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ANNUAL REPORT

2014-15

VISION
Safe and clean seas, saving lives.

MISSION
Ensuring safe vessel operations, combatting marine pollution, and rescuing people in distress.

ASPIRATIONS
The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) plays a custodial role in keeping Australia’s seas safe
and clean, and providing search and rescue services.
To perform these roles, we have to think and operate in a forward-looking way, anticipating, assessing
and making decisions today to meet tomorrow’s challenges.
We will:
• take the lead in maritime safety regulation, maritime environmental emergencies, and maritime
and aviation search and rescue
• lead the implementation of measures promoting and giving effect to safety and environment
policies, both nationally and internationally
• have strong and confident strategic partnerships with stakeholders
• be sought after as a preferred choice for career development and advancement
• support our operations and community through information systems that are linked, reliable and
up to date.

PLAN ON A PAGE
Our Plan on a Page (page V) captures our vision, mission and aspirations, and also describes our
strategic challenges, goals and responses. Everything we do, as described in this annual report, is in
response to these strategic challenges and in pursuit of these goals. Demonstration of the alignment
between our activities and our strategic challenges is provided on each chapter’s cover page.

Cover Image courtesy of Luke Taylor, SurfLife Australia Photography
facebook.com/SurflifeAustraliaPhotography
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PLAN ON A PAGE PLAN ON A PAGE STRATEGIC CHALLENGE 1 ADDRESSING GROWTH AND COMPLEXITY IN OUR OPERATING ENVIRONMENT • • • • Ensure safe shipping in Australian waters Minimise emissions and discharges from ships in the marine environment Respond efficiently and effectively to maritime casualties and marine pollution incidents Save lives by coordinating search and rescue STRATEGIC CHALLENGE 2 KEEPING PACE WITH CHANGE • Minimise the regulatory burden with a single set of rules for domestic vessels and seafarers • Implement a modernised regulatory scheme for international trading and foreign vessels • Build and promote a quality international shipping register STRATEGIC CHALLENGE 3 ENSURING A COMPETENT AND FAIRLY TREATED MARITIME WORKFORCE • Have an active and competent maritime workforce • Reduce unnecessary barriers enabling increased pathways for participation within the maritime industry • Ensure compliance with international standards for training certification and watchkeeping • Ensure decent working and living conditions for seafarers on board ships STRATEGIC CHALLENGE 4 INFLUENCING INTERNATIONAL ARRANGEMENTS • Make sure international standards reflect Australian expectations and international standards are reflected nationally • Improve and promote maritime safety and environmental protection in our region • Have a strong regional voice in international fora • Make sure regional approaches align with International Maritime Organization priorities. and AMSA’s role • Be respected and trusted STRATEGIC CHALLENGE 6 ENSURING A VIBRANT AND PROGRESSIVE ORGANISATION • • • • • v Have a professional. search and rescue issues. STRATEGIC CHALLENGE 5 ENGAGING WITH THE COMMUNITY • Have an Informed and engaged community on maritime issues. anywhere Maintain a level of funding that will sustain our service delivery into the future Have effective and efficient processes and systems Maintain a flexible pool of external and internal capability and resources Our activities SC1 SC2 SC3 Our governance SC6 Our people SC6 Vessel and seafarer safety SC1 SC2 SC3 Search and rescue SC1 SC4 SC5 Marine environment SC1 SC4 SC5 Navigation safety SC1 SC4 SC5 Working with industry SC1 SC2 SC3 SC4 SC5 SC4 SC5 SC4 SC5 SC6 vi . flexible and engaged workforce that is change ready Use technology to improve the services we deliver to do business anytime.

On behalf of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA). Braddon ACT 2612 GPO Box 2181. It is the government’s preferred policy that the reports be tabled by 31 October. and in accordance with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Act 1990.net. Canberra ACT 2601 p +61 (0)2 6279 5994 m +61 408142337 e s.richey@bigpond.au vii viii . Under the PGPA and AMSA Acts. Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) requires that corporate Commonwealth entities prepare an annual report in accordance with the relevant Rule (being the Public Governance. The report provides a detailed description of AMSA’s operations during the year as well as financial statements and the Auditor-General’s report on those financial statements. the directors of AMSA (the members of the Board) are responsible for this annual report. Warren Truss MP. 24 September 2015 The Hon Warren Truss MP Deputy Prime Minister Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600 Dear Deputy Prime Minister The report is to be presented to the responsible minister by 15 October and requires the minister to table the report in both Houses of the Parliament as soon as practicable after receiving it. Yours sincerely Stuart Richey AM 82 Northbourne Avenue. using the reporting arrangements set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2014-15 and the AMSA Corporate Plan 2013-18. AMSA reports to the Australian Parliament and Government through the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development.REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND RESPONSIBLE MINISTER TRANSMITTAL LETTER REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND RESPONSIBLE MINISTER The Public Governance. Performance and Accountability (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Rule 2015). Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for its preparation and content. The report is made in accordance with a resolution on 24 September 2015 of the Directors who are responsible. Performance and Accountability Act 2013. the AMSA Annual Report 2014-15 is presented in accordance with the Annual Reporting Orders and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Act 1990. Despite the transition to the PGPA Act from 1 July 2014. the Hon. the Rule confirms that the Commonwealth Authorities Annual Reporting Orders 2011 (Annual Reporting Orders) continue to apply for the purposes of the Annual Report 2014-15. I present to you the Annual Report for the reporting year 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015. This report provides a review of activities undertaken in 2014-15. Accordingly. This report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements set out in the Public Governance. the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011. under section 46(1) of the Public Governance.

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS VISION. MISSION & ASPIRATIONS PLAN ON A PAGE ii v TRANSMITTAL LETTER vii REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND RESPONSIBLE MINISTER viii CHAIRMAN’S REVIEW 2 ORGANISATIONAL PROFILE 6 Enabling legislation 7 Board & committees 7 AMSA Board 7 Board Audit Committee 8 Remuneration Committee 8 Organisational changes 9 Structure 9 FINANCIAL SUMMARY 12 OUR GOVERNANCE 18 AMSA Service Charter 20 Government and parliament 20 Planning and reporting arrangements 21 Risk management 21 Fraud control 21 Public Information Disclosure Act 2013 22 Business continuity 22 Performance measurement 22 Certified management system 22 Financial management 23 System upgrades 23 Procurement 23 Cost recovery 23 Insurance and indemnities 23 OUR PEOPLE Our workforce Workforce Strategy Workplace relations Workplace diversity Workforce profile Learning and development Work health. safety and environment Workers’ compensation premium Environmental performance VESSEL AND SEAFARER SAFETY ix International shipping Industry trends Ship inspections Creating a safety culture Qualifications Domestic commercial vessel safety National System streamlining Standards reform Governance arrangements Statement of Regulatory Approach Surveyor accreditation Industry liaison Training and education Safety management systems Qualifications Compliance and enforcement 26 27 27 27 27 28 29 30 31 32 34 35 35 35 36 38 39 39 39 39 40 41 41 41 41 41 43 SEARCH AND RESCUE 46 National search and rescue service 47 Notable 2014-15 incidents 47 National Search and Rescue Council 49 Distress beacons 49 Search and rescue capabilities 49 Technology developments 50 Torres Strait Marine Safety Program 51 Antarctic 51 MARINE ENVIRONMENT 54 National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies 55 Training 55 Response capability 56 Emergency towage 58 Protection of the Sea Levy reduced 58 Coral Sea Particularly Sensitive Sea Area 59 NAVIGATION SAFETY Shipping management Shipping management plans Under keel clearance management Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait Vessel Traffic Service Aids to navigation management Aids to navigation network Celebrating 100 years of Commonwealth management of aids to navigation WORKING WITH INDUSTRY Domestic consultation and events Maritime 2014: Ship to Shore Engagement and communication tools Advertising and market research Our Registered Training Organisation Working internationally International Maritime Organization International Civil Aviation Organization International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities Regional engagement 62 63 63 64 65 65 65 67 70 71 72 73 73 73 74 74 76 77 77 APPENDICES 80 Appendix 1 Financial statements Appendix 2 Non-financial performance Appendix 3 Board members Appendix 4 Strategic risk profile Appendix 5 Marine Orders issued in 2014-15 Appendix 6 AMSA’s functions and powers Appendix 7 Current publications 81 133 143 150 154 156 157 REFERENCES 166 Acronyms and abbreviations Compliance index Index Annual report contact 167 169 173 178 x .

1 CHAIRMAN’S REVIEW 1 2 .

AMSA also conducted a joint approach with Maritime New Zealand to procure the Medium-altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) capability for the region. with the Coral Knight taking over this role. and joining AMSA as a marine surveyor in 1994. I wish to thank the staff of AMSA. AMSA maintains a strong international presence through representation at various bodies. Maritime Labour Convention training and inspections. This report contains detailed information on our achievements. I acknowledge the contributions of my fellow Board members. environment protection. streamlined and sustainable. which commenced at the same time as the National System. challenges. In 2015 we are marking the centenary of the Australian Government’s management of lighthouses and other aids to navigation in Australian waters. AMSA has continued working to create an industry safety culture through engagement at the International Labour Organization. Finally. safe carriage of cargo. Having started his career in the shipping industry. In his six years at the helm. we are working to strengthen our capabilities to respond to shipping growth. these powers were exercised in 2014-15. Stuart Richey AM 24 September 2015 Two major contracts were signed in 2014-15 to improve AMSA’s search and rescue capability. 3 4 . Following the release of the North-East Shipping Management Plan in October 2014. It is testament to the expertise and dedication of our staff that we are able to not only fulfil our duties. As the National System continues to evolve. Our challenge now is to set a path for a National System that is consistent. For a relatively small agency. It has now been two years since AMSA took on the role of National Regulator for all commercial vessels—the biggest reform in our history. so does our role. the release of new ship safety videos. We are working to establish implementation arrangements and further detail around this decision. banning 4 vessels from Australian ports for periods ranging from 3 to 12 months. maintaining and operating three specifically-modified Bombardier Challenger jets. Under the Navigation Act 2012. particularly former Chairman Leo Zussino who retired from the Board in November. AMSA is working with our delegates and industry to implement initiatives to simplify compliance. The Coral Knight is not only responsible for providing an initial response to a casualty. I pass on our thanks for their continued support. Transport ministers and their officials have agreed that AMSA will assume full service delivery and cost recovery functions from July 2019. AMSA can issue directions to vessels that may pose an increased risk to seafarers. together with the Board and Executive. Captain Fred Ross also retired in November after three years of valuable service to the Board. I was fortunate to attend the Commonwealth Lighthouse Service centenary celebrations in Brisbane and launch the commemorative stamps and coins developed to coincide with the centenary. following a transition period commencing in July 2017. I am proud of our achievements to date and. Once fully operational. and activities throughout the past financial year. environment protection and safety of life at sea. technical cooperation programs and in memoranda of understanding.CHAIRMAN’S REVIEW CHAIRMAN’S REVIEW At AMSA. To Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss. on behalf of the Board. vessels or the environment. we are committed to maintaining our standing as a world-leading agency for maritime safety. Mick brings a wealth of experience to the role. In July 2014 AMSA farewelled our emergency towage vessel Pacific Responder. but play a vital role in the international maritime community. a few of which I would like to highlight. allowing us to respond more efficiently to distress situations. am committed to ensuring we are well placed to respond to future challenges. For the first time since the introduction of the Act. with our representation at the International Civil Aviation Organization enabling us to play a key role in the improvement of aeronautical search and rescue services. AMSA’s work is not limited to the maritime industry. and an ongoing research study with the University of Queensland and the University of Western Australia. his staff. Cobham will provide a comprehensive service which includes owning. Leo made a valuable contribution to the organisation. modifying. and search and rescue. As Chairman of AMSA. I wish to recognise the exemplary leadership provided by AMSA’s new Chief Executive Officer Mick Kinley. progressing initiatives in shipping management. Under this contract. but is also the primary platform for aids to navigation maintenance in its area of operation. and in 2014-15 we continued to play a vital role in this organisation. Under the National System for Domestic Commercial Safety (National System) AMSA has been working with state and territory marine agencies to implement ways to deliver a highly efficient and effective regulatory framework for operators. AMSA has been a member of the International Maritime Organization’s Council for more than 40 years. the MEOSAR system will reduce beacon detection times. A new contract was signed with Cobham SAR Services Pty Ltd to provide the next generation aircraft dedicated to search and rescue from 2016. As we look to the future. AMSA is working on a National Shipping Management Plan due for release in 2015-16. we have a wide scope of operations. and the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development.

2 ORGANISATIONAL PROFILE 5 6 .

the committee continued to focus on maintaining a sound financial system. and ensuring that we comply with the requirements of the PGPA Act and other relevant Acts. Queensland concentrating on National System discussions • undertook (via the Board Audit Committee) the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) Better Practice Guide performance assessment for audit committees. During the year. performance reporting. In doing so. The Board Audit Committee conducted 5 meetings in 2014-15 and reported directly to the Board after each meeting. skills and experience to assist the committee to perform its functions. The committee reports its findings. The committee is independent from management and the present committee comprises of three people: two Board members and one independent member. diligent. systems of risk oversight and management. financial statements. In 2014-15 the Board members: • received a presentation on the Public Governance. Other Board members may attend committee meetings as observers. The Board is appointed by the Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development. Membership of the Board Audit Committee and attendance at meetings are listed at Appendix 3. Appendix 3 lists Board members. Australian Government Solicitors • participated in Maritime 14: Ship to Shore. the AMSA Act. Remuneration Committee The Remuneration Committee assists the Board in considering senior executive remuneration matters and issues arising from the Remuneration Tribunal. their qualifications and experience. and balance sheets.ORGANISATIONAL PROFILE ENABLING LEGISLATION AMSA is the national agency responsible for maritime safety. AMSA’s key stakeholder group • participated in a stakeholder reception in Port Lincoln. on behalf of the responsible minister. All members have the appropriate qualifications. protection of the marine environment. Current Board members have experience in industry. • participated in a reception for the AMSA Advisory Committee in Canberra. knowledge. and full service delivery for the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety (National System) • toured domestic commercial vessel operations in Port Lincoln and received briefings from the Australian Maritime Fisheries Academy • participated in a stakeholder reception in Cairns. All members work on a part-time basis. BOARD AND COMMITTEES AMSA Board Our Board discharges its duties under the AMSA and PGPA Acts and has three main roles: • providing significant strategic oversight of AMSA. and attendance at Board meetings. with the exception of the Chief Executive Officer. and approving major expenditure • executing good governance by ensuring compliance with the PGPA Act. Board Audit Committee The Board Audit Committee assists the Board in fulfilling its audit. South Australia concentrating on discussions around maritime safety issues. workshops and discussions to deepen their knowledge in directors’ roles and board practices. compliance reports. while promoting careful. by determining the overall manner in which various functions should be performed. Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). and maritime and aviation search and rescue. improving processes and procedures for internal and external audit reporting. the Board expresses its understanding of the expectations of the minister within the context of: • strategy setting and approval • risk management • operating framework • communication and relationship management across the organisation • reviewing and evaluating the performance of the Chief Executive Officer and senior management • taking responsibility for AMSA’s resources with the financial oversight of AMSA’s budget and financial outlook. decisions and recommendations to the Board. Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for Directors by Senior General Counsel. Board members participate in presentations. the inaugural national shipping and domestic commercial vessel conference 7 8 . Our principal functions are: • promoting maritime safety and protection of the marine environment • preventing and combating ship-sourced pollution in the marine environment • providing infrastructure to support safety of navigation in Australian waters • providing a national search and rescue service to the maritime and aviation sectors. Membership of the Remuneration Committee and meeting attendance are listed in Appendix 3. transparent and ethical conduct throughout the organisation. and operational legislation with corporate governance implications. We are a statutory authority established under the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Act 1990 (AMSA Act) and as a Corporate Commonwealth Entity we are also subject to the Public Governance. accounting and reporting obligations in accordance with requirements of enabling legislation. The Remuneration Committee conducted one meeting and had one out of session paper during 2014-2015. The Chair of the committee and the members are appointed by the Board. financial and government institutions.

CORPORATE SECRETARY Robyn Rowntree STRUCTURE Our organisational structure is shown on the following page. • Michael Taylor AO FTSE was appointed to the Board in September 2014. • Gary Prosser was appointed Deputy Chief Executive Officer in January 2015. Board Chairman. Sarah Derrington Mike Taylor AO FTSE Gary Webb Peter Toohey • Mick Kinley was appointed Chief Executive Officer in August 2014. Chief Executive Officer (Ex Officio) Mick Kinley • Professor Sarah Derrington was reappointed to the Board in June 2015. support and representation (OLC) – Drafting of Marine Orders (OLD) DARWIN PORT HEDLAND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Mick Kinley SEARCH AND RESCUE General Manager: John Young – Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Australia – Search and Rescue Operations – Search and Rescue Resources and Training – SAR System Engagement & Policy Queensland GLADSTONE Western Australia GERALDTON BRISBANE South Australia New South Wales FREMANTLE ADELAIDE Victoria NEWCASTLE SYDNEY PORT KEMBLA CANBERRA MELBOURNE DEVONPORT 9 CORPORATE SERVICES General Manager: Cherie Enders (A/g) – Finance and business services – People and development – Information technology services – Planning. portfolio and performance CORPORATE RELATIONS General Manager: Mal Larsen – Communication – Stakeholder engagement – Media – Ministerial and parliamentary liaison – AMSA Connect LAUNCESTON 10 . Board Members Dr Russell Reichelt Prof.ORGANISATIONAL PROFILE BOARD ORGANISATIONAL CHANGES Chairperson Stuart Richey AM Deputy Chairperson Jennifer Clark There were many changes to our Executive and Board in 2014-15. and Captain Fred Ross. Departmental Member Andrew Wilson • Stuart Richey AM commenced as our new Board Chairman in November 2014. Board member. • Gary Webb and Peter Toohey were appointed to the Board in June 2015. departed in November 2014. • Leo Zussino. A map showing our national presence is below: THURSDAY ISLAND CAIRNS Northern Territory TOWNSVILLE AIRLIE BEACH MACKAY KARRATHA DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Gary Prosser SHIP SAFETY General Manager: Allan Schwartz – Ship inspection – Ship operations and qualifications – Shipping Registration Office – Compliance and enforcement NAVIGATION SAFETY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS General Manager: Brad Groves – Aids to navigation – International relations – Nautical & regulation – Vessel traffic and pilotage services MARINE ENVIRONMENT General Manager: Toby Stone – Management of the National Plan – National maritime emergency response arrangements – Environmental protection standards and liability arrangements DOMESTIC VESSELS General Manager: John Fladun – National System Implementation – National Standards – Coordination of training and safety education – Industry support – Liaison and reporting OFFICE OF LEGAL COUNSEL (OLC) & OFFICE OF LEGISLATIVE DRAFTING (OLD) – Legal advice.

3 FINANCIAL SUMMARY 11 12 .

The reduced shipping activity translated into levy revenue being below expectations for the year. The Protection of the Sea Levy (PSL) was reduced by 3 cents per net registered tonne to 11. we will face continued pressures on operating revenue as well as incurring additional implementation costs for the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety (National System) as we assume responsibility for service delivery under the National System from 1 July 2019. The decrease in surplus of $2.9 million.5 2.FINANCIAL SUMMARY FINANCIAL SUMMARY Financial overview Our financial result for 2014-15 was influenced by the following significant activities.4 million in 2014-15. compared with a $2. The main drivers resulting in decreased expenditure this year were a significant one-off expense which occurred in 2013-14 for business restructuring. To meet the decline in operating revenue. Notwithstanding this. This generated a reduction in levies to the shipping industry in the order of $9 million for the year. in this financial year we experienced reduced search and rescue activity and successfully achieved other planned savings initiatives. These pressures will not be able to be absorbed solely by continued cost reduction strategies.25 cents on 1 July 2014 as the Pacific Adventurer oil spill incident was settled and a $10 million pollution response reserve was established in the prior financial year. We will meet these challenges by drawing down on our retained surpluses and by operating in a deficit budget. we will remain financially viable as our projected cash balances are sufficient to meet our future commitments as they fall due. Our revenue performance was weighed down by the downturn in the Australian commodities sector driven by a drop in demand growth which resulted in reduced shipping activity for the year.1 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 0. Financial outcome We achieved an operating surplus of $0. savings strategies where successfully implemented to absorb the reduction in revenue without impacting on the delivery of regulatory services.0 million offset by decreased expenditure of $3. Looking forward to 2015-16 and beyond.4 2014-15 Figure 1 Operating result over financial years 2010-11 to 2014-15 ($millions) AMSA Canberra Office 13 14 . Furthermore. Our revenue decrease was mainly due to the reduction of the PSL by 3 cents per net registered tonne and reduced revenue growth projections driven by a downturn in shipping activity. 10.6 10.5 million surplus in 2013-14.1 million relates to decreased revenue of $6. and provisions for removal of asbestos at various aids to navigation sites.2 2.

The remainder came from rendering of services and other sources. 63 per cent of expenditure went to suppliers. Total expenditure in 2014-15 decreased by $3. In 2014-15. and 1 per cent on other expenses. The main revenue source contributing to this decrease were levies and rendering of services. 8% 1% OTHER 55% LEVIES FUNDING FROM GOVERNMENT 35% DEPRECIATION EMPLOYEE EXPENSES 7% 63% SUPPLIER EXPENSES 29% Figure 2 Revenue for 2014-15 Revenue has decreased by three per cent overall from last financial year. This year. 29 per cent on employee benefits. reduced search and rescue activity and various savings initiatives also contributed to the reduction in expenditure. remain broadly in line with that of last financial year. This reduction was offset by increased staff costs driven by enterprise agreement wage increases and costs associated with decommissioning of certain aids to navigation assets that were damaged in unforseen events. This has been partially offset by increased revenue from various government funding projects. 2% OTHER RENDERING OF SERVICES In 2014-15.9 million compared to 2013-14. This was primarily due to the one-off expenditure which occurred in 2013-14 for business restructuring and provisions for removal of asbestos at various aids to navigation sites.Financial statements.FINANCIAL SUMMARY Revenue Expenses Total revenue decreased by $6 million in 2014-15 primarily due to the reduction of the PSL and reduced revenue growth projections driven by a downturn in shipping activity. 7 per cent on depreciation. 55 per cent of our revenue was derived from levies and 35 per cent from government funding. 2014-15 2013-14 2014-15 2012-13 2013-14 2011-12 2012-13 2010-11 2011-12 0 50 100 150 LEVIES FUNDING FROM GOVERNMENT RENDERING OF SERVICES OTHER Figure 3 Change in revenue from 2010-11 to 2014-15 200 $MILLIONS 2010-11 0 50 100 150 SUPPLIERS 200 $MILLIONS EMPLOYEES DEPRECIATION OTHER Figure 5 Change in expenditure from 2010-11 to 2014-15 Further details of AMSA’s financial position can be found in Appendix 1 . in percentage terms. Figure 4 Expenditure for 2014-15 Areas of expenditure. 15 16 .

4 OUR GOVERNANCE SC6 17 18 .

The subcommittee noted that the majority of complaints related to seafarer qualification processes. 1973. the Foreign Affairs. GOVERNMENT AND PARLIAMENT Throughout 2014-15 we worked closely with the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development to provide briefings and responses to ministerial correspondence for the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development. in collaboration with our Office of Legal Counsel. means that we need to remain vigilant for any changes and subsequent impacts.e. the Joint Standing Committee on Treaties public hearing examining Amendments to the Annex of the Protocol of 1997 relating to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships. annual report) • Engagement with the AMSA Advisory Committee as the external review body The consequential amendments to the PGPA Act. Parliament or Ombudsman) We were not the subject of any reports made by the Auditor-General. Additional and Budget estimates hearings and Parliamentary inquiries. the Board Audit Committee reviewed its operations against the ANAO’s Better Practice Guide for Public Sector Audit Committees published in March 2015. or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner in 2014-15. We also appointed a new internal audit service provider for a period of 3 years. and the incremental introduction of the rules and guidance that give effect to the PGPA Act. the Commonwealth Ombudsman. Our service charter sets out our service standards and complaints procedures. Defence and Trade References Committee inquiry into Australia’s future activities and responsibilities in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic Waters in September 2014. as modified by the Protocol of 1987 relating thereto in March 2015. commencing on 1 July 2015. Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and the supporting rules and guidance. and preparation for the introduction of the Regulator Performance Framework (effective 1 July 2015). and the Institute of Internal Auditors was commissioned to undertake a review of internal audit in AMSA.1070(28) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Instrument Implementation Code and amendments to various IMO treaties in May 2015. a significant effect on our operations. a Parliamentary Committee. Our responses included: Action Reason PGPA transition plan Implement a formal. During the year eight complaints were reported to our Quality Assurance Subcommittee. To ensure that AMSA is operating in line with best practice. Our PGPA Act transition governance and coordination arrangements. were major areas of focus for us this year. the Federal Court of Australia and assisted Coronial Inquiries held in New South Wales and Queensland. None of these matters resulted in findings that have had. or may have. structured approach to managing transition to provide higher levels of assurance that requirements are met Response • PGPA transition governance and coordination arrangements established • Corporate Plan updated • Performance measures updated • Staff education and awareness sessions • Accountable Authority Instruction review underway Regulator Performance Framework implementation Encourage regulators to undertake their functions with minimum impact necessary • Identification of candidate measures • Streamlining and aligning measures with other performance reporting arrangements (i.  Senior executives appeared at the Senate and Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee for Supplementary. JUDICIAL DECISIONS AND REVIEWS BY OUTSIDE BODIES Judicial decisions / decisions of administrative bodies In 2014-15 we were party to matters before the Administrative Appeals Tribunal. Reports (Auditor-General.OUR GOVERNANCE OUR GOVERNANCE AMSA SERVICE CHARTER Ensuring compliance with the Public Governance. No ministerial directions within the meaning of these sections were issued by the Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development during the year. are our principal controls to manage this risk. and the Joint Standing Committee on Treaties public hearing examining Resolution A. 19 20 . Ministerial directions. the minister may give us written directions with respect to the performance of our functions. policies and notices Under sections eight and nine of the AMSA Act. We provided written submissions and senior officers attended public hearings of the Senate Environment and Communications References Committee inquiry into the adequacy of arrangements to prevent the establishment of invasive species likely to harm Australia’s natural environment.

and optimise our use of resources. which includes a fraud risk assessment. There was one instance of irregularity that was resolved. Our strategic risk profile is detailed in Appendix 4. the maximum tolerable outage periods for our key information technology infrastructure assets. A central consideration in planning is alignment. conducting surveillance audits with our recertification partner. We participated in the annual fraud survey conducted by the Attorney-General’s Department. Under Section 76 of the Public Information Disclosure Act 2013 (PID Act). after investigation. In early 2014. appointed Authorised Officers. we are satisfied that we have adequate fraud control measures in place to comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines (2011). agencies are required to report on the operation of public information disclosure in their organisation. This approach combines business planning with financial planning and budgeting. RISK MANAGEMENT We have a mature risk management culture which permeates all levels of our organisation. framework and guidelines are aligned with better practice methodologies and consistent with the international standard on risk management (AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009) and the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy 2014. A key part of demonstrating our commitment is comparing what we do against international best practice—as captured in the three quality standards we are certified against: • AS/NZ AS/NZS ISO 9001: 2008 Quality Management Systems • AS/NZS 4801: 2001 Occupational Safety and Health • AS/NZS ISO 14001: 2004 Environmental Management Systems. developed a mandatory online training module for all staff. Corporate Plan. All of our new employees were provided with fraud awareness training during their induction. Under these standards we are required to reaffirm our commitment annually by publishing a Business Policy signed by the Chief Executive Officer. Further. Our risk management policy. and the online fraud awareness refresher training module was updated. We are committed to continuous improvement. including an extraordinary meeting in October 2014 to review our preparedness for a pandemic. Our core business is primarily one of risk management—requiring constant monitoring of all activities undertaken both within and outside Australia’s immediate maritime environment. Strategic risks are actively monitored and shared with key stakeholders. The Management System and audit program are an important component of our assurance processes. During the year we conducted two formal risk management reviews of our organisation as a whole. we undertook an extensive review of our performance measures. and in particular. The focus this year was on updating and aligning our Corporate Plan and Portfolio Budget Statements to reflect this work. which reports fraud data to the Australian Institute of Criminology. or priorities change • supports performance monitoring and reporting. Our risk management program helps us to proactively manage our risks. There were no cases of fraud in AMSA reported during the year. has seen an increased focus on our assurance and control framework. risk management. in anticipation of the PGPA Act. including transition to the PGPA Act. BUSINESS CONTINUITY Our Command Plan and divisional business continuity plans were updated this year. as well as two reviews of each division. We must ensure that we have adequate measures in place to manage and mitigate existing and arising risks. and understand what is expected of them—reflected in engagement results and individual performance agreements • demand for resources can be matched against capacity and capability • supports evidence-based decision making when new business requirements emerge. The Business Continuity and Security Subcommittee met three times. Transition to an external information technology service provider initiated a review of our critical function plans. reduce our exposure to financial and reputational harm. There have been no reportable PID Act disclosures during the year. delivering the management system audit program (14 audits). PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT Our Corporate Plan contains key performance measures for each of our strategic challenges. and performance monitoring and reporting. Overall. Achievement against these performance measures is outlined in this report. Disciplined and structured planning has provided several benefits: • better visibility of core business and change activities • managers can ensure there is clear line of sight between their business activities and AMSA’s strategic goals • staff understand the contribution they make to our strategic direction. as not being fraudulent. All activities undertaken by AMSA contribute directly to our strategic goals as outlined in our Strategic Vision 2013-33. including our Board. 21 We have published a Chief Executive Officer PID Directive (policy) and Procedures. CERTIFIED MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Changes to the underlying government legislation of AMSA. and have delivered staff awareness sessions. was approved by the Board in June 2014. Major activities during the year included a review of the recommendations from our 2014 management system health check (and commencement of the subsequent action plan). and to ensure we meet the requirements of the Regulator Performance Framework (effective 1 July 2015). 22 .OUR GOVERNANCE PLANNING AND REPORTING ARRANGEMENTS PUBLIC INFORMATION DISCLOSURE ACT 2013 We have adopted an integrated planning and reporting approach. This policy is included in our Corporate Plan. The increasing volume of vessel traffic and offshore activities has the potential to increase the likelihood of incidents and consequential environmental damage and/or regulatory challenges. FRAUD CONTROL Our Fraud and Corruption Control Plan. be cost effective and develop practice solutions controls. and Plan on a Page. but at the same time be mindful of our regulatory function. and planning to better synchronise management system audit activity with other audit activity in AMSA. we have revalidated our risk management practices to ensure they support our obligations under the PGPA Act.

Throughout the year we have facilitated tendering and letting of the following long-term strategic service contracts: • Dedicated Airborne Search and Rescue Service (page 49) • Medium-altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) capability (page 50) • Fixed Wing Aerial Dispersant Capability (page 56) • outsourcing components of the information and communications technology function • establishment of the maritime reform panel for the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety • telecommunications contract.au). The Protection of the Sea Levy was reduced as of 1 July 2014 (page 58). The premium paid for this insurance for 2014-15 was $37. We indemnify our staff from liability when acting in good faith (without recklessness or gross negligence) in the course of their employment with AMSA. We are required by the Australian Government to use Comcover for our insurance needs. Insurance and indemnities We provide insurance cover to Board Members and other officers in line with the PGPA Act.FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT System upgrades During the year we upgraded our finance and human resource/payroll Financial Management Information System. Procurement We are compliant with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules (in achieving ‘value for money’ procurement) when purchasing goods and services. together with new service offerings which delivered increased functionality. automated and improved alert systems. phase one development of smartphone/tablet access app. 23 24 .327 (GST exclusive). and system stability and integrity improvements. Comcover’s relevant insurance policy covers legal liability (including legal costs) for our Board members and employees. Cost recovery We are required to follow Australian Government Cost Recovery Policy when setting charges to the shipping industry. We redeveloped our Cost Recovery Implementation Statement to meet the new requirements under the revised Australian Government Cost Recovery Guidelines. These system changes included: automation of ship movement data. During the year we participated in the portfolio charging review for the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development and outcomes were brought forward in the 2015-16 budget context.gov. Further details regarding our cost recovery activities are available in our Cost Recovery Implementation Statement on our website (amsa. primarily through levies and fee-for-service charges. We continued to roll-out enhancements to our levy management system through the release of software patches to improve usability and performance. This statement will be published in early 2015-16.

5 OUR PEOPLE SC6 25 26 .

Workplace diversity We acknowledge the value of supporting a diverse workforce that is representative of the community we serve. we had three Indigenous employees (0. and further developing our management information systems and reporting on people-related matters. The strategy is a key supporting document to the AMSA Corporate Plan 2014-18. Workforce Strategy The Workforce Strategy outlines our approach to managing and developing our workforce to address current and future challenges faced by our organisation. we have developed an implementation plan to deliver these initiatives over the next three years. at 30 June 2014. At 30 June 2015: • 11 per cent of employees are engaged through common law contracts. Workforce profile As at 30 June 2015. The increase in staff numbers this year was distributed across all divisions of the organisation. By comparison. Our priority from a people perspective is to maintain this level of engagement throughout our operational and strategically-focussed endeavours. our responses to the learnings from our 2014 Employee Survey.OUR PEOPLE OUR WORKFORCE Throughout 2014-15 we continued to support the development of our organisational capability through introducing more contemporary. integrated and effective people management practices that are designed to support us in achieving our operational and strategic goals.e. we released the AMSA Diversity Plan 2014-2017 which sets out initiatives to support the identification and removal of barriers which may prevent full and equitable participation in the workplace. The annual employee turnover for 2014-15 was 10 per cent. One of the initiatives of the AMSA Diversity Plan 2014-2017 aims to identify opportunities for targeted employment programs of Indigenous-specific positions. AMSA continued to support the implementation of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the Commonwealth Disability Strategy by ensuring its policies and procedures meet the needs of people with disabilities. in comparison to 87 per cent of employees being engaged under the Enterprise Agreement in the previous year AMSA 4     1       25 1   1 28 AMSA 3 3 2 1       6 1 1   14 • less than 1 per cent of employees are engaged under Australian Workplace Agreements AMSA 2   1 1       7 1 2 1 13 Workplace relations The AMSA Enterprise Agreement 2012-2015 expires on 5 September 2015. Non-ongoing Total all employees Ongoing Full-time Part-time Casual Full-time Part-time     F M F M F M F M F M   Chief Executive*   1                 1 Executive Manager*   8                 8 Senior Manager* 5 26 1 2             34 RCC Chief**               4     4 Senior SARO***               15 1   16 SARO             2 17     19 Port Marine Surveyor   5           40 1   46 AMSA 8   1       2 4 26     33 AMSA 7 9 6   2   1 5 28 3   54 AMSA 6 4 7 1       20 30 2   64 AMSA 5 9 4 1     1 20 13 2   50 • 88 per cent of employees were employed under the Enterprise Agreement. Formal negotiations for a replacement agreement commenced in June 2015 and are expected to continue for several months.especially in relation to the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety. 27 28 . In consultation with employee representative groups. As of 30 June 2015 it is under review in light of our developing mandate . Disability Report In 2014-15. supporting workplace diversity. we employed 375 people. We have consistently achieved a very high level of employee engagement since 2008 when compared with both government and industry sectors. In order to continue to build on the value of a diverse workforce. In 2014-15 preparations commenced for the negotiation of a new agreement that will comply with the new Australian Government Bargaining Policy (introduced in March 2014). The results of our third employee survey indicated sustained levels of engagement at the highest level. we focussed on building management capability in relation to employee performance management. such as Indigenous graduates/traineeships. with 295 employees based in our Canberra offices and 89 in regional offices. In particular. AMSA encouraged all staff to consider the impact of their professional actions on people with disabilities.78 per cent of our workforce). We have continued to strengthen our reputation as an ‘employer of choice’ through more focussed recruitment activity (i. we reviewed and adjusted our internal processes to make sure we are attracting the most suitable applicants). This year we progressed initiatives designed to equip our people to continue to be adaptable and responsive in an environment where we are expected to do more with the resources we have available. and the delivery of the AMSA Diversity Plan. AMSA 1                       Total 30 61 6 4   4 89 176 12 2 384 Table 1: Number of staff by classification at 30 June 2015 * Renewable performance-based contracts **RCC – Rescue Coordination Centre ***SARO – Search and Rescue Officer As at 30 June 2015. we employed a total of 384 employees. and to foster an environment that provides equity for people with a disability.

56 per cent of our workforce was 46 years or older and 22 per cent was over the age of 56. 150 120 90 60 30 0 RS YE AN A D RS AB O VE EA We have a strong commitment to preventing work health and safety incidents within the organisation. At that time. a number of e-learning courses were rolled out to employees to assist them in understanding the new requirements that impact their work. safety and environment management is an important component of our compliance and workplace health. 33 incidents were reported .  MULTIPLE MECHANISMS 56 5Y 46 -5 YE AR S 36 -4 5 YE AR ER -3 5 26 S Day-to-day health and safety issues are addressed by managers with assistance and advice (if required). With the introduction of new legislation. These principles are maintained through the national and international accreditations we hold and represent a commitment to a healthy. TRIP AND FALLS 29% 4% 21% OTHER 7% During 2014-15. Figure 6: Employee age profile at 30 June 2015 Learning and development MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT BODY STRESSING 14% SLIP. Health and Safety Representatives are elected by our employees and represent designated work groups throughout the organisation. our gender workforce demographic consisted of 137 females (36 per cent of our workforce) and 247 males (64 per cent of our workforce). Our efforts in e-learning have been recognised through the national LearnX Learning and Development Awards. We are committed to the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 and Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Section 516A). and is central to our commitment to quality management. trip and falls’ (29 per cent). 30 June 2014 At 30 June 2015. SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT Figure X – Employee age profile. policies and procedures. the Governance Awareness course was made available to all our employees as a refresher on important compliance and organisation requirements. 4% CRUSH/ JAMMING MENTAL 4% STRESS AND 7% CHEMICAL OTHER SUBSTANCES BY 4% CUT SHARP OBJECT BY 3% HIT MOVING OBJECT PART 3% BODY HITS OBJECT Figure 7: Health and safety incidents by category for 2014-15 Health and safety incidents that result in an injury are categorised according to the cause of the injury. Y AN EA D RS U N D 25 Work health. FIRST AID INJURY MEDICALLY TREATED INJURY 29 25% 31% Figure 8: Health and safety incident statistics for 2014-15 38% NEAR MISS TIME 6% LOST INJURY 30 . which comprises 12 Health and Safety Representatives. we continued to build upon our capability delivering high quality e-learning courses. safe and environmentally-responsible approach in all of our actions. One incident was reported to Comcare. 4 management representatives and 2 technical advisers. from AMSA’s Health Safety and Environmental Committee. This reflects that many employees join AMSA as a second career and bring substantial experience and knowledge to contribute towards our endeavours. The most common cause of injury during the year was ‘slip. During 2014-15. The committee met four times in 2014-15. Specifically. A total of 18 incidents related to contractors engaged by AMSA.6 of which did not require any medical or first aid treatment.OUR PEOPLE WORK HEALTH.

ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12 Total incidents 33 18 24 26 Total days lost to injury (days) 180 21 0 1 Number of lost time incidents 1 2 9 1 Number of workers’ compensation claims 1 3 1 3 Number of notifiable Comcare incidents 1 0 0 5 We actively promote the requirements of an internationally-recognised Environmental Management System (ISO 14001).5% 0. In 2014-15 we completed an energy audit of all of our offices.069 in 2013-14 to $236.0% COMMONWEALTH AVERAGE 1.5 per cent continues to remain well below the overall scheme premium rate of 1. This included our consumption of water. waste and electricity.0% 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 Figure 9: Our workers’ compensation premiums compared to the Commonwealth average 31 32 . We also continued to collect data from a range of sources to help monitor the impact our activities may be having on the environment. The purpose of this audit was to identify sources of energy use and opportunities for energy savings.0% AMSA 0.470 in 2014-15. Our premium rate of 0. 2. The electricity usage in our Canberra office decreased by 2 per cent from 2013-14 to 2014-15. 2014-15 Table 2 – Time lost to injury Workers’ compensation premium Our workers’ compensation premium decreased from $262.5% 1. Part of this process involves our Executive reviewing our activities annually to identify any potential risks those activities may pose to the environment.93 per cent.

6 VESSEL AND SEAFARER SAFETY SC1 33 SC2 SC3 SC4 SC5 34 .

The below vessels were banned (for defined periods) from Australia ports due to ongoing issues. on average. Ship inspections Port State control (PSC) is the inspection of foreign ships in national ports. vessels or the environment. to meet applicable standards despite repeated advice to take action.000 Master . better identification of causal factors with incidents.gov.Qualification system improvements) will be completed in 2015-16. In 2014-15 we undertook 10. grew by 6. Redevelopment throughout 2014-15 of our main database application systems for recording ship and cargo inspections. an increase of 2 per cent over the 26. finding 289 deficiencies.$5000 (plus costs) November 2014 Xin Tai Hai Panama Illegal disposal of garbage near Gladstone.6 per cent as ships were. and occupational health and safety. Their average age was 8. Each issue focusses on a topic relevant to maritime safety and explores safety trends. data recording and analysis. or being managed. In the year. to identify potential increases in traffic density at certain points within the Australian Exclusive Economic Zone. June 2014 Owner .$6000 Creating a safety culture In August 2014 we created a new section which concentrates on the areas of seafarer welfare. In February 2015 we launched a biannual safety bulletin. For the first time since the introduction of the Act. and breakdowns 3 months 9 January 2015 Meratus Sangatta* Indonesia Ship was detained 3 times since November 2012 and twice since November 2014 3 months 31 January 2015 Red Rover* Indonesia Ship was detained 3 times since September 2014 12 months *All three vessels (operated by PT Meratus Line) repeatedly demonstrated that they were not operating. These inspections verify that the condition of the ship and its equipment comply with the requirements of international regulations and that the ship is manned and operated in compliance with these rules. 35 36 . we can issue directions to vessels that may pose an increased risk to seafarers. Date Vessel Flag State Incident Fine July 2014 Morning Midas United Kingdom Pollution incident in Port Phillips Heads. we exercised these powers in 2014-15. two such prosecutions were completed. we undertook 84 flag State control (FSC) inspections of 68 Australian-flagged ships. The carrying capacity of this fleet. Modernisation of these systems will allow more effective analysis of safety issues and outcomes. and accident investigations.4 years.228 inspections of some 20 different types to ensure the safety of ships and their cargoes. Date Vessel Flag State Reason for ban Length of ban 25 August 2014 Vega Auriga Liberia Repeated breaches relating to seafarer welfare and ship maintenance—ship was detained 3 times since July 2013 3 months 24 November 2014 Territory Trader* Indonesia Repeated detentions (3 since July 2013) and a history of machinery and equipment malfunctions.638 in the previous year. compared to 8. This included 4106 PSC inspections of foreign ships.167 port visits (by 5643 individual ships). plus 3754 follow-up inspections of ships to ensure that corrective action had been taken in respect of deficiencies identified at previous inspections within Australia or by other maritime safety administrations within the AsiaPacific region. Under the Protection of the Sea (Prevention of Pollution from Ships) Act 1983 ships can be prosecuted for polluting Australian waters. The first issue focussed on working at heights and is available on our website (amsa.5 years. human factors.VESSEL AND SEAFARER SAFETY INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING Industry trends Directions and prosecutions In 2014-15 overall growth in activity by the foreign fleet moderated somewhat from previous years. This analysis will focus on the routes expected to be taken by shipping. In 2014-15. incident data. with 27. which identifies trends in maritime incidents in Australian waters with the aim of raising safety awareness. We have commissioned an analysis of the expected growth rates in shipping out to 2025 from 30 ports around the coastline. August 2013 Owner . safety management.6 per cent larger per port visit.au). and more efficient processing of qualifications. It is also expected to identify how these likely changes in shipping traffic to and from Australia may impact on the main north-south routes in the waters of Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. 4.2 years in 2013-14. Under the Navigation Act 2012. in deadweight tonnage terms. The average age of these ships was 14.$20. human factors. marine incidents and seafarers’ qualifications (see page 38 .

It is expected that this work will assist in the formulation of effective and evidence-based recommendations for the improvement of training programs. policies and regulations. 37 Qualifications Seafarer certificates In 2014-15 we issued 5568 certificates of various types to seafarers. 2006 activities over the year. 2006 results for 2014-15 Occupational health and safety In October 2014 one of our officers attended an International Labour Organization (ILO) meeting on maritime occupational safety and health. A proposed training course has been developed and is based on the existing Diploma in Maritime Operations (Deck Watchkeeper Certificate of Competency). training and examination seafarers must demonstrate to secure an AMSA qualification. In August 2014 we announced the extension of our suite of plastic credit card sized seafarer certificates. it is envisaged that the project will be completed in the first quarter of 2016. The following table provides statistics with respect to our MLC. Australia’s national maritime occupational safety and health legislation. 2006 deficiencies Total detainable deficiencies MLC. 2006 detentions Bulk carrier 6853 1045 231 14 165 10 Chemical tanker 241 68 3 0 3 0 Container ship 976 204 45 4 29 4  Vessel type Gas carrier 70 12 1 0 1 0 General cargo / multi purpose ship 766 114 39 1 27 1 Livestock carrier 235 40 8 0 5 0 Oil tanker 451 167 21 8 13 5 Vehicle carrier 318 48 5 0 5 0 Other ship types 1172 127 59 2 32 1 11. 2006.VESSEL AND SEAFARER SAFETY Seafarer welfare Research projects In August 2013 the Maritime Labour Convention. and Global Maritime Distress and Safety System certificates. including: • a self-service portal—allowing seafarers to initiate their own applications • improved data management • improved interface for seafarer medical requirements • a new online assessment process. Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) commercial yacht qualifications structure similar to the United Kingdom’s. already meets the majority of the requirements of the new ILO guidelines. The videos are available on our website (amsa. 38 . 2006 compliance has been confirmed as part of all port State control inspections. 2006 detainable deficiencies Total detentions 2014-2015 MLC. Since July 1 2014. New ship safety videos In October 2014 we launched a new series of information videos on ship safety.082 1825 412 29 280 21 Totals Table 2: MLC. MLC. In order to improve the first attempt pass rate we are working with a New Zealandbased company to develop computer-based multi-choice examinations. including 1666 certificates of competency. held in Geneva. Computer-based exams Seafarers who want to obtain an AMSA Certificate of Competency are required to undertake an AMSA final assessment. These reports will also be made available to AMSA examiners. A review of the Act’s underlying codes of practice is being carried out and will ensure that Australia is well placed to meet its international maritime occupational health and safety obligations. Following a successful trial for the Certificate of Safety Training in 2012. The system is configurable. work design. Qualification system improvements Over the period we have been working with an external consultant to develop a new online evidencebased certification solution—the Certification and Pilotage System (CPS2). plastic cards are now issued for certificates of competency and proficiency. sought to develop a guideline document for flag States on the implementation of the occupational health and safety requirements of the MLC. which a candidate must pass before being allowed to undertake the final assessment. the Australian Maritime College and the Transport and Logistics Industry Skills Council to develop an International Convention on Standards of Training. and the assessment of safety behaviour. the Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime Industry) Act 1993. 2006 (MLC. while management and surveyor workshops have identified ways to provide greater inspection consistency. 2006 training. This study is being undertaken in partnership with the University of Queensland and the University of Western Australia. With the introduction of CPS2. All of our marine surveyors have now completed AMSA-specific MLC.au): • a 25-minute port State control (PSC) training video for use by ships’ crews and operators and a 5-minute advisory video on PSC • a 5-minute advisory video on the Maritime Labour Convention. 2006) came into force.gov. 2006 • a 5-minute advisory video on shipping registration and the application of the Shipping Registration Act 1981. and control the level of experience. create internally and externally available certification options. both internationally and in Australia. Since that time. We are currently funding a 3-year (2013-16) research study assessing the determinants of safety culture in the maritime industry. Candidates will undertake the assessment in a secure location. We have drafted a Marine Order to introduce the new yacht qualification structure. On 109 occasions. which allows us to control the certification and licence structures. we have worked to strengthen our ship inspection regime. Subject to further stakeholder consultation. The meeting. designed to be more durable and secure than traditional paper certificates. They will receive a knowledge deficiency report to assist them prepare for their orals. which allows for career progression. numerous improvements will be made to the qualification system. Total deficiencies MLC. inspections were triggered by a complaint that was received from a seafarer or other person with a concern for seafarer welfare. procedures. Commercial yacht qualifications In September 2014 we commenced a project with the commercial yachting industry.

one in which the amount of regulatory oversight reflects the level of risk posed by a particular operation. The streamlining review was overwhelmingly supported by industry. whose members saw it as a rare opportunity to resolve concerns with how the National System had been implemented. and beyond. investment and more jobs. An organisational review of the division was also held to prepare for the future challenges of managing the National System as it evolves. and consistency with the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessels) National Law Act 2012. Strongest support was expressed for proposals related to operational areas. The National Regulator will take a ‘trust and verify’ approach to maintaining safety wherever possible. In the period. construction standards and operational areas. such as changes to composition of the non-survey category. The regulatory scheme is performance-based. Standards reform We continued to work with industry and maritime agencies to progressively review existing commercial vessel standards throughout the financial year. and to remove unnecessary red tape in marine safety regulation generally. (the National Law) and with Australian standards and international conventions.   39 40 . The National Regulator will strive to make it simple for people to maintain safety. innovation and business and environmental sustainability. With the initial 3-year transition period for the National System to end in June 2016. this date. with a further 79 written submissions received. these reviews also confirmed the need for the division to plan and implement arrangements in the lead-up to. while other proposals. 5. All 13 proposals were modified to some extent based on industry comment. the Northern Territory and industry to implement some of the more immediately achievable streamlining proposals. 9. and with a clear idea of what we could do to further improve the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety (National System). productive and diverse economy. not prescriptive. survey frequency and crew competency standards. 2. without having to make further application. we worked with State and Northern Territory maritime safety authorities to develop 13 concepts aimed at streamlining (or simplifying compliance with) the National System. in consultation with industry. with greater innovation. This work is ongoing. Regulation—and its application—is flexible enough to address the risks of a highly varied industry in order to support safety. received a more mixed response. 8. The operator has the primary responsibility for ensuring the vessel is safe and operates safely. They were also reviewed for opportunities to implement streamlining proposals. The National Regulator will make use of third-party expertise to bolster its regulatory safety activities. Safety is primary. the position of National Operations Manager was created to ensure coordination of all divisional operational activities. The National Regulator develops and maintains a collaborative relationship with industry. These included proposed changes to vessel survey requirements. As a result. In that time. We are progressively looking to implement some of the more complex reform proposals. including the ability to operate vessels less than 12 metres recreationally. In early 2014. operation. The National Regulator will work together with other safety agencies to reduce the potential for duplication of safety rules and the application of those rules. crewing and safety requirements. The statement recognises that regulation cannot eliminate every risk. and to operate vessels pending certification. Statement of Regulatory Approach The streamlining review of the National System highlighted the need for us to state clearly our approach to safety regulation. before the end of 2015.au). 4. The sessions were attended by about 800 industry representatives. This included reviewing the standards for consistency between each of them. 6. which set out the standards governing commercial vessel design. We spent the second half of the financial year working with States. This is a public statement of the need for a coherent approach to marine safety regulation. our staff held 27 meetings around the country to gather comment on the proposals. Governance arrangements In 2014-15 we continued to review the activities of our Domestic Vessel division to ensure we were best placed to provide leadership to delegates on the delivery of National System services while continuing our ongoing reform program. The statement sets out nine points that we will take into account when addressing the need for balanced regulation: 1. As a result. Reform work centred on simplification of the National Standards for Commercial Vessels. The full Statement of Regulatory Approach is available on our website (amsa. This involved working with technical reference committees and with industry to gain comment on the proposals. we also dedicated significant resources to improving our domestic commercial vessel engagement strategies and practices. 3.VESSEL AND SEAFARER SAFETY DOMESTIC COMMERCIAL VESSEL SAFETY National System streamlining We entered 2014-15 with the experience gained from our first full year as the National Regulator. 7.gov. and that the National Regulator must pursue practical solutions. balancing risk with the need for rules that support a strong. From May to July 2014 we ran an industry consultation program on the 13 concepts. we prepared a National System Statement of Regulatory Approach.

For the start of the National System. followed by workshop and industry education sessions. and to educate specific industry sectors on the need to have safety management systems (SMS) in place. marine safety agency assessors and auditors over the first half of 2015. we delivered initial training to 410 appointed Marine Safety Inspectors and 220 police officers. Safety management systems To help implement the National Standard for Commercial Vessels (NSCV) Part E. In 2014-15. face-to-face technical workshops were run for state and territory approved training organisations. As the year progressed. 41 42 . Significant training activities included our ongoing work with State and Northern Territory administrative and compliance and enforcement officers. To support nationally consistent implementation of Marine Order 506. registered training organisations. jointly developed with the Australian Maritime College. Training and education In addition to liaison activities. Liaison staff continued to work directly with industry to resolve issues that arose from some of the unforeseen complexities that came with the new National System. as well as dedicated AMSA and delegate SMS trainers. Industry liaison Through our regionally-based liaison officers. a PowerPoint presentation. The revisions simplified approval and audit processes and removed duplication with the Vocational Education and Training regulatory requirements. our staff carried out nationwide formal technical training during the financial year. AMSA carried out a series of workshops to provide industry with information about the changes. and general understanding of the National System increased. a participant workbook. which governs the approval of training organisations.VESSEL AND SEAFARER SAFETY Surveyor accreditation We accredit marine surveyors to make sure they have the appropriate education. for the first time giving the maritime sector a consistent standard against which to assess the nation’s commercial marine surveyors. This recognised the Clean Green Program as an equivalent system to meet the requirements of NSCV Part E. guidance material and processes they are using to act as our delegates. During the period we also worked with Southern Rocklobster Limited and the South Australian Rock Lobster Advisory Council to update their existing Clean Green Program. capability and capacity to survey domestic commercial vessels under the National Law. Qualifications To ensure ongoing standards of training for domestic commercial vessel crews. focussing on the technical standards of maritime training delivery and assessment. we worked to revise Marine Order 506. These in turn fed into the development of our streamlining review. A new National Surveyor Accreditation Scheme came into effect on 2 January 2015. It is being rolled out through industry peak bodies and associations. On 7 May 2015 we launched a National SMS Training Resource Kit. The new scheme was the result of significant work with both maritime agencies and industry—through initial sessions seeking comment on the proposed changes. we worked with State and Northern Territory maritime safety agencies to improve the advice. includes: facilitator notes. The kit. refresher training was delivered to around 400 Marine Safety Inspectors including a large number of police in New South Wales. and all ancillary resources required for a workshop. we shifted the focus of our liaison activity to working with industry and delegates more formally to identify opportunities for ground-up reform.

The following information represents the type and number of compliance and enforcement notices (Direction. No vessels were detained during the reporting period. or the DCV is operated in breach of a condition on its certificate • Certificate of Competency: a person operates or causes or permits another person to operate a DCV without holding the required certificate • General Safety Duty: a person breaches this duty 43 44 . or the DCV is operated in breach of a condition on its certificate • Certificate of Operation: a person causes or permits a DCV to be operated without a certificate in force for the vessel. There are 7 Marine Orders (numbered 501-507) made under the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law. As each Order is issued. More information on the legislation that underpins Marine Orders is available on our website. DIRECTION NOTICE PROHIBITION NOTICE IMPROVEMENT NOTICE JU L AU -14 G SE 14 PO 14 CT N 14 O VD 14 EC JA 14 N FE 15 B M -15 AR AP 15 R15 0 Following the commencement of the Navigation Act 2012.VESSEL AND SEAFARER SAFETY MARINE ORDERS Compliance and enforcement Compliance notices can be issued for a number reasons relating to safety. contraventions of the National Law. and where the issue of the notice is in the public interest. A total of 40 Marine Orders in the 1-100 series are required to be reissued in the program. 300 16 250 200 24 150 21 32 41 100 50 12 29 10 20 8 31 21 31 101 115 89 144 153 99 69 119 93 58 A full list of Marine Orders issued during 2014-15 can be found at Appendix 5. a substantial program is underway to improve the clarity and practicability of Marine Orders. We are aiming to complete this program by the end of 2016. 28 31 84 48 10 30 38 Marine Orders are a form of delegated legislation under Australia’s Commonwealth laws. Figure 10: Compliance and enforcement notices issued in 2014-15 Infringement notices enable a person who is alleged to have committed an offence against the National Law to pay a penalty to the National Regulator as an alternative to prosecution. Prohibition and Improvement notices) issued by Marine Safety Inspectors over the reporting period. a corresponding schedule in Marine Order 4 (Transitional modification) 2013 is replaced. 10 8 6 BREACH OF NOTICE 4 CoS (SURVEY) 2 CoO (OPERATION) CoC (QUALIFICATIONS) GENERAL SAFETY DUTY JU L AU -14 G SE 14 PO 14 CT N 14 O VD 14 EC JA 14 N FE 15 BM 15 AR AP 15 RM 15 AY JU 15 N -1 5 0 Figure 11: Infringement notices issued in 2014-15 • Breach of a notice: a person has breached a requirement/direction of one of the compliance and enforcement notices • Certificate of Survey: a person causes or permits a DCV to be operated without a certificate in force for the vessel. The following chart represents infringement notices issued over the reporting period and highlights the breakdown of the alleged offence types by month.

7 SEARCH AND RESCUE SC1 45 SC4 SC5 46 .

who was wearing an immersion suit. The Dornier aircraft was able to drop water and communications equipment to the yachtsman. A detailed look at a sample of our 2014-15 search and rescue incidents can be found on our website (amsa. Upon arriving on scene the Customs aircraft sighted the Enya II disabled in heavy seas but could not establish communications with the skipper who was visible on deck. Five people were led out and the one severely injured person was winched by the rescue helicopter and taken to Townsville Hospital. Cooktown helicopter search and rescue We were advised by a helicopter company that one of their helicopters crashed around 1pm on Tuesday 7 October 2014 at Mt Cook near Cooktown. ensuring that a consistent SAR service is delivered to those in need of assistance anywhere in Australia. we have a statutory duty to provide for a national search and rescue (SAR) service. The following two incidents are examples of the types of incidents that we routinely coordinate in conjunction with the police and other agencies. the yachtsman decided that he would attempt to swim the remaining distance to the ship and jumped into the ocean just before night fall. Our Cairns-based dedicated search and rescue Dornier aircraft and Rescue 521 helicopter from Townsville were also tasked to assist. The yachtsman cited the bravery of the Lars Maersk in their efforts to rescue him and also reflected on the need for those that venture to sea to have proper communications and emergency equipment to best ensure their survival if a mishap occurs. Queensland. The solo sailor was travelling between Queensland and New Zealand when his 10-metre yacht hit heavy seas and his yacht suffered rigging damage.gov. A debrief with the skipper of the Enya II revealed that the sailing vessel had sustained damage to the main sail and boom resulting in the vessel becoming non-manoeuvrable in extremely dangerous sea conditions.SEARCH AND RESCUE NATIONAL SEARCH AND RESCUE SERVICE Under the Australian Maritime Safety Act 1990.1 per cent of lives saved.au). The Yacht Enya II adrift 110km north of Lord Howe Island 48 . representing 98. which resulted in the rescue of 262 people across 7664 incidents. In addition. Rural Fire Brigade and National Park personnel made their way overland through dense vegetation and steep terrain to locate the helicopter and reach the six people in distress. Due to the conditions. The weather on scene was extreme with 6-9 metre waves and 70 kilometre per hour winds. the Queensland Ambulance Service. The helicopter crash site 47 Yacht Enya II rescue We received a 406 MHz distress beacon detection and a SPOT tracking device alert from the yacht Enya II approximately 110 kilometres north of Lord Howe Island around 10am on 3 September 2014. he was unable to close the distance and instead found himself adrift in the ocean. the yachtsman was unable to stem the flow of diesel fuel that was leaking heavily inside the yacht. A broadcast to shipping was issued and a Customs and Border Protection Dash 8 surveillance aircraft diverted. We also tasked our Essendon-based dedicated search and rescue Dornier aircraft. was recovered from the water by the Lars Maersk four hours later. The crew of the RAAF aircraft used night vision goggles to assist Lars Maersk in locating the yachtsman in the extreme weather conditions. A ground response team comprising of Queensland Police. The Danish-flagged container ship Lars Maersk was in the area and responded to the broadcast offering to provide assistance to the stricken yacht. We tasked a Hevilift B212 helicopter that was about to land at Cooktown and diverted it to confirm the crash position. In 2014-15 we coordinated a total of 447 searches. As the Lars Maersk was attempting to manoeuver alongside. a civil aircraft and a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) C-130J Hercules to assist. Notable 2014-15 incidents The majority of SAR incidents involve multiple organisations working together to develop an effective response plan to rescue people in distress. making the deck extremely slippery and unstable. The crew managed to notify the company using a mobile phone. The yachtsman. Six people were involved in the incident on board the Bell 206 helicopter and had sustained various degrees of injuries.

Over 70 per cent of all search and rescue incidents we responded to in 2014-15 involved a distress beacon. maintaining and operating the aircraft. This capability is currently being trialled for consideration as a future initiative. 49 50 . we regularly review and upgrade our technology. We also continued to progress work on the enhancement of the online beacon registration system. Of these registered beacons. In March 2015 we launched our new beacon website to make beacon information more accessible for our stakeholders. In addition to the dedicated aircraft. The list contains around 50 units (helicopters. Once fully operational. Distress beacons We conducted a joint approach with Maritime New Zealand to procure the MEOSAR capability for the region. and improve overall user experience during online beacon registration. The 2014 Australian Search and Rescue Award was presented to the crew of the Tasmanian Police vessel Van Diemen. 65 per cent are equipped with Global Positioning Satellite (GPS). The crew was responsible for saving the lives of 3 fishermen off Tasmania’s south-west coast in extreme weather conditions in January 2014. and a Mission Control Centre capable of processing MEOSAR data in Canberra. which is due to expire in the upcoming years. the members reviewed the strategic direction for the next five years and focused on initiatives that further enhance national search and rescue capability. to within 10 minutes. the specially equipped Dornier 328 aircraft and highly trained crews provided to AMSA by AeroRescue flew for a total of 2337 hours and participated in a wide range of tasks including searches for people in distress. Medium-altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue system The combined search and rescue system of Australia recorded nearly 20. Australia continues to manage the second largest 406 MHz distress beacon database in the world with more than 382. The contract for the dedicated aircraft in Darwin ended on 31 January 2015.000 incidents and thousands of lives saved across Australia in 2014-15. We are working with AeroRescue to continue providing a reliable and effective service until the transition to the new contracted provider is completed. This upgrade is a current priority of the International Cospas-Sarsat Programme which involves placing Medium-altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) receivers on new navigational satellites. During the meeting. Cairns and Melbourne. McMurdo Group’s Techno-Science Inc was awarded the contracts in September 2014 to install and maintain two 6-antenna MEOSAR satellite tracking ground stations in Western Australia and the North Island of New Zealand. The Challenger jets offer a longer search range and endurance. The MEOSAR system will dramatically improve both the speed and location accuracy of distress beacon detections globally. The existing Low-altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (LEOSAR) satellite system will be phased out in coming years under international arrangements. with an operational reserve aircraft located in Melbourne. which provides precise location information. • Guided Stores Delivery System. we maintain a list of qualified aviation operators for the provision of opportunity-based search and rescue services. Under this contract. the MEOSAR system will reduce beacon detection times from hours under the current system. which aims to support mobile devices. This enhanced beacon registration website will be launched in September 2015. Brisbane. It will work cooperatively to achieve overlapping coverage for Australia and New Zealand’s Search and Rescue Regions. Search and rescue capabilities Dedicated airborne search and rescue service The installation is expected to take 15 months and the system will be ready for operation in Australia and New Zealand by the start of 2017. Modifications to the aircraft include installation of advanced search and communication equipment. The Maritime Anomaly Detection capability is part of our Challenger specification. Cobham will provide a comprehensive service to us which includes owning. Melbourne and Perth. highlighting the extent to which the cooperative nature of the search and rescue system continues to make a difference to the safety of our community.SEARCH AND RESCUE National Search and Rescue Council We maintained a strong national leadership position as the Chair and Secretariat of the National Search and Rescue (NATSAR) Council. which will be in service by 2016 During 2014-15. The three specifically modified Bombardier Challenger 604 jets will operate out of Perth. In October 2014 New South Wales Police Force hosted the 38th annual NATSAR Council meeting in Sydney. minimising the search time required.000 beacons registered at 30 June 2015. A new contract was signed in October 2014 with Cobham SAR Services Pty Ltd (Cobham) which will provide the next generation aircraft dedicated to search and rescue from 2016. Technology developments To ensure we continue to provide an effective and efficient search and rescue service for the Australian community. 95 per cent of the time. aircraft and trained personnel) strategically located around Australia. with the remaining bases closing from August 2016 to February 2017. Distress beacons play a critical role in search and rescue. streamline business processes. This can be attributed to our ongoing public awareness campaign that specifically targeted the ‘GPS is best’ message in 2013-14. It extends coverage of a visual airborne search and can automatically detect target types (from people in the water to large vessels). AeroRescue has been providing a round-the-clock dedicated search and rescue service to us for the last 10 years. which allows supplies to be dropped from the aircraft and then ‘flown’ to the target point by an operator on board with a remote control. for a period of 12 years. In 2014-15 we continued to move forward with the upgrade of the International Cospas-Sarsat satellite system. modifying. homing to emergency beacons and deployment of stores. and emergency supply drop capability to people in distress. which uses ultra-high resolution cameras to automatically detect anomalies on the sea surface. A commendation award was also presented to the crew of a Navy Seahawk helicopter from Nowra’s 816 Squadron for their role in rescuing a French couple after their yacht sank off the New South Wales coast in September 2013. We are currently undertaking and/or planning trials of: We currently have a contract with AeroRescue Pty Ltd providing dedicated search and rescue aircraft based in Cairns. • Maritime Visual Anomaly Detection. as well as improved deployment speed.

51 52 . including Certificate II in Coxswain. This included participating in search and rescue exercises and incident debriefs and the provision of search and rescue training and equipment to AAD aircraft. as well as a range of pre-requisite courses. including: • Marine Operations integrated rating course (Australian Maritime College. and strong contribution to the work on the Polar Code (page 74). collaborative work with the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs. deployment of equipment and use of distress beacon homing equipment. 69 students successfully completed certificate level qualification. Tasmania) — 2 Torres Strait Islander students completed this 11-week course. which operate seasonally from Antarctic bases. ANTARCTIC We continued to have extensive involvement in the Antarctic in 2014-15 through our engagement in the annual Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting. The training was in visual search techniques. • School Based Education Program — this continuous program provides high quality fitted lifejackets and educates school aged children about marine safety across 20 remote campuses in the Cape communities. at the end of which they were placed with an Australian shipping company to complete an 18-month ‘at sea’ training phase before formally entering the offshore maritime workforce. We also continued to have significant operational level engagement in the region through our partnership with the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD). • Under the delivery of the Torres Strait Maritime Pathways Project. Marine Engine Driver Grade III and Certificate III in Fishing Operations.SEARCH AND RESCUE TORRES STRAIT MARINE SAFETY PROGRAM In 2014-15 we continued to work with our partner agencies of the Torres Strait Marine Safety Program in delivering a number of safety and training initiatives in the Torres Strait and Cape York Peninsula.

8 MARINE ENVIRONMENT SC1 53 SC4 SC5 54 .

focussed on a spill event scenario from the offshore petroleum industry (details provided in the below table). at-sea Hazardous and Noxious Substance (HNS) Reconnaissance Team capability. and Maritime Casualty Officers. Of the 150 satellite passes. None were attributed to an identifiable spiller. as well as industry representation. State. 55 We maintain nine strategic equipment stockpiles of marine pollution response equipment around the Australian coastline. and in all cases natural degradation provided the most appropriate clean-up response. working with Commonwealth. We manage the plan. the aircraft are maintained in strategic locations around the coastline to respond to oil spills on a 24/7 basis. and Northern Territory governments. with pilot versions of the new courses trialled during the year. We receive reports of possible oil on the water within 60-90 minutes of the satellite image being acquired. As with the previous capability. Training Under the National Plan. as well as online training and workshops. reliable and timely way to monitor large areas. with a State Marine Pollution Controllers workshop being held in conjunction with the strategic component. We also delivered specialist workshops and exercises for National Response Team members. Able to operate 24 hours a day. During 2015 our satellite surveillance program targeted 9 areas of heavy shipping where there is the potential for oil spills. Environmental Science Coordinators. Operations Officer.MARINE ENVIRONMENT NATIONAL PLAN FOR MARITIME ENVIRONMENTAL EMERGENCIES The National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies (National Plan) sets out the cooperative arrangements between governments and industry to respond to shipping casualties and maritime pollution incidents. The development of the Advanced Equipment Operator course was completed and this course was conducted in May 2015—for the first time as a competency-based course. we deliver competency-based training courses. and a forward field base established in Exmouth to undertake field and aerial deployment operations. As of 2014-15 we have the capacity to access satellite-based radar surveillance systems to assist oil spill response operations. Shoreline Response. Planning Officer. Component Date Location Summary Strategic 27-28 May Perth and Canberra This component exercised high level communication and coordination between the Australian Government. AMSA and National Response Team personnel in Perth. all were small and far offshore. and included the activation of the Offshore Petroleum Incident Coordination Committee. as well as industry and emergency services. Stocks of dispersant are stored at these stockpiles as well as at other key locations. In 2014-15 we received and distributed new booms to the stockpiles and signed extensions on standing offer arrangements for the supply of oil spill response equipment. interstate and national resources. It involves multi-level government organisations and agencies from across Australia. there are an additional 12 aircraft available to the contractor. In addition to the contracted aircraft. and the offshore petroleum industry. These reports are quickly assessed and then sent to the relevant authority for follow-up action. This capability forms part of Australia’s obligation to prepare for. In the event of a significant incident. a pollution incident by hazardous and noxious substances. A new contract commenced for the supply of the Fixed Wing Aerial Dispersant Capability under the National Plan. Basic Equipment Operator and Advanced Equipment Operator. and respond to. Exercise Westwind Operational Response capability We signed a memorandum of understanding with Fire and Rescue New South Wales in 2014-15 to deliver an onboard. these aircraft could be called upon to assist in a response. 19 returned positive alerts. This exercise is of national importance as it ensures strategic and operational preparedness for marine pollution incidents. The AMSA Registered Training Organisation is the only provider able to issue a Statement of Attainment for this course. As part of the review and continuous improvement of the training regime. the new capability provides a greater capacity to respond to an incident. Exercise Westwind formed part of a week of development programs. Exercise Westwind. with the first courses held in April and June 2015. Response and Cooperation to Pollution Incidents by Hazardous and Noxious Substances. Similar to Exercise Northerly (held in 2014). the Western Australian Government. some of the specialist technical courses were redesigned. Incident Controller. The National Plan is exercised on an annual basis. However. The team provides us with a 24/7 capability to undertake on-scene evaluations of HNS incidents on ships at sea. 56 . We are developing a national HNS response capability based on a tiered system. 8-12 June Perth and Exmouth An Incident Management Team was mobilised with oil industry. and stand up the Offshore Petroleum Incident Coordination Committee which is chaired by the Department of Industry and Science. as a party to The Protocol on Preparedness. This team will report back to decision makers on shore so the most effective response can be launched without having to bring potentially dangerous substances into port. The strategic component of the exercise provided the first opportunity to test the Offshore Petroleum Incident Coordination Framework. and through inclement weather. and subject to their availability. as the aircraft are faster and have a larger payload. consisting of: • level 1: small on board incident requiring remote advice with no onsite attendance • level 2: medium or significant incident requiring full on site attendance • level 3: major spill/incident requiring state. conducted in 2015. satellite radar provides an effective. Fire and Rescue NSW hazardous material (HAZMAT) technicians and an AMSA maritime casualty officer will form the reconnaissance team that responds to an incident. We entered into a partnership with the Australian Maritime College to provide maritime familiarisation training to the HAZMAT technicians. In 2014-15 we conducted 29 training courses (involving 521 participants) covering the following roles: Incident Management Team. and 10 reports indicated a high level of confidence of oil on the water. Some of the requirements of the capability include: • 6 primary aircraft located around Australia • available to fly within a specified time period from activation • suitably equipped to undertake aerial dispersant application activities in the marine environment • able to operate offshore up to 200 nautical miles from the coast • provision of adequately trained personnel to support contract requirements.

PROTECTION OF THE SEA LEVY REDUCED The Australian Government reduced the rate of the Protection of the Sea Levy effective from 1 July 2014. The SMIT Leopard subsequently towed the vessel to Gladstone. Emergency towage We farewelled our emergency towage vessel (ETV) Pacific Responder at midnight on 7 July 2014. remain unaltered. replacing the Coral Knight.25 cents to 11. After a Powers of Intervention direction to the ships. The levy rate reduced from 14.25 cents per net registered tonne per quarter. It is due to enter service on 1 July 2016. we took a proposal to the International Maritime Organization to increase the liability limits under the 1996 Protocol to the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims. The funds generated by the higher levy were also used to establish a $10 million pollution response reserve. It was drifting north-east of Perkins Reef and north of Elusive Reef. about 379 kilometres north-east of Gladstone when it was disabled. the SMIT Leopard. the Marine Navigation Levy and the Marine Navigation (Regulatory Functions) Levy. and protecting the marine environment from pollution. nationwide Emergency Towage Capability program that we manage as part of the National Plan. a towline was established between the ships on 12 January with assistance provided by the Queensland Police vessel Lyle M Hoey. stabilising a casualty to prevent further damage. The Coral Knight is a new-build anchor handling tug and supply vessel with a bollard pull of 82 tonnes and a maximum speed of 14 knots. We activated an emergency towage vessel from Gladstone. It funds AMSA’s environmental protection activities─preventing and combating ship-sourced pollution in the marine environment.MARINE ENVIRONMENT MV THOR COMMANDER On 11 January. Due to the vessel’s 25-hour transit time. we sent out a broadcast to vessels in the area. The vessel is capable of providing an initial response to a casualty with its focus on towing a casualty out of immediate danger. This international agreement allows a shipowner or salvor to limit the total amount they can be required to pay for damage. It is a substantial component of the larger. the Pacific Responder handed over ETV responsibility to the Coral Knight as part of the new 10-year emergency towage capability contract. The vessel is also the primary platform for the aids to navigation maintenance program in its area of operations. which occurred off the south-east coast of Queensland in March 2009. Also as a result of the Pacific Adventurer incident. towing or escorting a casualty to a place of refuge. The Chinese-flagged cargo carrier MV Xinfa Hai responded with an offer of assistance. We successfully obtained the agreement of parties to increase the liability limits by approximately 50 per cent. In May 2015 a bill to amend the Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims Act 1989 (to reflect these increased liability limits) was passed by both Houses of Parliament. The Thor Commander was successfully diverted away from the reef and towed in an easterly direction prior to the SMIT Leopard’s arrival on 13 January. the Antigua Barbuda-flagged general cargo ship MV Thor Commander reported it had damaged its main engine. fire-fighting. The levy rate was previously increased in June 2010 to meet part of the cost of cleaning up the oil spill from the Pacific Adventurer incident. The levy applies to ships of more than 24 metres in length entering an Australian port carrying more than 10 tonnes of oil in bulk as fuel or cargo. The second vessel will provide an enhanced towage capability. issued by the Maritime Emergency Response Commander (MERCOM). The build of a customised second new emergency towage vessel has begun with the first steel cut in January 2015. The rates for our other two levies. After 8 years of service. The Master and crew of the MV Xinfa Hai were presented with an AMSA plaque and certificate of recognition for their outstanding seamanship 57 58 . The increased liability limits took effect on 8 June 2015.

000 square kilometres of the Coral Sea. PAPUA NEW GUINEA SOLOMON SEA PORT MORESBY TORRES STRAIT PSSA OUTER ROUTE HOLMES REEF TWO-WAY ROUTE CORAL SEA CAIRNS DIAMOND PASSAGE TWO-WAY ROUTE AREA TO BE AVOIDED CORAL SEA PSSA TOWNSVILLE MACKAY GREAT BARRIER REEF PSSA ROCKHAMPTON QUEENSLAND BRISBANE 59 60 . The proposal was approved by the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee in May and came into effect in June. In 2014-15 we submitted a proposal to the IMO to extend the existing Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait PSSA into the Coral Sea. The new area covers approximately 564. Three Associated Protective Measures (a new recommendatory Area to be Avoided and two two-way routes) accompanied the proposal (see page 75 and below chart). It includes the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park which was made the world’s first Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in 1990.CORAL SEA PARTICULARLY SENSITIVE SEA AREA The Coral Sea is considered one of the most distinctive and undisturbed natural systems in the world.

9 NAVIGATION SAFETY SC1 61 SC4 SC5 62 .

measures and approaches for ensuring the safety of shipping and protection of the marine environment. stability parameters. narrow channels. given the limited depth of water. SHIPPING MANAGEMENT Shipping management plans On 7 October 2014 the Australian Government released a plan for managing shipping traffic in the Great Barrier Reef. During the year. Under keel clearance management The Torres Strait is naturally challenging for shipping. Since its inception. In 2014-15 we used the technology available through Automatic Identification System (AIS) and established a virtual AIS aid to navigation in the location of OG Rock. The UKCM system allows pilots to plan. the maritime environment in which we work.gov. Under this new arrangement.NAVIGATION SAFETY OVERVIEW We deliver a range of services which provide vessels with the ability to navigate safely around Australia’s coastline and to and from its ports. together with MSQ. There were several key system changes during the period. we are the Competent Authority. 63 64 . vessel transits through the complicated waterway in a safe manner that considers a vessel’s declared deepest draught. This is for educational purposes (with no fine attached). fringing coral reefs and at times strong currents and tidal streams. and then conduct. which poses a risk to deep draught vessels. we revised the governance and operational arrangements for REEFVTS. The North-East Shipping Management Plan was jointly developed by Queensland and Australian Government agencies over a period of 2 years and takes into account projected growth in shipping to the year 2032. It outlines measures currently in place to manage the safety of shipping in the region and proposes options and actions to further minimise the environmental impacts of shipping. work began on a specific improvement to the UKCM system to develop and implement a ‘chart overlay’ function. The creation of this virtual AIS aid to navigation comes at minimal cost and has been established to offer assistance in the decision making required by a deep draught vessel’s pilot and master during a UKCM transit. OG Rock is a shoal located in a narrow section of the Torres Strait shipping channel. which is available to view and download on our website (amsa.au). available water depth. Torres Strait and Coral Sea. • day/dusk/night mode of operation (illumination configuration) It defines: our mandate. The upgraded system was released on 5 November 2014 and incorporated a number of improvements in functionality. and our preferred technologies. • increased flexibility for pilots to create and modify transit plans whilst underway Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait Vessel Traffic Service In 2014-15 we continued to work closely with Maritime Safety Queensland (MSQ) on the implementation of vessel traffic services for the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait (REEFVTS). We led the development of the North-East Shipping Management Plan. A new memorandum of understanding commenced on 1 July 2015. • an improved hardware platform to cater for the increasing data requirements of the system. position. Through time-based reporting. short transits through the REEVTS area can be classified as part of a single voyage. anticipated changes to shipping activity (and how we keep track of those changes). thereby reducing reporting requirements • issuing of notices during a port State control inspection (and letters to owners) to a ship identified as non-compliant with its pre-entry/entry reports. the UKCM system has been subject to a continual improvement process in order to provide pilots with a robust system that offers the most user-friendly platform possible. Feedback received from pilots on this additional safety initiative has been positive and we will monitor the effectiveness over time through consultation. This plan describes how we are strengthening our current capabilities to understand and respond to the challenge of dealing with changing shipping activity around Australia. and MSQ is the day-to-day operator of the service. In addition. In December 2013. the work incorporated specific aspects related to direct feedback received from pilots and pilot providers. so that we can meet current and future challenges. including: • streamlining of cruise ship reporting. The plan is due for release in 2015-16. tides and tidal streams. but has resulted in positive feedback from shipowners who were not previously aware of non-compliance incidents. Our mandated under keel clearance management (UKCM) system has been used operationally by marine pilots since 1 July 2014. including: • a network currently comprising 490 visual and electronic aids to navigation • ship routeing systems • ship reporting systems • vessel traffic services. including: • a chart overlay function that provides an additional spatial dimension for pilots when performing transit plan calculations and transits • updates to the latest Australian Hydrographic Service bathymetry data In 2014-15 we continued to progress our National Shipping Management Plan.

currently comprising 490 aids at approximately 380 sites. in the management of hazardous materials at aids to navigation sites). The availability of these aids to navigation in 2014-15 is detailed in Appendix 2. the site proved highly valuable in assisting with voice communication during the MV Thor Commander incident (page 57). We also developed high-level user requirements as an input to the maintenance contractor’s process to select a suitable new aid to navigation remote monitoring system which is due to be implemented in 2016. New aids to navigation maintenance contract Our new 10-year contract for aids to navigation maintenance commenced on 1 July 2014. following the completion of a competitive tender process and a contract transition phase. Key outcomes in 2014-15 included: the finalisation of a new national guideline on the provision of aids to navigation information to the Australian Hydrographic Service for charting purposes. Major aids to navigation modifications In January 2015 we completed the modification of the Swain Reefs aids to navigation structure to the north-east of Gladstone on the Outer Shipping Route of the Great Barrier Reef. It was therefore necessary to trial and implement a cost effective satellite communications solution to enable the transfer of the vessel tracking data to our vessel tracking systems and facilitate the essential voice communication between ships and the REEFVTS Centre in Townsville. 65 Maintenance work underway on an aid to navigation in the Port Walcott region 66 . The contract includes the implementation of several technology enhancements within the first four years of the contract which will have significant financial and operational benefits. Bedding down various changes between the previous and new contracts was a key focus in 2014-15. and consultation with states and ports on new AMSA policy and procedures covering installation and use of AIS aid to navigation equipment within Australian waters. During 2014-15 good progress has been made against the implementation schedule for these technical innovation projects with 22 buoys being exchanged. Shortly after the modifications were completed.NAVIGATION SAFETY AIDS TO NAVIGATION MANAGEMENT Aids to navigation network We manage an extensive network of aids to navigation around the coastline. tracking vessels in excess of 70 nautical miles from the site. including replacement of: • our remaining steel buoys with polyethylene-hulled buoys • incandescent lights with LED lights • all AIS base stations including upgrading the functionality of equipment • aids to navigation remote monitoring equipment and the related management system. The modifications were necessary to enable AIS vessel tracking and very high frequency (VHF) communication infrastructure and to increase the range of the light. A particular challenge for the project was the site’s considerable distance offshore. Excellent range is being obtained from the AIS station. This project was one of a number of navigation safety initiatives that have been implemented following the extension of REEFVTS to the area south of Mackay after the grounding of the bulk carrier Shen Neng 1 in 2010. 29 LED lights being installed. The Aids to Navigation Strategy and Operations Working Group meets biannually to consider issues regarding the provision and management of aids to navigation across jurisdictions. Other key contract deliverables which have been progressed in 2014-15 include the development of asset management strategies for each of our aids to navigation sites and the contractor enhancing workplace health and safety controls (for example. and 11 AIS base stations being replaced.

From the Commonwealth Lighthouse Service’s inception in 1915. Bustard Head and Sugarloaf Point • launched commemorative stamp and coin sets which were developed in partnership with the Royal Australian Mint and Australia Post • attended the official Commonwealth Lighthouse Service Centenary celebration. the Australian Government has been responsible for the provision of an extensive network of aids to navigation around the coastline. through various Commonwealth agencies (including AMSA since 1991). The division of responsibility was confirmed in a 1934 agreement between the Commonwealth and the states where the Commonwealth was responsible for ocean highway aids and the states remained responsible for aids required for port entry. Designs were based on local conditions and used local building materials wherever possible. In June 1911 the Lighthouses Act came into effect after an extensive report into the condition of existing state lighthouses and the need for upgrades and additional aids to navigation (that were proposed to come under Commonwealth responsibility). 67 68 . In 1788 convicts built Australia’s first marine light on South Head at the entrance to Sydney Harbour.CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF COMMONWEALTH MANAGEMENT OF AIDS TO NAVIGATION In 2015 we are marking the centenary of the Australian Government’s management of lighthouses and other aids to navigation in Australian waters. To mark the anniversary we: • released a calendar featuring various heritage lighthouses • hosted various open days at our lighthouses around the country • launched an interactive map detailing our 55 heritage lighthouses • produced cardboard kit models of lighthouses at Tasman Island. On 1 July 1915 the Commonwealth officially accepted responsibility for around 163 lights beacons and buoys required by commercial shipping. within ports. the style of their lighthouses greatly differed. Prior to Federation. the various colonies of Australia built. maintained and manned their own lighthouses. rivers and inland waterways. This was simply an iron basket on a tripod which was replaced in 1818 by Australia’s first lighthouse—Macquarie Light. As the colonies were very independent in terms of government and geographical distance.

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WORKING WITH INDUSTRY

DOMESTIC CONSULTATION
AND EVENTS
In 2014-15 we conducted numerous consultations with stakeholders on a range of issues, standards,
Marine Orders, and policy developments.
From September to October 2014 we conducted our biannual stakeholder satisfaction survey to collect
feedback and measure stakeholders’ assessment of our performance. This survey included National
System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety (National System) stakeholders for the first time.
A total of 397 individual stakeholders participated in telephone interviews and an online survey.
Overall, stakeholders assessed their level and quality of engagement with AMSA; our performance;
our clarity of purpose and integrity; and performance and accessibility of staff very positively. Results
indicated support for stakeholders, service delivery, and regulation of the National System as areas
for improvement. The survey results provided a positive overall picture of the perceptions held of our
performance across a broad range of functions, reflecting a period of consolidation from the results
achieved in 2012. This provides a sound platform for us to continue to implement and integrate our
regulatory responsibilities across our expanded stakeholder base.
Our principal consultative body with the maritime sector is the AMSA Advisory Committee, made up of
industry leaders from the shipping, offshore and fishing industries, the Australian Marine Conservation
Society, the largest maritime trade union, the Royal Australian Navy, and other relevant Australian
Government agencies. The committee met twice during 2014-15. We also established the inaugural
Fishing Industry Advisory Committee to lead our consultation with this important sector.
Our participation in other consultative bodies is detailed below.
AMSA-run consultative bodies:
• AMSA Advisory Committee
• Australian Search and Rescue Consultative
Forum
• Bulk Cargoes Advisory Group
• Navigational Services Advisory Committee
• AMSA Livestock Advisory Committee
• Australian Seafarers’ Welfare Council
• Human Elements, Training and
Watchkeeping Stakeholders Workshop
• Marine Pollution Preparedness and
Response Technical Group
• Marine Pollution Prevention Technical
Group
• Marine Pollution Recovery Technical Group
• Australian Government National Plan
Committee
• Domestic Vessel Industry Advisory
Committee
• Fishing Industry Advisory Committee
• National Standard for Commercial Vessels
(NSCV) Part F2 – Leisure craft & NSCV
Part G – General Safety requirements
• Navigation Safety Advisory Group
• North-East Shipping Management Group
• North-East Water Space Management
Working Group
• National Plan Strategic Coordination
Committee
• National Plan Strategic Industry Advisory
Forum
• National Search and Rescue Council

71

External consultative bodies:
• Aids to Navigation Strategy and Operations
Working Group
• Australian Automatic Identification System
Working Group
• Australian International Telecommunications
Union Working Group
• Australia New Zealand Safe Boating
Education Group
• Australian Recreational Boating Safety
Committee
• Australian Shipbuilders’ Association Technical
Committee
• state/territory search and rescue committees
• Australian Strategic Air Traffic Management
Group
• Bass Strait Livestock Shipping Committee
• Civil Aviation Safety Authority Standards
Consultative Committee
• Livestock Export Standards Advisory Group
• Maritime Agencies Forum
• National Plan Strategic Industry Advisory
Forum
• National Seafood Industry Alliance
• National Volunteer Marine Search and Rescue
Committee
• Ports Australia Environmental and
Sustainability Working Group
• Ports Australia Operations Working Group
• REEFVTS Management Group
• Standards Australia technical committees
(various)
• Vessel Tracking Services Working Group

MARITIME 2014: SHIP TO SHORE
Our inaugural combined shipping and
domestic commercial vessel conference
Maritime 2014: Ship to Shore was held from
10-12 November in Melbourne.
More than 400 delegates attended the
conference, where International Maritime
Organization (IMO) Secretary-General Koji
Sekimizu delivered the keynote address,
reflecting on the past achievements and
future challenges of the IMO. Deputy
Prime Minister Warren Truss addressed
the conference, detailing the Australian
Government’s commitment to working with
maritime industries to foster strong and safe
growth.
Eighteen exhibitors attended the conference,
giving conference delegates the latest insight
into maritime technology, products, services
and training. The Australian Maritime College
was the platinum sponsor of Maritime 2014,
with Australian Maritime Systems, Riverside
Marine, Maritime Employees Training
and Briar Maritime gold sponsors, and
International Maritime Services, Ausmarine
and the Oil Response Company of Australia
Pty Ltd proudly supporting the conference.
Panel discussions provided a forum for honest
and frank debate about issues for both the
shipping industry and domestic commercial
vessel operators.

The Hon Warren Truss MP, Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development
speaks at the Maritime 2014 conference.
72

WORKING WITH INDUSTRY

ENGAGEMENT AND
COMMUNICATION TOOLS

WORKING INTERNATIONALLY

In 2014-15 we produced a variety of newsletters:
• AMSA Aboard: our flagship publication. As of March 2015 this e-newsletter is published monthly
• Working Boats: our newsletter for the domestic commercial vessel industry

We maintain a strong international presence by actively promoting continuous improvements to
international shipping practice and developments related to maritime and aviation search and rescue.
We do this through representation at various international and regional bodies, technical cooperation
programs, and in memoranda of understanding.

• On Scene: newsletter for the National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies
• Maritime Safety Awareness Bulletin: a new biannual bulletin for the shipping industry.
We had more than 777,500 visits to our website this year.
Our media officers maintain a 24/7 media hotline to respond to media enquiries and, through the
media, provide information to the public on incidents within our jurisdiction. We continued to expand
our social media presence to support our strategic challenges and keep the community informed about
major developments and significant operations. In 2014-15 we issued 71 media releases and our
social media channels continued to grow. As of 30 June 2015 we had a Facebook following of more
than 20,500 and a Twitter following in excess of 23,500.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is the global standard-setting authority for the safety,
security and environmental performance of international shipping. It also oversees the obligation for
countries to provide a search and rescue service to mariners wherever they sail. Australia is a founding
member of the IMO and has been represented on the IMO Council for more than 40 years.
Our key achievements at the IMO in 2014-15 are detailed below.
Initiative

Summary

Advertising and market research

Maritime Safety
Committee

Section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 requires certain reporting on advertising and
market research by Commonwealth agencies, including those covered by the Public Governance,
Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

Brad Groves, General Manager Navigation Safety and International
Relations, was elected as Chairman of the IMO’s Maritime Safety
Committee (MSC) for 2016. The election was conducted on 11 June
during the 95th session of MSC.

Polar Code

The International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (Polar
Code) has been adopted by the IMO to come into force on 1 January
2017. The Polar Code covers the full range of shipping-related matters
relevant to navigation in polar regions and contains mandatory
requirements and recommendations for ships operating in Antarctic and
Arctic waters.

Supplier

Purpose

Cost

WIN Television

Community service announcement – beacons

$60,000.00

Blaze Advertising

Recruitment advertising

$38,383.14

OUR REGISTERED TRAINING
ORGANISATION
The number of students enrolled through our Registered Training Organisation (RTO) has remained
steady around the previous year’s level. We had 355 student enrolments in 2014-15 (compared to 393
in 2013-14). Since being notified of the successful re-registration of our RTO for a further five years,
we have successfully maintained our compliance with the requirements of the Australian Skills Quality
Authority.
The new Standards for RTOs 2015 came into effect requiring existing organisations to comply from 1
April 2015. To prepare for this new phase of regulation, we reviewed and modified our relevant policies
and procedures to ensure compliance with these new standards.

73

International Maritime Organization

The work on developing the Polar Code commenced in 2010
at IMO with AMSA’s active participation representing Australian
interests. Through correspondence and working groups, Australia made
several significant contributions to the Code, including requirements
on lifesaving and firefighting appliances, safe navigation, pollution
prevention, emergency response and search and rescue.  
Safe carriage of cargo

We worked with industry and partner countries to progress new
schedules for cargo types that have the potential to liquefy (manganese
ore, coal and bauxite); as well as establish interim carriage
requirements for liquid hydrogen in bulk.

Waste management

We co-sponsored a submission to the IMO Marine Environment
Protection Committee which detailed a Regional Reception Facilities
Plan (for ships’ waste) for the Small Island Developing States in the
Pacific Region. We provided technical assistance to the Secretariat of
the Pacific Regional Environment Programme during the development
of this plan, and conducted gap analyses of reception facilities in five
ports across the region.

Particularly Sensitive
Sea Area (PSSA)
extension

We submitted a proposal to the IMO to extend the existing Great Barrier
Reef and Torres Strait Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) into the
Coral Sea (page 59). The proposal was approved by the IMO Marine
Environment Protection Committee in May 2015 and came into effect
in June 2015. The new area covers approximately 564,000 square
kilometres of the Coral Sea.

74

WORKING WITH INDUSTRY

Initiative

Summary

International Civil Aviation Organization

New ship routeing
systems

Three Associated Protective Measures for the south-west Coral Sea
accompanied our PSSA proposal to the IMO—a new recommendatory
Area to be Avoided and two two-way routes. These measures were
adopted by the IMO Maritime Safety Committee in June and will come
into effect on 1 January 2016.

As a member of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) we work closely with the
Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development and other Australian Government aviation
agencies to fulfil Australia’s obligations as a signatory to the Convention on International Civil Aviation.
This involves the provision of an aeronautical search and rescue (SAR) service, aeronautical SAR
expertise and advice, and assistance in progressing ICAO’s major initiatives.

On 1 December 2014 a new IMO-adopted recommendatory two-way
route in the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait came into effect.
Automatic Identification System data from early 2015 shows that its
implementation has been a success, with most ships following the new
route.

Australia has been a member of ICAO’s governing Council since its formation in 1947 and is involved
in more than 60 ICAO committees, panels and study groups dealing with a broad cross-section
of aviation matters, including being a member of the ICAO Air Navigation Commission. Our key
achievements at ICAO in 2014-15 are detailed below.

A new ship routeing system came into effect on 1 June 2015 at Papua
New Guinea’s Jomard Entrance following a joint proposal by Papua
New Guinea and Australia to the IMO.

75

E-navigation

We coordinated national and international efforts to develop IMO
guidance on Human Centred Design for navigation systems,
incorporating Software Quality Assurance and Usability Testing.
We also led work at the International Association of Marine Aids to
Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities’ (IALA) E-Navigation Committee
to draft e-navigation test-bed reporting guidance, which has since been
accepted by the IMO.

Safety of life at sea

Together with other IMO Member States, we have championed
improving the ability of ships to conduct rescues when dedicated search
and rescue resources are not available. This came into effect through
an International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS)
Regulation adopted by IMO resolution, which takes effect in July 2015.
The new regulation requires all ships to develop plans and procedures
for such emergency situations, and recommends the carriage of
equipment for these recovery operations and the need to conduct drill
exercises for ships’ crews.

Initiative

Summary

Asia/Pacific SAR Task
Force

We continued our leadership towards improvement measures for
regional search and rescue services in the region through chairing
this task force. Since its establishment in 2012, this task force has
contributed significantly to raising the profile of SAR issues within the
region, including the development of a regional SAR plan to assist
with improving regional capability. It reports to the ICAO Asia/Pacific
Air Navigation Planning and Implementation Group, an Air Traffic
Management Sub-Group, in which AMSA also participates as a member
of the Australian delegation.

Ad-hoc Working Group
on Aircraft Tracking

We provided technical SAR expertise as a member of this working
group, which during this year developed the new ICAO Global
Aeronautical Distress and Safety System Concept of Operation. This
proposed new system sets the framework for the development of a
worldwide aircraft tracking system to improve current global tracking
capability, providing more timely alerts of aircraft emergencies and
greater accuracy of aircraft distress locations. This will offer additional
support for search and rescue, recovery, and accident investigation
activities.

ICAO/IMO Joint
Working Group on
Harmonization of
Aeronautical and
Maritime SAR

We maintained our status as one of eight Aeronautical SAR Members of
this joint working group. This group assists ICAO and IMO in developing
provisions regarding new SAR techniques and procedures where
both aeronautical and maritime interests are involved, including the
International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue Manual.

Staff secondment

At the beginning of 2015, a jointly funded initiative by the Department
of Infrastructure and Regional Development and AMSA saw the
secondment of an AMSA SAR technical expert to ICAO Headquarters,
Montreal, Canada for 2 years. This initiative was welcomed by ICAO,
which now provides the global aeronautical SAR community with a
fulltime expert dedicated to addressing worldwide SAR system issues
based on key recommendations following the search for Malaysia
Airlines flight MH370.

76

As Secretariat of APHoMSA. printed and distributed the Indian Ocean MOU manual. Mauritius and Sri Lanka. In 2012 we completed a SAR Capability Assessment project for the Papua New Guinea (PNG) National Maritime Safety Authority. radio communications for developing rescue coordination centres. Regional engagement In addition to our other international obligations. France and the United States.6 million in funding to work in cooperation with our partnering countries to develop their capability to provide more effective response to maritime and aviation distress situations within their search and rescue regions and to enhance capability in the broader region. Kiribati and Solomon Islands as part of our inaugural International Staff Exchange Program. we presented many key topics. In response to these challenges. Asia-Pacific region The 16th session of the Asia-Pacific Heads of Maritime Safety Agencies (APHoMSA) forum was held in Shenzhen. The forum built on improved governance reforms made over the past few years. delivering the AMSA-developed e-Broadcast system to provide BASARNAS with the ability to view and communicate with ships transiting through the search and rescue region. we commenced operational delivery of the 2 and half year Search and Rescue Capability Partnership Program with the Maldives. Our legal officers provided assistance to IALA throughout the year in reviewing the organisation’s secretariat functions and their proposed move to an International Intergovernmental Organisation. In 2014-15 we continued to conduct PSC and maritime English language training courses. Samoa under the partnership between the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP). The participants were given an overview of our operations. developed the Maritime Search and Rescue Technical Arrangement for Cooperation among Pacific Island Countries and Territories. We intend to offer an expanded program annually as a way of strengthening relationships with counterpart agencies and helping to build improved maritime safety practices across the region. and environment protection capability in the Indian Ocean. New Zealand. In 2014-15 we undertook an exercise to cost the recommendations. With SPREP and the IMO. New Caledonia from 13-17 April 2015. meeting with representatives from the Sri Lankan Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre 77 78 . as well as IALA’s Legal Advisory Panel. we continue to have a central role in facilitating the forum. the Pacific Island countries and territories. We are a member of two regional memoranda of understanding (MOU) on port State control (PSC) the Indian Ocean MOU and the Tokyo MOU (in the Asia-Pacific region). AMSA. and expert missions under both of these arrangements. We will receive a total of $2. and Vessel Traffic Services Committee. Support was also provided for a number of matters of significance for Australia. We provide extensive assistance under the Australian Government’s Indonesian Transport Safety Assistance Package (ITSAP). We also designed. bringing together senior maritime officials from across the Asia-Pacific region to discuss issues of mutual interest. We also provided search and rescue assistance including: embedding a search and rescue capability officer within Indonesia’s national search and rescue agency BASARNAS. including Australia. and AMSA. Our specialists are represented at all four technical committees. in support of the effort to improve coordination and collaboration in the region. Our officers currently occupy the role of Vice Chair of two technical committees: Aids to Navigation Engineering and Sustainability Committee. together with Australia. studied our International Safety Management processes. Indian Ocean region In mid-January 2015. providing PNG with an understanding of the investment required to implement the system improvements. In 2014-15 we continued to provide high-level marine pollution response assistance to our regional partners in the Pacific. International staff exchange program In October 2014 we hosted 9 participants from China. and the ICAO Asia Pacific SAR Plan. As a Development Partner of the Pacific Regional SAR Workshop. This is being delivered under the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade ‘Government Partnerships for Development’ program. In August an oil spill response training program was held in Apia. we also work extensively with our neighbouring countries to contribute to the ongoing development of ship safety. This arrangement has so far been accepted by five countries. Christine Macmillian. Republic of Korea. and completing 9 BASARNAS search and rescue officer exchange programs. Providing effective search and rescue capabilities to the vast Pacific region presents a sizeable challenge to a number of countries. and visited some of Australia’s regional pollution prevention and response facilities. accompanied our marine surveyors through a range PSC activities. including a case study on Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. China from 21-23 April 2015. search and rescue. we also co-hosted a regional training workshop in Samoa on International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution From Ships (MARPOL) Annex VI .Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from International Shipping. We attended the 6th Pacific Regional Search and Rescue Workshop in Noumea. delivering drift modelling capability and training to provide BASARNAS with access to real time wind and ocean current data to formulate more accurate search areas (this was subsequently used in conjunction with the e-broadcast system in the search for AirAsia flight QZ8501). Asia-Pacific and Antarctic regions. In 2014-15 our marine surveyors provided training and support to the Indonesian Director General of Sea Transportation in the areas of ship and navigation safety.WORKING WITH INDUSTRY International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities AMSA is one of the 22 National Member Authorities elected to the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA). This resulted in a number of recommendations relating to the provision of PNG’s maritime and aviation search and rescue services. Maritime New Zealand. international registration of distress beacons.

11 APPENDICES 79 80 .

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS APPENDIX 1 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 81 82 .APPENDIX 1 .

502 Rental income 4D 833 1.780 1.333 182.092 2.029 - Total other comprehensive income 13. This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the directors.637 Suppliers 3B 126.541 Total gains Total own-source income Net cost of services Revenue from Government 4H Surplus attributable to the Australian Government OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services 13.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY STATEMENT BY THE DIRECTORS. at the date of this statement.999 205. In our opinion.541 Changes in asset revaluation surplus The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.APPENDIX 1 .625 57.342 Fees and fines 4B 76 - Interest 4C 2.270 201.092 183.367 12.386 2. AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2015 NET COST OF SERVICES Notes 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 EXPENSES Employee benefits 3A 59.087 357 2.331 Total expenses LESS: OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-Source Revenue Stuart Richey AM Chairman of the Board Australian Maritime Safety Authority Michael Kinley Chief Executive Officer Australian Maritime Safety Authority Attilio Martiniello Chief Financial Officer Australian Maritime Safety Authority Sale of goods and rendering of services 4A 16.903 22.776 134. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER In our opinion. 83 84 .907 22.327 6 Other revenue 24 September 2015 24 September 2015 24 September 2015 Total own-source revenue Gains Reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments 4F 2 Foreign exchange 4G 2 - 4 6 19.565 Finance costs 3D 67 58 Write-down and impairment of assets 3E 384 301 Losses from asset sales 3F 1.546 182. there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Authority will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.048 Depreciation and amortisation 3C 13. Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2015 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance. and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.029 - Total comprehensive income attributable to the Australian Government 13.449 186.879 18.035 4E 560 459 19.

010 2015 $’000 176.101 - - 91.386 176.485 - 30.500 1.426 249.130 - 11.162 10. (222) 35.986 37.485 2.541 165.122 176.000 10.396 65.525 24.642 8.E 7F 7G Asset revaluation surplus 37.940 126.396 - 11.769 2.686 81 - 81 - 17.029 91.C 7B.132 34.856 123.417 22.396 189.541 104.882 2014 $’000 9 2015 $’000 91.357 10.500 - - 1.371 1.500 - - 1.101 2015 $’000 The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.857 40.541 2.064 84.911 7.261 176.203 76.751 7.986 2015 $’000 37.986 102.162 2015 $’000 162 10.706 21.C 7D.986 7.101 2014 $’000 8A 8B 1.485 7.629 16.ASSETS Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other investments Total financial assets Non-Financial Assets Land and buildings Property.668 170.396 (162) 35.543 15.261 - 2.500 1.169 6.436 Total Liabilities Net Assets 60.162 - - 10.501 2014 $’000 Contributed equity/ capital 6A 6B 6C 189.261 Adjusted opening balance Comprehensive income Non financial asset revaluation increment Provision for restoration assessment Surplus for the period Total comprehensive income 32.000 79.941 4.010 176.485 7.010 7.101 91.010 EQUITY Contributed equity Reserves Retained surplus Total equity 37.010 10A 10B The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.438 4.440 156.882 35.396 37.101 91.501 30.658 357 13.500 2015 $’000 1.261 Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 32.371 1.409 5.829 2.541 2.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 86 .384 - - 10.294 15.984 165.000 2014 $’000 Pollution reserve 7A.014 35.658 13.500 2014 $’000 General reserve 222 10.871 37.212 5.986 - - 37. Increase to pollution reserve Closing balance as at 30 June 2015 Transfers between equity components - 357 357 35.763 35.909 9.986 116.984 2014 $’000 Total equity 2015 $’000 Retained earnings AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2015 Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Equity injection Total transactions with owners Notes AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Statement of Changes in Equity for the period ended 30 June 2015 APPENDIX 1 .746 241.350 189.640 37. plant and equipment Intangibles Inventories Other non-financial assets Total non-financial assets Total Assets LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers Other payables Total payables Interest Bearing Liabilities Finance leases Total interest bearing liabilities Provisions Employee provisions Other provisions Total provisions 85 2014 $’000 54.

87 88 .442 Net commitments by maturity 747.622) (81.414 3.028 747.414 One year or less 12.649 Total commitments payable 828.325 33.311 68.856 411.411 (881) (898) (361) (48) (1.004 80.730 56.485 Total cash received - 7.651) (12.638 744.945 153.208) (36.819) (7.854 337.244 (21.982 13.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2015 AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2015 Notes 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 Sublease rental income and lease incentive Cash received Receipts from Government Sale of goods and rendering of services Interest Net GST received Other Total cash received 181.546 136.129 186.116 12.220) (16.429 One year or less Total capital commitments 76.259 1.242) (38.909 76.437 206.785) (13.746 59.424) (33.779) (79.050 379.280 213.286 15.829 17.031) Commitments payable 395 241 (395) 7.589 219.966 2.414 744.275 Investments 15.411 Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.275) FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Contributed equity - 7. 2014 $’000 (1.311 342.408 13.545 80.139 129.292 417.436 6.593 146.642 Capital commitments 3.242) (38.545 342.490 Cash used Employees Suppliers Total cash used 11 59.546 21.031) Commitments payable Capital commitments Land and buildings Property. plant and equipment 13.622) (81.379 824.275 (28.436 6.733) 21.460 INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of property.APPENDIX 1 .085 759 3.649 68.256 2.485 Repayment of borrowings Finance lease interest Total cash used Net cash from financing activities Net increase (decrease) in cash held Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 6A The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.651 12.050 379.365 1.030 7.779) (409) Other commitments Goods and services contracts 3 Operating leases 4 Total other commitments BY MATURITY Commitments receivable Operating lease income One year or less From one to five years Total operating lease income Other commitments receivable One year or less From one to five years Over five years Total other commitments receivable Cash used Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period Other commitments Total commitments receivable Net commitments by type Net cash used by investing activities 2015 $’000 Commitments receivable OPERATING ACTIVITIES Net cash from operating activities BY TYPE Total commitments receivable (9.872 338.000 - Total cash used 28. plant and equipment 1 Intangibles 2 Total capital commitments 379 231 16 10 592 380 2.629) (79.313 26.151 2.642 55.651 12.004 27.463) (409) (37.213 Operating lease commitments 54.436 6.276 193.068 3.379 Over five years Total operating lease commitments Goods and services contracts commitments One year or less From one to five years Over five years Total goods and services contracts commitments 67.463) (37.829 From one to five years 40.

APPENDIX 1 . and adjustment of rentals to current market levels. subject to varying arrangements as outlined above. Capital commitment for property. plant and equipment is for pollution response equipment and aids to navigation. aids to navigation. A portion of AMSA's contract payments are in respect of the exclusive use of specific assets. Some payments are subject to increases/decreases in accordance with movements in the Consumer Price Index. Contingent rental amounts have not been taken into account in determining commitments. information technology outsourcing and search and rescue aerial capability. 89 90 . including fixed percentage increases. This portion is recognised as an operating lease in accordance with Interpretation 4 . 4.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS (Cont'd) as at 30 June 2015 AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Notes: 1. Significant increases in goods and services commitments relate primarily to new contracts for pollution response capabilities. 2. Lease payments. Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2015 Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period Note 3: Expenses Note 4: Own-Source Income Note 5: Fair Value Measurement Note 6: Financial Assets Note 7: Non-Financial Assets Note 8: Payables Note 9: Interest Bearing Liabilities Note 10: Provisions Note 11: Cash Flow Reconciliation Note 12: Contingent Liabilities and Assets Note 13: Senior Management Personnel Remuneration Note 14: Related Party Disclosures Note 15: Remuneration of Auditors Note 16: Financial Instruments Note 17: Financial Assets Reconciliation Note 18: Reporting of Outcomes Note 19: Cost Recovery Summary Note 20: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes. 3. Motor vehicles leases Contractual arrangements containing a lease No contingent rentals exist. Some occupancy leases include renewal clauses. and some of the arrangements include an option to renew/extend. increases/decreases in accordance with movements in the Consumer Price Index. Operating leases included are effectively non-cancellable and are tabled as follows: Table of Contents .Notes Nature of lease General description of leasing arrangement Occupancy leases AMSA's lease payments are subject to a variety of arrangements.Determining Whether an Arrangement Contains a Lease. Capital commitment for intangibles is for software systems redevelopment. Any renewal or purchase options available are unlikely to be exercised by AMSA. and contingent rents have not been taken into account in determining commitments.

stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured • the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to AMSA. Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. revised standards. saving lives. interpretations or amending standards that were issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board prior to the signing of the statement by the Chairman. not for profit. No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard. AMSA’s vision is safe and clean seas. The revenue is recognised when: • the amount of revenue. no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. 1. services of a maritime nature on a commercial basis to the Commonwealth and/or states and territories. see 1.15 below No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period unless noted.1 Objective of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority 1.8 below • any liabilities in relation to pollution incident costs. Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer. except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements No other new standards. 1. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with: • Financial Reporting Rule 2015 (FRR) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2014. The continued existence of AMSA in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for AMSA’s administration and programs.3 Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note. and • Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period. It requires the reporting of budgetary information by not-for-profit entities within the General Government Sector against actual outcomes and explanations of significant variances between the budget and the actuals. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified. 1. AMSA’s Outcome Statement is to minimise the risk of shipping incidents and pollution in Australian waters through ship safety and environment protection regulation and services and maximise people saved from maritime and aviation incidents through search and rescue coordination. services to the maritime industry on a commercial basis provide. entity. AASB 1055: Budgetary Reporting (issued in March 2013) This standard applies to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2014. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. The accounting policies are consistent with the previous year except where otherwise disclosed. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable. Receivables for goods and services. Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). 91 92 . Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method as set out in AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.APPENDIX 1 . AMSA had no transactions with the Government as owner (2013-14: one). are expected to have a future material financial impact on AMSA.6 Gains Sale of Assets Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer. which have 30 day terms. The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.5 Revenue Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when: • • • • the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer AMSA retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to AMSA. The objective of AMSA is to: Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements • • • • • • promote maritime safety and protection of the marine environment prevent and combat ship-sourced pollution in the marine environment provide infrastructure to support safety of navigation in Australian waters provide a national search and rescue service to the maritime and aviation sectors provide. The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention. AMSA has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements: • estimates relating to “certain on cost factors” applied in calculating long service leave entitlements. Comparative information is not required. on request. Revenue from Government Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities (appropriated to the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development as a corporate Commonwealth entity payment item for payment to AMSA) is recognised as revenue from government by AMSA unless the funding is in the nature of an equity injection or a loan. 1. 1. and are applicable to the future reporting period.4 New Australian Accounting Standards The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) is an Australian Government controlled.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Cont’d) 1. see 1. Except where stated.7 Transactions with the Government as Owner In 2014-15. are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. on request.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance.

Financial Assets at Fair Value through Profit or Loss Assets in this category are classified as current assets. AMSA accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans. In operating leases. Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are stated at fair value.APPENDIX 1 . with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. Lease payments are allocated between the principal component and the interest expense. The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. or. The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June 2015 represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year. Leased assets are amortised over the period of the lease. Where an asset is acquired by means of a finance lease. The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of AMSA is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes. AMSA deems transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy to have occurred at the end of the reporting period. the asset is capitalised at either the fair value of the lease property or. Held-to-Maturity Investments Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity dates that AMSA has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity investments. All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. with revenue recognised on an effective yield basis. part (or all) of the cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in the reserve is included in surplus and deficit for the period. Leave 1.13 Financial Assets • held-to-maturity investments • loans and receivables.9 Leases A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date. the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits. Effective Interest Method The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. Held-to-maturity investments are recorded at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will apply at the time the leave is taken. the present value of minimum lease payments at the inception of the contract and a liability is recognised at the same time and for the same amount. professional leave.12 Cash Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand and demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value. 1. a shorter period. 93 94 . Where the asset is disposed of or is determined to be impaired. Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets that are recognised at fair value through profit or loss. Superannuation The majority of AMSA staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS). Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets. the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS Accumulation Plan (PSSap). Interest is calculated using the effective interest method and foreign exchange gains and losses on monetary assets are recognised directly in profit or loss. Available-for-Sale Financial Assets Available-for-sale financial assets are non-derivatives that are either designated in this category or not classified in any of the other categories. AMSA recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those affected employees that it will carry out the terminations. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset.10 Borrowing Costs Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and ‘termination benefits’ due within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts. where appropriate. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset. AMSA makes employer contributions to the employee superannuation schemes at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government of the superannuation entitlements of AMSA’s employees.8 Employee Benefits 1. The discount rate used is the interest rate implicit in the lease. Separation and Redundancy AMSA classifies its financial assets in the following categories: Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. Where a reliable fair value cannot be established for unlisted investments in equity instruments. surveyors leave and long service leave. to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination. including AMSA’s employer superannuation contribution rates. All other schemes are defined contribution schemes. Other schemes staff belong to are the Australian Government Employees Superannuation Trust (AGEST) and self managed super funds. Available-for-sale financial assets are recorded at fair value.11 Fair Value Measurement The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave. 1. The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. if lower. Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. 1. these instruments are valued at cost. Gains and losses arising from changes in fair value are recognised directly in reserves (equity) with the exception of impairment losses.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Cont’d) Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Cont’d) 1. AMSA used the shorthand method in accordance with the FRR (as per the Commonwealth Entities Financial Statements Guide) to calculate the long service leave liability.

AMSA determines an estimate of that obligation in accordance with Australian Accounting Standard AASB 137 Provisions. Section 17). which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). AMSA makes these reimbursements on the basis of polluter (or potential polluter) pays. or for nominal consideration. Other financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced). Where AMSA has such a reimbursement obligation. buildings. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Asset Recognition Threshold Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below: Following initial recognition at cost. Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. the cost approach and the income capitalisation approach. advice from independent experts. This valuation was performed in accordance with all aspects of the relevant accounting. The fair value of assets was measured by the three approaches recognised by AASB 13 including the market comparison approach. Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount. Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets by determining a range of possible outcomes from which a sufficiently reliable estimate of the obligation can be made. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate. experience with similar incidents and AMSA’s reasonable expectation of the probability of occurrence. Revaluations Other Financial Liabilities ‘Other financial liabilities’ are initially measured at fair value. This is particularly relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in land. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets. Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring. Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss 1. Plant and Equipment Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value.If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred. insurance and valuation framework. with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis. 1. unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements.19 Property.17 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets Trade receivables. 1. AMSA is responsible for reimbursing the direct clean up costs arising from an oil pollution incident that cannot be recovered from the polluter. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the operating result. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. 95 96 .APPENDIX 1 . These approaches are consistent with generally accepted valuation methodologies utilised by the valuation profession. Assets acquired at no cost.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Cont’d) Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Cont’d) Loans and Receivables 1. AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement and AASB 116 Property. which includes (but is not limited to) the Financial Reporting Rule 2015 (Part 3. Purchases of property. Plant and Equipment. Financial assets held at amortised cost . Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. 1. plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position. In determining an estimate of the obligation AMSA considers reliable available information. The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. except for purchases costing less than $3.14 Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or ‘other financial liabilities’. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the operating result except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote. the amount of the impairment loss is the difference between the carrying amount of the asset and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the current market rate for similar assets. Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability. Australian Valuation Solutions (AVS) has provided a comprehensive review and valuation of all stated assets with representative sample inspections undertaken for each asset class as at 30 June 2015 for financial reporting purposes. bringing AMSA’s total pollution response financial capability to $50 million. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured.15 Pollution incident costs Under Australia’s National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies.000. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’. either from the Pollution Reserve or by adjusting the Protection of the Sea Levy accordingly to recover any reimbursements made or due to be made. Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. furniture and fittings and aids to navigation taken up by AMSA where there exists an obligation to make good at the end of any lease term. In the latter case. are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition. These costs are included in the value of AMSA’s assets with a corresponding provision for the ‘make good’ recognised.16 Pollution Reserve AMSA has established a Pollution Reserve to enable it to fund responses to pollution incidents while claims are being settled and as a contingency in the event that future pollution claims exceed the limited liability of any ship owner. loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as ‘loans and receivables’.18 Acquisition of Assets Impairment of Financial Assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period. AMSA has also established an unsecured commercial line of credit of $40 million. net of transaction costs. 1. property plant and equipment are carried at latest valuation less subsequent depreciation and impairment losses.

Inventories acquired at no cost or at nominal consideration are initially measured at current replacement cost at the date of acquisition.Vessels and Amphibians . 1. The economic benefit from the use of the items that would result if AMSA were deprived of these items is not material.22 Inventories Depreciable property. Depreciation rates (useful lives). Where indications of impairment exist. the Marine Navigation (Regulatory Functions) Levy and the Protection of the Sea Levy are collected on behalf of the Government by the Department of Immigration and Border Protection and designated AMSA staff. Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. Plant and Equipment.Vehicles 3 to 40 years 3 to 40 years 10 to 20 years 10 to 20 years 5 to 8 years 5 to 8 years * Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the life of the lease. adjusted for any loss of service potential. 1.23 Taxation / Competitive Neutrality AMSA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT). Workers compensation is insured through Comcare. expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office. and for receivables and payables.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Cont’d) Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Cont’d) Depreciation 1. Depreciation rates applying to each type of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives: Reportable Asset types Buildings on freehold land 2015 2014 20 to 40 years 20 to 40 years Property. While a small number of these items are on display in AMSA’s offices they are not considered to be held for public exhibition. The useful life of AMSA’s software is 5 to 15 years (2013-14: 5 to 15 years).20 Capital Works Under Construction Capital works under construction are carried at cost as ‘Work In Progress’ and capitalised when completed and ready for use. residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current.21 Intangibles AMSA’s intangibles comprise purchased or internally developed software for internal use. AMSA’s inventory is largely for its own consumption or distribution at nil cost. Revenues. 97 98 . Other aids to navigation assets under finance leases are accounted for under AASB 117 Leases. if sales are made they represent the distribution of inventory at a nominal value. or current and future reporting periods. 1.Plant and Equipment 3 to 30 years 3 to 30 years . Comcover.Office and Computer Equipment 3 to 16 years 3 to 16 years .942). in all cases.APPENDIX 1 . 1. education or research. as appropriate. nor are they used in the operational activities of AMSA. plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives using.445. Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period There were no post balance date events that need to be disclosed in the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2015.Aids to Navigation . Certain aids to navigation assets (such as heritage lighthouses) are primarily held as operational assets rather than being held for cultural. environmental or historical significance value and are therefore accounted for in accordance with AASB 116 Property. Plant and Equipment is made up of the following: . Derecognition An item of property. plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal. Goods and Services Tax (GST) and Customs Duties. the straight-line method of depreciation. While AMSA does not ordinarily hold inventory for sale. All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2015. Heritage assets Heritage assets held by AMSA are not brought to account.078. AMSA’s inventories are valued at cost. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.25 AMSA Levy Collection The Marine Navigation Levy. Impairment All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2015. the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.24 Insurance AMSA has insured for risks through the Government insurable risk fund. 1.014 of levies (gross collection) on behalf of the Government during 2014-15 (2013-14: $116. Collected levies are transferred to the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development for deposit to the Official Public Account. AMSA collected $113.Furniture and Fittings (includes leasehold improvements)* 2 to 10 years 2 to 10 years .

225 98.829 Material and services 92.201 Administration 6.385 Total write-down and impairment of assets 17 2 384 301 Note 3F: Losses from Asset Sales Other suppliers Land and buildings Operating lease rentals – external parties Minimum lease payments Workers compensation expenses Total other suppliers Total supplier Proceeds from sale 14.719 41.543 6.564 7.145 Total goods supplied Note 3E: Write-Down and Impairment of Assets Asset write-downs and impairments from: Write-down of inventory Services rendered in connection with External parties Total services rendered Total goods and services supplied or rendered Impairment of receivables 13.028 119.067 Amortisation Computer software Note 3B: Suppliers 492 11.385 Total goods and services supplied or rendered 11.383 Note 3D: Finance Costs Total finance costs Goods supplied in connection with Related entities 2.262 97.165 8.620 Note 3A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries Note 3C: Depreciation and Amortisation Superannuation Leave and other entitlements Buildings Separation and redundancies 874 732 Other employee benefits .240 112.028 119.219 112.048 Carrying value of assets sold Selling expense - 673 20 14 - 1.020 13.776 134.028 Defined benefit plans 3.Fringe Benefits Tax 751 640 59.553 98.780 1.545 115 119 1.037 6.492 1.377 901 1.367 12.625 57.379 4.803 21.702 93.663 126. plant and equipment Carrying value of assets disposed Total losses from asset sales 99 (400) 100 .523 4.486 14.413 4.489 6.074 Defined contribution plans 5.875 Intangibles Total amortisation Goods and services supplied or rendered 478 11.136 Communications 7.803 21.270 Property.APPENDIX 1 .592 External parties 95. plant and equipment Total depreciation Assets held under finance leases 6.637 Total employee benefits Depreciation Property.250 1.565 Finance leases 16 10 Unwinding of discount 51 48 67 58 367 299 Total depreciation and amortisation Travel and transport 11.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 3: Expenses Note 3: Expenses (Cont'd) 2015 2014 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 42.748 14.337 262 326 14.493 1.240 13.

502 2.262 13.538 2 - Total rendering of services 16.449 186.253 65.354 Marine Navigation (Regulatory Functions) Levy 48.314 31.087 182.342 18.035 560 459 560 459 Total rental income Total foreign exchange gains Levy revenue: Australian Maritime Safety Act 1990.080 Sale of goods in connection with External parties Total sale of goods Total fees and fines 76 - 76 - Total interest 2.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 4: Own-Source Income Note 4: Own-Source Income (Cont’d) OWN-SOURCE REVENUE 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 Note 4A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services GAINS 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 Note 4F: Reversals of Previous Asset Write-Downs and Impairments Reversal of impairment for receivables recovered 2 2 127 115 Reversal of impairment losses for property.449 186.APPENDIX 1 .087 Marine Navigation Levy 32.085 182.216 2 - Total sale of goods and rendering of services 16.284 65.449 186. plant and equipment - 4 127 115 Total reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments 2 6 Rendering of services in connection with Related entities External parties 2.315 Protection of the Sea Levy 31.331 182.092 2.234 4.215 18.087 Note 4E: Other Revenue Insurance recoveries Total other revenue 101 102 .349 46. s48 Note 4C: Interest Deposits Non-speculative Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development Note 4B: Fees and Fines Fines Note 4G: Foreign Exchange Gain 5.502 Note 4H: Revenue from Government Corporate Commonwealth Entity payment item Total revenue from Government Represented by: Services provided on behalf of the Government Note 4D: Rental Income Other Operating lease: Sublease -related entities 478 530 Sublease -external parties 355 505 833 1.092 2.268 39.678 16.953 1.

0%) -20.084 134. Consumed economic benefit / Obsolescence of asset Market approach Depreciated replacement cost (DRC) Depreciated replacement cost (DRC) Replacement cost .322 3 2 3 3 3 2 Adjusted market transactions Adjusted market transactions Replacement cost .9%) per annum (20.Highest and Best Use AMSA’s assets are held for operational purposes and not held for the purposes of deriving a profit.084 134.Market approach The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of AMSA’s building asset class relate to the adopted price per square metre.NA.180 6.322 3.0% NA Range (weighted average) Fair value measurements .5% .NA.634 - 8.0%) -10.0% (2.New.NA.226 3.785 137. AMSA did not measure any non-financial assets at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2015. Property. Non-financial liabilities Provision for restoration Non-financial liabilities Total fair value measurements of liabilities in the statement of financial position 137.5.956 4.0%) -10. A significant increase (decrease) in market transactions would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement. 2.Depreciated replacement cost (DRC) A significant increase (decrease) in this consumed economic benefit / obsolescence of the asset would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.774 103.785 3 - 767 7A Buildings Total non-financial assets Total fair value measurements of assets in the statement of financial position 3 5.Depreciated replacement cost (DRC) A significant increase (decrease) in this consumed economic benefit / obsolescence of the asset would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.5.970 3.0% NA (20.3% (7. Consumed economic benefit / Obsolescence of asset Market Approach Adjusted market transactions Adjusted market transactions Adjusted market transactions Inputs Used Depreciated replacement cost (DRC) Market Approach Market approach Market approach Valuation Technique(s) For Levels 2 and 3 fair value measurements New .0% New .360 3.457 8. The current use of all controlled assets is considered their highest and best use.price per square metre.490 7A Notes Land Non-financial assets Land Fair value measurements 2015 2014 Category $'000 $'000 Level Note 5A: Fair Value Measurements.5% . plant & equipment Property. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.4% .322 3.970 4. either directly or indirectly.540 9. Valuation Techniques and Inputs Used The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. Valuation Techniques and Inputs Used (Cont'd) Sensitivity of the fair value measurement to changes in unobservable inputs for category level 3 Land . Note 5: Fair Value Measurement Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 5: Fair Value Measurement (Cont'd) Note 5A: Fair Value Measurements.Market approach A significant increase (decrease) in market transactions may result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement. Building .760 531 106. Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability. There have been changes to the valuation techniques for assets in the property.0% (2.NA.New (price per square metre). plant & equipment 4. plant & equipment Property.5.33.103 5.9%) per annum NA New .799 7A Buildings 3 - 280 7A 2 4. Consumed economic benefit / Obsolescence of asset Replacement cost .0% (2.New. 104 .115 7A 7B 7B 7B 7B Buildings Leasehold improvement Property. 1. Provision for restoration . A significant increase (decrease) in market transactions would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement. 0.5%) per annum (10. Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability.970 4. were not identified this financial year. Property.Depreciated replacement cost (DRC) A significant increase (decrease) in this consumed economic benefit / obsolescence of the asset would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.Market approach The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of AMSA’s land asset class relate to the adopted price per square metre. 1. Leasehold improvement . plant and equipment class. Building . In instances where sufficient observable inputs. Consumed economic benefit / Obsolescence of asset Depreciated replacement cost (DRC) Market approach Adjusted market transactions Replacement cost . the valuation technique was changed from a Market approach to a DRC approach. 0.Depreciated replacement cost (DRC) A significant increase (decrease) in this consumed economic benefit / obsolescence of the asset would result in a significantly higher (lower) fair value measurement.7%) per annum New .2% . Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date. 2. such as market transactions of similar assets.New . plant and equipment . plant and equipment .

where indicators suggest that the value of the class has changed materially since the previous reporting period). regardless of the timing of the last specific valuation. Under the DRC approach the estimated cost to replace the asset is calculated and then adjusted to take into account its consumed economic benefit / asset obsolescence (accumulated depreciation). 2. that class is subject to specific valuation in the reporting period. plant and equipment .700 11.valuation processes 5. economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the asset under consideration. Property.443 3.645 (282) 3.383 Total gains/(losses) recognised in other comprehensive income1 55 (11.801 10.115 107.306 9. Valuation Techniques and Inputs Used (Cont’d) 2015 $’000 Total Note 5: Fair Value Measurement (Cont'd) As at 1 July Total Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 2014 $’000 APPENDIX 1 .475 2015 $’000 2014 $’000 2015 $’000 9. AVS has used significant professional judgement in determining the fair value measurements.180 - (272) (519) Total gains/(losses) recognised in net cost of services1 Buildings Buildings Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements . There are no Level 3 unrealised gains/(losses) presented in the statement of comprehensive income this year. property zoning and property market conditions. plant & equipment Property.540 9.225 280 (45) (45) - - 734 734 - 2 Transfers into Level 3 2 - 15. 2015 $’000 Leasehold improvements.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 106 . Total as at 30 June Transfers out of Level 3 Changes in unrealised gains/(losses) recognised in net cost of services 3 117.Adjusted market transactions 2014 $’000 Land Assets that do not transact with enough frequency or transparency to develop objective opinions of value from observable market evidence have been measured utilising the cost (Depreciated replacement cost or DRC) approach.722 (267) 2.422 103. Note 5B: Reconciliation for Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements Land The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of property. The transfers into Level 3 hierarchy during the year were due to assets that are no longer valued using a market approach (with a DRC approach adopted due to a lack of reliable market evidence) - 1.835 100. AMSA engaged Australian Valuation Solutions (AVS) to undertake a full revaluation and confirms that the models developed comply with AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement. Reference was made to available sales evidence together with other relevant information related to local economic.709 117. where practicable.226 5.262 - 4. plant & equipment AMSA tests the procedures of the valuation model as an asset materiality review at least once every 12 months (with a formal revaluation undertaken once every three years). Consumed economic benefit / asset obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical.540 Note 5A: Fair Value Measurements.037 103. A significant increase (decrease) in this input would result in a significant higher (lower) fair value measurement.211 - - 225 821 Purchases Transfers between classes 13.812 Property. 3. plant and equipment .reconciliation for assets Note 5: Fair Value Measurement (Cont'd) Notes to and forming part of the financial statements The weighted average is determined by assessing the fair value measurement as a proportion of the total fair value for the class against the total useful life of each asset. 2015 $’000 Non-financial assets Land & buildings .136) (11.540 267 1.835 125. Buildings. plant and equipment assets relates to the market demand and valuers’ judgement to determine the fair value measurement of these assets.319) (1. loss of asset sales and change in asset revaluation surplus.835) (2.Adjusted market transactions Leasehold improvements Significant Level 3 inputs utilised by AMSA are derived and evaluated as follows: Leasehold improvements Property.988) (9. If a particular asset class experiences significant and volatile changes in fair value (i.115 7.029) (9. These gains/(losses) are presented in the statement of comprehensive income under depreciation and amortisation.180 8. 2014 $’000 Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements .105 AMSA's policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1. 5.Consumed economic benefit / Obsolescence of asset 2014 $’000 AMSA controls assets situated in remote locations where property markets experience few transactions.150) - 113.e.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 5: Fair Value Measurement (Cont'd) Note 6: Financial Assets Note 5B: Reconciliation for Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements (Cont'd) Non-financial liabilities Total gains/(losses) recognised in net cost of services1 Total gains/(losses) recognised in other comprehensive income 1 Purchases Total as at 30 June Changes in unrealised gains/(losses) recognised in net cost of services 2 2014 $’000 $’000 Note 6A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements .000 62.113 4. 2.909 76.064 9.238 1.322 4.658) - - 642 3. There are no Level 3 unrealised gains/(losses) presented in the statement of comprehensive income this year.066 (17) (2) Other receivables -external entities Less impairment allowance Goods and services Total impairment allowance Total trade and other receivables (net) (17) (2) 9.294 8.064 9.642 On deposits 43.311 8.000 54.129 689 Total other receivables 5.909 14.294 8. Cash on hand 11.918 3.294 8.790 Total trade and other receivables (gross) 9.507 5.918 4.970 4.392 265 341 Total receivables for goods and services Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development: Receivables Total receivable from Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development Other receivables: GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office Interest Operating lease rentals -related entities - 46 Other receivables -related entities - 322 1.971 10 (643) (1.reconciliation for liabilities As at 1 July 2015 Provision for restoration Provision for restoration 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 4. AMSA's policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1.064 Trade and other receivables (net) expected to be recovered No more than 12 months Total trade and other receivables (net) 107 108 . These gains/(losses) are presented in the statement of comprehensive income under finance costs and change in asset revaluation surplus.APPENDIX 1 .970 - - 1.642 Total cash and cash equivalents Note 6B: Trade and Other Receivables Good and services receivables in connection with Related entities 4 32 External parties 562 326 566 358 3.238 1.

921 0 to 30 days 367 78 55 Trade and other receivables (gross) aged as follows Not overdue Overdue by: 31 to 60 days 243 61 to 90 days 18 5 More than 90 days 20 7 9.770 3. plant and equipment this year (2014: $3.901). plant and equipment Total property. plant and equipment (2014: $0) were booked to the asset revaluation reserve by asset class and included in the equity section of the Balance Sheet.115 (2.180 7.226 12.000 - 15.066 111. Plant and Equipment Leasehold improvements Valuation Accumulated depreciation Total leasehold improvements Other property.360 4.751 Note 7A: Land and Buildings Land Fair value Total land Overdue by: More than 90 days 17 2 Total impairment allowance 17 2 Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2014: 30 days).066 Total trade and other receivables (gross) Impairment allowance aged as follows 2015 $’000 2014 $’000 3. increment of $2.226 8.APPENDIX 1 .496 Total land and buildings 21. Revaluation decrement of $395.023 18.935) 9. No land or buildings are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.447 (951) 11.357 4.663 7.875 (19.522 for land (2014: $0).065 118. plant and equipment Note 6C: Other Investments Deposits1 Total other investments There was no reversal of impairment losses to property.330.940 15. Note 7B: Property.000 - No indicators of impairment were found for land and buildings.856 8.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 6: Financial Assets (Cont'd) Note 7: Non-Financial Assets 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 8.311 8.770 4. 109 15.950) (176) 114.890 for property. Reconciliation of the Impairment Allowance Goods and services Opening balance 2015 2014 $'000 $'000 2 5 Amounts written off 17 (3) Amounts recovered and reversed (2) (2) - 2 17 2 Increase/ (decrease) recognised in net cost of services Closing balance 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 15.360 Buildings on freehold land Work in progress Valuation Accumulated depreciation Total buildings on freehold land 4.000 - 15.170 12.545 for buildings on freehold land (2014: $0) and an increment of $9.147 14. 110 . Term deposits in banks greater than three months.435.571 123. Revaluations of non-financial assets Total other investments are expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months Total other investments 1.000 - An independent valuer (Australian Valuation Solutions) has revalued the net book values of the asset classes owned by AMSA as at 30 June 2015 for financial reporting purposes. No property. plant and equipment are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months. plant and equipment Work in progress Valuation Accumulated depreciation Accumulated impairment losses Total other property. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1.822 129.131 126.

619 (24.186) 141.994 4.807 (951) 15.836) (176) 139.360 4.770 3.114) 143.266 9.664) 158.751 (1.360 4.331 (11.061) 123.830 (476) 16.496 4.990) 163.170 18.435 (492) 225 (395) - 18.903 Total $’000 148.940 (673) 21.856 $’000 and buildings Other property.360 Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by: Gross book value Accumulated depreciation/amortisation Accumulated impairment losses Net book value 30 June 2014 12.040 (492) 16.984 2.549 plant & equipment $’000 Other property.638) 127.357 126.357 (1.447 (951) 11. 146.634 4 (11.170 (420) 3.475 11.360 4.496 12.493) 126.940 21.357 6.447 (951) 11.250) 123.885) (176) 123.940 5.297 (2.856 (20) 15.166) 148.270) 139.751 $’000 plant & equipment 163.634 4 (11.607 (1.770 Net book value as of 30 June 2015 represented by: Gross book value Net book value 30 June 2015 (478) (20) 11.111 (253) 18.619 (23. Plant and Equipment 2014 Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Cont'd) Notes to and forming part of the financial statements 4.496 4.812 (23.354 and buildings $’000 Total land 21.751 8.209 2.812 (22.770 3.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 112 .607 $’000 Total APPENDIX 1 .297 11.371 (11.360 4.012) 139.187 (13.297 148. Plant and Equipment 2015 Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Cont'd) Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Total land 16.856 (478) 16.807 (951) 15.017 (14.170 12. 126.470 (476) 11.360 Buildings $’000 As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment Net book value 1 July 2013 Additions By purchase Reversal of impairment losses Depreciation/amortisation expense Disposals Other Net book value 30 June 2014 Land $’000 Note 7C: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property.607 8.498) 146.360 $’000 $’000 As at 1 July 2014 Gross book value Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment Net book value 1 July 2014 Additions By purchase Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income Depreciation/amortisation expense Disposals Other Net book value 30 June 2015 Buildings Land Note 7C: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property.

438 7.158 3.438 7.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Cont'd) Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Cont'd) 2015 2014 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Internally developed – in progress 3.409 10.536 Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment (5.438 Net book value 1 July 2014 Note 7F: Inventories Total other non-financial assets .409 10.537 7.327 5.are expected to be recovered in: Total other non-financial assets Additions By purchase or internally developed Amortisation Net book value 30 June 2015 4.169 4.048 More than 12 months 4.402 2.440 6.266 2.438 7.440 No more than 12 months 2.668 4.409 7.883 1. Inventories held for distribution Total inventories $594.742) 10.438 Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by: Gross book value 11.APPENDIX 1 .742) 7. Note 7G: Other Non-Financial Assets No intangibles are expected to be disposed of in the next 12 months.668 4.664 5.824).147) (4.742) 7.180 Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment (3.536 15.377) 10.180 Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment (3.742) (3.158 Additions By purchase or internally developed Amortisation Net book value 30 June 2014 (901) (901) 7.127) (5.328 9.147) 5.181 5.742) (3.409 Computer software Total $’000 $’000 Net book value 30 June 2015 Note 7E: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles 2014 As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment Net book value 1 July 2013 9. 6.536 11.941 Internally developed – in use 8.180 (5.348 (1.127) 10.169 4.180 11. No items of inventory were recognised at fair value less cost to sell.941 Note 7D: Intangibles Computer software Purchased Total computer software (gross) Accumulated amortisation Total intangibles 3.377) (1.392 6.116 2.189 15.181 3.127) (3.328 (4.881 of inventory held for distribution was recognised as an expense in 2015 (2014: $544.440 Prepayments Total other non-financial assets Note 7E: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles 2015 Computer software Total $’000 $’000 As at 1 July 2014 Gross book value 11.438 Net book value 30 June 2014 113 114 .180 11.348 4.438 No indicators of impairment were found for intangible assets.409 Net book value as of 30 June 2015 represented by: Gross book value 15.668 4.

862 Deduct: future finance charges (1) - 81 - Total Total finance leases Supplier payables expected to be settled in more than 12 months External parties Total Total supplier payables 9. Note 8B: Other Payables 2.871 2.871 2. There are no contingent rentals.967 34.180 2.173 Minimum lease payments 82 - 25.220 27.795 27.829 A finance lease exists in relation to aids to navigation assets from Australian Maritime Services Ltd.871 2.829 Trade creditors and accruals Finance leases Total finance leases Lease expected to be settled Supplier payables expected to be settled in no more than 12 months Within one year Related entities 209 689 External parties 25. Settlement was usually made within 30 days.59%.769 37. The lease is noncancellable and is for a fixed term of 10 years (ending June 2024).227 Total supplier payables 34.602 Operating lease rentals 9.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 8: Payables Note 9: Interest Bearing Liabilities 2015 2014 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 81 - 81 - Note 8A: Suppliers 24.974 10.857 Other payables are expected to be settled No more than 12 months Total other payables 115 116 .857 2.549 9.549 9.APPENDIX 1 .967 9. The interest rate implicit in the lease is 5.011 27.769 37.187 Superannuation 311 272 Separation and redundancies 353 388 26 10 Salaries and wages Prepayments received/unearned income Other Total other payables 1 - 2.857 2.

970 Provision for asbestos removal 2.970 2.780 1.525 - 12 - - 12 (17) (7) (120) (202) (346) (1.228) (1.085 4.887) 10.417 7.335 7.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 10: Provisions Note 11: Cash Flow Reconciliation 2015 2014 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 17.546) 182.322 2. 117 118 .APPENDIX 1 .911 Difference Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities Net cost of services Revenue from Government Note 10B: Other Provisions Provision for restoration 3.704 12. AMSA has therefore made a provision to reflect the present value of this obligation.024) 301 821 (4.417 7.449 186.909 76.187 Total other provisions 5.212 16.642 - - (182.525 Provision for onerous lease Provision for business unit restructuring Total other provisions Other provisions expected to be settled No more than 12 months Adjustment for non-cash items Depreciation and amortisation Reversal of impairment losses for property.063 32 - 5.207 17.212 16.087 13.092) (183.658) (167) - - (1.367 12.230) (30) (228) (535) (2.270 67 58 Movements in assets / liabilities Increase in employee provisions Other provisions - Net cash from operating activities (1.313 26.063 2.212 16.417 Total (4) 1.203 150 202 7.322 4.525 82 338 More than 12 months 5.642 Statement of financial position 54.488 14 310 7.825) 27 22 2 - 51 3.909 76. plant and equipment Loss on disposal of assets Finance costs (Increase) in net receivables (Increase) in inventories (Increase) in other non financial assets Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables* Carrying amount 1 July 2014 Additional provisions made Amounts used Amounts reversed Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate Closing balance 30 June 2015 Increase in other payables Restoration Asbestos removal Onerous Business unit lease restructuring $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 4.565 Note 10A: Employee Provisions Leave Total employee provisions Employee provisions expected to be settled No more than 12 months More than 12 months Total employee provisions 5.460 * This change is net of any non-financial asset accruals.911 Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Statement of financial position to Cash flow statement 17.203 32 150 - 202 5.911 Cash and cash equivalents as per Cash flow statement 54. Provision for restoration AMSA has an obligation contained in leases or legislation for the making good to five property leases and 159 aids to navigation sites.127 12.

Directors are also included in this note and in the comparatives.000) and pollution incidents of $8.018 5.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 12: Contingent Liabilities and Assets Note 13: Senior Management Personnel Remuneration Contingent assets Claims for damages or costs Total 2015 2014 2015 2014 Salary $’000 $’000 $’000 Performance bonuses 13. In the normal course of operation.inclusive of FBT where applicable 2015 - 2. The figures above do not include two directors as they do not receive payments from AMSA. The quantifiable contingencies include pollution incidents of $518.000 (2014: $13.127 3.136.186 (82.354 8.018 8.857 Quantifiable Contingencies 214.120 166. The figures vary between financial years due to individuals commencing with or leaving AMSA during the financial year.837 457.833 74.674 (113.302 4.APPENDIX 1 .872 (513) 13.018 5. 3.581 296.000 (2014: $5. Note 13 was prepared on an accrual basis. Note 15: Remuneration of Auditors Significant Remote Contingencies AMSA had no significant remote contingencies. grants or other transactions have been made to any related parties. AMSA is responsible for the provision of funds necessary to meet the clean up costs arising from ship sourced marine pollution.515) 169 Assets realised (1.000).020.538 44.534) (201.018.517 Total short-term employee benefits Post-employment benefits Other long-term employee benefits 2014 2015 2014 Annual leave accrued $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 Long-service leave 5.515) 169 (4.052 13.963 Notes: 1.17.354 8.065) 101. and in all circumstances is responsible for making appropriate efforts to recover costs of any such incidents.517 457. 4. The recovery of the amounts disclosed as contingent liabilities is included in the amounts disclosed as a contingent asset.000 (2014: $117.059 459.122 44. no amount has been included.774.875 14.872 (513) 13.875 8. The total number of senior management personnel that are included in the above table is 19 (2014:15).391) 3.217.758.000 Total other long-term employee benefits Total senior executive remuneration expenses - 3.057 3.755 Other expenses . Financial statement audit services were provided to AMSA by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) Total 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 95 90 95 90 No other services were provided by the ANAO.059 459.500) 518 18 5.720 118. Unquantifiable Contingencies Note 14: Related Party Disclosures No loans.875 New contingent assets recognised Rights expired Total contingent assets Balance from previous period New contingent liabilities recognised Re-measurement Total contingent liabilities Net contingent assets Total 323. 119 120 .818 Superannuation Contingent liabilities $ Car parking . 2.382.857 8. The contingent assets include insurance claims for cyclone damage to a number of aids to navigation of $490.039) - 8.643.875 14.018 (4. where quantifying a reasonable estimate of the cost to remediate ship sourced marine pollution has not been possible.039) - (1.inclusive of FBT Total post-employment benefits Claims for damages or costs 2014 $ Short-term employee benefits $’000 Balance from previous period 2015 (4.775.000).500) 518 18 5.000 5.052 551 167 551 167 Re-measurement (4. In accordance with the accounting policy in Note 1.

394 15.876 81 24.352 78.502 2.593).352 78.094 2. 121 122 .502 2.000 71.083 (2014: $9.094 2.350 78.000 71.876 27.602 27.602 4G 4C 2 2.APPENDIX 1 .FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 16: Financial Instruments Note 16: Financial Instruments (Cont'd) Notes 2015 $'000 2014 $'000 Note 16D: Fair Value of Financial Instruments Carrying amount 2015 $'000 Fair value 2015 $'000 Carrying amount 2014 $'000 Fair value 2014 $'000 Cash and cash equivalents Receivables for goods and services Other receivables Other investments Total 54.852 76.795 24.795 24.602 27.350 9 8A 81 24.501.094.909 549 1.602 27.642 356 1.352 78.602 27.092 2.909 549 1.795 24.909 549 1.602 27.350 76.876 27.876 24.394 15.642 356 1.852 54.602 Note 16A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial assets Receivables Cash and cash equivalents Receivables for goods and services Other receivables Other investments Total receivables Total financial assets Financial liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Finance leases Trade creditors Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Total financial liabilities Note 16B: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Assets Receivables Exchange gains Interest revenue Net gain on receivables 6A 6B 6B 6C 54.816).502 Net gain on financial assets Financial assets The net income from financial assets not at fair value through profit and loss was $2.394 15.350 Financial liabilities Finance leases Trade creditors Total 81 24.000 71.852 71.642 356 1. Note 16C: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 16 10 Net loss on financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 16 10 Net loss on financial liabilities 16 10 Interest expense 3D The total interest expense from financial liabilities not at fair value through profit and loss was $16.221 (2014: $2.852 76.

000 71.000 (2014: $1.795 24. In addition. AMSA had policies and procedures that guided employees on debt recovery techniques that were to be applied.909 (99) 1. AMSA's financial liabilities are trade creditors and finance leases.642 356 1.700 USD (2014: $5. The effect on profit and equity as at the reporting date from a 10. This amount is equal to the total amount of trade. other receivables and interest 2015: $1.352 78.876 - - 81 24. Interest rate risk To ensure sufficient liquidity to meet AMSA’s working capital requirements. The statistical analysis has been based on main currencies’ movement for the last five years. Western Samoa Tala $6.5%) favourable/unfavourable change in Australian dollars against foreign currency holdings with all other variables held constant is $1.852 76.252.602 27.602 Within 1 year $'000 1 to 5 years $'000 >5 years $'000 Total $'000 - 81 24.642 211 1.700 USD). Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2015 The following table illustrates AMSA's gross exposure to credit risk.205 648 648 145 145 Foreign currency risk Foreign currency risk refers to the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to changes in foreign exchange rates. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that AMSA will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities.000).394 15.909 549 1.876 27.960.APPENDIX 1 . Note 16G: Market Risk Credit quality of financial instruments not past due or individually determined as impaired Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents Receivables for goods and services Other receivables Other investments Total Finance lease liabilities Trade creditors Total On demand $'000 Not past due nor impaired Not past due nor impaired Past due or impaired Past due or impaired 2015 $'000 2014 $'000 2015 $'000 2014 $'000 54. AMSA is exposed to foreign exchange currency risk primarily through undertaking certain transactions denominated in foreign currency. AMSA held no collateral to mitigate against credit risk.12 (2014: $1. AMSA has assessed the risk of the default on payment and has allocated $16.112 Kina).112 Kina (2014: $3.9% (2014: 11. The maximum exposure to credit risk is the risk that arises from potential default of a debtor.876 Within 1 year $'000 27.000 71.368) to an impairment allowance account.602 1 to 5 years $'000 - >5 years $'000 - Total $'000 27. excluding any collateral or credit enhancements 2015 $'000 2014 $'000 Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents Receivables for goods and services Other receivables Other investments Total 54.9% was based on both statistical and non-statistical analysis.079.000 WST) and United States Dollar $5.204 76.350 Financial liabilities Finance leases Trade creditors Total 81 24.795 24.602 27.602 27.352 78. AMSA’s short term investments are set with certain parameters. namely Standard & Poors rating of A-1+ and/or Moody’s P-1 for authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs). Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2015 Receivables for goods and services Total 0 to 30 days $'000 367 367 31 to 60 days $'000 243 243 61 to 90 days $'000 18 18 90+ days $'000 3 3 Total $'000 631 631 Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2014 Receivables for goods and services Total 123 0 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 90 days 90+ days $'000 78 78 $'000 55 55 $'000 5 5 $'000 5 5 Total $'000 143 143 124 .394 15.000 WST (2014: $6.727 in 2015 (2014: $2.88). This is highly unlikely due to appropriation funding and mechanisms available to the entity and internal policies and procedures put in place to ensure that there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations. This information is then revised and adjusted for reasonableness under the current economic circumstances. AMSA is exposed to foreign currency denominated in Papua New Guinea (PNG) $3.602 Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2014 Trade creditors Total On demand $'000 - AMSA has no derivative financial liabilities in either the current and prior years.710.795 24. The method used to arrive at the possible currency risk of 10.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 16: Financial Instruments (Cont'd) Note 16: Financial Instruments (Cont'd) Note 16E: Credit Risk Note 16F: Liquidity Risk AMSA is exposed to minimal credit risk as the majority of receivables are for appropriations or amounts owed by the Australian Tax Office in the form of a Goods and Services Tax refund.

611 3.350 Note 18: Reporting of Outcomes Note 18: Net Cost of Outcome Delivery AMSA has only one outcome as disclosed in Note 1. 2015 $'000 2014 $'000 110.151 Note 19: Cost Recovery Amounts applied Payments from Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development Own source revenue Total amounts applied Receivables Not overdue Overdue by: 0 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 90 days More than 90 days Total receivables * Cost recovered activities: 1.APPENDIX 1 .FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 17: Financial Assets Reconciliation Note 19: Cost Recovery Summary Notes Note 17: Financial Assets Total financial assets as per Statement of financial position Less: Non-financial instrument components Receivable from Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development Operating lease rentals . Environmental protection – preventing and combating ship-sourced pollution in the marine environment.792 Revenue Payments from Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development Own source revenue Total revenue 111. 2.931 3.445 2.706 3.999 205. Note 20: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances The following tables provide a comparison of the original budget as presented in the 2014-15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) to the 2014-15 final outcome as presented in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards for AMSA. 4. Marine services.128 115.658 116.879 22.455 Expenses Cost recovered activities* Total expenses 120. developing and maintaining legislative instruments and operational standards. Ship and seafarer safety – safety regulation through the ship and cargo inspection program.383 111.637 116. including international liaison.provision of aids to navigation.092 182.238 4.392 6.894 114.1.050 3.151 42 30 18 19 - 3.related entities GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office Total non-financial instrument components Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 6B 6B 6B 16A 2015 $'000 2014 $'000 79.879 19. 3.092 183.589 121.203 84. Navigation infrastructure .351 71.356 78.333 Total 2015 $’000 201. 125 126 .113 7.792 120.918 46 4.561 3.336 2.852 1.546 183.546 Net costs shown include intra-government costs that are eliminated in calculating the actual budget outcome. Documentation (Cost Recovery Implementation Statement) for the above activities is available on the environment section of the AMSA website. Expenses Own-source income Outcome 1 2015 2014 $’000 $’000 201.907 22.922 4.333 Net cost of outcome delivery 182.248 120. The Budget is not audited.999 19.907 2014 $’000 205. ship registration and issuing a range of seagoing qualifications.383 111.

350 189.907 Non-Financial Assets Land and buildings Property.092 175.896 8.029 13.328 523 4.535 34.900 2.367 67 384 1. 2.863 (1. 128 .746 225. 2.780 201.820 Revenue from Government Surplus attributable to the Australian Government 182. Explanations of major variances are provided further below between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015.671 16.579 127.396 53.390 81 - 81 81 - 81 17.907 19.237 17.629 18.298 ASSETS Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other investment Total financial assets LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers Other payables Total payables Interest Bearing Liabilities Finance leases Total own-source income OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Changes in asset revaluation reserves Total other comprehensive income 13.234) Total Liabilities Net Assets 60.294 15.413 3.625 126.800 710 19.386 - 13.372) Total Assets 249.479 7.029 Total comprehensive income attributable to the Australian Government 13.546 1.780 7.357 10.250 7.449 357 175.601 31.000 79.298 EQUITY Contributed equity Reserves Retained surplus Total equity 37.113 172.089 10.102 122.543 23.885 17.396 189.320 5.999 59.013 894 15.177 357 Variance2 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 54.409 5.014 35.870 172.098 13.776 13.986 102.986 116.APPENDIX 1 .342 76 2.869 521 8. plant and equipment Intangibles Inventories Other non-financial assets Total non-financial assets 21.687 12.212 5.296 11.915 361 (732) (489) (310) (1.092 833 560 19.668 170.169 6.350 29.640 26. AMSA's original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respect of the reporting period 2014-15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).769 2. AMSA's original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respect of the reporting period 2014-15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).089 828 67 384 1.909 9.871 37.511 172.396 37. 127 Budget estimate Original1 Total interest bearing liabilities Provisions Employee provisions Other provisions Total provisions 1.098 7.543 21.108) (126) (1.272 - 7.898 5.029 - 13.056 851 Net cost of services 182.903 16.029 13.203 43. Explanations of major variances are provided further below between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015.386 1.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 20: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances (Cont’d) Note 20: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances (Cont’d) Note 20A: Departmental Budgetary Reports AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2015 AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2015 Actual NET COST OF SERVICES EXPENSES Employee benefits Suppliers Depreciation and amortisation Finance costs Write-down and impairment of assets Losses from asset sales Total expenses Actual Budget estimate Original1 Variance2 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 59.400 52.539 194.000 26.272 6.211 24.417 22.202) (2.940 126.056 (204) 76 292 123 560 847 LESS: OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-Source Revenue Sale of goods and rendering of services Fees and fines Interest Rental income Other revenue Total own-source revenue Gains Reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments Foreign exchange Total gains 2 2 4 - 2 2 4 19.

986 - - - - 37.730 146.829 2.651 (28.971) (10.371 3.511 35.000 - 162 10.522 (7.101 11.658 11. 2.010 172.132 59.101 - - - - - 91.658 11.500 13. AMSA's original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respect of the reporting period 2014-15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).651 15.762) 76.000 - 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 Original1 Variance2 37.986 37.750 3.371 1.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 20: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances (Cont’d) AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2015 Actual OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Receipts from Government Sale of goods and rendering of services Interest Net GST received Other Total cash received Cash used Employees Suppliers FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash used Repayment of borrowings Finance lease interest Total cash used Net cash from financing activities Net increase (decrease) in cash held Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period Original1 Budget estimate Variance2 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 181.912 3.098 2015 $’000 Original1 Variance2 2015 $’000 1.206 139.116 17. AMSA's original budgeted financial statement that was first presented to parliament in respect of the reporting period 2014-15 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).176.276 7.116 1.313 196.658 13.522) 379 16 395 (395) 379 16 395 (395) (21.158 9.453 Total cash used Net cash from operating activities 206.101 91.101 2015 $’000 - 1.986 - 37. Explanations of major variances are provided further below between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015.371 - 1.259 213.396 172.261 - 2015 $’000 91. 130 .642 54.775 11.098 - - - - - .500 - 1.977 (2.511 - 35.129 (21.093 2.396 (222) 357 357 31.189.427) 242 2.029 13. Explanations of major variances are provided further below between the actual and original budgeted amounts for 2015.386 357 1.986 - - - 37.909 54.261 - 35.885 104.256 2.014 10.384 222 - - - - 10.511 - - - - 31.867 43.750 357 357 (222) 3.986 - 2015 $’000 Total equity 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 - 13.371 - - - - - .162 10.010 172.129) (7.129 General reserve Pollution reserve Contributed equity/ capital 31.546 57.098 17.256 13. plant and equipment Investments Total cash used Net cash used by investing activities 13.500 - - - - - - - - 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 Original1 Variance2 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 Original1 Variance2 10.500 1.129 15.500 1.986 - 37.000 - - - 162 10.013 (1.386 357 1.029 1.387 1.896 21. 2.101 91.000 28.651) 21.684 206.298 - 13.912 2015 $’000 Original1 Variance2 .733) (10.299 10. Transfers between equity components Increase to pollution reserve Closing balance as at 30 June 2015 Comprehensive income Non financial asset revaluation increment Provision for restoration assessment Surplus for the period Total comprehensive income Adjusted opening balance Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period Asset revaluation reserves Actual Budget estimate Actual Budget estimate Actual Budget estimate Actual Budget estimate Actual Budget estimate Actual Budget estimate Retained earnings 2015 $’000 AUSTRALIAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY Statement of Changes in Equity for the period ended 30 June 2015 Note 20: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances (Cont’d) Notes to and forming part of the financial statements APPENDIX 1 .176.729 (425) 7.457 6.524 7.029 - 3.162 2015 $’000 - 222 384 - 10.130 2015 $’000 2015 $’000 Original1 Variance2 2015 $’000 91.658 - 1.845) INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of property.129 21.013 1.000 7.500 - - - - - - 11.589 175.478) 15.

141 million.524 million and provisions decreased by $1.013 million is mainly attributable to underspend in planned capital works and a $8.property. Losses asset sales and inventory impairment Losses from write down of aids to navigation assets of $1.089 million. Revenue from Government The variance of $7. Write down of dispersant stock by $0. Own source Income (Statement of comprehensive income).870 million higher than in the original budget primarily due to an increase in search and rescue activity relating to Malaysian airlines MH370 incident. Losses asset sales and impairment write down (Statement of comprehensive income). Equity change The difference in the equity of $17.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Note 20: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances (Cont’d) Note 20B: Departmental Major Budget Variances for 2015 Explanations of major variances Suppliers Paid Supplier expenses increased by $4.108 million.869 million and the cash used for suppliers increased by $7.384 million used for combating oil spill pollution.912 million compared to estimated value in original budget and an increase of $13.683 million for other agencies and an increase in cost for search and rescue by $1. payables increased by $7. Employee expenses (Statement of comprehensive income). Affected line items (and statement) Supplier expenses (Statement of comprehensive income). Equity change (Statement of Changes in Equity).523 million. Supplier payable (Statement of financial position) and Operating cash used .453 million. This is a result of undertaking additional externally funded maritime related training activities of $3. 131 Changes in asset revaluation (Operating Statement).APPENDIX 1 .847 million is mainly attributable to an insurance recovery related to the MV Tycoon incident. Cash and Investments The cash and investments balance increase by $26. 132 . Own source Income Variance of $0. Also contributing to the variance is the payable balance at year end 30 June 2014 being $7. The key contributing factor is payout of unused leave balances from staff departures.689 million receipt for MH370 not in the original budget.suppliers (Cash flow statement). Employees Employee expenses increased by $0.298 million is attributable to closing equity balance as at 30 June 2014 being higher by $3. cash used increased by $2.177 million is due primarily to an increase of $8.689 million in cash received for the Malaysian airlines MH370 search and rescue incident from additional estimates and net effect of levy and other income.780 million arising from cyclone damage and obsolescence. Financial assets (Statement of financial position) and Operating cash received and cash used . Employee provision (Statement of financial position) and Operating cash used . Revenue from Government (Statement of comprehensive income) and cash received (Cash flow statement).029 million from asset revaluation.employees (Cash flow statement). plant and equipment (Cash flow statement).

au). Prog. 133 2 There was a higher deficiency rate for Priority 4 ships (2.4 Target Sub.1 Sub.9).1 1 Prog.1 Priority two ships: 60% Priority three ships: 40% Result Availability of pollution response resources and equipment to a pollution incident 100% 100% Availability of emergency response capability 100% availability of emergency towage vessels and fixed wing dispersal aircraft 99% 3 There is a reduction over time in the ratio of reports to AMSA under the Protection of the Sea (Prevention of Pollution from Ships) Act 1983 of serious pollution incidents Significant pollution incidents: < 0. Prog. 1. 2006 (MLC. 1.1 Key performance indicator MARINE ENVIRONMENT Key performance indicator Sub.1 Sub. Prog.gov.1) than in 2013-14 (2. 1.1.1 Result Priority 4: 2.1 3 The Emergency Towage Vessel (ETV) Coral Knight was detained in Cairns on 11 December 2014 due to non-conformances of the International Safety Management Code.1 PBS 2014-15 Page 134 Prog. 1. within each priority group.0). in part because 2014-15 was the first full year of application of this Convention. These can also be found in the AMSA Strategic Vision 2013-2033 and our Plan on a Page (page v).1 There is a reduction over time in the ratio of reports to AMSA under the Navigation Act 2012 of significant ship operational incidents compared to the total number of ship port visits to Australia. 1.5 PBS 2014-15 Page 136 Priority 2: 3. separated by strategic challenge. Appropriate measures were put in place and training completed to rectify the deficiencies and the vessel was released on 15 December. Prog. This was due to a higher rate of Maritime Labour Convention. Prog. Prog. 2006) deficiencies.1.1 Priority 3: 2.2% Ship operation incidents: 0. This appendix details our performance targets.7 Significant pollution incidents: Nil All regulatory measures introduced internationally or domestically are given effect within specified timeframes 100% 100% Prog. These documents are available on our website (amsa. This resulted from a slightly higher deficiency rate in the structural/equipment. 1.1. 1.1 PBS 2014-15 Page 136 Prog. objectives and deliverables set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2014-15 (PBS) and Corporate Plan 2014-2018 (CP).1 SHIP SAFETY PBS 2014-15 Page 133 Reference 2 2.1 PBS 2014-15 Page 133 Prog. 1. 1.25 average per inspection Ship inspection deficiency rates: Prog. 1. and the average number of deficiencies per ship inspection Ship operation incidents: 0.1 PBS 2014-15 Page 134 Improved standard of foreign ships operating in Australian waters Declining average number of deficiencies per inspection.1 Number of port and flag State ship inspections Port State inspections: 3000 Port State inspections: 4106 Flag State inspections: 60 Flag State inspections: 84 1 The deficiency rate per inspection of Priority 2 ships was slightly higher in 2014-15 (3.1. The International Safety Management deficiency rate was unchanged and the MLC. 1.1.1.1 Inspection rate of risk assessed eligible foreignflagged ships Priority one ships: 80% Sub. and results against those targets.4) compared to 2013-14 (2.APPENDIX 2 . Priority 3: 71% Priority 4: 58% Priority four ships: 20% PBS 2014-15 Page 133 Prog. 2006 deficiency rate was slightly lower. 1. 1. 1. Priority 1: 3. operational and human factor deficiency categories due to an increased inspection focus on these areas. Prog. Prog. 134 .7 Sub.7 deficiencies per inspection Priority 1: 93% Priority 2: 84% Sub.1 Target Sub. 1.NON-FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE APPENDIX 2 NON-FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE We measure our performance against the strategies.1.04% PBS 2014-15 Page 133 Ship inspection deficiency rates: <3. Discussions were held with the primary contractor and a plan put in place to ensure both the management and crew of the operators of the ETV are all aware of their legislative obligations in regards to operating and crewing an Australian-flagged vessel. 1. Achieved Partially achieved Not achieved SC1: ADDRESSING GROWTH AND COMPLEXITY IN OUR OPERATING ENVIRONMENT Reference Prog.1.

Prog. 6 The contract for the dedicated aircraft in Darwin ended on 31 January 2015.1.NON-FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Reference Key performance indicator Target Result Reference SEARCH AND RESCUE PBS 2014-15 Page 135 Prog. 5 The availability target was not achieved due to minor hardware faults and a lightning strike disabling one of the two ground tracking stations (LUTs) for a short period of time. system redundancy ensured our search and rescue services were not negatively impacted. Prog. 1.1.3% 9 DGPS: 99. as well as a successful beacon registration campaign which resulted in more incidents being resolved before search operations were initiated. Prog. 1. Prog.9% Category 2 Lights: 99% Category 2 Lights: 99.6% REEFVTS Radars: 98. Meas. 10 The target for Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait Vessel Traffic Service (REEFVTS) radar availability was not met due to extended outages at Pelorus Island radar (due to cyclone-related damage to the solar power supply).9% Electronic aids: Electronic aids: AIS: 99.1. 1.1. 1. and resource unavailability. 1. In 2014-15 the principal factors militating against a 100 per cent result related to severe injuries in the occurrence of incidents and medical conditions of the people at risk.2 PBS 2014-15 Page 136 Prog.8% Category 1 Lights: 99.1 Sub.8% Met-ocean sensors: 99. 1.2 PBS 2014-15 Page 135 Prog. From December 2016.1. All regulatory measures introduced internationally are given effect in Marine Orders within specified timeframes 100% 93% 8 Availability of the Marine Aids to Navigation network (compliance with International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities guidelines) Visual aids: Visual aids: Category 1 Lights: 99.1 Sub.1% 7 (262 lives saved) 4 AMSA Search and Rescue conducted 447 searches this year compared to 504 in 2013-14. although planned dates slipped due to legal and policy complexities. 1. the circumstances of individual incidents determine the success of search and rescue responses and achievement of a perfect 100 per cent is not expected.8% DGPS: 99.6%10 Racons: 99. (A person is defined as being at risk if the person has a chance of surviving the initial maritime or aviation incident) 100% Prog.2 PBS 2014-15 Page 134 Prog. In practice. Work on outstanding Marine Orders is progressing.6% Racons: 99. the new service will provide full national coverage with 3 bases.1.2 PBS 2014-15 Page 135 Key performance indicator 98. 1. Two Marine Orders were given effect within specified timeframes during the period. with the remaining AeroRescue bases closing from August 2016 to February 2017. 135 136 . 7 Our objective is to save all lives at risk during distress incidents. This is a 13 per cent decrease. 1. 1. 1.APPENDIX 2 .8% Category 3 Lights: 95% Category 3 Lights: 99.8% REEFVTS Radars: 99. 6 Availability of distress and safety communications services 100% of the time 4 Page 12 99. Opportunity providers will be used while we transition to the new service provider. 1. which can be attributed to the reduced number of suspected asylum seeker vessels.1 Sub. Prog.44% of the time 5 Sub.8% Met-ocean sensors: 99. However. 9 The target for Automatic Identification System (AIS) availability was not met due to an extended outage of the Swain Reefs satellite communications link.1 Provision of Rescue Coordination Centre (RCC) with capacity to handle incidents and searches Incidents: 8500 Incidents: 7664 CP 2014-18 Searches: 740 Searches: 447 Perf.6% AIS: 99.1 Sub. Prog.2 PBS 2014-15 Page 135 Target Result NAVIGATION SAFETY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Sub.9% 8 Twelve Marine Orders were given effect within specified timeframes during the year.1 Prog.2 Number of search and rescue units 5 dedicated airborne units and an additional 50 trained units available on an opportunity basis 4 dedicated airborne units and an additional 52 trained units available on an opportunity basis 6 Median time for the Rescue Coordination Centre to initiate a response 30 minutes 27 minutes Maximise percentage of saved lives as a proportion of lives at risk.9% Unlit Beacons: 97% Unlit Beacons: 100% Topmarks and         daymarks: 97% Topmarks and          daymarks: 99.

Prog.APPENDIX 2 .1 Sub.NON-FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE SC2: KEEPING PACE WITH CHANGE Reference Key performance indicator DOMESTIC VESSELS PBS 2014-15 Page 134 Prog. 11 Domestic Vessels content is included under strategic challenges 1 and 2. 1.2 CP 2014-18 Perf.1. 1 Page 15 Target Result 11 Reference Key performance indicator Target Result Further develop service delivery partnerships with jurisdictions and arrangements for the national maritime safety regulatory system Completed by June 2016 The National System Transition Program has been focussed on the preparation of a transition package which will be tabled at a Maritime Senior Officials Group meeting in July 2015. A significant training program. 1. DOMESTIC VESSELS Further develop service delivery partnerships with jurisdictions and arrangements for the national maritime safety regulatory system Completed by June 2016 Implement the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety Fully implemented by July 2016 While the remaining streamlining reforms are being progressed for finalisation in quarter one of 2015-16. 1. costs and cost recovery. 1 Page 15 As the program moves into the delivery phase it is expected that the program structure will change to reflect the work required.1 Sub. which has centred on the use of the National Data Management System. The transition package will include discussion about a blueprint. we are also undertaking a strategic review of streamlining reforms to ensure they complement a coherent National System. Other projects will be brought on line over time. Prog. Meas.2 Discrete functions and services of the National System will be implemented in stages. has been undertaken across Australia with National System delegates. 1.1. The indicators are the same. 137 138 .  CP 2014-18 Perf. Meas. however the results are different (to cover our current operating environment and change activities). PBS 2014-15 Page 134 Prog. transitional funding and engagement with industry. Implement the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety Fully implemented by July 2016 Project managers have been allocated to 12 projects and planning is progressing. The training is in line with our commitment to improving the control environment surrounding the National Law and will help us work more closely with our delegates.

2006 • Active role in education. Meas. 12 There are often significant fluctuations year to year in demand levels for seafarers’ qualifications.APPENDIX 2 . Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW). and played an active role in education. Strong engagement with International Labour Organization (ILO) 100% Business as usual SHIP SAFETY CP 2014-18 Perf. 1 Page 17 The number of entry level certificates shows an increase on previous years (allowing for one-off fluctuations in some years due to changes to the regulatory framework) • seafarer certificates processed (all types): 9857 • certificates of competency (CoC): 904 • oral examinations: 615 • safety training certificates (CoST): 3963 • International Safety Management audits: 56 CP 2014-18 Perf. Meas. 1 Page 21 Maintain Australia’s position on the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Council (election every two years) Election to IMO Category C Australia’s IMO Election strategy is being delivered as per plan.NON-FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE SC3: ENSURING A COMPETENT AND FAIRLY TREATED MARITIME WORKFORCE Reference Performance indicator Target Result Perf. 3 Page 21 • International Safety Management audits: 77 We continued to engage with. usually resulting from changes to the regulatory requirements of the International Convention on Standards of Training. Meas. compliance and enforcement activities. and provide information to. Meas. 139 140 . compliance and enforcement • certificates of all types: 5568 • certificates of competency (CoC): 1154 • oral examinations: 655 • safety training certificates (CoST): 212312 CP 2014-18 Perf. Meas. 2 Page 17 CP 2014-18 Perf. The revised Marine Order 11 came into force 1 May 2015. our stakeholders. 3 Page 17 Reference Performance indicator Target Result NAVIGATION SAFETY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SHIP SAFETY CP 2014-18 SC4: INFLUENCING INTERNATIONAL ARRANGEMENTS Seafarers’ welfare support systems are coordinated and services to seafarers are improved • Ongoing engagement and provision of information to stakeholders Marine Order 11 (living and working conditions on vessels) is reviewed To implement a new revised Marine Order 11 following a review of issues arising from implementation of the Maritime Labour Convention.

ISO14001 and AS/ NZS4801 is maintained 100% Surveillance Audit 20440/26 conducted by Davis Langdon Certification Services from 11-13 May 2015. Meas. transparent and consistent regulator 141 Reference Performance indicator Target Result AMSA achieves unqualified financial statements and maintains financial viability 100% 100% Compliance with statutory. Since 2008 we have consistently achieved a very high level of employee engagement (when compared with both government and industry sectors) CORPORATE SERVICES • Formal written evaluation surveys for three Safety Management System workshops CP 2014-18 SC6: ENSURING A VIBRANT AND PROGRESSIVE ORGANISATION • Survey completed • Overall. Meas. 4 Page 27 CP 2014-18 Perf. AMSA’s staff turnover rate shows a declining trend to previous years and is less than that of comparable public sector agencies AMSA’s employee turnover does not depart from the desired range: 5-12% per annum The annual turnover rate for 2014-15 was 10% AMSA’s biennial staff engagement survey indicates strong staff satisfaction and engagement relative to public sector averages and continues to improve on previous years Conduct Employee Opinion Survey The results of our third employee survey conducted in 2014-15 indicated sustained levels of engagement at the highest level. 2 Page 23 An external stakeholder survey will be conducted every two years Through this survey we will aim to determine that the maritime sector: • is aware of AMSA’s role as the maritime safety regulator and has a clear understanding of its regulatory responsibilities • feels effectively engaged with AMSA. Meas. Meas.APPENDIX 2 . including in the setting of regulatory standards • finds AMSA to be a fair. Meas.NON-FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE SC5: ENGAGING WITH THE COMMUNITY Reference Performance indicator Target Result CORPORATE RELATIONS CP 2014-18 Perf. Meas. our performance. financial and business requirements is maintained 100% 100% Certification to ISO9001. and performance and accessibility of staff very positively. Meas. 6 Page 27 142 . Renewal of accreditation is not required until 2017. Meas. 1 Actively seek stakeholder feedback Page 23 Incorporate suggested improvements into our communication and engagement approaches • Formal written evaluation survey for Working Boats April 2015 edition • Marine order and marine notice consultation • Feedback also received and actioned through our general enquiry line Perf. 2 Page 27 CP 2014-18 Perf. 3 Page 27 CP 2014-18 Perf. our clarity of purpose and integrity. 1 Page 27 CP 2014-18 Perf. CP 2014-18 Perf. stakeholders assessed their level and quality of engagement with AMSA. 5 Page 27 CP 2014-18 Perf. No nonconformances were identified Accreditation as a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) is maintained RTO is registered until 2017 Preparations are complete for compliance with new regulations for RTOs which took effect on 1 April 2015.

She is Chair of the Australian Bureau of Statistics Audit Committee. and the Department of Defence Audit and Risk Committee. He sailed with the BHP fleet before undertaking various shore-based roles including fleet safety instructor and project engineer. Ms Clark is currently a Non-Executive Director on the Board of the Australian Payments Clearing Association Limited (APCA) and is a member of APCA’s Audit Compliance and Risk Management Committee. Mick had an extensive career with BHP having commenced as an engineer cadet with BHP Transport. Mr Richey’s business includes salmon. and advisory roles to the Australian Government. Mick holds an Australian Chief Engineer Class 1 Certificate. and the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care Audit and Risk Committee. He was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2005.AMSA BOARD MEMBERS APPENDIX 3 AMSA BOARD MEMBERS Stuart Richey AM (Chair) Tasmanian commercial fisherman Stuart John Richey AM was appointed Chair of the AMSA Board on 21 November 2014 for a period of 5 years. the Attorney-General’s Department Audit and Risk Management Committee. for service to the commercial fishing industry. particularly maritime safety and casualty response. Since that time he has gained experience across all of AMSA’s business. Ms Clark was appointed to the Board on 8 May 2012 and was appointed Chair of the Board Audit Committee in February 2014. Mick joined AMSA in 1994 as a marine surveyor in Cairns. particularly the promotion of sustainable utilisation of Australian Government-managed fisheries resources and the development of new national marine polices and safety legislation. scallop. the Institute of Marine Engineering Science and Technology (UK). Her banking experience included financing and providing advice to companies across a broad range of industries and for major infrastructure projects. As Managing Director of Richey Fishing Company and Richey Services.APPENDIX 3 . Mr Richey has been serving as a Board member since July 2013. a Bachelor of Engineering. and the Australian Institute of Company Directors. a Bachelor of Applied Science. Mick was previously the Deputy Chief Executive Officer and held this position since October 2008. Prior to joining AMSA. Dr Reichelt served as the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Institute of Marine Science and as Chairman of Australia’s Fisheries Research and Development Corporation and Seafood Services Australia Ltd. Previously. bringing to the table his strong leadership style and his years of experience in marine policy and planning. 143 144 . Ms Clark is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and has been a Board member of a number of companies and Australian Government agencies over the past 20 years. and Chief Executive of CRC Reef Research Centre Ltd and Reef and Rainforest Research Centre Ltd. finance and governance through a career as a Non-Executive Director since 1991 and as an Investment Banker for over 20 years. and as Deputy Chair since April 2014. Mick Kinley (Chief Executive Officer) Michael (Mick) Kinley became the Chief Executive Officer of AMSA on 27 August 2014. and a Graduate Diploma in Legal Studies. He has a PhD in Marine Science (tropical ecology) from the University of Queensland. Jennifer Clark (Deputy Chair) Jennifer Clark was appointed Deputy Chair of the AMSA Board on 10 February 2015 for a period of 5 years. Dr Russell Reichelt Dr Russell Reichelt is currently Chairman and Chief Executive of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and a Non-Executive Director of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation Limited. Other past roles include Chairman of the National Oceans Advisory Group. Ms Clark is also an independent member of the Australian Taxation Office Audit and Risk Committee. Mr Richey is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. squid and marine charter operations. Ms Clark has an extensive background in business. Mr Richey served as foundation member and Deputy Chair on the Board of the Australian Fisheries Management Authority and from 2003-12 was Deputy Chair of the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation. and is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering. Dr Reichelt was appointed to the AMSA Board from 7 August 2007 and reappointed for a period of 3 years from 30 July 2013. the Austrade Audit and Risk Committee. the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Audit Committee. Between 1992 and 2001.

Mr Taylor is a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and the Institute of Public Administration of Australia. Principal of Foursight Associates and. and Executive of the Queensland Council of Unions. Energy and Minerals. Mr Toohey is the Secretary for the Queensland branch of the Australian Institute of Marine and Power Engineers. Peter Toohey Peter Toohey was appointed to the AMSA Board on 17 June 2015 for a 3-year term. participation in the Phase II Airport sales process. and was Chairman of the Murray Darling Basin Authority (2009-11). Professor Derrington commenced her legal career in litigation sections of Freehills in Canberra and then Minter Ellison in Brisbane before pursuing an academic career at UQ. Mr Webb is currently Chairperson. aviation and transport law. Director of the Australian Maritime College Board. Professor Derrington is currently Dean of Law at the University of Queensland (UQ). Mr Webb previously served as Chairman. Director of Upline Pty Ltd. Transport and Regional Services (2004-09). and Secretary. Master of Laws (UQ) and Doctor of Philosophy (UQ) in the field of marine insurance law. Andrew Wilson Andrew Wilson is the Deputy Secretary of the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development and is the departmental representative on the AMSA Board. Hunter Valley Coal Chain Coordinator Limited. Professor Derrington is currently the Vice Chairman of the Australian Maritime and Transport Arbitration Commission. and Supporting Member of the London Maritime Arbitrators’ Association. and became a seagoing marine engineer in 1978 working in all positions from 7th to Chief Engineer on tankers and bulk carriers with Howard Smith Shipping. maritime.AMSA BOARD MEMBERS Professor Sarah Derrington Gary Webb Professor Sarah Derrington was appointed to the AMSA Board on 8 May 2012 and was reappointed for a 2-year period on 17 June 2015. and Bachelor of Surveying (Honours). Director of the Melbourne University . and the reform of the provision of services to the Indian Ocean Territories. Brisbane Tugs with Svitzer Australia. Lifeline Hunter & Central Coast. the University of Nantes and the University of Aix-Marseilles. Professor Derrington has a Bachelor of Arts in French and German (UQ). From 1991 to 2015. 146 . Director. Professor Derrington was Professor of Admiralty Law /Director Marine and Shipping Law Unit at the University of Queensland and has been a visiting Professor in maritime law at the University of Nottingham. Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Ports Australia. and State Sports Centre Trust. Professor Derrington is a member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators. Prior to that. Department of Agriculture. representing the NSW Treasury. and Member of the Admiralty Rules Committee for the Commonwealth of Australia. Mr Webb is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Mr Wilson has a Bachelor of Commerce degree from Deakin University.Melbourne Business School. Graduate Diploma in Education (TAFE). Engineer Class 1 (Motor). insurance law. to maximise the value of the longterm lease of the Port of Newcastle for the NSW Government. Newcastle Seafarers Centre Limited. Mr Taylor was formerly the Secretary to Australia’s Department of Infrastructure. Chairman of Risk and Finance sub-committee Somerville House School Council. Fisheries & Forestry (2000-04). Gary Webb was appointed to the AMSA Board on 17 June 2015 for a 3-year term. Hunter TAFE Foundation Limited. He was appointed to the AMSA Board from 1 August 2005. Mr Toohey is currently a Board member and Federal Executive of the Australian Institute of Marine and Power Engineers. he participated in 18 salvages with United Salvage and Svitzer Salvage as salvage engineer. NSW Board of Surveying and Spatial Information 2007. Maritime & Logistics and provided strategic advice to Morgan Stanley. Hunter Research Foundation. and Natural Resources and Environment). spending the past 28 years within the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development. He was awarded the City of Newcastle Australia Day Citizen of the Year in 2008 and the Inaugural Outstanding Service Award. and insolvency. oversight of the Aviation White Paper. Mr Toohey holds the AMSA Certificate of Competency. Mr Taylor holds a Bachelor of Agricultural Science from the University of Melbourne and a Diploma of Agricultural Economics from the University of New England. Michael Taylor AO FTSE Michael (Mike) Taylor was appointed to the AMSA Board on 10 September 2014 for a 3-year term. oversight of the stronger shipping for a stronger economy reform of the Australian Coastal Shipping Industry. he was responsible for the leadership and management of three departments for the Government of Victoria (1992-2000) (Agriculture. she was in full-time practice as a Barrister-at-Law specialising in general commercial litigation. More recently. Marine Engineering Higher certificate from Sydney Technical College. until recently. Mr Wilson has held a variety of positions within the Australian Public Service over his 30-year career. Mr Toohey is currently Chief Engineer. Mr Taylor is the part-time Chair of the Geoffrey Gardiner Dairy Foundation. He is Principal of Gary Webb Ports.    145 Mr Webb was formerly the Chief Executive Officer and Director of Newcastle Port Corporation (2004-13) and worked in maritime operations for Newcastle Port Corporation since 1989. and Director. Director of the Public Transport Development Authority. Chairman.APPENDIX 3 . Bachelor of Laws with Honours (UQ). He began his career with Howard Smith Industries as an apprentice fitter and turner and marine engineer student in 1974. and Craftsman’s certificate Fitter and Turner. and Director. Mr Webb holds a Graduate Diploma in Business Administration (Executive). bankruptcy. His career highlights involve the establishment of the Office of the Coordinator General. Fellow of the Nautical Institute.

Mr Zussino previously served as Chief Executive Officer of the Gladstone Ports Corporation Limited (2000-13). Captain Fred Ross Captain Fred Ross’ appointment ceased on 21 November 2014. Shipping Industry Reform Authority. Previously Captain Ross held the position of President and Executive Member of the organisation from 1970. Mr Zussino was appointed Chairman of the AMSA Board on 11 November 2008. Zussino (Chair) Leo M. BOARD MEETINGS AMSA Board attendance Member Stuart Richey AM (Chair) Attendance at meetings and teleconferences 6/6 Terms of office Appointed member from 1 July 2013 Appointed Deputy Chair from 15 April 2014 Appointed Chair from 21 Nov 2014 to 20 Nov 2019 Jennifer Clark (Deputy Chair) 6/6 Appointed member from 8 May 2012 Mick Kinley (Chief Executive Officer) 6/6 Member ex-officio from 24 Aug 2014 to 25 August 2019 Dr. Chairman of the Gladstone Economic and Industry Development Board. and member of Central Queensland University Council. Captain Ross has been a member of the Marine Industry Restructuring Agreement. President of the Association of Australian Ports and Maritime Authority Inc (now Ports Australia). Captain Ross resigned as Director Offshore Division of the Australian Maritime Officers Union. Russel Reichelt 5/6 Appointed member from 7 August 2007 to 9 August 2016 Mike Taylor AO 4/5 Appointed member from 10 September 2014 to 9 September 2017 Andrew Wilson 6/6 Member ex-officio from 1 August 2005 Prof. Executive Committee member of Queensland Ports Association. Chairman of the Queensland Port Authorities Association. Sarah Derrington 5/5 Appointed member from 8 May 2012 to 7 May 2015 Appointed Deputy Chair from 10 Feb 2015 to 9 Feb 2020 Re‑appointed from 17 June 2015 to 16 June 2017 Peter Toohey 0/0 Appointed member from 17 June 2015 to 16 June 2018 Gary Webb 0/0 Appointed member from 17 June 2015 to 16 June 2018 Leo M. Captain Ross’ sea-going career was on Australian vessels serving as Seaman to Master. USA. Captain Ross is currently Assistant to the Arbitrator North West Shelf Continuity of Operations.AMSA BOARD MEMBERS PAST BOARD MEMBERS Leo M. and AMSA Advisory Committee from inception (until becoming a Board member). Mr Zussino has a Masters Degree of Business Administration from the University of Oregon. holding command with Caltex from 1972-92. Zussino’s appointment ceased on 21 November 2014. a position he held from 1995 to 2011.APPENDIX 3 . He held positions within the International Transport Workers Federation and the International Labour Organization. Zussino 2/2 Appointed Chairman 10 November 2008 Re-appointed from 22 November 2011 to 21 November 2014 Captain Fred Ross 147 2/2 Appointed member from 22 November 2011 to 21 November 2014 148 .

Zussino (Chair) 1/1 Stuart Richey AM 1/1 Dr Russell Reichelt 1/2 Prof. Sarah Derrington 2/2 Board meetings included: • 208th – 14 August 2014 • 209th – 18 September 2014 • 210 – 9 December 2014 th MINOR 1 3 4 5 6 7 RISK NUMBER 1.STRATEGIC RISK PROFILE APPENDIX 4 STRATEGIC RISK PROFILE Board Audit Committee meetings Attendance at meetings Jennifer Clark (Chair) 4/4 Dr Russell Reichelt 4/4 David Lawler 4/4 EXTREME ! HIGH ! MODERATE ! Remuneration Committee meetings Remuneration Committee attendance Member LEGEND RISK RATING Board Audit Committee attendance Member Strategic risk profile as at February 2015 INHERENT RESIDUAL LOW Attendance at meetings Leo M.APPENDIX 4 . Failure to deliver a National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety that is sustainable and delivers the aims and objectives required by government LEGEND LEGEND INHERENT RISK RISK RATING RATING Inherent risk: Extreme! EXTREME EXTREME • 211th – 26 February 2015 Residual risk: High • 212th – 16 April 2015 Controls: • 213th – 17 June 2015 2 HIGH INHERENT RESIDUAL RESIDUAL ! ! ! HIGH ! ! MODERATE MODERATE • Consultation with industry and Maritime Agencies Forum LOW • Streamlining initiatives Board Audit Committee meetings included: LOW • Proposals for an efficient regulatory scheme and service delivery MINOR MINOR 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 RISK RISK NUMBER NUMBER 5 6 6 7 7 • 121st – 1 September 2014 • 122nd – 17 September 2014 • 123rd – 21 November 2014 • 124th – 19 March 2015 • 125th – 4 June 2015 Remuneration Committee meetings included: • 20th – 17 September 2014 • Out of session – 12 December 2014 149 150 .

equal emphasis on interpersonal/engagement competencies. such as the Public Governance Performance and Accountability Act 2013 MINOR RISK NUMBER • Integrated planning.STRATEGIC RISK PROFILE LEGEND RISK RATING 2. 2006 compliance LOW RISK NUMBER • National network of aids to navigation and other navigational services (e. and technical skills Relating to: • (non-AMSA) aids to navigation and  maritime communications • National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies • Coastal Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) in the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait LEGEND RISK RATING • National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety ! EXTREME • Search and rescue RISK RATING Inherent risk: Extreme ! ! INHERENT RESIDUAL LEGEND INHERENT RESIDUAL HIGH EXTREME Residual risk: Moderate ! ! MODERATE HIGH Controls: LOW MODERATE ! • Strengthening existing relationships MINOR LOW 1 2 3 • Strong contract and project management 4 5 6 7 RISK NUMBER • Strong stakeholder relationships MINOR 1 2 3 4 5 6 • Strong performance of AMSA as a stand-alone RISK NUMBER regulator 151 7 152 . and service providers • New approach to marine surveyor recruitment . Nexus) 5. procedures and practices to!! reflect whole-of-AMSA requirements EXTREME MINOR LOW 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 • Early incorporation of governmentRISK changes NUMBER to corporate compliance requirements. A major incident with loss of life and/or ! significant environmental harm LEGEND RISK RATING INHERENT RESIDUAL EXTREME LEGEND RISK RATING !! ! INHERENT RESIDUAL !! Residual risk: Moderate ! ! Residual risk: Low ! Controls: Controls: INHERENT RESIDUAL MODERATE HIGH LOW MODERATE MODERATE HIGH LOW MODERATE ! • Development and implementation of a modern regulatory framework MINOR 1 2 3 4 6 7 • Ship inspection program—port State control and 5Maritime Labour Convention. and exercises Inherent risk: High ! • National Search and Rescue Plan ! Residual risk: Moderate ! HIGH MODERATE • Aerial surveillance including Automatic Identification System • System and earth observation systems Controls: LOW HIGH RESIDUAL MODERATE LOW • Stringent recruitment processes • Pollution response financial capability MINOR MINOR 1 2 • Skilled migration program available 1 2 3 • Maritime emergency response arrangements 3 4 5 4 RISK NUMBER RISK NUMBER 5 6 6 7 7 • Registered Training Organisation (RTO) certification of AMSA courses including adaptation of courses to apply new technology • Dedicated aerial response capability • Emergency towage capability • Certified Management System • 24/7 operation of AMSA Search and Rescue • Continued industry funding through levy payments • Workforce Strategy 3. financial.g.g. Failure of investments. budgeting and contract management processes and monitoring • Network of shipping fairways (new and routeing measures where appropriate to RISKenhanced NUMBER promote safer navigation) • Search and Rescue Business Transformation Program • Partnership with key stakeholders • Active membership within the interdepartmental reference group 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 • Compliance and assurance framework • Navigation Safety Program • Legislation and compensation regimes (environmental protection) • Ship traffic risk management (vessel tracking. Managing shared responsibilities with state and territory partners. mandatory pilotage) • Real time maritime and aircraft positional information system for identifying assets for emergency response purposes • Mature incident management systems (e. The decline of the Australian-trained skilled maritime workforce impacts AMSA’s ability to attract.APPENDIX 4 . develop and maintain a skilled and ! ! workforce experienced LEGEND LEGEND INHERENT RISK RATING RISK RATING • Maritime safety and distress communication services • Nationally-accredited training for search and rescue personnel EXTREME INHERENT RESIDUAL EXTREME ! • National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies. pilotage) MINOR LEGEND RISK RATING HIGH EXTREME Inherent risk: High HIGH EXTREME Inherent risk: Extreme INHERENT RESIDUAL 4.

fire detection and fire extinction MODERATE LOW • Communication and engagement strategy RISK NUMBER Commencement 15 Residual risk: Moderate ! Controls: Topic 154 . 2011. It eliminates schedule 38 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013. 91 Marine pollution prevention . which replaces the 1991 Code mentioned in the previous issue. and the order has been rewritten in a clearer style. stowage and securing 01/08/2014 This order updates the reference to the Code of Safe Practice for Ships Carrying Timber Deck Cargoes. 19 Tonnage measurement 01/09/2014 This order replaces Marine Order 19 (Tonnage measurement) 2003 following a review of the order as part of our ongoing review of instruments. Failure to adapt and deliver to the deregulation ! ! environment EXTREME EXTREME HIGH ! HIGH ! ! Inherent risk: Moderate MODERATEMODERATE Residual risk: Low Controls: LOW LOW MINOR MINOR 1 12 23 34 5 4 • Deregulation Steering CommitteeRISK NUMBER RISK NUMBER 56 67 7 • Development of guidance documentation 153 Description Construction fire protection. LOW MINOR 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 MINOR 1 2 3 4 5 7 • Structured approach to stakeholder engagement and 6consultative processes and maintenance of RISK NUMBER industry relationships • Participation in national and international fora • Regional capacity. It eliminates schedule 39 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013. Separate requirements are set out for Australian vessels that are not covered by SOLAS. The structure of the order has been changed and current legislative drafting style applied. 42 Cargo.APPENDIX 5 . technical and cooperation programs in Indian Ocean and Asia-Pacific regions • Torres Strait Marine Safety Program • International Maritime Organization Marine Environment Protection Committee and the International Oil Pollution Compensation Funds • International Civil Aviation Organization. Foreign vessels not covered by SOLAS are required to comply with any certificates issued by or for the administration of the country in which they are registered. Australian vessels must also comply with additional requirements set out in the Schedules. 54 Coastal pilotage 01/07/2014 This order implements a review of the previous order and eliminates schedule 30 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013. It eliminates schedule 22 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013.oil 01/07/2014 This order gives effect to parts of Annex I of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution From Ships (MARPOL) dealing with the prevention of oil pollution from ships and prescribes matters for Chapter 4 of the Navigation Act and for Part II of the Pollution Prevention Act. References to particular positions in AMSA are removed. 35 Additional safety measures for bulk carriers 01/08/2014 This order updates definitions of bulk carriers. The scope of the order is extended to include cargo matters covered by Chapter VI of SOLAS. 93 Marine pollution prevention noxious liquid substances 01/07/2014 This order gives effect to Annex II of MARPOL dealing with the prevention of pollution from noxious liquid substances from ships and prescribes matters for Chapter 4 of the Navigation Act and prescribes matters for Part III of the Pollution Prevention Act. Major incident or adverse media campaign ! confidence in AMSA as a leads to loss of !! respected regulator and provider of services LEGEND RISK RATING INHERENT RESIDUAL EXTREME LEGEND RISK RATING INHERENT RESIDUAL EXTREME HIGH HIGH MODERATE Inherent risk: Moderate !! Marine Orders made under the Navigation Act 2012 and the Protection of the Sea legislation Marine Order 01/07/2014 This order applies Chapter II-2 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) to Australian and foreign vessels that come within its terms. This order eliminates schedule 6 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013. Cospas-Sarsat • National Search and Rescue Council • Targeted communication and education campaigns LEGEND LEGEND RISK RATING RISK RATING ! INHERENT INHERENT RESIDUAL RESIDUAL 7. It eliminates schedule 10 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional Modifications) 2013.MARINE ORDERS ISSUED IN 2014-15 APPENDIX 5 MARINE ORDERS ISSUED IN 2014-15 6. It eliminates schedule 20 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013.

It eliminates schedule 16 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013. maintenance and certification of vessels. 503. The structure of the order has been changed and current legislative drafting style applied. 49 High-speed craft 16/02/2015 This order deals with the certification of high speedcraft and eliminates schedule 26 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013. the Act under which we were established. 156 .OUR FUNCTIONS AND POWERS APPENDIX 6 OUR FUNCTIONS AND POWERS Marine Orders made under the Navigation Act 2012 and the Protection of the Sea legislation Marine Order 16 2 25 31 Topic Load lines Commencement 01/11/2014 Australian International Shipping Register Amendment 2014 (No. MO70 is one of the 4 Marine Orders made this year that replaced MO3. 504. 505 and 507 following amendments made to the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012. and reporting of marine incidents and defects.APPENDIX 6 . Vessel operations Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 and Marine Orders made under it Navigation Act 2012 and Marine Orders made under it Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime Industry) Act 1993. Description This order replaces Marine Order 16 (Load Lines) 2004 following a review of the order as part of our ongoing review of instruments. notification of intended movement of vessels involved in planned tows. This order provides generally for the survey. whether or not they are covered by SOLAS. in relation to the discharge of inspectorate functions Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities Security Act 2003. 2006. It eliminates Schedule 7 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional Modifications) 2013. This order has been amended so that it modifies Marine Order 70 (Seafarer certification) 2014 (MO70) instead of Marine Order 3 (MO3). including requirements for Chapter I of SOLAS. Modifications to seafarer certification arrangements are still required for seafarers who work on International Register vessels. 1) 01/11/2014 Equipment lifesaving 01/12/2014 Vessel surveys and certification 16/02/2015 Our powers and functions are described in the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Act 1990. Changes were made to some sections to improve clarity. 11 Living and working conditions on vessels 01/05/2015 This order reviews requirements following one year of implementation of the Maritime Labour Convention. The structure of the order has been changed and current legislative drafting style applied. A new requirement for vessels to have ship-specific plans and procedures for recovery of persons from the water is applied to all Regulated Australian Vessels. It eliminates Schedule 12 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional Modifications) 2013. in relation to the appointment of AMSA Navigation Act 2012 inspectors as duly authorised officers Registration Shipping Registration Act 1981 Marine pollution Protection of the Sea (Prevention of Pollution from Ships) Act 1983 and Marine Orders made under it Protection of the Sea (Powers of Intervention) Act 1981 Protection of the Sea (Civil Liability) Act 1981 Protection of the Sea (Oil Pollution Compensation Fund) Act 1993 Protection of the Sea (Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems) Act 2006 and Marine Orders made under it Protection of the Sea (Civil Liability of Bunker Oil Pollution Damage) Act 2008 Levies – in role as ‘Collector’ Marine Navigation Levy Act 1989 Marine Navigation Levy Collection Act 1989 Marine Navigation (Regulatory Functions) Levy Act 1991 Marine Navigation (Regulatory Functions) Levy Collection Act 1991 Protection of the Sea (Shipping Levy) Act 1981 Protection of the Sea (Shipping Levy Collection) Act 1981 Marine Orders made under the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 Marine Order 508 155 Name National law amendment Commencement 28/11/2014 Description This order amends Marine Orders 501.

gov.au Title Annual Reports (from 1999) A report to the Australian Parliament on AMSA’s activities for the year AMSA's Vision 2013-33 This report details how AMSA will provide effective maritime safety regulation through a period of sustained growth Corporate Plan A plan outlining AMSA’s planned activities and performance targets for the next three years AMSA's Technical Cooperation Strategy 2010-2015 A report describing AMSA’s Technical Cooperation Strategy for the Asia-Pacific region for 2010-2015 AMSA Enterprise Agreement 2012-2015 An agreement between AMSA and its employees detailing terms and conditions of employment AMSA Aboard A maritime industry e-newsletter based on AMSA operations AMSA The Second Decade The Second Decade provides an historical overview and highlights AMSA’s achievements throughout its most recent decade (2001-11). Protection of the Sea (POTS) Acts Protocol The Purpose of this Protocol is to provide guidance on the application of the AMSA Description About AMSA (Corporate) Navigation Act 2012 Protocol Title Compliance and Enforcement policy as it relates to the powers contained within the suite of the Protection of the Sea (POTS) Acts Shipping Registration Act Protocol The Purpose of this Protocol is to provide guidance on the application of AMSA’s Compliance and Enforcement policy as it relates to the powers contained within the Shipping Registration Act 1981 Domestic commercial vessels The Regulatory Plan The purpose of this document is to provide the detail of the regulatory requirements that will apply to domestic commercial vessels and their crew when the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 (the National Law) comes into effect in 2013 Maritime Safety Awareness Bulletin The Maritime Safety Awareness bulletin is published twice a year and looks at trends in maritime incidents with an aim to raise safety awareness in the industry National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety Streamlining Concepts Blueprint for the future regulatory arrangements Working Boats newsletter The maritime safety legislation places obligations on maritime operators and other parties (including those listed below) to ensure safety and protection of the marine environment.CURRENT PUBLICATIONS APPENDIX 7 CURRENT PUBLICATIONS All publications are available from the AMSA website (www.ship safety The Purpose of this Protocol is to provide guidance on the application of AMSA’s Compliance and Enforcement Policy as it relates to the powers contained within the Navigation Act 2012 (Navigation Act) Compliance and Enforcement Policy AMSA’s Compliance and Enforcement Policy which complements the modernisation of the suite of legislation it administers Fact Sheet . Compliance and Enforcement Policy Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 Protocol 157 Description Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime Industry) Act 1993 Protocol The Purpose of this Protocol is to provide guidance on the application of AMSA’s Compliance and Enforcement Policy as it relates to powers contained within Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime Industry) Act 1993 (the OHS(MI) Act). in the circumstances and to the standards specified in the legislation The Working Boats newsletter is a quarterly publication and is dedicated to informing industry and seafarers about the latest news and developments in the National System for domestic commercial vessel safety The streamlining concepts at a glance A guide to streamlining rules and regulations for accessibility purposes Industry guidance notices The Purpose of this Protocol is to provide guidance on the application of AMSA’s Compliance and Enforcement Policy as it relates to the powers contained within the Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012 (National Law). Guidance notices provide up-to-date information to assist compliance with the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety International .au). Limited hard copies of certain publications can also be obtained by contacting: AMSA Communication Phone: (02) 6279 5000 Email: communication@amsa.amsa.Port State Control in Australia Outlines Australia’s port State control responsibilities 158 .APPENDIX 7 .gov.

APPENDIX 7 . Ship Detention List Index Index of detained vessels by month Incident Reporting Service Charter Survival at Sea A comprehensive guide on all distress situations and emergencies at sea A Charter on receiving.shipping registration Australian Register of Ships Information on how to register a ship Fact Sheet . Seacare Compliance and Enforcement Policy 159 Description 160 . that apply to Australian and foreign vessels. hazardous and harmful cargo Explains the Seafarers Safety. made under Australian Commonwealth legislation. monitoring and acting upon maritime incident reports.Marine Orders Information about Marine Orders which are a form of regulation.Training -  Information for Registered Training Organisations These fact sheets outline policies.Helicopter Operations Frequently asked questions These ‘frequently asked questions’ and answers provide general information about Marine Orders Part 57 Helicopter Operations Ship Registration – Frequently Asked Questions The most frequently asked questions in regards to the registration of a ship A guide for medical carriage requirements on regulated Australian vessels Yachts.Australian International Shipping Register Marine Qualifications Provides information for foreign seafarers seeking employment on ships that are registered in the Australian International Shipping Register Fact Sheet .Australian International Shipping Register Details about registering a ship on the Australian International Shipping Register Navigation Act 2012 Protocol The Purpose of this Protocol is to provide guidance on the application of AMSA’s Compliance and Enforcement Policy as it relates to the powers contained within the Navigation Act 2012 Fact Sheet .Transferring Ownership NWEA Guidelines for the Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Movement Operations Australian Supplement Safe Management of Offshore Supply and Rig Move Operations Requirements for transferring ownership of an Australian ship Guide to the Registration of a Ship on the International Register The purpose of this guide is to provide an outline of the process of registration on the Australian International Shipping Register. Dangerous. International . International . Incident Notification Guide This guide provides practical assistance in helping operators understand the Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime Industry) Act 1993 (OHS(MI) Act) notification process. requirements and information for AMSA Registered Training Organisations Shipping Registration Act Protocol The Purpose of this Protocol is to provide guidance on the application of AMSA’s Compliance and Enforcement policy as it relates to the powers contained within the Shipping Registration Act 1981. Port State control annual reports Annual port State control activity reports REEFVTS User Guide This guide will help masters of ships give REEFVTS the correct ship reports and benefit from the services provided by REEFVTS. Maritime Skills Availability Study A study conducted by Thompson Clarke Shipping Pty Ltd into the availability of maritime skills within the Australian maritime industry.seafarers Australian Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Handbook A guide for the GMDSS on Australian vessels in Australian waters Automatic Identification System (AIS) A brochure providing basic information on AIS. Hazardous and Harmful Cargoes Handbook A guide for the safe carriage and handling of dangerous.CURRENT PUBLICATIONS Title Description Title Fact Sheet .Seafarer qualifications These fact sheets provide information regarding to seafarer qualifications Fact Sheets . Cruisers and Fishing Boats: who owns what? Information regarding the benefits of ship registration Medical carriage requirements on regulated Australian vessels MASTREP Booklet Ship reporting instructions for the Australian area Fact Sheet . Rehabilitation and Compensation Authority (Seacare Authority) and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s (AMSA) approach to workplace health and safety regulation under the Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime Industry) Act 1993 (the OHS(MI) Act) Fact Sheets . Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime Industry) Act 1993 Protocol The Purpose of this Protocol is to provide guidance on the application of AMSA’s Complianceand Enforcement Policy as it relates to powers contained within Occupational Health and Safety (Maritime Industry) Act 1993 (the OHS(MI) Act).

Emergency Response Centre Information about AMSA’s emergency response centre Fact Sheet . Survival at Sea A comprehensive guide on all distress situations and emergencies at sea Fact Sheet . Polarised Lenses and Dark Adaptation This fact sheet advises operators. particularly at night.APPENDIX 7 .Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) Information about Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) National Search & Rescue Council publications and manuals Australia's national search and rescue service adopts techniques and procedures that have been developed in a manner consistent with Australia’s international obligations Fact Sheet . Environment National Plan Annual Reports The annual reports for Australia’s National Plan National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies The National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies (National Plan) sets out national arrangements. providing detailed tidal information in the Torres Strait and Great Barrier Reef 162 . Navigation Safety in Australian Waters 2010 -2025 This planning document is a collection of principles and strategies for the provision of navigational services by AMSA. the ships they service and the pilots embarked within these ships.Frequently asked questions Fact Sheet .Dornier 328 Search and Rescue Aircraft Information about AMSA’s search and rescue aircraft Navigation Coastal Pilotage Fatigue Risk Management Plan (The Default Plan) Marine Order 54 (Coastal pilotage) 2014 (MO54) requires pilotage providers to ensure that each coastal pilot complies with this default Fatigue Risk Management Plan.Photochromic Lenses. to a paper chart or to an electronic equivalent such as Electronic Chart Display and Information System (ECDIS). Torres Strait and Coral Sea continues to be conducted to the highest standards possible.Torres Strait and Great Barrier Reef 161 Description The Queensland Coastal Passage Plan has been developed as a guide for the conduct of pilotage in Queensland coastal pilotage areas.Automatic Identification System (AIS) Class B Information about Automatic Identification System (AIS) Class B Information about VHF DSC radio communications Fact Sheet . policies and principles for the management of maritime environmental emergencies.GNSS Navigation and horizontal datums This information sheet will assist mariners when transferring positions from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Stow It Don't Throw It Information on garbage disposal regulations applicable to shipping Protection of the Sea .Emergency Towage Vessel ETV Coral Knight Information about AMSA’s AMSA’s dedicated Emergency Towage Vessel ETV Coral Knight A publication prepared with data from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Fact Sheet .Conventions and Legislations in Australia Information on garbage disposal regulations applicable to shipping Fact Sheet .VHF DSC Radio Communications .Automatic Identification System (AIS) Class A Information about Automatic Identification System (AIS) Class A Fact Sheet . new and strengthened management measures to ensure shipping within the Great Barrier Reef. National Plan .Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) Information about Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) Fact Sheet . masters/skippers and seafarers on precautions to be taken by those with lookout duties. Search and rescue Australian Search and Rescue An overview of Australia’s search and rescue system Watchkeeping Standards Information regarding Watchkeeping Standards for Seafarers Aviation Search and Rescue An overview of Australia’s search and rescue system specific to aviation incidents Distress Beacon Frequently Asked Questions A brochure answering many commonly asked questions relating to distress beacons Fact Sheet . Passage Plan Background and Guidance This guide seeks to improve pre-pilotage communications between coastal pilotage providers.CURRENT PUBLICATIONS Title Description Title Guidelines for the medical examination of seafarers and coastal pilots These guidelines have been compiled for the use of Medical Inspectors who are assessing an individual’s fitness to work at sea. Queensland Coastal Passage Plan Tide Tables .On Scene Newsletters Biannual magazine for Australia’s National Plan Fixed Wing Aerial Dispersant Capability To assist the pilot in applying the dispersant a separate aircraft with a trained aerial observer onboard is tasked to fly above the aircraft and direct the pilot towards the heaviest concentrations of oil. North-East Shipping Management Plan The plan identifies existing.

APPENDIX 7 - CURRENT PUBLICATIONS

163

Title

Description

Report on the 2011/12 Review of the
National Plan

This Report outlines the outcomes of the Review as agreed
by the National Plan Management Committee (NPMC ) in
July 2012.

Oil Spills in the Australian Marine
Environment: Environmental
Consequences and Response
Technologies

This document outlines the risk and impact of oil spills,
and the new technologies being employed for improving
spill surveillance, modelling of slick trajectories and the
development of geographic information systems to support
spill response decision making.

Identification of Oil on Water - Aerial
Observation and Identification Guide

This booklet is intended to assist people involved in aerial
observation and surveillance to more accurately report the
presence of oil in the marine environment.

Exercise Northerly, Darwin,
September 2014

The purpose of Exercise Northerly was to identify areas for
improvement in the response to maritime environmental
emergencies.

Exercise Sea Dragon Phase 2,
Western Port Victoria, June 2012

The aim of this exercise was to implement and review the
effectiveness of a combined Commonwealth, Victorian
and industry marine pollution response to a tier 3 pollution
incident in Victorian State waters.

Response to the Montara Wellhead
Platform Incident

Provides a report into the Montara Well Platform oil spill
incident

Response to the Pacific Adventurer
Incident

Report by the incident analysis team into the response to
the container loss and oil spill from the Pacific Adventurer
off the coast of Brisbane

Pasha Bulker Report

Response to the Pasha Bulker Grounding

Global Peace oil spill response report of the incident analysis team

Report by the Incident Analysis Team into the response by
the National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea.

The Response to the Laura D'Amato
Oil Spill

Response to the Laura D'Amato Oil Spill from the incident
analysis team

The Response to the Port Stanvac
Oil Spill

Response to the Port Stanvac Oil Spill from the incident
analysis team

The Response to the Iron Baron Oil
Spill

Response to the Iron Baron Oil Spill from the incident
analysis team

Exercise Barossa, South Australia,
June 1998

The purpose of Exercise “Barossa” was to activate and test
National Plan oil spill response arrangements

Exercise George Bass, Victoria,
June 1996

National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil.

164

12

REFERENCES

165

166

REFERENCES

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

167

Acronym/Abbreviation

Meaning

Acronym/Abbreviation

Meaning

AASB

Australian Accounting Standards Board

PGPA Act

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

AIS

Automatic Identification System

PID Act

Public Information Disclosure Act 2013

AMSA

Australian Maritime Safety Authority

PSC

port State control

AMSA Act

Australian Maritime Safety Act 1990

PSSA

Particularly Sensitive Sea Area

ANAO

Australian National Audit Office

REEFVTS

Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait Vessel Traffic Service

APHoMSA

Asia-Pacific Heads of Maritime Safety Agencies forum

RTO

Registered Training Organisation

APM

Associated Protective Measure

SAR

search and rescue

BASARNAS

Indonesian search and rescue authority

SOLAS

International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea

ETV

emergency towage vessel

SPREP

South Pacific Regional Environment Program

FSC

flag State control

STCW

GPS

global positioning system

International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and
Watchkeeping

IALA

International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse
Authorities

TSMSP

Torres Strait Marine Safety Program

UKCM

under keel clearance management

ICAO

International Civil Aviation Organization

VTS

vessel traffic services

ILO

International Labour Organization

IMO

International Maritime Organization

ITSAP

Indonesian Transport Safety Assistance Package

MARPOL

International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution From Ships

MEOSAR

Medium-altitude Earth Orbiting Search and Rescue system

MLC, 2006

Maritime Labour Convention, 2006

MOU

memorandum of understanding

MSQ

Maritime Safety Queensland

National Law

Marine Safety (Domestic Commercial Vessel) National Law Act 2012

National Plan

National Plan for Maritime Environmental Emergencies

National Regulator

National Marine Safety Regulator

National System

National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety

NATSAR Council

National Search and Rescue Council

NSCV

National Standard for Commercial Vessels

168

150-153. qualifications. It is the Government’s preferred policy that the reports be tabled by 31 October. 170 .10 Clause 14 a • names. 154. 19. Appendix 1 • Operational results 133-142 Appendix 2 • Significant changes in AMSA’s state of affairs or principle activities 9 • Amendments to AMSA’s enabling legislation and to any other legislation directly relevant to its operation 7. Schedule 1 . experience 81-132 Appendix 1 • number and attendance of board meetings • executive or non-executive Organisational structure • organisational structure Auditor General's report Clause 1(c) 81 Financial Statements certification: statement signed by the directors Clause 2(3) 83 Summary of requirements Approval by directors Statement on governance Legislative reference Page no. 156 • Financial results 81-132. 155 Clause 11 viii The report is to be presented to the responsible Minister by 15 October and requires the Minister to table the report in both Houses of the Parliament as soon as practicable after receiving it. 7. Appendix 2. 150-153 Appendix 4 Related entity transactions Clause 15 NA Key activities and changes affecting the authority Clause 16 a Complies • Factors and events influencing performance. 154. 10 • education and performance review process for directors 7./ Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 comment Clause 6 vii (Letter of Transmittal) Exemptions (a written exemption from any requirement granted by the Finance Minister) Clause 7 Parliamentary standards of presentation Clause 8 Plain English and clear design Enabling legislation and summary of objectives and functions Responsible minister 1 169 • location. 8 • ethics and risk management policies 21-22. 19./ Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 comment Ministerial directions and other statutory requirements Clause 12 19-23 Information about directors Clause 13 143-149 Appendix 3 Clause 14 9./ CAC Act 1997 comment Section 9(2) viii Legislative reference Page no. 8. of major activities and facilities NA • main corporate governance practices 19-23 • Board committees and their main responsibilities 7.Reporting Requirements comment Clause 1(a) 133-142 Appendix 2 Clause 1(b) Summary of requirements Legislative reference Page no. 133-142.REFERENCES COMPLIANCE INDEX Summary of requirements Timeframe for tabling in Parliament1 Summary of requirements Report of operations Financial Statements Legislative reference Page no. 3 Clause 9 Complies • Significant events under section 15 of CAC Act NA Clause 10 viii. 133-142. in Australia or elsewhere. including risks and opportunities 35-78./ CAC Act 1997. 22.

REFERENCES Summary of requirements Legislative reference Page no. for insurance against officers liability for legal costs Requirement Other legislative references Page no. • Indemnities given to current or former officers • Premiums paid. Commonwealth Ombudsman or Office of the Australian Information Commissioner. or agreed to be paid. Other statutory requirements Disability Discrimination Act 1992 28 • Advertising and Market Research Commonwealth Disability Strategy 73 • Occupational Health and Safety Report Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (section 311A) 30 • Environmental Performance Report Work Health and Safety Act 2011 30 Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (section 516A) 30 • Commonwealth Disability Strategy • Public Interest Disclosure Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013 171 21 172 ./ Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 comment Clause 17 20 Obtaining information from subsidiaries Clause 18 NA Indemnities and insurance premiums Clause 19 23 Disclosure requirements for GBEs Clause 20 NA Index of Annual Report requirements Clause 21 167-171 Judicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies • judicial decisions/decisions of administrative bodies • report by the Auditor-General • reports by a Parliamentary Committee.

AMSA Board members Appendix 4 .REFERENCES INDEX A Acronyms and abbreviations Advertising and market research Aids to navigation management Aids to navigation network AMSA Board AMSA Board members AMSA service charter Annual report contact Antarctic Appendices Appendix 1 .Financial statements Appendix 2 .Current publications Asia-pacific region Aspirations B Board and Committees Board Audit Committee Board Audit Committee meetings Board Audit Committee meetings Board Audit Committee meetings included: Board. 99 103 108 125 121 23 14 14 81 91 98 99 101 103 108 110 115 116 117 118 119 120 120 120 121 125 125 126 126 90 14 21 174 .Our functions and powers Appendix 7 .Non-financial performance Appendix 3 . Board Audit Committee and Remuneration Committee Board meetings Business continuity C Cash Flow Reconciliation Cash Flow Statement Celebrating 100 years of Commonwealth management of aids to navigation Certified Management system Chairman’s review Commercial yacht qualifications Compliance and enforcement Compliance index Compliments and complaints Computer-based exams Contingent Liabilities and Assets Cooktown helicopter search and rescue Coral Sea Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) Cost Recovery Cost Recovery Summary Creating a safety culture 173 167 73 65 65 7 143 20 178 51 80 81 133 143 150 154 156 157 78 ii 7 8 149 149 149 7 148 22 118 87 67 22 3 38 43 169 178 38 119 47 59 23 126 36 D Dedicated airborne search and rescue service Directions and prosecutions Disability Report Distress beacons Domestic commercial vessel safety Domestic consultation and events E Emergency towage Enabling legislation Engagement and communication tools Environmental performance Events After the Reporting Period Exercise Westwind Expenses F Fair Value Measurement Financial Assets Financial Assets Reconciliation Financial Instruments Financial management Financial outcome Financial overview Financial Statements Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period Note 3: Expenses Note 4: Own-Source Income Note 5: Fair Value Measurement Note 6: Financial Assets Note 7: Non-Financial Assets Note 8: Payables Note 9: Interest Bearing Liabilities Note 10: Provisions Note 11: Cash Flow Reconciliation Note 12: Contingent Liabilities and Assets Note 13: Senior Management Personnel Remuneration Note 14: Related Party Disclosures Note 15: Remuneration of Auditors Note 16: Financial Instruments Note 17: Financial Assets Reconciliation Note 18: Reporting of Outcomes Note 19: Cost Recovery Summary Note 20: Budgetary Reports and Explanations of Major Variances Notes to and forming part of the financial statements Financial summary Fraud control 49 36 28 49 39 71 58 7 73 32 98 55 16.Strategic risk profile Appendix 5 .Marine orders issued in 2014-15 Appendix 6 .

102 147 115 22 21 ii. Parliament or Ombudsman) Research projects Response capability Revenue Risk management 37 9 6 vi 19 26 73 27 63 101. 41 38 166 77 120 8 149 149 125 viii 20 38 56 15 21 176 . policies and notices Mission MV Thor Commander N National Plan National plan for maritime environmental emergencies National Search and Rescue Council National search and rescue service National System streamlining Navigation safety New aids to navigation maintenance contract New ship safety videos Notable 2014-15 incidents 175 39 20 64 O Occupational health and safety Organisational changes Organisational profile Our activities Our governance Our people Our registered training organisation Our workforce Overview Own-Source Income P Past Board members Payables Performance measurement Planning and reporting arrangements Plan on a page Procurement Protection of the sea levy reduced Provisions Public information disclosure act 2013 Q Qualifications Qualification system improvements 65 54 44 72 37 50 20 ii 57 10 55 49 47 39 62 65 37 47 R References Regional engagement Related Party Disclosures Remuneration Committee Remuneration committee meetings Remuneration Committee meetings Reporting of Outcomes Reporting requirements and responsible minister Reports (Auditor-General. v 23 58 117 22 38. 2006 Medium-altitude Earth Orbit Search and Rescue system Ministerial directions.REFERENCES G Governance arrangements Government and parliament Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait Vessel Traffic Service IIndian Ocean region Industry liaison Industry trends Insurance and indemnities Interest Bearing Liabilities International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities International Civil Aviation Organization International Maritime Organization International shipping International staff exchange program JJudicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies 77 41 35 23 116 77 76 74 35 78 Judicial decisions / decisions of administrative bodies 20 20 L Learning and development 29 M Major aids to navigation modifications Marine environment Marine Orders Maritime 2014: ship to shore Maritime Labour Convention.

policy or service.gov.gov. 2601.au/contact-us © Australian Maritime Safety Authority This work is copyright. 655 Collins Street Docklands VIC 3008 GPO Box 2181 Canberra City ACT 2601 PO Box 16001 Collins Street West Melbourne VIC 8007 Telephone: (02) 6279 5000 Facsimile: (02) 6279 5950 Telephone: (03) 8612 6000 Facsimile: (03) 8612 6003 Brisbane Fremantle Level 9. It may be reproduced in whole or part subject to the inclusion of acknowledgement of the source and no commercial usage or sale. members of the public may contact: Telephone: (02) 6279 5000 Website: www. Canberra City ACT. or ask questions relating to any AMSA decision.au. 260 Elizabeth Street Sydney NSW 2000 PO Box K976 Haymarket NSW 1240 34 156 ii Telephone: (02) 8918 1300 Facsimile: (02) 8918 1390 Compliments and complaints Workforce profile Workforce Strategy Work health.amsa. Reproduction for purposes other than those indicated above requires the written permission of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority. offer a compliment. Queensgate Centre 10 William Street Fremantle WA 6160 PO Box 10790 Adelaide Street Brisbane QLD 4000 PO Box 1332 Fremantle WA 6959 Telephone: (02) 3001 6800 Facsimile: (02) 3001 6801 Telephone: (08) 9430 2100 Facsimile: (08) 9430 2121 Sydney Level 5.amsa. GPO Box 2181. ISSN 1039-0626 Copy/design/typeset: Australian Maritime Safety Authority.REFERENCES S Safety management systems Schedule of commitments Seafarer certificates Seafarer welfare Search and rescue Search and rescue Search and rescue capabilities Search and rescue resources Ship inspections Shipping management Shipping management plans Standards reform Statement of Changes in Equity Statement of Comprehensive Income Statement of Financial Position Statement of Regulatory Approach Structure Summary of Significant Accounting Policies Surveyor accreditation System upgrades T Table of contents 41 88 38 37 10 46 49 10 35 63 63 39 86 84 85 40 9 91 41 23 Technology developments Torres Strait Marine Safety Program Training Training and education Transmittal letter ix 50 51 55 41 vii U Under keel clearance management 64 V Vessel and seafarer safety Vessel operations Vision W Workers’ compensation premium 177 ANNUAL REPORT CONTACT General enquiries and comments about this report can be directed to: Telephone: (02) 6279 5000 An electronic copy of this report with additional information detailing the activities of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority is available at www. 178 . safety and environment Working internationally Working with industry Workplace diversity Workplace relations 31 28 27 30 74 70 27 27 Y Yacht Enya II rescue 48 To make a complaint. procedure. 410 Ann Street Brisbane QLD 4000 Level 1. AMSA’s main offices: Canberra Melbourne 82 Northbourne Avenue Braddon ACT 2612 Level 3.

au AMSA191 (10/15) .amsa.gov.www.