted on the course Sakai site. Recitation problem
answers but not solutions will also be posted. In this way, recitation problems can be used as a
genuine store of unsolved practice problems for study purposes. Students are encouraged to discuss
them with each other and with instructors.

In addition to the guidelines above, this course will also adhere, under the HMC Honor Code, to
the following homework policy:
When working on homework, you may not use homework or recitation problem solutions from
Physics 51 in previous years or from sources external to HMC.
You should start by working on the problem sets independently, and discuss the problems with
classmates and instructors only after making a reasonable attempt at independent solutions.
Final solutions should be prepared by each student individually, without directly consulting
any material written by others.
If you write on your papers during recitation to remind yourself of the correct method or
answer, make it clear to the grader that this material is not to be graded.
Each Monday problem set includes an asterisked problem. To help you gauge your learning
and to develop the ability to solve problems independently, this problem is to be done without
assistance from other students (including students not in the course, such as AE tutors);
however, you may speak with course instructors for general guidance. If you are unable to
complete a problem on your own, for maximal credit you should still present the solution as
far as you are able to independently develop it.
These rules are established to help you learn the course material and to be fair to all students.
Exams: This semester there will be two 75-minute exams and a three-hour final exam. All exams
will be closed books and notes. They will cover material from the lectures, text, section discussions,
and homework problems. The first exam is scheduled for Thursday, October 1, from 8:10 to 9:25 am;
the second exam will be on Thursday, November 12, from 8:10 to 9:25 am. The final exam will take
place on Wednesday, December 16, from 7:00 to 10.00 pm.
Grades: The course grade will be determined from the final exam (35%), two midterm exams
(totaling 45%, with the higher exam result counting for 25%), and homework (20%). In addition,
class participation in the recitation section will be used at your instructors discretion as part of
the homework score in the determination of final grades.
Getting the Most Out of Physics 51: Each student should attend and actively participate in
lectures and recitations, and do the assigned reading and homework problems in order to master
the course material. Assigned reading will be most helpful to your learning if it is done before the
lecture. If you have questions about the homework problems or course concepts, you are encouraged
first and foremost to see your section instructor or other instructors in the course. You might also
find it helpful to attend Academic Excellence or talk to your classmates.
Electronic Device Use in Lecture and Recitation: During class please silence your cell phone
and do not use it to place calls, text, or access the Internet. You may not use an electronic device
during class for purposes other than those related to the course, such as taking notes.
Students Requiring Extra Time on Exams: If you are permitted extra time on exams, it is
your responsibility to notify your recitation instructor at least a week before each exam to make
your needs known. This allows us to arrange for appropriate extra space in which you can take the
exam.
Honor Code: The HMC Honor Code applies to all students in this course.

Physics 51 Schedule
Date

Day

Assignment

Sept 1

Tue

Lecture 1 Coulombs Law, the Electric Field, and Superposition


Read: HRK Chapters 25 and 26

Sept 2

Wed

Recitation 1 Problem Set 1: HRK E26.8, E26.16, P26.1

Sept 3

Thurs

Lecture 2 Gausss Law


Read: HRK Chapter 27

Sept 7

Mon

Recitation 2 Problem Set 2: HRK P26.7*, P27.2, P27.6, P27.16

Sept 8

Tue

Lecture 3 Applications of Gausss Law


Review: HRK Chapter 27

Sept 9

Wed

Recitation 3 Problem Set 3: HRK E27.22, P27.17

Sept 10

Thurs

Lecture 4 Electric Potential and Potential Energy


Read: HRK Chapter 28

Sept 14

Mon

Recitation 4 Problem Set 4: HRK P27.13*, E28.2, E28.12, P28.4

Sept 15

Tue

Lecture 5 Electric Potential Applications


Review: HRK Chapter 28

Sept 16

Wed

Recitation 5 Problem Set 5: HRK P28.6, P28.10

Sept 17

Thurs

Lecture 6 Differential Forms for Electrostatics


Read: Feynman, Vol. II, Sections 3-1 through 3-8

Sept 21

Mon

Recitation 6 Problem Set 6: HRK P28.12*, E28.35, E28.42; SUP1


Note: In E28.35 also determine the volume charge density between the plates
and the surface charge density on the plates, assuming one plate is
at x = 0 and the other at x = 1.28 cm. The plates are conductors.

Sept 22

Tue

Lecture 7 Capacitors and Energy in the Electric Field


Read: HRK Chapter 30

Sept 23

Wed

Recitation 7 Problem Set 7: HRK E30.27, E30.37

Sept 24

Thurs

Lecture 8 Electric Fields in Matter


Read: HRK Chapter 29

* problems are to be done independently

Date

Day

Assignment

Sept 28

Mon

Recitation 8 Problem Set 8: HRK P30.13*, E30.40; SUP2

Sept 29

Tue

Lecture 9 DC Circuits
Read: HRK Chapter 31

Sept 30

Wed

Recitation 9 Review for the exam (no homework)

Oct 1

Thurs

First Midterm Exam (8:109:25 am)

Oct 5

Mon

Recitation 10 Problem Set 9: HRK P31.18*, P29.6

Oct 6

Tue

Lecture 10 The Magnetic Field


Read: HRK Chapter 32

Oct 7

Wed

Recitation 11 Problem Set 10: HRK E32.32, P32.6

Oct 8

Thurs

Lecture 11 Sources of Magnetic Field


Read: HRK Sections 33-1 through 33-4

Oct 12

Mon

Recitation 12 Problem Set 11: HRK E33.24*, E33.13, P33.2, P33.8

Oct 13

Tue

Lecture 12 Amp`eres Law


Read: HRK Sections 33-5 and 33-6

Oct 14

Wed

Recitation 13 Problem Set 12: HRK E33.33 (parts (a)-(e) only), P33.12

Oct 15

Thurs

Lecture 13 Electromagnetism and Special Relativity


Read: Feynman, Vol. II, Section 13-6
Helliwell, Introduction to Special Relativity, Appendix J

Oct 19

Mon

Fall Break

Oct 20

Tue

Fall Break

Oct 21

Wed

Recitation 14 Additional recitation problems on Amp`eres law

Oct 22

Thurs

Lecture 14 Faradays Law


Read: HRK Chapter 34

* problems are to be done independently

Date

Day

Assignment

Oct 26

Mon

Recitation 15 Problem Set 13: HRK P33.13*, E34.23, E34.30, P34.9

Oct 27

Tue

Lecture 15 Inductance, Magnetic Energy, and LR Circuits


Read: HRK Sections 36-1 through 36-4

Oct 28

Wed

Recitation 16 Problem Set 14: HRK E36.21, P36.9

Oct 29

Thurs

Lecture 16 Completing Maxwells Equations


Read: HRK Sections 38-1 through 38-3

Nov 2

Mon

Recitation 17 Problem Set 15: HRK P34.6*, P38.3; SUP3, SUP4

Nov 3

Tue

Lecture 17 Electromagnetic Waves


Read: HRK Sections 38-4, 38-5

Nov 4

Wed

Recitation 18 Problem Set 16: HRK E38.16, E38.22; SUP5

Nov 5

Thurs

Lecture 18 Conservation of Energy and the Poynting Vector


Read: HRK Sections 38-6, 38-7

Nov 9

Mon

Recitation 19 Problem Set 17: HRK P38.13*, P38.14, E38.25, E38.28

Nov 10

Tue

Lecture 19 Magnetic Materials


Read: HRK Chapter 35

Nov 11

Wed

Recitation 20 Review for the exam (no homework)

Nov 12

Thurs

Second Midterm Exam (8:109:25 am)

Nov 16

Mon

Recitation 21 Problem Set 18: HRK P38.5*, E35.12, P35.1, E35.9

Nov 17

Tue

Lecture 20 Reflection, Transmission, and Interference of E&M Waves


Read: HRK Section 41-5, Townsend Sections 1.1, 1.2

Nov 18

Wed

Recitation 22 Problem Set 19: HRK E41.23; SUP6

Nov 19

Thurs

Lecture 21: Polarization


Read: HRK Chapter 44

* problems are to be done independently

Date

Day

Assignment

Nov 23

Mon

Recitation 23 Problem Set 20: HRK P41.7*, P44.3, P44.4, E44.3

Nov 24

Tue

Lecture 22 The Particle Nature of Light


Read: Townsend Section 1.3

Nov 25

Wed

Problem Set 21: Townsend Problems 1.4, 1.9, 1.13


Sections do not meet

Nov 26

Thurs

Thanksgiving

Nov 30

Mon

Recitation 24 Discuss Problem Set 21 and additional recitation problems

Dec 1

Tue

Lecture 23 The Quantum Nature of Light: Single-Photon Interference


Read: Townsend Sections 1.4, 1.5

Dec 2

Wed

Recitation 25 Problem Set 22: Townsend Problems 1.19, 1.24, 1.26


Note: In Problem 1.24 use = 706 nm.

Dec 3

Thurs

Lecture 24 Double-Slit Interference, Diffraction Gratings


Read: Townsend Sections 1.6, 1.7

Dec 7

Mon

Recitation 26 Problem Set 23: Townsend Problems 1.25*, 1.27, 1.29, 1.34

Dec 8

Tue

Lecture 25 Single-Slit Diffraction, the Principle of Least Time


Read: HRK Chapter 42, Townsend Section 1.8

Dec 9

Wed

Recitation 27 Problem Set 24: Townsend Problems 1.37, 1.43

Dec 10

Thurs

Lecture 26 Atom Interferometry

Dec 16

Wed

Final Exam (7-10 pm)

* problems are to be done independently

Supplemental Problems
~ = y
SUP1: Consider the vector field C
x + x
y in the x-y plane.
(a) Sketch the field lines.
~ C.
~
(b) Calculate
(c) Calculate

~ d`~ over the closed curve x2 + y 2 = 1.


C

(d) Show that Stokes theorem holds by evaluating


the curve in part (c).

~ C)
~ dA
~ over a surface bounded by
(

SUP2: A dielectric material of dielectric constant e and thickness b is placed in the interior of a
parallel-plate capacitor with plate separation d, shown below. Assume that there is a uniform free
surface charge density on the plates of the capacitor.
(a) What is the polarization charge density pol induced on each surface of the dielectric? Hint:
Determine your answer using Gausss law and the definition of the dielectric constant, e =
E0 /E.
(b) Show that the capacitance is given by
C=

e 0 A
b + e (d b)

SUP3: A parallel-plate capacitor has circular plates of radius R and separation d. The capacitor
is connected to a battery of voltage V and then disconnected so that the charge ought to remain
constant. The air is humid, however, and the stored charge leaks back across the capacitor gap
at the rate ileak . Assume that this leakage current is uniformly distributed across the area of the
plates. Find the magnetic field everywhere between the plates.

SUP4: In a material of non-zero electrical resistivity , the relationship between electric field
~ = ~j. For copper, = 2 108 m. A copper wire with a circular
and current density is E
cross-sectional area of 4 mm2 carries a current of 40 A.
(a) What is the longitudinal electric field (field along the length of the wire) in the copper?
~ changing, and what is the
(b) If the current is changing at a rate of 5000 A/s, at what rate is E
resulting displacement current?
(c) Does the displacement current contribute significantly to the magnetic field outside the wire?
Explain your answer.
SUP5:
~ = E0 y
(a) Consider an electromagnetic wave in a vacuum with electric field E
sin(kxt). What
is the propagation direction of this electromagnetic wave?
~ = E0 y
(b) Consider an electromagnetic wave with electric field E
sin(kx + t). What is the
propagation direction of this electromagnetic wave?
~ = E0 y
(c) Consider the electric field E
[sin(kx t) + sin(kx + t)]. Show that this electric field
satisfies the wave equation
~
~
~
~
2E
2E
2E
1 2E
+
+
=
2
2
2
2
x
y
z
c t2
provided /k = c.
SUP6: Light traveling in air (n1 = 1) enters the smooth, flat surface of a pond (n2 = 1.33) at
normal incidence.
(a) What fraction of the light is reflected and what fraction is transmitted?
(b) If the maximum amplitude of the electric field in the incident light is E0 , what is the maximum
amplitude of the electric field in the reflected light?
(c) When you see scenery reflected in a still pond or lake, how is that situation different from
the one you have just calculated?