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Lestojas, Jan Patrick L.

English 4M

BSMT - III

AIS - Automatic Identification System. Electronically exchanges ship data including: ID,
position, course, and speed, with other nearby ships and VTS stations
AZIMUTH THRUSTER - Steerable thruster that protrudes below the vessel with the
ability to rotate through nearly 360
AZIPOD - Steerable thruster with electric propulsion motor installed within the pod
outside the ship's hull
BELLY ROBBER
Insulting name for a Chief Steward
BILGE KEEL A strake running along the ship's sides at the turn of the bilge, to reduce
rolling of vessel
BINNACLE The pedestal where the magnetic compass is mounted
BITTER END Also refers to the end link of an anchor chain where it is attached in the
chain locker.
BITTER END The end of a rope that is tied off, hence the expression "to the bitter end".
A bitt is a metal block with a cross-pin used for tying lines to, found on docks.
BLACK GANG
Boiler room firemen, who originally stoked the boilers with coal
BLUE STAR WELLIES
B.O.T. contraceptives issued on board. With a sensitivity
rating equivalent to a wellington boot.
BOARD OF TRADE ACQUAINTANCE Friend of another person that had sailed
with. I.e. Signed on BOT articles
BOARD OF TRADE SPORTS
Fire, emergency and lifeboat drills
BOTTOM PLATES The plates surrounding a large main engine at crankcase door level,
above the tank tops
BOX BOAT Container ship
BRONZYING Sunbathe
BULKHEAD DYNAMO
Oil lamp, refers to when ship's generators were often shut
down in port at night/or and unreliable
BULKHEAD Bulkhead (partition), a wall within the hull of a ship, side of tank or
compartment
BUNK BOARD
Loose board that was placed down outside of bunk in heavy
weather to prevent occupant falling out
BUNKERING To load fuel oil from ashore or from a bunkering barge
BURMA ROAD
Access alleyways below main deck, either side of hatches on a
container ship running full length of ship
Cargo handling - the activity of moving goods on and off ships, planes, trucks, etc.
CHAIN LOCKER
A compartment usually at the forward end of a ship which is used
to store the anchor chain
CHIPPY
Ship's Carpenter
CHOCK A BLOCK A rope block heaved to its full extent.
CHUNDER BOX
Toilet

CHUNDER Originates from when seasick sailors would stick their head out of a
porthole. As they did this they would shout "Watch Under"
Collision - an instance of one moving object or person striking violently against another.
Communication - the imparting or exchanging of information or news.
CONNY ONNY
Tinned Condensed Milk, probably from Liverpool slang. Normally
watered down to resemble fresh milk before frozen homogenized milk was available.
CROW'S NEST
A structure in the upper part of the mainmast of a ship that is used
as a lookout point
DECKHEAD INSPECTION Go to sleep
DECKHEAD A deckhead is the underside of a deck in a ship. As a ceiling to the room of
a house.
DESERT CHICKENSAll wings and legs served to lesser mortals after Passengers and
Senior Officers were satisfied
DHOBI DUST
Washing powder
DHOBI RASH
Tinea cruris, fungal skin infection of the groin often mistakenly
supposed from not rinsing clothes enough, but actually due to excess sweating
DHOBI
To wash clothing or linen. Origin from Indian sub-continent where a
Dhobi is a washerman
DOCKING BOTTLE Bottle of Duty Free Liquor purchased from bond before entering
port
DODGER
Wind brake fitted to the front of bridge wings to deflect wind and rain
from watch-keeper's face
DONKEY BOILER Originally a boiler on deck to provide steam for sail winches. Now
a synonym for an auxiliary boiler
DONKEYMAN
Engine room rating that operated the donkey (auxiliary) boiler.
DOSE Sexually transmitted disease
DPS Dynamic positioning system, a means to automatically maintain a ships position
and heading by using her own propellers and thrusters
DR
Seaman's Book Entry, Declined to report which was really bad
DUCT KEEL Box structure running from the forward engine room bulkhead to the
collision bulkhead and are utilized to carry pipelines and cables
DUNNAGE Timber used in the stowage of cargo to prevent damage to ship and cargo.
Air-bags are commonly used today.
Electronic navigation - refers to the use of electronic charts and systems for
marine navigation.
EPIRB Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon
FARMER
Third AB on a Bridge watch. So named because he was paid for doing
"very" little
FIDDLES
Frames around dining tables and galley stoves to prevent items spilling
onto the deck in rough weather
FIELD DAY A day when all were turned to, to carry out a task (normally unpleasant).
In the Navy, "field day" refers to a thorough cleaning of the ship's spaces

Fo'c'sleAlternative spelling for forecastle. The foremost part of the upper deck
FORCED DRAFT JOB
A generously proportioned young lady
FORECASTLE
The foremost part of the upper deck
GADGET
Slang for Cadet/Apprentice
GAZONCAS Any brand of foreign currency notes
GMDSS
The Global Maritime Distress Safety System is an internationally agreedupon set of safety procedures, types of equipment, and communication protocols used to
increase safety and make it easier to rescue distressed ships
GOLDEN RIVET
Fictitious final rivet in the vessel which "impressionable" young
ladies were invited to inspect
GREEN FLASH
GROCER
Mildly insulting name for a Chief Steward
GYPSY
Notched chain wheel for raising the anchor on a windlass
GYROCOMPASS
A gyrocompass is essentially a gyroscope, a spinning wheel
mounted on gimbals so that the wheel's axis is free to orient itself in any way
HARRY TATE
First Mate
HEADS
Another name for toilet which used to be situated at the bow
HEAVY LIFT JOB A generously proportioned young lady
HEAVY LIFT SHIP Heavy Lift ships are specifically designed to carry heavy or
oversized cargo, such as Starman America
HOLYSTONE Large block of sandstone used to scrub wooden sheathed decks
IMARSAT
Inmarsat plc is an international telecommunications company operating
system of geosynchronous telecommunications satellites
IN THE OFFING
Vessels awaiting entry to a port, sometimes, due to adverse wind
conditions would stand OFF the land and sail back and forth till a berth was available.
Indicates the draft of the ship and the legal limit to which a ship may be loaded for
specific water types and temperatures
IRISH PENNENT
Any loose whipping or halyard flapping aloft which offends the
eye of the Bridge Officer
JASPER
Blaberus giganteus or the giant cockroach
KEEL A structural keel is a large beam around which the hull of a ship is built
KNOCK OFF Finish work
LAMPY
Lamptrimmer. Originally just that in the days of oil lamps, petty officer
below Bosun
Leadership - the action of leading a group of people or an organization.
LECKY
Electrical Officer
Lifesaving - is the act involving rescue, resuscitation and first aid. It often refers to water
safety and aquatic rescue; however, it could include ice rescue, flood and river rescue,
swimming pool rescue and other emergency medical services.
LIVENER
Another name for "hair of the dog". Recovery drink after a night ashore

LOGGING Up in front of the Skipper to get a bollocking and your name in the log
book and the loss of TWO days pay
Maneuvering - move skillfully or carefully.
Meteorology - the branch of science concerned with the processes and phenomena of the
atmosphere, especially as a means of forecasting the weather.
MIDDLE PLATES The floor plates surrounding a large main engine half way up
Momentary illumination of the horizon, in green, just as the sun finally sinks out of view
at sunset
MONKEY ISLAND Ship's upper bridge, or deck above bridge on modern vessel
MONKEYS FIST
End knot for a heaving line
Navigation - the process or activity of accurately ascertaining one's position and planning
and following a route.
NAVTEX
Automated system for instantly distributing maritime navigational
warnings, weather forecasts and warnings
NETTY
Once commonly used in South Shields to describe the toilet. Originally
were the nets spread forward at the bow to be used by the crew as a toilet area.
Oceanography - the branch of science that deals with the physical and biological
properties and phenomena of the sea.
OLD MAN Captain
OVER THE WALL Over ship's side
PEGGY
Nickname for Crews' messman. Origin unknown
PLIMSOLL LINE
POET'S DAY Friday. P**s Off Early Tomorrows Saturday
PROFESSIONAL THIRD Third Engineer with years of experience, but no Certificate
so unable to progress to Second Engineer.
PUNCHING THE TUBES Cleaning boiler tubes
Radar - a system for detecting the presence, direction, distance, and speed of aircraft,
ships, and other objects, by sending out pulses of high-frequency electromagnetic waves
that are reflected off the object back to the source.
RADAR
Radio Detection and Ranging. Radar is a system that uses electromagnetic
waves to identify the range, direction and speed of both moving and fixed objects
RDF Radio Direction Finder. A radio receiver for finding the direction to a radio source
RING BOLTERS
The illegal practice of the crew carrying girl friends between New
Zealand ports
ROCK DODGING On a Home Trade run
ROUND TURN
Manoeuvre carried out in emergency to avoid collision and to
rapidly slow vessel.
S.A.R.T.
Search and Rescue Transponder. Device used to locate survival craft or
distressed vessels by creating a series of dots on a rescuing ship's 3 cm radar display
SAT C Satellite Communication System
Search and rescue (SAR) - is the search for and provision of aid to people who are in
distress or imminent danger.
SHORE BOSUN
Leader of "party" girls from ashore

SHORT ARM INSPECTION Medical inspection for sexually transmitted disease.


Normally carried out in the USA and Australia
SHOW A LEGWake up, R.N. term from when shore women slept onboard. The owner of
a hairy leg would be "started" by the Bosun.
SKY PILOT Priest / Seaman's Mission Padre
SMOKO
Tea or coffee break. Refers to when 90% sailors smoked tobacco and
could smoke during break times
SOOGIE (SOOGEE) Caustic soda in solution with other detergent for cleaning
paintwork. Also a verb meaning to clean
SPURLING PIPE
Steel pipe through which anchor cable passes and leads down to
the chain locker
Stability - the state of being stable.
STRAKE
Steel plating on the exterior hull of a vessel, running longitudinally along
the vessel from the stem to the stern
Survival - the state or fact of continuing to live or exist, typically in spite of an accident,
ordeal, or difficult circumstances.
TABNABS Small items of food offered at break times, such as biscuits and cakes
normally made by the ship's baker
TANGLEMATIC
Twin tub washing machine. Named in desperation after the effect it
had on your washing!
TANK TOP Normally refers to the top of a double bottom tank, which in the case of an
engine room is equivalent to floor
THE CHANNELS A state of high euphoria when almost home to see family/friends
after a long trip! With ref. To English Channel
THUNDERBOX
Toilet hung over the stern of a vessel
TICKET
Certificate of Competency. I.e. Master's Certificate, Chief Engineer's
Certificate etc.
TIGERCaptain's Steward
TONNAGE HATCH A small hatch, normally aft on shelter-deck vessel. Related to old
Tonnage Regulations and theoretically could not be watertight.
Trim - make (something) neat or of the required size or form by cutting away irregular or
unwanted parts.
TWEEN DECK
Deck(s) below the main deck. Originally on sailing ships open to
weather and used for cargo or steerage passengers
UHF Ultra High Frequency radio. Generally used for onboard communications and
between ship and oil rigs/platforms etc.
VHF Very High Frequency radio. Used for short range ship to ship and ship to shore
communications
Watchkeeping - the nautical terms concerns the division of qualified personnel to operate
a ship continuously. On a typical sea-faring vessel, be it naval or merchant, personnel
keep watch on the bridge and over the running machinery.

WELL DECK Upper deck situated between two blocks of accommodation. Also a hangar
like deck located at the water line in the stern of some amphibious assault ships
WINDLASS Machine for raising and lowering the anchor(s)
WORKING ALLEY Alleyway through accommodation that also served as access to
machinery space