THE FINANCIAL
 
 
SYSTEM AND
THE ECONOMY
PRINCIPLES OF MONEY AND BANKING

 

 

Éric Tymoigne

 

 
 

THE FINANCIAL
SYSTEM AND THE
ECONOMY
PRINCIPLES OF MONEY AND BANKING
 
 
 

FIRST DRAFT

ÉRIC TYMOIGNE
 
 
 

© August 2016 by Eric Tymoigne. All rights reserved. 
 
 
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
PREFACE ....................................................................................................................................................................... V 
CHAPTER 1: BALANCE-SHEET MECHANICS ......................................................................................................................................... 1 
WHAT IS A BALANCE SHEET? ............................................................................................................................................. 2 
BALANCE SHEET RULES..................................................................................................................................................... 4 
CHANGES IN THE BALANCE SHEET ....................................................................................................................................... 6 
Net cash flow ........................................................................................................................................................ 6 
Net addition to assets and liabilities ..................................................................................................................... 7 
Net income ............................................................................................................................................................ 8 
Net capital gain ..................................................................................................................................................... 8 
CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL-BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS................................................... 10 
BALANCE SHEET OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ............................................................................................................. 11 
FOUR IMPORTANT POINTS .............................................................................................................................................. 12 
Point 1: The Federal Reserve notes are a liability of the Fed. ............................................................................. 12 
Point 2: The Fed does not earn any cash flow in USD ......................................................................................... 13 
Point 3: The Fed does not lend reserves and does not rely on the taxpayers ..................................................... 14 
Point 4: Banks cannot do anything with reserve balances unless they are dealing with other Fed account 
holders ................................................................................................................................................................ 16 
CAN THE FED BE INSOLVENT OR ILLIQUID? ......................................................................................................................... 17 
CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL-BANK BALANCE SHEET .................................................20 
THE MONETARY BASE AND THE MONEY SUPPLY ................................................................................................................... 21 
RESERVES: REQUIRED, EXCESS, FREE, BORROWED, NON‐BORROWED ...................................................................................... 23 
HOW DOES THE MONETARY BASE CHANGE? ....................................................................................................................... 27 
CAN THE FED ISSUE AN INFINITE QUANTITY OF MONETARY BASE? .......................................................................................... 29 
CHAPTER 4: MONETARY-POLICY IMPLEMENTATION .............................................................................................................. 33 
WHAT DOES THE FED DO IN TERMS OF MONETARY POLICY AND WHY? ..................................................................................... 34 
TARGETING THE FFR PRIOR TO THE 2008 FINANCIAL CRISIS .................................................................................................. 37 
A GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE FEDERAL FUNDS MARKET ........................................................................................... 40 
TARGETING FFR AFTER THE GREAT RECESSION ................................................................................................................... 41 
CHAPTER 5: FAQS ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING.............................................................................................................................47 
Q1: DOES THE FED TARGET/CONTROL/SET THE QUANTITY OF RESERVES AND THE QUANTITY OF MONEY? ...................................... 48 
Q2: DID THE VOLCKER EXPERIMENT NOT SHOW THAT TARGETING RESERVES IS POSSIBLE? ........................................................... 49 
Q3: IS TARGETING THE FFR INFLATIONARY? ...................................................................................................................... 51 
Q4: WHAT ARE OTHER TOOLS AT THE DISPOSAL OF THE FED? ............................................................................................... 52 
Q5: WHAT IS THE LINK BETWEEN QE AND ASSET PRICES?..................................................................................................... 53 
Q6: HOW AND WHEN WILL THE LEVEL OF RESERVES GO BACK TO PRE‐CRISIS LEVEL? THE “NORMALIZATION” POLICY ....................... 54 
Q7: IS THERE A ZERO LOWER BOUND? .............................................................................................................................. 55 
Q8: WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF A NEGATIVE INTEREST‐RATE POLICY? ..................................................................................... 59 
Q9: HOW DID CENTRAL BANKERS JUSTIFY USING NEGATIVE INTEREST RATES AND QE? ............................................................... 60 
Q10: SHOULD THE FED FINE‐TUNE THE ECONOMY? ............................................................................................................ 60 
Q11: IS THE FED A PRIVATE OR A PUBLIC INSTITUTION? ....................................................................................................... 62 
Q12: WHAT ARE NO‐NO SENTENCES FOR WHAT THE FED DOES? (WILL GIVE YOU A ZERO ON MY ASSIGNMENTS) ............................ 63 
CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS........................................................................................ 66 
MONETARY POLICY AND THE U.S. TREASURY ..................................................................................................................... 67 


 

Treasury’s involvement in monetary policy during the 2008 crisis ..................................................................... 69 
Other examples of Treasury’s involvement in monetary policy .......................................................................... 72 
FISCAL POLICY AND THE FED ........................................................................................................................................... 74 
A NECESSARY COORDINATION OF TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK ACTIVITIES ............................................................................ 76 
TO GO FURTHER: CONSOLIDATION OR NO CONSOLIDATION? THAT IS THE QUESTION. ............................................................ 77 
TO GO EVEN FURTHER: WHAT ARE THE RELEVANT QUESTIONS TO ASK FOR A MONETARILY SOVEREIGN GOVERNMENT? ............... 79 
CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE ..............................................................................................................................................................................84 
WHAT IS LEVERAGE? .................................................................................................................................................... 85 
WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF LEVERAGE? ..................................................................................................................... 86 
WHAT ARE THE DISADVANTAGES OF LEVERAGE? ................................................................................................................. 86 
Interest‐rate risk ................................................................................................................................................. 86 
Higher sensitivity of capital to credit and market risks ....................................................................................... 87 
Refinancing Risk and Margin Calls ...................................................................................................................... 87 
Impact On mortgage debt ................................................................................................................................................ 87 
Impact on security‐based debt: Margin call risk .............................................................................................................. 89 

EMBEDDED LEVERAGE ................................................................................................................................................... 89 
BALANCE‐SHEET LEVERAGE, SOME DATA ........................................................................................................................... 91 
THE FINANCIALIZATION OF THE ECONOMY ......................................................................................................................... 92 
CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS .......................................................................................................................... 96 
THE BALANCE SHEET OF A BANK ....................................................................................................................................... 97 
WHAT DO BANKS DO? ................................................................................................................................................. 100 
WHAT MAKES A BANK PROFITABLE? ............................................................................................................................... 100 
RISKS ON THE BANK BALANCE SHEET ............................................................................................................................... 103 
BANKING ON THE FUTURE ............................................................................................................................................ 105 
EVOLUTION OF BANKING SINCE THE 1980S ..................................................................................................................... 107 
CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION ................................................................................................................................................. 111 
EXAMPLES OF BANK REGULATIONS ................................................................................................................................. 112 
Reserve requirement ratios ............................................................................................................................... 112 
Capital adequacy ratios .................................................................................................................................... 113 
CAMELS rating .................................................................................................................................................. 114 
Underwriting requirements ............................................................................................................................... 115 
WHY ARE THERE STILL FREQUENT AND SIGNIFICANT FINANCIAL CRISES IF REGULATION IS SO TIGHT? ............................................. 115 
Deregulation, competition and concentration ............................................................................................................... 115 
Deenforcement and desupervision ................................................................................................................................ 118 
Regulatory arbitrage....................................................................................................................................................... 119 

THEORIES OF BANK CRISES AND BANKING REGULATION: TWO VIEWS ..................................................................................... 120 
Laissez faire, laissez passer: Crises as Random events ...................................................................................... 120 
Save capitalism from itself: Crises as internal contradictions ........................................................................... 122 
CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS ........................................................................................................................ 127 
MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS: CREDIT AND PAYMENT SERVICES ....................................................................................... 128 
WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE EXAMPLE ABOVE? .......................................................................................................... 132 
Point 1: The bank is not lending anything it has: when providing credit services, the bank swaps promissory 
notes with its clients ......................................................................................................................................... 132 
Point 2: The bank does not need any reserves to provide credit services ......................................................... 132 
Point 3: The bank is not using “other people’s money”: it is not a financial intermediary between savers and 
investors ............................................................................................................................................................ 133 
point 4: The bank’s promissory note is in high demand .................................................................................... 134 
HOW DOES A BANK MAKE A PROFIT? MONETARY DESTRUCTION .......................................................................................... 135 

ii 
 

INTERBANK PAYMENTS, WITHDRAWALS, RESERVE REQUIREMENTS, AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS: THE ROLE OF RESERVES
 ............................................................................................................................................................................... 138 
WHAT LIMITS THE ABILITY OF A BANK TO PROVIDE CREDIT SERVICES? .................................................................................... 140 
MOVING IN STEP ........................................................................................................................................................ 141 
LIMITS TO MONETARY CREATION BY THE CENTRAL BANK AND PRIVATE BANKS .......................................................................... 142 
TO GO FURTHER: A SIDE NOTE ON ALTERNATIVE VIEWS OF BANKING: THE MONEY MULTIPLIER THEORY AND FINANCIAL 
INTERMEDIATION. ....................................................................................................................................................... 142 
CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM ................................................................................... 147 
THE REAL EXCHANGE ECONOMY .................................................................................................................................... 148 
Money supply is a veil ....................................................................................................................................... 148 
Finance and the economy ................................................................................................................................. 149 
Conclusions ....................................................................................................................................................... 151 
THE MONETARY PRODUCTION ECONOMY ........................................................................................................................ 152 
Money is everything .......................................................................................................................................... 152 
Why monetary incentives matter? And what are other implications? ............................................................. 153 
Finance and the economy ................................................................................................................................. 154 
Beyond incentives: the role of macroeconomic forces ...................................................................................... 155 
Conclusions ....................................................................................................................................................... 157 
CONCLUSION ............................................................................................................................................................. 157 
CHAPTER 12: INFLATION ......................................................................................................................................................................... 160 
THE QUANTITY THEORY OF MONEY: MONETARY VIEW OF INFLATION ..................................................................................... 161 
INCOME DISTRIBUTION AND INFLATION: A NON‐MONETARY VIEW OF INFLATION ..................................................................... 164 
TO GO FURTHER: KALECKI EQUATION OF PROFIT, INTEREST RATE AND INFLATION ................................................................ 168 
CHAPTER 13: BALANCE-SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY ....................................................... 171 
A PRIMER ON CONSOLIDATION ...................................................................................................................................... 172 
THE THREE SECTORS OF THE ECONOMY ........................................................................................................................... 173 
SOME IMPORTANT IMPLICATIONS .................................................................................................................................. 175 
point 1: The beginning of the economic process requires that someone goes into debt. ................................. 175 
point 2: Not all sectors can record a surplus at the same time ......................................................................... 176 
point 3: Public debt and domestic private net wealth ...................................................................................... 180 
point 4: Business cycle and sectoral balances ................................................................................................... 182 
CONCLUSION ............................................................................................................................................................. 184 
TO GO FURTHER: SECTOR BALANCES FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE NATIONAL INCOME AND PRODUCT ACCOUNTS ................. 184 
TO GO EVEN FURTHER: NIPA AND FA DEFINITIONS OF SAVING ...................................................................................... 185 
CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES......................................................................................................................................................... 190 
DEBT DEFLATION ........................................................................................................................................................ 191 
Step 1: Overindebtedness and distress sales ..................................................................................................... 192 
Step 2: Distress sales and deflation, the “Dollar Disease” ................................................................................ 192 
Step 3: Deflation and debt liquidation; the “Debt Disease” .............................................................................. 192 
Step 4: Prices and profit and net worth, the “Profit Disease” ........................................................................... 193 
Step 5: the “Amplifier effect” ............................................................................................................................ 194 
Step 6: Pessimism .............................................................................................................................................. 194 
Step 7: Interest‐rate spread .............................................................................................................................. 195 
Conclusion ......................................................................................................................................................... 196 
ORIGINS OF DEBT DEFLATION ........................................................................................................................................ 197 
Real exchange economy: Efficient markets and imperfections ......................................................................... 197 
Monetary production economy: The financial instability hypothesis ............................................................... 198 
Financial fragility ............................................................................................................................................................ 199 

iii 
 

The Financial instability hypothesis ................................................................................................................................ 200 

HOW TO DEAL WITH FINANCIAL CRISES ............................................................................................................................ 202 
TO GO FURTHER: PONZI FINANCE AND THE BALANCE SHEET ............................................................................................ 203 
TO GO EVEN FURTHER: MINSKY AND INCOME VS. CASH INFLOW .................................................................................... 204 
CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS ................................................................................................................................................... 207 
FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS ............................................................................................................................................. 208 
A SPECIFIC FINANCIAL INSTRUMENT: MONETARY INSTRUMENTS ........................................................................................... 209 
AT WHAT PRICE SHOULD A FINANCIAL INSTRUMENT CIRCULATE AMONG BEARERS? .................................................................. 210 
FAIR VALUE AND PURCHASING POWER ............................................................................................................................ 212 
ACCEPTANCE OF MONETARY INSTRUMENTS ..................................................................................................................... 214 
TRUST AND MONETARY SYSTEM: TRUST IN THE ISSUER VS. SOCIETAL TRUST ............................................................................ 216 
WHY ARE MONETARY INSTRUMENTS USED? THE MONETARY FUNCTIONS ............................................................................... 218 
CHAPTER 16: FAQS ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS ...................................................................................................................... 222 
Q1: CAN A COMMODITY BE A MONETARY INSTRUMENT? OR, DOES MONEY GROW ON TREES? .................................................. 223 
Q2: CAN A MONETARY INSTRUMENT BECOME A COMMODITY? ........................................................................................... 224 
Q3: IS MONEY WHAT MONEY DOES? .............................................................................................................................. 225 
Q4: ARE CONTEMPORARY GOVERNMENT MONETARY INSTRUMENTS IRREDEEMABLE? OR, IS THE FAIR VALUE OF CONTEMPORARY 
GOVERNMENT MONETARY INSTRUMENTS ZERO? ............................................................................................................... 227 
Q5: IS MONETARY LOGIC CIRCULAR? .............................................................................................................................. 228 
Q6: DO ISSUERS OF MONETARY INSTRUMENTS PROMISE A STABLE PURCHASING POWER? ......................................................... 228 
Q7: ARE MONETARY INSTRUMENTS NECESSARILY FINANCIAL IN NATURE? .............................................................................. 229 
Q8: ARE CREDIT CARDS MONETARY INSTRUMENTS? WHAT ABOUT PIZZA COUPONS? WHAT ABOUT PRETEND‐PLAY BANKNOTES AND 
COINS? WHAT ABOUT BITCOINS? .................................................................................................................................. 229 
Q9: WHAT WERE SOME ERRORS MADE IN PAST MONETARY SYSTEMS? .................................................................................. 230 
Q10: DO LEGAL TENDER LAWS DEFINE MONETARY INSTRUMENTS? WHAT ABOUT FIXED PRICE? ................................................. 232 
Q11: IS IT UP TO PEOPLE TO DECIDE WHAT A MONETARY INSTRUMENT IS? WHO DECIDES WHEN SOMETHING IS DEMONETIZED? ...... 232 
Q12: CAN ANYBODY CREATE A MONETARY INSTRUMENT? .................................................................................................. 232 
CHAPTER 17: HISTORY OF MONETARY SYSTEMS ....................................................................................................................... 235 
MASSACHUSETTS BAY COLONIES: ANCHORING OF EXPECTATIONS AND INAPPROPRIATE REFLUX MECHANISM ................................. 236 
MEDIEVAL GOLD COINS: FRAUD, DEBASEMENT, CRYING OUT, AND MARKET VALUE OF PRECIOUS METAL ...................................... 237 
TOBACCO LEAFS IN THE AMERICAN COLONIES: LEGAL TENDER LAWS AND SCARCITY OF MONETARY INSTRUMENTS .......................... 239 
SOMALIAN SHILLING: THE DOWNFALL OF THE ISSUER AND CONTINUED CIRCULATION OF ITS MONETARY INSTRUMENT ..................... 240 
GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................................................. 242 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR ................................................................................................................................................... 248 

 
 

iv 
 

 

PREFACE 
This text is the preliminary draft for a textbook that is the result of an extensive revision of posts published 
on  the  blog  neweconomicperspectives.org.  Why  write  a  new  money  and  banking  text  when  there  are 
already so many available? There are three main reasons. First, texts usually do not have a coherent theme 
that  runs  through  them  and  that  ties  together  all  the  chapters.  Second,  the  monetary  and  banking 
chapters usually leave a lot to be desired because they present outdated views or are too limited in their 
presentation of the topic. Three, the macroeconomic sections usually do not use what was presented in 
the previous chapters, leave aside important debates in academia, and only briefly deal with balance sheet 
interrelationships to analyze macroeconomic issues. This preliminary text deals with these three issues.  
Throughout the text, the concept of balance sheet is central and used to analyze all the topics presented. 
Not only are balance sheets relevant to understand financial mechanics, but also they force an inquirer to 
fit a logical argument into double‐entry accounting rules. This is crucial because if that cannot be done 
there is an error in the logical argument. 
The monetary and banking aspects and their relation to the macroeconomy are analyzed extensively in 
this text by relying on the literature that has been available for decades in non‐mainstream journals, but 
that has been mostly ignored until recently. Gone is the money multiplier theory, gone in the financial 
intermediary theory of banks, gone is the idea that central bank control monetary aggregates, gone is the 
idea that finance is neutral in any range of time, and gone is the idea that nominal values are irrelevant. 
Preoccupations about monetary gains, solvency and liquidity are central to the dynamics of capitalism, 
and finance is not constrained by the amount of saving.  
The chapters dealing with monetary systems are also much more developed than a typical textbook. As 
such, the “money” chapter, usually first in M&B texts, only comes much later in the form of three chapters, 
once balance‐sheet mechanics and financial concepts, such as present value, have been well understood. 
In addition, the link between macroeconomic topics and banking theory is fully established to analyze 
issue of inflation, economic growth, financial crisis, and financial interlinkages.  
Of course, all this is still work in progress. There are many chapters missing for a full text and some of the 
chapters will need to be rewritten to account for comments by my students and others. Below is a list of 
missing Chapters that will be added between January and June 2017 (some of this is already included in 
the book but is underdeveloped): 
1. Overview  of  the  financial  system  (how  financial  companies  differ  because  of  different  balance 
sheets) 
2. Financial state of different macroeconomic sectors, flow of funds analysis (who is a net creditor? 
Etc.) 
3. Federal Reserve System institutional analysis 
4. Interest rate and interest rate structure 
5. Pricing of securities  
6. Securitization 
7. Derivatives 
8. Monetary policy in action (issues surrounding interest‐rate rules, transmission channels, etc.) 

 

9. International monetary arrangements and exchange rates 
10. Modeling  (theory  of  the  circuit,  including  the  money  supply  in  models,  stock‐flow  coherency, 
portfolio constraints, capital gains, using models, etc.) 
In the second draft, the first five Chapters above will be Chapters 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 respectively; Chapter 1 
will still be about balance sheet mechanics and will be expanded. The Chapter 2 in the text below will be 
included in Chapter 3 above. Securitization and derivative will be included after studying banks in details 
(i.e. after Chapter 10 below). International arrangement will come toward the end of the book. 
In order to use this preliminary edition, it is recommended that institutional analysis be done first by the 
instructor. Any text will do for that purpose but the lecturer can emphasize how the structure of balance 
sheets differs between financial companies in order to explain what each financial company does.  
I wish to thank all the readers of the posts that form the basis of this preliminary text. Their comments 
were very helpful to improve clarity of the text and correct some mistakes. Many thanks to Stavros N. 
Karageorgis for carefully reading and editing the draft. 
 

vi 
 

 

CHAPTER 1: 
After reading this chapter you should understand: 
What a balance sheet is 
Why a balance sheet changes 
How a balance sheet changes 
 

CHAPTER 1: BALANCE‐SHEET MECHANICS 
The U.S. financial system is extremely complicated. Figure 1.1 provides an overview of that system 
that consists of three main categories; financial markets, financial companies and regulatory and 
supervisory institutions. While most parts of that system will be at least mentioned in this draft, 
the draft focuses mostly on the Federal Reserve System and depository institutions.  
International Financial Markets (Foreign Exchange Markets, Eurocurrencies, Eurobonds, Foreign Bonds)
Capital Markets: Securities with a maturity superior to one year
(Stocks, Bonds, Asset-Backed Securities)
Financial Markets

Money Markets: Securities with a maturity of one year or less
(BAs, CDs, CPs, Federal funds loans, RPs, bills)

Primary Market
Organized Exchanges
Secondary Market
OTC Markets

Insurance Markets (Forwards, Futures, Options, Swaps)
Organized Exchanges (CBOT, CBOE, NASDAQ, NYSE)
Financial-Market Companies
Security Firms (Investment Banks, Brokerage Firms)
Commercial Banks
Depository Institutions
Thrift Institutions (Credit Unions, Savings Banks, Savings and Loan Associations)
Financial Sector

Financial Companies
Financial Investment Companies (Hedge Funds, Pension Funds, Mutual Funds, Real Estate Investment Trusts)
Insurance Companies (Life Insurance Companies, Property and Casualty Insurance Companies, Monolines)
Finance Companies (Business Finance Companies, Consumer Finance Companies, Sales Finance Companies, SPEs)
Government Financial Agencies

Government-Sponsored Enterprises (FAMC, FCS, FHLBS, FHMLC, FNMA,
SLMA)
Government Loan Guarantee Programs and Government Loan Programs (ExIm Bank, FHA, FCA, GNMA, SBA, VA, DLP)
Federal Reserve System (Fedwire, Discount Window, Open Market Trading
Desk)

Private: National Associations (SIFMA, FINRA, NBA, NFA), Organized Exchanges, Clearing Systems (OC
Corp., CHIPS), Credit-Rating Agencies
Regulatory and Supervisory Institutions
Government: Department of Housing and Urban Development (FHFA), Department of Labor, Department of
Treasury (OCC, OTS), Independent Federal Agencies (CFTC, FCA, FDIC, Federal Reserve Board, Reserve
Banks, Fedwire, FTC, NCUA, SEC, CFPB), Interfederal agencies (FFIEC, FSOC), State Banking and
Insurance Commissioners
CBOE: Chicago Board Options Exchange, CBOT: Chicago Board of Trade, CFPB: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, CFTC: Commodity Futures Trading Commission, DLP: Direct Loan Program,
Ex-Im Bank: Export-Import Bank, FAMC: Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (“Farmer Mac”), FCA: Farm Credit Administration, FCS: Farm Credit System, FDIC: Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation, FFIEC: Federal Financial Institution Examination Council, CHIPS: Clearing House Interbank Payment System, FHA: Federal Housing Administration, FHFA: Federal Housing Finance
Agency, FHLBS: Federal Home Loan Banks System, FHMLC: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”), FNMA: Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), FSA: Farm
Service Agency, FSOC: Financial Stability Oversight Council, FTC: Federal Trade Commission, GNMA: Government National Mortgage Association (“Ginnie Mae”), FINRA: Financial Industry
Regulatory Authority, NASDAQ: National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System, NBA: National Bankers Association, NCUA: National Credit Union Administration, NFA:
National Futures Association, NYSE: New York Stock Exchange, OC Corp.: Option Clearing Corporation, OCC: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, OTC: Over-the-Counter, OTS: Office of
Thrift Supervision, SBA: Small Business Administration, SEC: Securities and Exchange Commission, SIFMA: Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, SLMA: Student Loan Marketing
Association (“Sallie Mae”), SPE: Special Purpose Entity, VA: Department of Veteran Affairs.

Figure 1.1. The U.S. financial sector 
The  core  of  the  financial  system  consists  of  financial  documents  and  among  them  are  balance 
sheets. Balance sheets provide the foundation upon which most of an M&B course can be taught: 
monetary creation by banks and the central bank, nature of money, financial crises, securitization, 
financial  interdependencies,  you  name  it,  it  has  to  do  with  one  or  several  balance  sheet(s).  As 
Hyman P. Minsky used to note, if you cannot put your reasoning in terms of a balance sheet there 
is a problem in your logic.  

WHAT IS A BALANCE SHEET? 
It is an accounting document that records what an economic unit owns (its “assets”) and owes (its 
“liabilities”). The difference between its assets and liabilities is called net worth, or equity, or capital 
(Figure 1.2).  


 

CHAPTER 1: BALANCE‐SHEET MECHANICS 

Figure 1.2 A balance sheet 

 

There are many different ways to classify assets and liabilities. For our purposes, a balance sheet 
can be detailed a bit according to Figure 1.3. Financial assets are claims on other economic units; 
non‐financial assets (aka real assets) may be reduced to physical things (cars, buildings, machines, 
pens,  desks,  inventories,  etc.)  but  may  also  include  intangible  things  (goodwill  among  others). 
Demand liabilities are liabilities that are due at the request of creditors (cash can be withdrawn 
from bank accounts at will by account holders); contingent liabilities are due when a specific event 
occurs (life insurance payments to a widow); dated liabilities are due at specific periods of time 
(interest and principal mortgage payments are due every month).  

Figure 1.3 A simple balance sheet 

 

Balance sheets can be constructed for any economic unit. That unit can be a person, a firm, a sector 
of the economy, a country, anybody or anything with assets and liabilities. Table 1.1 shows the 
balance sheet of all U.S. households (and non‐profit organizations) in the United States. In 2014, 
U.S. households owned $98.3 trillion worth of assets and owed $14.2 trillion worth of liabilities, 
making net worth equal to $84.1 trillion (98.3 – 14.2). Households held $29.2 trillion of non‐financial 
assets and $69.1 trillion of financial assets. Their two main liabilities were mortgages ($9.4 trillion) 
and consumer credit (credit card debts, student debts, healthcare debts, etc.) ($3.3 trillion). 


 

CHAPTER 1: BALANCE‐SHEET MECHANICS 

Table 1.1 Balance sheet of households and NPOs. 
Source: Financial Accounts of the United States 

 

BALANCE SHEET RULES 
A balance sheet follows double‐entry accounting rules so a balance sheet must always balance, that 
is, the following must always be true: 
Assets = Liabilities + Net Worth 
The practical, and central, implication is that a change in one item on the balance sheet must be 
offset by at least one change somewhere else so that a balance sheet stays balanced. 

 

CHAPTER 1: BALANCE‐SHEET MECHANICS 
Start with a very simple balance sheet. The only asset is a house worth $100k that was purchased 
by putting down 20k and asking for $80k from a bank (Figure 1.4). 

Figure 1.4 A simple balance sheet 

 

What is the impact of a bank forgiving $40k of principal on the mortgage? The value of mortgage 
went down by 40k and the value of net worth went up by 40k so that the accounting equality is 
preserved (Figure 1.5) 

 
Figure 1.5 Effect of forgiving some of the mortgage principal 
Going back to the first balance sheet, what is the impact of the value of the house going up by $20k? 
The asset value went up by $20k and the net worth went up by $20 and here again the accounting 
equality is preserved. (Figure 1.6). 

 
Figure 1.6 Effect of higher house price 
Sometimes, to get to the point more quickly and to highlight the changes, economists prefer to use 
so‐called “T‐accounts” (because the shape of the table looks like a T) that record only the changes 
in the balance sheet (Δ means “change in”). The offsetting accounting entry is shown more clearly. 
It comes from opposite changes in two items on the right side of the balance sheet (Figure 1.7), and 
a change in asset and net worth by the same amount (Figure 1.8). Of course, these are not the only 

 

CHAPTER 1: BALANCE‐SHEET MECHANICS 
two ways the offsetting is done to preserve the accounting equality. We will encounter other cases 
as we move forward. The point is that one must change at least two things in a balance sheet to 
make  sure  that  the  equality  A  =  L  +  NW  is  preserved.  One  must  always  ask:  what  is  (are)  the 
offsetting entry change(s)? This has practical implications when studying how banks and central 
bank operate. 
Household 
ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Mortgage: ‐$40 
Net worth: +$40 
 
Figure 1.7 T‐account that records the decline of the mortgage principal 
ΔAssets 
 

 
Household 
ΔAssets
ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
House: +$20  
Net worth: +$20 
 
Figure 1.8 T‐account that records the higher house value 

CHANGES IN THE BALANCE SHEET 
One can classify factors that change a balance sheet in four categories: 

Cash inflows and outflows: net cash flow. 

Purchases and sales of assets, issuance and repayment of debts: Net acquisition of assets 
and liabilities. 

Incomes and expenses: net income. 

Capital gains and capital losses: net change in the market value of assets and liabilities. 

The  last  three  categories  are  recorded  more  carefully  in  other  accounting  documents  than  the 
balance sheet, but this section focuses on their relation to the balance sheet. 

NET CASH FLOW 
Cash inflows and cash outflows lead to a change in the outstanding value of monetary balances 
held by an economic unit, that is, a change in the quantity of physical currency or funds in a bank 
account held on the asset side. Some assets lead to cash inflows while some liabilities and capital 
(dividend payments) lead to cash outflows. 
If the cash inflows are greater than the cash outflows, monetary assets held by an economic unit 
go up. The economic unit can use them to buy assets or pledge them to leverage its balance sheet 
(see Chapter 7). If net cash flow is negative, then monetary‐asset holdings fall and the economic 
unit may have to go further into debt to pay some of its expenses (Figure 1.9).  


 

CHAPTER 1: BALANCE‐SHEET MECHANICS 

 

Figure 1.9 Balance sheet and cash flow 

Going back to the balance sheet of Figure 1.4, assume that a salary of $40k is earned and that part 
of the salary is used to service a 30‐year fixed‐rate 10 % mortgage. Assuming linear repayment of 
principal to simplify (actual mortgage servicing is calculated differently), Figure 1.10 shows what 
the cash flow structure looks like. 

Figure 1.10 Balance sheet and cash flows, an example 

 

The balance sheet at the beginning of the following year is shown in Figure 1.11 (assuming all cash 
flows involve actual cash transfer instead of electronic payments). Quite a few things have changed 
in the balance sheet. There is a net inflow of cash of $29.3k, the principal of the mortgage fell by 
the amount of principal repaid, and the change in net worth accounts for these two changes. 
 


 

CHAPTER 1: BALANCE‐SHEET MECHANICS 

 
Figure 1.11 Balance sheet after the cash‐flow impacts 

NET ADDITION TO ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 
Net cash flow records the net addition of monetary balances but there are many other assets on 
the balance sheets. Overtime, assets loss value via depreciation, or destruction, or repayment of 
principal; some assets are sold while others assets are purchased. The net change in the monetary 
value of assets (acquisitions minus loss of value and sales) impacts the balance sheet. Depreciation 
is counted as an expense and so impacts net income. Similarly, liabilities on the balance sheet are 
progressively repaid (principal repayment) or reduced in other ways, while new liabilities are issued 
by  an  economic  unit.  The  net  issuance  of  liabilities  (new  liabilities  –  principal  reductions)  also 
impacts the balance sheet of their issuers. They also impact the balance sheet of the creditors given 
that the liabilities of someone are the financial assets of someone else. 
Current net worth = Previous net worth + Net addition to assets and liabilities of the period  
Figures  1.4  shows  the  impact  of  acquiring  non‐financial  assets  (the  house)  and  incurring  new 
liabilities (the mortgage). Figure 1.5 shows the impact of a decline in the principal amount of the 
mortgage. 

NET INCOME 
Net income leads to a change in net worth: 
Current net worth = Previous net worth + Net addition to assets and liabilities of the period + 
Net income of the period 
Net income can be positive or negative so net worth may rise or fall depending on what the value 
of net income is. In the previous example (Figures 1.10 and 1.11), net cash flow and net income are 
the  same  thing;  however,  not  all  incomes  necessarily  lead  to  cash  inflows  (see  Chapter  4  and 
Chapter 10).  There is a debate about  whether one should record capital  gains and losses in the 
income statement. For the purpose of this section, the two are clearly separated. 

NET CAPITAL GAIN 
The value of assets and liabilities change merely because of changes in their market prices even 
though  their  quantities  has  not  changed  (no  net  addition).  If  accounting  is  done  on  a  “mark‐to‐

 

CHAPTER 1: BALANCE‐SHEET MECHANICS 
market” basis, i.e. by valuing balance‐sheet items on the basis of their current market value, these 
changes are accounted in the balance sheet. Some assets see their prices go up (capital gains) while 
other see their prices go down (capital losses) and the difference between capital gains and capital 
losses (net capital gains) affects the net worth accordingly: 
Current net worth = Previous net worth + Net addition to assets and liabilities of the period + 
Net income of the period + Net acquisition of assets and liabilities of the period + Net capital 
gains of the period 
The example of Figure 1.3 is a simple illustration of the impact of capital gains.  
The  effect  of  a  change  in  the  market  prices  of  assets  and  liabilities  may  not  be  recorded  in  the 
balance sheet if  they are  valued on a  cost basis. For financial assets, there are three options to 
record their value. Level 1‐valuation uses the available market price. Level‐2 valuation, for assets 
that do not have an active market, uses a proxy market as a point of reference. Level‐3 valuation, 
also called mark‐to‐model (or more cynically “mark‐to‐myth”), uses an in‐house model to give a 
dollar value to the asset. During the 2008 crisis, major financial institutions argued that the market 
prices of some assets did not reflect their true value because of a panic in markets. The Securities 
and Exchange Commission allowed them to move to level‐2 or level‐3 valuation to avoid recording 
capital losses on their assets. Many analysts have been critical of that decision and considered it to 
be a convenient way to hide major losses of net worth by financial institutions. 
Summary of Major Points 
1‐ A balance sheet is one of the important financial documents used to record the financial state of 
an economic unit 
2‐ Assets represent what is owned and liabilities represent what is owed by an economic unit 
3‐  Net  worth  or  capital  or  equity  is  the  difference  between  the  monetary  value  of  assets  and 
liabilities 
4‐ A balance sheet must balance, i.e. at all time the following must be true: Assets = Liabilities + Net 
Worth  
5‐ A balance sheet follows double‐entry accounting rules: a change somewhere leads to at least 
one offsetting change somewhere else to ensure that the balance sheet stays balanced. 
 
Keywords 
Balance  sheet,  non‐financial  assets,  financial  assets,  demand  liability,  time  liability,  contingent
liability, net worth, capital, net income, net cash flow, net capital gain, net acquisition of assets and 
liabilities, level‐1 valuation, level‐2 valuation, level‐3 valuation 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: What does a balance sheet do? 
Q2: If the value of assets goes up and the value of liabilities goes down, what happens to net worth?
Q3: If the value of assets and liabilities changes by the same amount, what happens to net worth?
Q4: If outstanding assets depreciate faster than the acquisition of new assets, what happens to the 
value of assets? To the value of net worth? 
Q5: If an economic unit takes on new debt faster than it repays outstanding principal, what happens
to the level of liabilities? Of net worth? 
 

 

 

CHAPTER 2: 

After reading this Chapter you should understand: 
What the main components of a central‐bank balance sheet are 
How a central bank provides reserves 
That a central bank does not rely on taxpayers 
That a central bank does not lend reserves 
That a central bank does not use any domestic monetary instruments 
That a central bank does not earn any cash flow in the domestic currency 
That banks cannot buy anything with reserve balances from the public 
 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 
The  Federal  Reserve  System  (the  Fed)  is  a  typical  central  bank.  It  provides  the  currency  of  the 
nation, it is the depository and fiscal agent of the Treasury, it provides advances of funds to banks, 
and it intervenes in financial markets. In order to understand how all this is done, it is important to 
understand the balance sheet of the Fed. This Chapter applies the insights of Chapter 1 to study the 
balance sheet mechanics of the Fed. 

BALANCE SHEET OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
Table  2.1  shows  the  actual  balance  sheet  of  the  Federal  Reserve  System.  It  sums  the  assets, 
liabilities, and capital of all twelve Federal Reserve banks and consolidates them (i.e. removes what 
Fed banks owe to each other). The main asset is Treasury securities that amounted to about $718 
billion in January 2005.  

Table 2.1 Actual balance sheet of the Federal Reserve System 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H.4.1) 

 

The  main  liability  is  outstanding  Federal  Reserve  notes  (FRNs)  issued—that  is,  held  outside  the 
twelve Federal Reserve banks’ vaults—that amounted to $718 billion in January 2005. This line in 
the balance sheet includes all FRNs issued regardless who owns them. A distant second liability was 
reserve balances (“deposits of depository institutions”) that amounted to $31 billion.  

11 
 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 
Capital consists mostly of the annual net income of the Fed (“surplus” line) and the shares that 
banks must buy when becoming members of the Federal Reserve System (the “capital paid in” line). 
These shares are not tradable, cannot be pledged (banks cannot use them as collateral and they 
cannot  be  discounted),  do  not  provide  a  voting  right  to  banks,  and  pay  an  annual  dividend 
representing 6% of net income of the Fed.  
Any left‐over net income is transferred to the U.S. Treasury and the Secretary of the Treasury can 
use the funds only for two purposes: to increase Treasury’s gold stock or to reduce outstanding 
amount of Treasuries.1 
For analytical purposes, it is best to rearrange the balance sheet of the Fed according to Figure 2.1. 
Through this book, a lot will be done with L1, L2 and L3 as well as A1 and A2 because they are all 
central to the understanding of domestic monetary policy operations. In addition, L1 only contains 
the  FRNs  held  by  banks,  the  domestic  public  and  foreigners.  Indeed,  for  analytical  purposes, 
economists like to measure the outstanding value of FRNs in circulation, that is, FRNs held outside 
the vaults of private banks (“vault cash”), of the Federal Reserve banks, and of the U.S. Treasury. 
FRNs held by the Treasury are included in L3, FRNs held by the Federal Reserve banks are included 
nowhere (they have not been issued so they are not a liability yet). 
Assets 
A1: Securities 
A2: Domestic private banks’ 
promissory notes  
A3: Foreign‐denominated assets 
A4: Coins and Treasury currency 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
L1: Federal Reserve notes in 
circulation  and vault cash 
L2: Reserve balances (Checking 
account due to banks)  
L3: Treasury’s account and Federal 
Reserve notes held by Treasury 

A5: Other assets (buildings, furniture, 
L4: Accounts due to foreigners and 
etc.) 
others 
L5: Other liabilities (including equity 
capital) 

Figure 2.1 A simplified balance sheet of the Federal Reserve System 

 

FOUR IMPORTANT POINTS 
POINT 1: THE FEDERAL RESERVE NOTES ARE A LIABILITY OF THE FED. 
One immediately notes that the central bank does not own any cash or a bank account in US dollar, 
i.e. there are no domestic monetary instruments on its asset side besides a few Treasury currency 
items (United States notes, etc.) and some coins. The Fed does not use coins to spend, it acts as 
coin dealer on behalf of the Treasury,2 that is, Fed buys all new coins from the U.S. Mint at face 
value and sells them to banks at their request by debiting their reserve balances. The Fed also buys 
back coins that banks have in excess by crediting their reserve balances. Gold certificate account 
(first line under assets) are just electronic entries to record the safe keeping of some of the gold 
stock owned by the U.S. Treasury; The Fed does not own any gold.3 The Fed does own some foreign 
monetary instruments (SDR accounts, accounts at foreign central banks, foreign currency). 
12 
 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 
What the U.S. population considers to be “money,” the Federal Reserve notes (FRNs), is recorded 
as a liability on the balance sheet of the Fed. FRNs are a specific security issued by the Fed and the 
Fed owes the holders of the FRNs. Chapter 15 studies what is owed. FRNs are secured by some of 
the assets of the Federal Reserve banks, most of them are Treasuries (Figure 2.2) 

 
Figure 2.2. Level and composition of the assets pledged against the FRNs out of the Federal 
Reserve vaults, trillions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H4.1) 
Note: USTS means U.S. Treasury security, MBS means mortgage‐backed security. 

POINT 2: THE FED DOES NOT EARN ANY CASH FLOW IN USD  
When the Fed receives a net income in US dollars it does not receive any cash flow, i.e. no monetary 
asset goes up. What goes up is net worth. How does that occur? Suppose that banks request an 
advance  of  funds  of  $100  repayable  the  next  day  with  a  10%  interest.  Today  the  following  is 
recorded: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
Promissory notes of banks: +$100  

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: +$100 

The Fed just typed an entry on each side of its balance sheet, one to record the crediting of reserve 
balances and one to record the Fed is now a creditor of private banks by holding a claim on banks. 
The next day banks must pay back $100 and an additional $10. The full repayment of the principal 
leads to: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
Promissory notes of banks: ‐$100  
13 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 
What  about  the  $10  payment?  It  leads  to  an  additional  decrease  in  reserve  balances  and  the 
offsetting operation is an increase in net worth at the Fed (and a decrease in net worth at private 
banks) 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$10 
Net worth: +$10 

These two T‐accounts are normally consolidated into one: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
Promissory notes of banks: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$110 
Net worth: +$10 

Here we go! The Fed records an income gain! 
How does it transfer that to the Treasury? Easy! A Fed employee types the following on a keyboard: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Treasury’s account: +$10 
Net worth: ‐$10 

The transfer of funds between accounts is like keeping scores by changing amounts recorded on the 
liability side. Banks lost 10 points, Treasury gained 10 points. 

POINT 3: THE FED DOES NOT LEND RESERVES AND DOES NOT RELY ON 
THE TAXPAYERS 
In Table 2.1, there is a line labeled “loan” on the asset side, and one will often hear and read—even 
in Fed documents—that the Fed lends reserves to banks. In the balance sheet of Figure2.1, there is 
no “loan” but instead there is “A2: Domestic private banks’ promissory notes.”  
This  textbook  will  not  the  use  the  words  “loan,”  “lender,”  “borrower,”  “lending,”  “borrowing,” 
when analyzing banks (private or Fed) and their credit operations. Banks do not lend money—they 
are not money lenders—and customers do not borrow money from banks. Words like “advance,” 
“creditor,” “debtor,” are more appropriate words to describe what goes on in banking operations.  
The word “lend” (and so “borrow”) is really a misnomer that has the potential of confusing—and 
actually  does  confuse—people  about  what  banks  do.  “Lending”  means  giving  up  an  asset 
temporarily: “I lend you my car for a few days” is represented as follows in terms of a balance sheet: 
Dr. T 
ΔAssets 
Car: ‐$100 
Claim on borrower of car: +$100  

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

Alternatively, if someone goes to see a loan shark for his gambling habits and borrows $1000 cash, 
then the balance sheet of the loan shark changes as follows 

14 
 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 
Loan shark 
ΔAssets 
Cash: ‐$1000 
Claim on gambler: +$1000  

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

The  loan  shark  loses  cash  temporarily—he  does  lend  cash—and  if  the  gambler  does  not  repay 
quickly with hefty interest, the loan shark comes with a baseball bat and breaks his legs (or worse!).  
“To lend” is really not a proper verb to explain what the Fed does because reserve balances and 
FRNs are not assets of the Fed, they are its liabilities. As shown in point 2, when the Fed provides 
reserve balances to banks, the Fed gives to banks its own promissory note (reserve balances) and 
banks  give  to  the  Fed  their  own  promissory  notes.  What  the  Fed  does  is  to  swap/exchange 
promissory notes with banks. This is one way for banks to obtain reserves balances. Chapter 4 and 
Chapter 10 explain why banks are so interested in the Fed’s promissory note and how they obtain 
reserves. Figure 2.3 shows what the banks’ promissory note looks like. 

 
Figure 2.3 Template of the promissory note issued by banks to the Discount Window 
Source: Federal Reserve Bank Services (Operating circular No. 10) 

15 
 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 
In this legal document (and others attached to it), a bank recognizes that it is indebted to the Fed 
because the Fed provided an advance of funds, that is, credited the bank’s reserve balance. Now 
the bank promises to comply with the terms of the contract that details time table for repayment, 
interest, collateral requirements, covenants, what happens in case of default, etc. The Fed keeps a 
copy of this document in its vault; it is an asset for the Fed (A2 in Figure 2.1) because the bank made 
a legal promise to the Fed. The Fed can force the bank to comply with the demands of the promise. 
The main point is that, when the Fed provides funds to banks, the Fed does not give up something 
it first had to acquire. The Fed does not use “tax payers’ money” (or anybody else’s money) as we 
often heard during the 2008 financial crisis when large emergency advances had to be provided to 
many  financial  institutions.  When  the  Fed  provides/advances  funds  to  banks,  it  just  credits  the 
accounts of banks by keystroking amounts. Chapter 10 shows that the same logic applies to private 
banks. 

POINT  4:  BANKS  CANNOT  DO  ANYTHING  WITH  RESERVE  BALANCES 
UNLESS THEY ARE DEALING WITH OTHER FED ACCOUNT HOLDERS 
One may also note that nobody in the U.S. population has a bank account at the Federal Reserve. 
Only domestic banks, foreign central banks, and other specific institutions (such as the International 
Monetary Fund and some government‐sponsored enterprises) have an account at the Fed.4 When 
banks use their accounts at the Fed to make or to receive a payment, the only other institutions 
that can receive the funds (or make a payment to banks) are those that also hold an account at the 
Fed. Banks cannot use their reserve balances to buy something from an economic unit that does 
not have an account at the Fed because funds cannot be transferred. Similarly, you and I cannot 
make electronic payments to a person who does not hold a bank account.  
This is what happens when banks spend $100 from their reserve balances: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 

This  T‐account  is  incomplete  because  it  lacks  the  offsetting  accounting  entry.  What  are  the 
possibilities? Below are three of them: 
1‐ Banks ask for FRNs: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
FRNs: +$100 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 

2‐ Banks settle taxes (theirs or that of the US population): 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 
Treasury’s account: +$100 

3‐ Banks participate in an offering of securities by a government‐sponsored enterprise: 

16 
 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 
GSEs’ account: +$100 

You may think of other ways to transfer $100 worth of funds on the liability side of the Fed. Once 
again, the Fed is basically keeping scores by transferring funds among account holders and keeping 
a tab.  
The  main  point  is  that  banks  cannot  buy  anything  with  reserve  balances  from  anyone  in  the 
domestic economy except from each other and other Fed account holders. Banks as a whole cannot 
use reserve balances to acquire any security issued by the private sector or any goods and services 
(one bank could use its reserve balance to buy such things from another bank). More reserves do 
not provide banks more purchasing power in the domestic economy to buy existing bonds, stocks, 
houses, etc.  
If banks wanted buy something from someone in the domestic economy with Fed currency, they 
would have to get more vault cash first (case 1 above). Chapter 10 shows that banks do not operate 
that way to make payments. Nor do banks lend cash (they are not the loan shark of point 2). 

CAN THE FED BE INSOLVENT OR ILLIQUID? 
No. The Fed cannot “run out of dollars” because it is the issuer of the dollar. The Fed could have a 
negative net worth and still be able to operate normally and meet all its creditors’ demands. 
The main role of net worth in a private balance sheet is to protect the creditors (the holders of the 
liabilities).  Think  of  the  house  example  in  Chapter  1.  The  house  was  funded  by  $80k  of  funds 
obtained from a bank and $20k down. If the mortgagor defaults, the bank can foreclose and sell 
the house. With a net worth of 20k, the home price can fall by 20% before the bank is unable to 
recover the funds advanced to the mortgagor. If the down‐payment had been 0% (mortgage was 
$100k), when the bank forecloses it does not have any financial buffer against a fall in house price. 
For  the  Fed,  this  is  financially  irrelevant,  although  politically  it  may  raise  some  eyebrows  in 
Congress. It can meet all payments due denominated in USD at any time, no matter how big they 
are. 

17 
 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 

Summary of Major Points 
1‐ The main liability of the Federal Reserve System is the cash we have in our wallet, Federal Reserve
notes. 
2‐ The main asset of the Federal Reserve System is Treasury securities. 
3‐ Lending means temporarily giving up an asset; as such the Federal Reserve System does not lend 
reserves because reserves are its liability. 
4‐ To credit the account of its account holders, the Federal Reserve System swaps promissory notes
with them.  
5‐  To  obtain  an  advance  from  the  Fed,  private  banks  must  provide  collateral  to  back  their 
promissory note. 
6‐ Paying interest to the Fed increases its net worth and debits the Fed accounts of whomever is 
paying the interest. There is no cash flow gain, i.e. no increase in monetary balances on the asset 
side of the Fed’s balance sheet. 
7‐ Banks can only transfer funds in/out of their Fed accounts from/to other Fed account holders, in
the same way you and I can only transfer funds from our checking account to another checking 
account. As such private banks cannot buy anything with their reserve balances from the public. 
8‐ The Federal Reserve System issues the U.S. currency so it cannot run out of U.S. currency and
can pay any debt it owes denominated in the U.S. dollar. 
 
Keywords 
Currency in circulation, Federal Reserve note, reserve balance, loan, lending, advance, swapping. 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: Do the Federal Reserve banks own any domestic monetary instruments?  
Q2: Do the Federal Reserve banks use coins to buy assets? 
Q3: Why do the Federal Reserve banks not lend reserves? 
Q4: Why is it not possible for private banks to buy things from the public by using their reserve 
balances? 
Q5: What can private banks buy with their reserve balances? 
Q6:  When  private  banks  pay  an  interest  to  the  Federal  Reserve  banks,  how  do  Federal  Reserve
banks record this income gain? Is there any gain of cash flow? 
Q7: Why is it not possible for the Federal Reserve System to be insolvent? 
 
Suggested Readings 
Check  the  “General  Information” 
https://www.frbdiscountwindow.org/  

tag 

of 

the 

Discount 

Window 

website: 

Check “About the Fed” here: http://www.federalreserve.gov/aboutthefed/default.htm  
Check  the  website  of  the  Board  of  Governors  of  the  Federal  Reserve  System,  especially  the
following:  http://www.federalreserve.gov/monetarypolicy/bst_fedsbalancesheet.htm.  Table  5 
contains an interactive section about the balance sheet of the Fed. 
 

18 
 

CHAPTER 2: CENTRAL‐BANK BALANCE SHEET: MECHANICS AND IMPLICATIONS 

Database Exploration 
How to retrieve time series data about the balance sheet of the Fed?  
Step 1: Go to Series H.4.1: http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h41/ 
Step 2: Click on “PDF” and look for Table 5. Use it as a reference point to select data. 
Step 3: Click on “Data download program.” 
Step 4: Select option A “Build your package.” 
Step 5: In “2. Category” select “Assets” and “Liabilities and Capital.” 

Step  6:  Continue  with  the  subcategories  and  components.  You  can  select  more  or  less  details
relative to Table 5.  
Step 7: Continue with other miscellaneous selections (frequency, time frame, etc.) and download.
Tip: Always download “total assets” and “total liabilities” so you can sum all the components of
each category and make sure they equal the total. If not, you forgot a component. 
 
                                                            
1 For detail see Section 7 of Federal Reserve Act. 
2

 See  Current  FAQs:  “What  is  the  role  of  the  Federal  Reserve  with  respect  to  banknotes  and  coins?”  at 
http://www.federalreserve.gov/faqs/currency_12626.htm 
3  See  Current  FAQs:  “Does  the  Federal  Reserve  own  or  hold  gold?”  at  http://www.federalreserve.gov/faqs/does‐the‐
federal‐reserve‐own‐or‐hold‐gold.htm 
4 A  recent  working  paper  released  by  the  Bank of  England  proposes  to  expand the  access  to  accounts  at  the  Bank  of 
England to the general population. Staff Working Paper No. 605, “The macroeconomics of central bank issued digital 
currencies” by John Barrdear and Michael Kumhof. 

19 
 

 

CHAPTER 3:

After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What reserves and monetary base are 
What the most common means to obtain reserves for banks are 
How the composition of reserves has changed over time 
How  reserves  and  monetary  base  are  injected  into,  and  removed  from,  the 
economy 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
The  previous  Chapter  explained  how  the  balance  sheet  of  the  Fed  works.  The  current  Chapter 
begins to study the details of how the Fed operates in the economy in terms of monetary policy. To 
understand what the Fed does, it is first necessary to define the monetary base and see how it 
relates to the Fed’s balance sheet. The Chapter quickly looks at the difference between monetary 
base and money supply, and also looks more carefully at what reserves are.  

THE MONETARY BASE AND THE MONEY SUPPLY 
The monetary base (aka “high‐powered money”) is defined as: 
Monetary Base = Reserve balances + vault cash + currency in circulation 
In  its  widest  meaning,  “in  circulation”  refers  to  any  monetary  instrument  not  held  by  its  issuer; 
Federal  Reserve  Notes  (FRNs)  outside  the  Federal  Reserve  banks  and  any  Treasury‐issued  cash 
outside the Treasury. Economists prefer to use a narrower definition. Currency in circulation is any 
currency outside vaults of private banks (“vault cash”), of the Treasury, and of the Fed—what is 
held by “the public.”  

 
Figure 3.1 Monetary base, billions of dollars 
Sources: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (H3 and H6 series)  
Technically, cash means currency and coins. The Fed and Treasury use the word “currency” to mean 
paper money only. Currency in circulation includes mostly FRNs, but also some Treasury currency 
(United States notes, silver certificates) and national bank notes (issued prior to the creation of the 
Fed in 1913) that the Treasury still agrees to take at face value at any time.1 The distinction between 
coins and currency is mostly statistical and does not have any analytical power. Chapter 15 shows 
that  the  material  of  which  something  is  made  is  irrelevant  to  determine  if  it  is  a  monetary 
instrument. This book uses the word cash and currency interchangeably. 
To simplify, the U.S. monetary base can be reduced to (see Figure 2.1 for meanings of L1 and L2): 
21 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
Monetary base = L1 + L2 
That is, the monetary base is the sum of reserve balances and FRNs held by entities other than the 
Fed and the Treasury.  
Until recently, currency in circulation was the largest component of the monetary base and it grew 
steadily to almost $1.4 trillion today, most of which are FRNs,2 and between one‐half and two‐thirds 
of the value of currency in circulation is held abroad.3 The global financial crisis led a large increase 
in reserve balances from about $24 billion on average from January 1959 to August 2008 to about 
$2.5 trillion today (Figure 3.1). 

Figure 3.2 Money supply (M1 aggregate), billions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H.6) 

 

The  monetary base is not the same thing as the money supply.  Money supply means monetary 
instruments held by non‐bank economic units and outside the Treasury and other official foreign 
institutions. There are several ways to measure that, and monetary aggregate M1 is the narrowest 
(Figure 3.2): 
M1 = Currency in circulation + Private‐bank checking accounts of non‐banks, non‐federal, non‐
official foreign economic units + others 
M1  relates  to  the  Fed’s  balance  sheet  only  via  part  of  L1.  Since  1959,  FRNs  in  circulation  has 
represented a growing proportion of the monetary base (Figure 3.2). From 20% in the 1960s to 30% 
in the early 1990s. The 1990s recorded a rapid growth in the share of FRNs in circulation that peaked 
at 56% of the monetary base in 2007 and has been around 40% to 50% since the late 1990s. The 
proportion of demand accounts represented about 80% of the monetary base in the 1960s, but this 
share  fell  quickly  and  almost  continuously  following  the  emergence  of  alternatives  to  demand 
accounts. The share of demand accounts in the monetary base reached 20% of the monetary base 
right before the 2008 financial crisis. Since the crisis, the share of demand accounts has increased 
sharply to reach 40% of the monetary base. Traveler’s checks have always been an insignificant 
22 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
component  of  the  money  supply.  For  reasons  related  to  monetary  policy  detailed  in  Chapter  5 
(Question 1), the growth rate of M1 increased in 2009. 
It is important to make a distinction between the money supply and the monetary base because 
the central bank has no direct influence on the money supply. The Fed does not deal with the public 
directly,  private  banks  do.  Even  for  FRNs,  private  banks  are  in  charge  of  injecting  FRNs  into  the 
economy, and they do so only if customers want to withdraw cash. In a 2010 interview4 Chairman 
Bernanke noted regarding the announced purchase of $600 billion of Treasuries (aka “quantitative 
easing”): 
One myth that's out there is that what we're doing is printing money. We're not 
printing money. The amount of currency in circulation is not changing. The money 
supply is not changing in any significant way. 
Translated  in  the  terms  of  what  was  presented  above,  Bernanke  states  that  L2  has  gone  up 
dramatically but that M1 has not changed. The Fed did not issue FRNs to the public (L1 did not 
increase), it just credited the accounts of banks by buying Treasuries from them and, as Chapter 2 
shows, banks cannot do much with reserve balances.  
One should note that the Treasury’s account at the Fed (L3) and its accounts at private banks (called 
Treasury Tax and Loans accounts (TT&Ls)) are not part of the monetary base or the money supply. 
They are “funds.” The outstanding value of the Treasury’s accounts is not counted in any definition 
of the monetary base or the money supply.  

RESERVES:  REQUIRED,  EXCESS,  FREE,  BORROWED,  NON‐
BORROWED 
Within  the  monetary  base,  reserves  are  central  to  monetary‐policy  operations  so  this  section 
studies a bit more carefully the reserve‐side of the monetary base. Total quantity of reserves is: 
Total reserves = Reserves balances + applied vault cash = L2 + part of L1 
Applied vault cash are the FRNs that banks decide to use to calculate the quantity of reserves they 
report to the Fed (the rest of vault cash is called “surplus vault cash”). From the 1990s and until the 
Great Recession, applied vault cash had represented the majority of total reserves and peaked to 
about  80%  of  total  reserves.  Since  August  2008,  reserves  balances  have  been,  by  far,  the  main 
component of total reserves (Figure 3.3).  
It  is  possible  for  reserve  balances  (L2)  to  be  negative,  that  is,  the  Fed  allows  banks  to  have  an 
overdraft; however, the Fed expects that banks close any overdraft at the end of each day. If a bank 
cannot  do  so,  the  Fed  charges  a  very  high  interest  rate  because  the  overdraft  is  a  form  of 
uncollateralized advance, contrary to Discount Window advances. If the overdraft persists, the Fed 
may take a closer look at how the bank runs its business. 
 

23 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 

 
Figure 3.3 Decomposition of total reserves in terms of forms, billions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H.3) 
Total reserves can be decomposed into other categories than those based on the form reserves 
take. One may also be interested in knowing how banks obtained their reserves. The Fed is the 
monopoly supplier of reserves and there are two ways for the Fed to provide reserves: 
-

Discount Window operations: advances funds by swapping promissory notes with banks 
(see Chapter 2): “borrowed reserves” 

-

Open‐market operations: Fed buys some financial assets from banks either permanently 
(“outright  purchases”)  or  temporarily  (“repurchase  agreements”):  “non‐borrowed 
reserves” 
Total reserves = borrowed reserves + non‐borrowed reserves 

Non‐borrowed reserves have been the main source of reserves for banks (Figure 3.4) because the 
Fed  discourages  the  use  of  the  Discount  Window  (interest  rate  is  higher  and  Fed  may  increase 
supervision if a bank comes to the Window too often). The stigma of going to the Window is so 
strong that, during the 2008 crisis, the Fed had to change its Discount Window procedures to entice 
banks that desperately needed reserves to come. 
Non‐borrowed reserves was negative  during most of 2008 and peaked at about ‐$330  billion in 
October 2008 just about at the same time as borrowed reserves reached their peak value (Figure 
3.5). Non‐borrowed reserves is measured by total reserves minus borrowed reserves. Borrowed 
reserves is measured by A2 in Figure 2.1. For reasons related to monetary developments discussed 
in Chapter 4, total reserves became smaller than A2 during the 2008 financial crisis. The central 
bank provided a lot of advances but removes most of the reserve injection that resulted from the 
advance. 
 

24 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 

 
Figure 3.4 Decomposition of total reserves in terms of sources, billions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H.3) 
 

 
Figure 3.5. Borrowed and non‐borrowed reserves during the 2008 financial crisis 
Sources: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H.3) 
Finally, the total quantity of reserves can be decomposed in terms of the reasons why banks hold 
reserves.  Banks  in  the  United  States  must  have  a  certain  proportion  of  reserves  relative  to  the 
outstanding value of the bank accounts they issued: 
25 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
-

Required  reserves:  The  quantity  of  reserves  banks  must  hold  in  proportion  of  the  bank 
accounts they issued. 

-

Excess  reserves:  whatever  quantity  of  reserves  that  banks  have  in  excess  of  required 
reserves. 
Total reserves = Required reserves + excess reserves 

Up until the 2008 crisis, banks held reserves mostly because they had to do so (Figure 3.6). Excess 
reserves was virtually zero (Chapter 4 explains why). Up until the crisis, the quantity of reserves was 
also relatively stable over decades and averaged $40 billion (Figure 3.7).  
One may sometimes encounter the word “free reserves,” which just means the difference between 
excess reserves and borrowed reserves. Throughout this series, the most important categorization 
will be the last one: excess versus required reserves. 

 
Figure 3.6 Decomposition of total reserves in terms of uses, billions of dollars  
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H.3) 
 
 

26 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 

 
Figure 3.7 Decomposition of total reserves in terms of uses until august 2008, billions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H.3) 

HOW DOES THE MONETARY BASE CHANGE? 
The monetary base goes up or down depending on what happens to the other items in the balance 
sheet of the Fed. Following the point that balance sheets must balance we have (using Figure 2.1): 
L1 + L2 = A1 + A2 + A3 + A4 + A5 – L3 – L4 – L5 
So monetary base will be injected when:  

-

27 
 

The Fed buys something (i.e. acquires an asset) from banks or the public 
-

Higher A1: Buying securities (T‐bills, T‐bonds, etc.)  

-

Higher A2: Advances of Federal Funds  

-

Higher A3: Buying foreign currency from private banks 

-

Higher A5: Buying a pizza, a building, or a service from someone 

The other Fed account holders spend in the US economy and when the Fed pays dividends 
to banks 
-

Lower L3: Treasury spends 

-

Lower  L4:  US  exports,  government‐sponsored  enterprises  buy  mortgages  from 
banks 

-

Lower L5: Fed pays dividends to member banks 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
Monetary base is reduced when the opposite transactions occur. Buying coins from the Treasury 
does not change the monetary base because L3 goes up by the same amount as A4; it is an intra‐
federal government transaction. Let us go through two examples: 
Case 1: The Federal Reserve buys T‐Bills worth $100 from banks 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
ΔA1: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
ΔL2: +$100 

 
Banks 
ΔAssets 
T‐bills: ‐$100 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

You have just witnessed the creation of monetary base: The central bank credits the account of 
banks by typing “100” on the keyboard of a computer. The Fed could also have printed bank notes 
(ΔL1 = +$100) but purchases from banks are done electronically because of convenience. 
Case 2: Dr. T pays his income taxes worth $1000. 
Assume that Dr. T still mails his income‐tax paperwork with a check payable to the United States 
Treasury. The Treasury receives the check and brings it to the Fed. To simplify, the following ignores 
Treasury’s tax and loan accounts (TT&Ls) because that just complicates the analysis without adding 
any insights at this point (see Chapter 6). The Fed sends the check to the bank of Dr. T. and so the 
bank debits the bank account of Dr. T by $1000.  
Bank of Dr. T. 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of Dr. T.: ‐$1000 

What is the offsetting operation on the bank’s balance sheet? The $1000 have to go to the Treasury. 
Given that we assumed that the Treasury only has an account at the Fed we know that the offsetting 
operation cannot be (it would be if TT&Ls had been included): 
Bank of Dr. T. 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of Dr. T.: ‐$1000 
TT&Ls: +$1000 

The  Treasury  only  has  an  account  at  the  Fed  so  the  following  will  occur  when  the  $1000  are 
transferred (which would be the second step if TT&Ls were included in the analysis): 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Treasury’s account: +$1000 

But that again begs the question: What is the offsetting accounting entry on the balance sheet of 
the Fed? It cannot be “Account of Dr. T: ‐$1000” because Dr. T does not have an account at the Fed.  
The answer is that when the Fed receives the check, it has a claim on Dr. T.’s bank. The bank settles 
that claim by giving up reserves and the funds are transferred into the account of the Treasury. 

28 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
Interbank claims (claims among private banks, and between the Fed and private banks) are always 
settled with transfers of reserves. 
Bank of Dr. T. 
ΔAssets 
Reserve balances: ‐$1000 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of Dr. T.: ‐$1000 

 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$1000 
Treasury’s account: +$1000 

You  have  just  witnessed  the  destruction  of  monetary‐base:  taxes  destroy  monetary  base.  The 
central  bank  deleted  $1000  in  the  reserve  balance  and  keystroked  $1000  in  the  account  of  the 
Treasury.  
Of course, if the Treasury spends then reserve balances are credited, and if Treasury spends more 
than its taxes then there is a net injection of reserves: fiscal deficits (government spending larger 
than taxes) lead to a net injection of reserves. Keep that in mind for Chapter 4. 
As a side note, one may note that Dr. T’s balance sheet changes as follows when taxes are paid: 
Dr. T. 
ΔAssets 
Account of Dr. T.: ‐$1000 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Net worth: ‐$1000 

An alternative accounting would be if Dr. T had owed a known dollar amount of taxes for a while, 
i.e. if the Treasury held some tax receivables against Dr. T. In that case, instead of net worth, it 
would be tax receivables that would go down by $1000. 

CAN  THE  FED  ISSUE  AN  INFINITE  QUANTITY  OF  MONETARY 
BASE? 
Yes, it technically can because the monetary base is composed of liabilities of the Fed. In practice 
though,  the  Fed’s  ability  to  inject  reserves  is  constrained  by  the  operational  requirements  of 
monetary policy. Chapter 4 shows that if the central bank issues reserves regardless of the needs 
of banks, it is not be able to achieve a specific policy interest rate it sets for itself unless it changes 
its operational procedures. 
At the origins of the Fed, some constraints were also put on the types of securities that the Fed 
could buy or that banks could pledge as collateral with their promissory notes to get an advance 
from the Discount Window. There was a fear that the Fed would over issue monetary base given 
its broad monetary power. Here is the language of the preamble of the 1913 Fed Act states:  
To  provide  for  the  establishment  of  Federal  reserve  banks,  to  furnish  an  elastic 
currency, to afford means of rediscounting commercial paper, to establish a more 
effective supervision of banking in the United States, and for other purposes. 
“Elastic currency” just means that the Fed is able to add and remove monetary base at the will of 
banks and the public, that is, in response to the needs of the economy. However, until 1932, the 
29 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
Fed operated under the Real Bills Doctrine (RBD). What that meant was that the Fed ought to only 
accept securities that “self liquidate” in A1 and as collateral for A2 (see Figure 2.1). Self‐liquidating 
securities  are  those  that  are  issued  and  destroyed  in  relation  to  economic  activity.  Firms  issue 
securities to produce goods and services (see Chapter 10) and repay them when firms sell their 
production.  The  idea  was  that  by  tying  monetary‐base  creation  to  the  financing  of  economic 
activities, the Fed would avoid inflationary tendencies that could come from an elastic currency. 
Monetary base (and so money supply as the thought of the time—erroneously—went) would grow 
in‐sync with production. 
In practice, RBD never worked out well for both theoretical and practical reasons. WWI led to a 
large holdings of Treasuries by the Fed. The Great Depression led to the elimination of the doctrine, 
and  the  1932  Banking  Act  widened  dramatically  the  types  of  securities  the  Fed  could  accept  if 
needed (Table 3.1).  

 
Table 3.1 Holdings of securities by the Fed, 1915‐1950 
Source: Marshall’s Origins of the Use of Treasury Debt in Open Market Operations: Lessons for 
the Present  
One  of  the  problems  of  RBD  is  that  it  relied  on  private  indebtedness  (issuances  of  securities  by 
companies  to  finance  production,  “real  bills”)  for  monetary  policy  to  work.  During  a  recession, 
banks  did  not  have  enough  real  bills  to  sell  or  pledge  to  the  Fed  because  economic  activity  is 
moribund so private issuance plunges. This is problematic because the scarcity of real bills limited 
the ability of banks to obtain reserves, just at the time when banks desperately needed additional 
reserves  to  counter  bank  runs  (people  running  to  banks  to  ask  for  cash)  and  make  interbank 
payments. 
More recently, Dodd‐Frank Act of 2010 amended the Federal Reserve Act to constrain the capacity 
of  the  Fed  to  use  “emergency  powers,”  that  is,  its  ability  to  accept  any  type  of  securities  from 
anybody.  This  was  a  reaction  to  the  advances  provided  to  AIG;  AIG  was  not  part  of  the  Federal 
30 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
Reserve System. It was also a reaction to the opaqueness of the Discount Window operations during 
the crisis and how questionable some of the transactions were. 
The Fed needs to be able to fight panics and the ensuing liquidity crisis when everybody (including 
every banks) is trying to get their hands on the currency. This is, indeed, why the Fed was created. 
It can only do so by being able to buy, or accept as collateral, a wide verity of securities.  
This leads us to a final important point. Given that the Fed provides a safety valve in the financial 
system, this safety may lead to moral hazard. Financial‐market participants may take more risks 
knowing that, if things go south, the Fed will intervene to avoid a collapse of the financial system. 
As a consequence the Fed must do two things: 
-

The Fed should also have ample regulatory and supervisory powers, and it should use them. 
That is what the last bit of the preamble is all about.  

-

The Fed should discourage moral hazard and promote safe banking practices by accepting 
only securities that are of quality (that is based on sound underwriting and not in default) 
and from solvent institutions: The Fed exists to squash banking liquidity crises (temporary 
inability  to  access  funds),  not  to  keep  insolvent  banks  alive  (permanent  inability  to  pay 
creditors). 

Unfortunately, these two conditions have not been met recently and moral hazard has increased 
dramatically.  
The alternative is Andrew Mellon’s advice to Hoover: “liquidate labor, liquidate stocks, liquidate 
farmers, and liquidate real estate…it will purge the rottenness out of the system.” However, the 
cleansing properties of market mechanisms do not work properly, especially so in times of financial 
crisis and panic (see Chapter 14). 
Summary of Major Points 
1‐ Banks hold reserves mostly because they are required to do so. 
2‐ The Fed provides reserves to banks mostly by buying short‐term Treasuries from them, either 
temporarily or permanently. 
3‐ Currently, the Fed is able to provide as many reserves as needed by banks. 
4‐ Until 1932, the Fed was limited in its ability to provide reserves to banks because of constraints
on the type of assets it could buy or take as collateral from them. 
 
Keywords 
Total reserves, required reserves, excess reserves, free reserves, borrowed reserves, non‐borrowed 
reserves, reserve balances, vault cash, overdraft, applied vault cash, surplus vault cash, Real Bills
Doctrine, elastic currency 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: When a bank borrows reserves from another bank is that classified as borrowed reserves? 
Q2: Is all vault cash part of total reserves? 
Q3: Are excess reserves those that are not wanted by banks? 
Q4: What is the impact of a fiscal deficit on the monetary base? 
Q5: When the Fed sells Treasuries to banks, what happens to the monetary base?  
Q6: What are the two types of operations that the Fed uses to provide reserves to banks? 
31 
 

CHAPTER 3: MONETARY BASE, RESERVES AND CENTRAL BANK BALANCE SHEET 
 
                                                            
1  See  the  following  link  for  an  explanation  of  the  role  of  the  Fed  in  terms  of  coins  and  notes: 
http://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/coin_about.htm 
2 See http://www.federalreserve.gov/faqs/currency_12773.htm 
3
Board  of  Governors  of  the  Federal  Reserve  System,  Currency  and  coins  services: 
http://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/coin_about.htm 
4 See the following 2010 interview with 60 minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxSv2rnBGA8 

32 
 

 

CHAPTER 4: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What monetary policy is all about 
Why monetary policy is done 
How the Federal Reserve implements monetary policy 
How monetary policy operations changed following the Great Recession 
How monetary policy can be conceptually analyzed 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
Chapter 2 examined the balance sheet of the Fed and Chapter 3 provided important information 
about the meaning of reserves and other basic concepts and their relation to the balance sheet of 
the Fed. This Chapter examines how a central bank implements monetary policy. 

WHAT  DOES  THE  FED  DO  IN  TERMS  OF  MONETARY  POLICY 
AND WHY? 
While the details of operating procedures have changed through time, the federal funds rate (FFR) 
has  progressively  gained  in  importance  as  a  relevant  operating  tool  (that  is,  as  a  means  to 
implement  monetary  policy)  since  the  1920s.  The  FFR  is  the  yearly  rate  of  interest  at  which 
participants in the federal funds market lend and borrow federal funds (“fed funds” for short) to 
each  other  overnight.  For  example,  if  the  FFR  is  at  3%  it  means  that  if  a  bank  borrowed  $100 
continuously for a year at that rate it would have to pay a $3 of interest. The equivalent daily rate 
is 0.0081% so if a bank borrows $100 in the evening, it has to repay the $100 plus $0.0081 of interest 
payment the next morning. While that does not seem much, when tens of billions of dollars are 
involved daily even such small interest rate can bring substantial income to the lender of fed funds.1 
Fed funds are the dollar value of the accounts at the Federal Reserve (L2, L3, and L4 in the balance 
sheet presented in Figure 2.1). Holders of these accounts include private banks, the U.S. Treasury, 
government‐sponsored  enterprises,  the  International  Monetary  Fund,  securities  firms,  among 
others. Some of these account holders need more funds (usually banks)2 while others usually have 
more than needed. The fed funds market3 allows these participants to meet and make deals.  

 
Figure 4.1 Daily average of FFR (grey line) and FFR target (black line), percent 
Source: Federal Reserve Bank of New York. 
The Fed is highly interested in the FFR and aims at targeting that rate, that is, the Fed wants to make 
sure that the FFR prevailing in the market does not deviate too much from the FFR desired by the 
34 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
Fed (the FFR target) (Figure 4.1). Most of the time the Fed targets a specific number but sometimes 
it targets a range. This is the case today with a range of 0.25‐0.5%. From the late 1970s until 1991, 
the Fed also had a range that was as high as 16%‐22% in mid‐1981 and as wide as 13%‐20% in early 
1980 (Figure 4.2). Since 1994, the FFR target has been public information as the Fed has committed 
to be more transparent. 
The Fed is highly interested in this interest rate for two main reasons. First, the FFR is a cost for 
banks so if the cost changes, the interest rates they charge to customers change. Second, market 
participants make portfolio choices (that is, buy or sell assets) with the aim of maximizing the rate 
of return on assets. They compare portfolio strategies and choose those that provide the highest 
yield. While making these portfolio choices, financial‐market participants take into account future 
monetary policy (that is, future FFR targets), which ends up impacting the current interest rate of a 
wide range of securities.   
Regarding the cost side of FFR, banks need reserves for four purposes (see Chapter 10 for further 
explanation): 

Cash withdrawals by customers: people get cash from banks. 

Reserve requirements: banks must keep a certain quantity of reserves that is a proportion 
of the dollar amount in the bank accounts they issued. 

Interbank debt settlements: paying debts due to other banks. 

Payments to other Fed account holders: for example tax payments leads to a drainage of 
reserves. 

Figure 4.2 Monthly FFR average and target FFR range, 1979‐1990, percent 
Source: Transcripts of the FOMC meetings 
Note: After 1990, the FOMC targeted a FFR digit 
 
35 
 

 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
By far, the largest day‐to‐day need for reserves is interbank settlements because banks that do not 
have enough reserves to make the necessary payments must get reserves to avoid default. They 
may get them either from other banks or other fed funds holders, or may go to the Fed. In any case, 
banks have to pay interest and the FFR is what banks pay to get reserves through the fed funds 
market (“non‐borrowed reserves”). This cost is then routinely passed on to their customers so that 
when the FFR rises, rates on mortgages, advances to students, credit cards, etc. also go up (see 
prime bank rate in Figure 4.3). 
In terms of portfolio choices, say that in 2016 you have $1000 and you want to figure out a way to 
make the highest gains over the next two years. Say only two portfolio strategies are available. A 
“long‐term strategy” is to buy and hold for two years a 2‐year security that pays 5%. A “short‐term 
strategy” is to buy a 1‐year security that pays 3% and to reinvest the proceeds in 2017 into another 
1‐year security. Your choice between the two strategies should depend on what you expect the 1‐
year rate to be in 2017. You are indifferent between the two strategies if they provide the same 
rate of return, which means that you expect a 1‐year yield of about 7% in 2017 (solve $1000*(1.05)2 
= $1000*1.03*(1+x) where x is the expected one‐year rate in 2017). If you expect the 1‐year rate to 
be  higher  than  7%,  the  short‐term  strategy  is  more  profitable.  In  that  case,  financial‐market 
participants will sell outstanding 2‐year securities and buy 1‐year securities, which raises the 2‐year 
rate  and  lowers  the  1‐year  rate  until  the  two  strategies  provide  the  same  rate  of  return.  For 
example, if the expected 1‐year rate is 8%, then if the 2‐year rate goes up to 5.2% the 1‐year rate 
is  2.5%.  Generalizing  the  logic,  a  rising  FFR  (similar  to  1‐year  rate  going  up)  raises  the  rates  on 
longer‐term securities. Long‐term rates depend on expectations about future monetary policy and 
if FFR is expected to rise (fall), long‐term rates will rise (fall). 
There  is  a  very  high  correlation  between  the  FFR  and  all  other  interest  rates.  The  correlation  is 
about 0.99 for short‐term securities and about 0.8 for long‐term securities like T‐bonds (Figure 4.3). 
Beyond expectations about future FFR, the interest rate on securities, especially of longer terms to 
maturity, is also influenced by inflation risk, tax risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, among others, which 
makes the link between FFR and longer‐term securities less strong. 
By influencing all interest rates, the Fed hopes to influence the willingness of the private sector to 
spend on goods and services; the ultimate goal being to influence inflation and employment. For 
example, if the Fed thinks that inflationary pressures are building up, the reasoning goes at follows: 
Higher expected inflation by the Fed leads to a higher FFR target, which raises the FFR, which raises 
other  rates,  which  discourages  private  economic  units  from  seeking  external  funds  and  raises 
thriftiness, which slows down spending on goods and services, which lowers inflation (see Chapter 
12). There are a lot of steps between FFR and inflation/employment, and one may doubt it works 
well, but that is the logic behind the intervention of the Fed in the fed funds market.  
The Fed has a dual mandate, that is, its goal is to achieve both price stability (currently defined 
unofficially  as  achieving  a  2%  inflation  rate)  and  full  employment  (defined  as  being  at  an 
unemployment  rate  at  which  inflation  is  stable,  the  “NAIRU”).  Other  central  banks,  like  the 
European Central Bank, only focus on price stability. 

36 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 

 

Figure 4.3 FFR and other rates 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (series H.15) 

 

TARGETING THE FFR PRIOR TO THE 2008 FINANCIAL CRISIS 
While banks do need reserves, they also do not like to hold more reserves than they need because 
reserves did not use to pay any interest. Chapter 3 shows that, prior to the crisis, banks held very 
few reserves, and most of them were held because the Fed required it. Banks like to keep a bit of 

37 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
excess  reserves  to  avoid  the  overnight‐overdraft  penalty  rate  (Chapter  2  explains  that  reserve 
balances can be negative). 
What happens if banks cannot get enough fed funds for their needs? Banks cannot create more 
than what is available, only the Fed can. If the Fed does not add more fed funds then the FFR rises 
steeply  and  quickly  given  that  bank  must  have  the  reserves  they  need.  A  higher  FFR  does  not 
incentivize banks to demand less fed funds; their demand for reserves is inelastic and mostly non‐
discretionary. 
What happens if banks have too much fed funds? Banks cannot destroy/remove fed funds, only the 
Fed can. If the Fed does not remove enough fed funds, the FFR will fall very quickly to 0% given that 
banks do not have any other use for the excess reserve balances they have. A lower FFR does not 
give banks an incentive to supply less fed funds. 
To minimize fluctuations in the FFR and keep it around the target, the Fed intervenes daily to add 
or to remove fed funds by adding or removing reserve balances according to the needs of banks. If 
the  FFR  is  above  target  then  the  Fed  adds  reserves,  if  the  FFR  is  below  target  the  Fed  removes 
reserve balances. 
The way the Fed does this is via open‐market operations that usually involve exchanging reserves 
with T‐bills with banks (Figure 4.4): 

If FFR < FFRT, banks lend and borrow at an interest rate that is too low relative to what the 
Fed wants. To correct that the Fed sells T‐Bills to banks, which drains reserves. 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
T‐bills: ‐$100 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 

 
Banks 
ΔAssets 
T‐bills: +$100 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

If FFR > FFRT, banks lend and borrow at too high an interest rate relative to what the Fed 
wants.  Banks  have  too  few  reserves.  To  correct  that  the  Fed  buys  T‐bills  from  banks  by 
crediting their reserve balances.  
Fed 
ΔAssets 
T‐bills: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: +$100 

 
Banks 
ΔAssets 
T‐bills: ‐$100 
Reserve balances: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

The open‐market operations can be permanent (“outright purchase/sale” by the Fed) or temporary 
(“repurchase  agreement”  and  “reverse  repurchase  agreement”:  the  Fed  and  banks  agree  to 
perform the opposite transaction the following morning). For banks to agree to trade with the Fed 
instead of putting reserves in the  market—or for banks to get reserves from the Fed instead of 

38 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
borrowing from other banks—the Fed has to provide incentives. The Fed also has to make trades 
that ensure that the FFR stays around its target.  
Suppose that a bank has $1000 worth of reserves that it is ready to supply in the fed funds market. 
Suppose that the FFR is currently at 3% (so a daily rate of 0.0081%), where the Fed wants it to be, 
but if the bank supplied the funds the FFR would fall to 2%. How can the Fed entice the bank not to 
dump the funds in the market? One way is to do something similar to the following: the Fed sell to 
the bank one T‐bill for $999.92 and promises to buy it back the next day for $1000. This provides a 
daily rate of return of 0.0081% to the bank.  
The Fed does something similar when banks borrow fed funds at a rate higher than what the Fed 
wants (FFR > FFRT). It buys T‐bills at a price consistent with FFRT. That forces those willing to lend 
fed funds to comply with the FFRT; otherwise, no bank will borrow from them given that the Fed 
offers to provide reserves at a lower rate. 

Figure 4.4 Targeting the FFR: Open‐market operations 

 

The Fed could do this all day long and FFR would be on target all the time, but practically the Fed 
only intervenes once a day and accepts that the FFR fluctuates around the target. Each day, the Fed 
anticipates  the  approximate  need  for  reserves  by  estimating  how  the  items  that  change  the 
monetary base will change during the day (A1 through A5, L3, L4, and L5 of Figure 2.1).  
The Fed is  basically applying a sort of  buffer‐stock  policy on reserves in the  same way diamond 
cartels limit the supply of diamond to control diamond price (I am sorry to tell you that diamonds 
are  not  rare).  The  main  difference  between  the  Fed  and  diamond  cartels  is  that  the  Fed  has 
complete pricing power because it is the monopoly supplier of reserves. 
Beyond day‐to‐day intervention in the fed funds market to maintain a FFRT, the Fed also sometimes 
changes its FFRT. Given that the demand for reserves is almost perfectly inelastic and given how 
small the increments and decrements in the FFRT are (usually 25 basis points at a time, that is, 0.25 
percentage point), when the Fed changes its FFRT, it usually does not do anything for the target to 
be reached. If the Fed decides to lower the FFRT, it does not have to inject reserves first for the 
target to be reached. If the Fed decides to raise the FFRT, it does not have reduce the quantity of 

39 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
reserves  to  reach  the  target.  The  FFR  will  move  quickly  around  the  target  following  the 
announcement of a change.4  
Another way to understand that point is to again go back to the point that banks cannot do much 
with reserve balances, so any reserves they have in excess they will supply in the fed funds market. 
If the Fed announces it will offer reserves at a lower FFRT, banks must comply with the new FFRT 
when they offer to lend reserves, otherwise nobody will borrow from them. If the Fed announces 
it offers reserves at a higher FFRT, banks with reserves to lend also raise at which they offer to lend 
reserves. Otherwise, they forego an income opportunity because banks that need reserves have 
nowhere else to go (only the Fed can create more reserves and it will do it only at a higher FFR). It 
is “the Fed’s way or the highway.” 

A  GRAPHICAL  REPRESENTATION  OF  THE  FEDERAL  FUNDS 
MARKET 
The Fed supplies, at a cost equal to the FFR target, whatever quantity of reserves is needed (Figure 
4.5). The demand for reserves is almost perfectly insensitive to changes in FFR.5 Banks must meet 
interbank payments, tax payments, reserve requirements and withdrawals regardless of what the 
FFR is, and banks have very little incentive to ask for more reserves when rates fall because, as 
explained in Chapter 3, banks cannot do much with them. 

Figure 4.6 The federal funds market 

 

The fact that the supply of reserves is horizontal seems to suggest that the Fed supplies an infinite 
quantity of reserves. That is not the case, all that is saying is that the Fed supplies whatever banks 
demand. If banks want more reserves (demand curve shifts to the right), the Fed supplies more. If 
banks want fewer reserves, the Fed removes reserves; the currency is “elastic.” The Fed does not 
proactively add or remove reserves: 

If the Fed adds reserves without consulting banks, the FFR falls to zero. 

If the Fed removes reserves without consulting banks, the FFR rises to infinity. 

Thus, while the Fed does the injection and deletion of reserves, the Fed adds or removes only on a 
defensive basis to maintain the FFR on target. 

40 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
What monetary policy is all about is setting the price of reserves and letting the quantity of reserve 
adjust. The FFR is a policy variable that does not reflect any scarcity or abundance of reserves, or 
the preference of banks for reserves. A low FFR can prevail with very few reserves because if banks 
do not need many reserves, the Fed does not supply many at a given FFRT. A high FFR can prevail 
with a very large quantity of reserves because if banks need lots, the Fed supplies lots at a given 
FFRT. 

TARGETING FFR AFTER THE GREAT RECESSION 
As the financial crisis grew from 2007 onward, the Fed began to lower its interest rate target from 
late 2007 (Figure 4.1) and, from early 2008, to provide significant quantities of emergency funds to 
the financial system (Figure 4.6). At first, the Fed neutralized the impact of all emergency advances 
by selling Treasuries so its supply of Treasuries fell by 40% in about six months (Figure 4.6). The Fed 
provided reserves to bank X that was in difficulty, bank X paid its creditor bank Y, bank Y had excess 
reserves  available  to  lend  in  the  fed  funds  market,  Fed  drained  all  excess  reserves  by  selling 
Treasuries to bank Y. This allowed the Fed to maintain a positive FFR while also helping struggling 
financial institutions. 
In  September  2008,  the  collapse  of  Lehman  Brothers  led  to  a  panic  and  the  Fed  responded  by 
providing  large  amounts  of  emergency  advances  (A2  of  Figure  2.1  went  up  a  lot).  No  fed  funds 
market participant was willing to lend reserves to anybody; the fed funds market froze and the FFR 
became highly volatile (Figure 4.1). Emergency advances by the Discount Window led to a very large 
increase in reserve balances by almost $1 trillion by early 2009. From September 2008 until the end 
of the year, in order to keep FFR positive, the Fed did try to neutralize some of the impact of its 
massive emergency operations by working with the Treasury (Chapter 6 delves into the Treasury‐
central bank coordination). However, in order to fight the recession (and so potential deflation and 
unemployment),  the  Fed  also  rapidly  lowered  its  FFR  target,  eventually  to  reach  zero  (0‐0.25% 
range to be precise) by December 2008 (Figure 4.1).  
The Fed then wondered what it could do next to help lower interest rates further given that the 
FFR target was at 0% and given that the Fed did not intend to have a negative FFR target. Two things 
were done: 
1‐ Promise  not  to  raise  the  FFR  target  for  a  long  time  (“forward  guidance”):  this  pushed 
expectations of a rise in FFR further in the future and so lowered other interest rates.  
2‐ Outright  purchases  of  long‐term  securities  with  the  goal  of  lowering  long‐term  interest 
rates (“credit easing” followed by “quantitative easing”). By buying long‐term securities, 
the Fed raised the price of these securities which lowered their yield.  
The  Fed  bought  outright  long‐term  Treasuries  but  also  long‐term  private  securities  (Mortgage‐
backed securities guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae)6 (Figure 4.6, Table 4.1). 
It did so without neutralizing the impact on reserves so reserves balances increased rapidly beyond 
the needs of banks (see Chapter 3). As a consequence, if the Fed had continued to operate as it did 
before the crisis, the FFR would have stayed stuck at 0% for as long as there would have been a 
large quantity of excess reserves. 

41 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 

 
Figure 4.6 Assets of Fed and excess reserves (white line), trillions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (series H.4.1) 
 

Table 4.1 Maturity distribution of securities, loans, and selected other assets and liabilities, 
January 20, 2016, millions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (series H.4.1) 

 

Currently, the Fed wants to be able to raise the FFR even though banks have ample quantities of 
excess reserves. To do so, it has changed its operating procedures by paying interest on reserve 
balances (L2). This theoretically puts a floor on the FFR because if banks can earn interest on their 
Fed accounts, they do not have an incentive to lend these reserves in the fed funds market if the 
FFR goes below the interest rate on reserve balances (IOR).  
The Fed and other central banks now operate under a “corridor” framework (Figure 4.7). In theory, 
the FFR can only fluctuate between the IOR and the discount window rate (DWR). The FFR target is 
42 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
set in the middle of the corridor and the three rates (IOR, FFRT and DWR) move together. There is 
a horizontal band instead of a horizontal line. Banks have no incentive to lend reserves if FFR is 
below IOR so FFR cannot fall below that. Banks have no incentive to borrow in the fed funds market 
if the DWR is lower than FFR so FFR will not rise above the DWR. 

Figure 4.7 Interest‐rate corridor 

 

In practice, the corridor in the United States is porous. In terms of the floor, other Fed accounts do 
not qualify to receive interest so their holders have an incentive to keep lending fed funds in the 
market even if FFR is below IOR. Government‐sponsored enterprises (in L4), especially the Federal 
Home Loan Banks,7 were a major source of excess supply of fed funds. Since the end of 2015, the 
Fed  has  solved  this  problem 8  by  indirectly  paying  interest  to  other  account  holders  through  an 
auction  mechanism.  Now  the  IOR  is  a  true  floor.  In  terms  of  the  ceiling,  access  to  the  Discount 
Window  is  highly  stigmatized  and  contains  some  non‐monetary  costs  in  terms  of  increased 
supervision and loss of reputation. As a consequence, banks refrain from going to the Window even 
if DWR is inferior to FFR. The true ceiling in that case is the overnight‐overdraft penalty rate. During 
the 2008 financial crisis, the Fed dealt with this problem by providing fed funds through the Window 
via occasional auctions in which participants could bid anonymously.  
A corridor policy does not have to be implemented only in period of excess reserves. If a central 
bank wants to intervene less frequently in the overnight market, a corridor policy can be useful to 
limit the volatility of the overnight interbank rate. For example, the ECB has been operating that 
way  since  the  beginning  (Figure  4.8).  It  intervenes  in  the  market  only  once  a  week  and  lets  the 
ceiling and floor do the job of containing the overnight rate around the target overnight rate during 
the  rest  of  the  week.  Narrowing  the  gap  between  the  floor  and  the  ceiling  would  reduce  the 
volatility  of  the  overnight  rate.  The  Fed  had  been  on  a  semi‐corridor  since  2003  when  the  Fed 
decided to raise DWR above the FFRT and to move both in sync while IOR stayed at zero all the 
time. 

43 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 

Figure 4.8 Corridor of ECB 
Source: Kahn’s Monetary Policy under a Corridor Operating Framework 

 

 
Summary of Major Points 
1‐ The Federal Reserve targets the cost of reserves not the quantity of reserves. It does so by setting
the cost of providing advances (Discount Window operations) and by setting the cost at which banks
lend to, and borrow from, each other (open‐market operations). 
2‐  By  setting  directly  the  cost  of  reserves,  the  Federal  Reserve  can  indirectly  influence  all  other
interest rates. The influence is the strongest on short‐term market rates and on interest rates that 
banks charge to their customers. 
3‐ Through changes in interest rates, the Federal Reserve hopes to change spending habits and so
to influence employment and inflation. 
4‐ When the Fed changes its FFR target, it does not have to change the quantity of reserves to make
the FFR move toward the target. In order to maintain the FFR around a given FFR target, the Fed 
intervenes daily to perform open‐market operations. 
5‐ The Fed cannot supply fewer or more reserves than banks demand, otherwise it misses its FFR
target. The Fed adds or removes reserves according to the demands of banks. 
6‐ A high FFR can prevail with a large quantity of reserves and a low FFR can prevail with a small
quantity of reserves. FFR is a policy variable not a market‐determined variable. 
7‐ Quantitative easing led to a large increase in excess reserves. In order to be able to raise the FFR 
when it wants, the Fed changed its operating procedures by paying interest on reserves. Quite a
few central banks now operate under a corridor framework. 
 
Keywords 
Federal funds rate, federal funds market, Discount Window rate, interest rate on reserves, corridor 
framework,  quantitative  easing,  open‐market  operation,  outright  purchase/sale,  repurchase
agreement, discount window operations, elastic currency. 
 
44 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 

Review Questions 
Q1: If the Fed supplies more reserves than banks want, what happens to the FFR? What if supplies 
less? What will the Fed do to maintain the FFR on target? 
Q2: What does a horizontal supply of reserves means in terms of the supply of reserves and the
federal funds rate? 
Q3: How can a corridor framework help reduce the volatility of the FFR? What would happen to the
FFR if the discount rate, interest rate on reserves and FFR target were all equal? 
Q4: Why are the interest rates set by banks highly correlated with the FFR? 
Q5: Why are market rates correlated with the FFR? What happens if it is expected that the FFR will
fall? 
Q6: If the Fed had not adopted a corridor framework, what would have been the problem for future
monetary policy? 
Q7: How could a corridor fail to contain the FFR? 
Q8: What does it mean for the Fed to provide an elastic currency? 
 
Suggested readings 
“Come with me to the FOMC” by Governor Duke briefly presents what goes on during a meeting: 
https://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/speech/duke20101019a.htm 
Chapter  7  of  Meulendyke’s  U.S.  Monetary  Policy  and  Financial  Markets  is  a  detailed  version  of 
Duke’s speech, albeit a bit dated: https://research.stlouisfed.org/aggreg/meulendyke.pdf 
Kahn’s Monetary Policy under a Corridor Operating Framework provides a readable presentation of 
the corridor framework. 
More advanced readings are:  
Dow,  S.C.  (2006)  “Endogenous  money:  structuralist,”  in  P.  Arestis  and  M.C.  Sawyer  (eds)  A 
Handbook of Alternative Monetary Economics, 35‐51, Northampton: Edward Elgar. 
Fullwiler,  S.T.  (2008)  “Modern  central  bank  operations—General  principles,” 
http://www.cfeps.org/ss2008/ss08r/fulwiller/fullwiler%20modern%20cb%20operations.pdf 
Fullwiler,  S.T.  (2013)  “An  endogenous  money  perspective  on  the  post‐crisis  monetary  policy 
debate,” Review of Keynesian Economics, 1 (2): 171‐194. 
Lavoie, M. (2006) “Endogenous money: Accomodationist,” in P. Arestis and M.C. Sawyer (eds) A 
Handbook of Alternative Monetary Economics, 17‐34, Northampton: Edward Elgar. 
Lavoie,  M.  (2010)  “Changes  in  central  bank  procedures  during  the  subprime  crisis  and  their
repercussions for monetary theory,” International Journal of Political Economy 39 (3), 3‐23. 
Moore,  B.J.  (1988)  Horizontalists  and  Verticalists:  The  Macroeconomics  of  Credit  Money. 
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
Moore, B.J. (1991) “Money supply endogeneity: ‘reserve price setting’ or ‘reserve quantity setting’,”
Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, 13 (3): 404‐413. 
 

45 
 

CHAPTER 4: MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION 
                                                            
1

 Historical  data  about  the  federal  funds  market  can  be  found  at  the  Federal  Reserve  Bank  of  New  York: 
https://apps.newyorkfed.org/markets/autorates/fed‐funds‐search‐result‐page 
2 See  “Who’s  Borrowing  in  the  Fed  Funds  Market?”  by  Gara  Afonso,  Alex  Entz,  and  Eric  LeSueu  at 
http://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/12/whos‐borrowing‐in‐the‐fed‐funds‐market.html 
3  See  The  Federal  Funds  Market:  A  Study  by  a  Federal  Reserve  System  Committee  by  the  Federal  Reserve  System  at 
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/docs/meltzer/bog1959.pdf 
4 This absence of a liquidity effect has been well documented. See Fullwiler, S.T. (2003) “Timeliness and the Fed’s Daily 
Tactics.” Journal of Economic Issues 37 (4):  851‐880 
5 This graph ignores complications that comes from reserves requirements, which would flatten the demand for reserves 
at the FFRT. See Fullwiler, S.T. (2013) “An endogenous money perspective on the post‐crisis monetary policy debate” 
Review of Keynesian Economics, 1 (2): 171‐194. 
6The  Federal  National  Mortgage  Association  (Fannie  Mae)  was  a  government  agency  created  in  1938  to  improve  the 
liquidity  of  mortgages  by  acting  as  dealer  of  FHA/VA‐insured  mortgages.  Until  the  1966  credit  crunch,  Fannie  Mae 
remained a minor player in the secondary market for mortgages because it exclusively dealt in conforming mortgages. 
The crunch led Fannie Mae to enlarge its dealership to conventional mortgages and it became the largest player in the 
secondary  mortgage  market.  In  order  to  cope  with  this  new  state  of  affairs,  Fannie  Mae  was  split  in  1968  into  the 
Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae) and Fannnie Mae. Ginnie Mae took the previous role of Fannie 
Mae  and  is  focused  on  maintaining  a  secondary  market  by  providing  guarantee  on  MBSs  backed  by  FHA/VA‐insured 
mortgages. Fannie Mae was converted into a government‐sponsored enterprise by acting as a dealer of conventional 
mortgages.  Federal  Home  Loan  Mortgage  Corporation  (Freddie  Mac)  was  created  by  an  act  of  Congress  in  1970  to 
compete with FNMA in the conventional mortgage market. 
7 See “Who’s Lending in the Fed Funds Market?” by Gara Afonso, Alex Entz, and Eric LeSueur from the Federal Reserve 
Bank  of  New  York  at:  http://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/12/whos‐lending‐in‐the‐fed‐funds‐
market.html 
8
 More  details  about  the  reverse  repurchase  agreement  operations  is  available  here: 
https://www.newyorkfed.org/markets/rrp_faq.html 

46 
 

 

CHAPTER 5: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
Why  targeting  the  quantity  of  reserves  is  not  practically  possible  and  goes 
against the purpose for which the Fed was created 
Why providing an elastic supply of currency is not by itself inflationary 
How quantitative easing impacts financial markets 
What a normalization policy is 
How central banks can set negative nominal interest rate 
Why central banks want interest rates to be negative 
What the impact of negative interest rates is on the profitability of banks 
What are some potential issues with fine tuning the economy with monetary 
policy 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
Previous Chapters studied the balance sheet of the Fed, definitions and their relation to the balance 
sheet of the Fed, and monetary‐policy implementation. This Chapter answers some FAQs about 
monetary policy and central banking. Each of them can be read independently. 

Q1: DOES THE FED TARGET/CONTROL/SET THE QUANTITY OF 
RESERVES AND THE QUANTITY OF MONEY? 
The Fed does not set the quantity of reserves and does not control the money supply (M1). It sets 
the cost of reserves; that is it. 
In terms of reserves, the Fed was created to provide an “elastic currency,” i.e. to provide monetary 
base according to the needs of the economic system in normal and panic times. It would be against 
this purpose to implement monetary policy by unilaterally setting the monetary base without any 
regard for the daily needs of the economic system. 
In terms of the money supply, the Fed has no direct influence. Even Federal Reserve notes (FRNs) 
are supplied through private banks, and banks supply only if customers ask for cash. The Fed does 
not force feed FRNs to the public, i.e. FRNs cannot be “helicopter dropped” via monetary policy. If 
the Fed did this, not only would it operate against the Federal Reserve Act, but also it would lead 
people to take the FRNs, bring them to banks, banks would have more reserves, FFR would fall, Fed 
would remove excess reserves to bring FFR back up—back to square one.  
The  Fed  may  have  an  indirect  influence  on  the  money  supply  through  changes  in  its  FFR  target 
because changes in the cost of credit may change the willingness of economic units to go into debt, 
but the link is tenuous (see Q10). 
Through its policy of Quantitative Easing, the Fed may have an indirect influence in two other ways. 
First, if the Fed buys long‐term Treasuries from banks, banks usually have an incentive to replenish 
their  holdings  of  Treasuries  because  they  allow  to  meet  capital  requirements  (see  Chapter  9) 
without compromising too much profitability and liquidity. Treasuries have a low‐capital weight, 
have a liquid market, and pay interest income. Banks will buy securities from non‐bank economic 
units by crediting the bank accounts of the latter (see Chapter 10). Second, if the Fed wants to buy 
securities from non‐central‐bank account holders, the Fed works through banks and the following 
occurs: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
Securities: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: +$100 

 
Banks of sellers of securities 
ΔAssets 
ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: +$100 
Account of sellers: +$100 
 
Sellers of securities 
ΔAssets 
ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of sellers: +$100 
 
Securities: ‐$100 

48 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
The money supply goes up by $100 when “account of sellers” increases by $100 (but it does not if 
only reserve balances go up by $100). 

Q2:  DID  THE  VOLCKER  EXPERIMENT  NOT  SHOW  THAT 
TARGETING RESERVES IS POSSIBLE? 
In the 1970s, the Monetarist school of thought gained some influence in policy circles. Monetarists 
argued that there is a close relation between the quantity of reserves and the money supply, and 
that the role of a central bank is to control the quantity of reserves in order to influence the money 
supply and ultimately inflation (see the quantity theory of money in Chapter 12). The Fed, under 
the leadership of Paul Volcker, tried to implement a monetary‐policy procedure that aimed at more 
closely  targeting  reserves  and  monetary  aggregates,  with  the  hope  of  taming  a  double‐digit 
inflation rate.  
Practically,  the  Fed  changed  interest‐rate  targeting  from  a  narrow  range  to  a  wide  range  (see 
Chapter 4), which increased the level and volatility of the FFR dramatically (Figure 5.1). The Fed did 
not allow the FFR to move freely as a targeting of total reserves implies. 
There is an academic debate about how truly “Monetarist” the Volcker experiment was, and this 
debate is reflected in the FOMC discussions of the time 
MR.  ROOS.  Well,  if  the  level  of  borrowing  comes  in  higher  than  we  would 
anticipate,  [can’t]  you  reduce  the  level  of  the  nonborrowed  reserves  path 
accordingly?  Can’t  you  adjust  your  open  market  operations  for  the  unexpected 
bulge in borrowing or the unexpectedly low borrowing if you ignore the effect on 
the fed funds market? Can’t you just supply or withdraw reserves to compensate 
for what has happened? 
[…] 
CHAIRMAN VOLCKER. The Desk can’t [adjust] in the short run. It’s fixed. In a sense 
they could do it over time if people are borrowing more, as they may be now. They 
seem to be borrowing more than we would expect, given the differential from the 
discount rate. But in any particular week it is fixed. 
MR. ROOS. Do we have to supply the reserves? 
CHAIRMAN VOLCKER. We have to supply the reserves. 
MR. ROOS. [Why] do we have to supply the reserves? If we did not supply those 
reserves, we’d force the commercial banks to borrow or to buy fed funds, which 
would move the fed funds rate up. (FOMC meeting, September 1980, page 6) 
Mr. Roos was deeply dissatisfied with the Fed still using a FFR target, albeit in the form of a wide 
range. While the Fed had a total‐reserve growth target related to the 3‐month growth rate of M1, 
if banks needed more than what was targeted, the Fed would supply extra reserves in order to 
relieve pressures on the FFR. Roos argued against this lenient reserve targeting and was for a total 
abandonment of any FFR targeting and a strict targeting of total reserves. Here he is in 1981: 
I think there’s a very basic contradiction in trying to control interest rates explicitly 
or  implicitly  and  achieving  our  monetary  target  objectives.  And  I  would  express 
49 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
myself  as  favoring  the  total  elimination  of  any  specification  regarding  interest 
rates. (Roos, FOMC meeting, February 1981, page 54) 
Most Federal Open Market Committee members were against that position on the ground that the 
role of the Fed is precisely to promote an elastic monetary base. The Fed was not created to dictate 
what  the  quantity  of  reserves  ought  to  be  but  to  eliminate  liquidity  problems  through  smooth 
interbank‐debt clearing and settlement at par, lender of last resort, and interest‐rate targeting. In 
addition, banks mostly hold reserves because they are required to, so if the Fed does not supply 
enough reserves to meet the requirements then banks will break the law. 
The  experiment  was  a  monetary‐policy  failure.  The  Fed  was  never  able  to  reach  its  reserve  or 
money  targets  and  the  experiment  contributed  to  massive  financial  instability  and  a  double‐dip 
recession. One may even doubt that it contributed significantly to the fall in long‐term inflation, 
which  had  more  to  do  with  the  downward  trend  in  oil  prices,  oil‐saving  policies  and  greater 
international labor competition: 
May I remind you that we shouldn’t take too much credit for the price easing? I 
never thought we were totally at fault for the price increases that we suffered from 
OPEC and food; and I don’t think the fact that OPEC and food have calmed down 
has a great deal to do with monetary policy per se, except in the very long run. 
(Teeters, FOMC meeting, July 1981, page 46) 
The Volcker experiment was, however, a public‐relation success. Most FOMC members knew that 
reserve targeting was not possible; still, it allowed them to claim that they were not responsible for 
the high interest rates of the period: 
I do think that the monetary aggregates provided a very good political shelter for 
us  to  do  the  things  we  probably  couldn’t  have  done  otherwise.  (Teeters,  FOMC 
meeting, February 1983, page 26) 
I  think  the  important  argument,  and  really  the  reason  why  we  went  to  this 
procedure, was basically a political one. We were afraid that we could not move 
the federal funds rate as much as we really felt we ought to, unless we obfuscated 
in  some  way:  We’re  not  really  moving  the  federal  funds  rate,  we’re  targeting 
reserves and the markets have driven the funds rate up. That may have had some 
validity  at  the  time,  and  I  had  some  sympathy  for  it.  But  as  time  goes  on,  I’ve 
become more and more concerned about a procedure that really involves trying to 
fool the public and the Congress and the markets, and at times fooling ourselves in 
the process. (Black, FOMC meeting, March 1988, page 12) 
Of  course  the  high  and  volatile  FFR  was  precisely  the  result  of  the  change  in  monetary‐policy 
procedures. If needed, some FOMC members were willing to do the same thing in the future: 
Well, I have only a little to add to all of this. I think Tom Melzer is probably right: 
We’re going to need to shift the focus to some measure or measures of the money 
supply as we proceed here if we can, both for substantive reasons and also because 
that  has  some  political  advantages  as  well,  as  we  go  forward.  (Stern,  FOMC 
meeting, December 1989, page 50) 

50 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 

Figure 5.1 Average and standard deviation of the FFR 
Source: Federal Reserve Board, NY Federal Reserve Bank 

 

Q3: IS TARGETING THE FFR INFLATIONARY? 
With the failure of the Volcker experiment, the FOMC entered a period of operational uncertainty 
until the mid‐1990s. The Fed was back on a tight FFR target procedure (there was still a wide range 
until 1991 but the Fed mostly targeted the middle of the range) and this was deeply unsatisfactory 
to FOMC members.  
We’ve advanced from pragmatic monetarism to full‐blown eclecticism. (Corrigan, 
FOMC meeting, October 1985, page 33) 
No, I would say that we have a specific operational problem that we have to find a 
way of resolving. Just to be locked in on the federal funds rate is to me simplistic 
monetary  policy:  it  doesn’t  work.    (Greenspan,  FOMC  meeting,  October  1990, 
pages 55–56) 
In a world where we do not have monetary aggregates to guide us as to the thrust 
of monetary policy actions, we are kind of groping around just trying to characterize 
where the stance is. (Jordan, FOMC meeting, March 1994, page 49) 
The Fed was unwilling to disclose that it was targeting the FFR, and continued to announce targeted 
growth ranges for monetary aggregates even though it did not use them for policy purposes.  
[In  response]  to  talk  that  says  we  can  significantly  influence  this  –  or  as  the 
phraseology goes that if we lower rates, we will move M2 up into the range – I say 
“garbage.” Having said all of that, I then ask myself: ‘What should we be doing?’ 
Well, we have a statute out there. If we didn’t have the statute, I would argue that 
we ought to forget the whole thing. If it doesn’t have any policy purpose, why are 
51 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
we doing it? By law [we have] to make such forecasts. And if we are to do so, I 
suggest that we do them in a context which does us the least harm, if I may put it 
that way. (Greenspan, FOMC meeting, February 1993, page 39) 
We do not, in fact, discuss monetary policy in terms of the Ms between Humphrey‐
Hawkins meetings. Don Kohn dutifully mentions them because he thinks he ought 
to, but that is not the way we think about monetary policy. (Rivlin, FOMC meeting, 
February 1998, page 91) 
To announce to the general public that the FOMC was targeting the FFR would be going against all 
the Monetarist principles (reserve targeting, money multiplier theory, quantity theory of money). 
Targeting an interest rate, and so having an elastic supply of reserves (horizontal supply at a given 
FFRT), seemed to indicate that the Fed was no longer willing to control inflation. FOMC members 
themselves believed that was the case: 
Many analysts, both inside and outside the Fed, argued that using the Federal funds 
rate  as  the  operational  target  had  encouraged  repeated  over‐shooting  of  the 
monetary objectives. (Meulendyke 1998 49) 
Talking  about  the  FFR  target  became  a  taboo  and  “the  Committee  deliberately  avoided  explicit 
announced  federal  funds  targets  and  explicit  narrow  ranges  for  movements  in  the  funds  rate” 
(Kohn, FOMC Transcripts, March 1991, page 1): 
I must say I’m still quite reluctant to cave in, if you will, on this question that we 
can do nothing but target the federal funds rate. (Greenspan, FOMC transcripts, 
March 1991, page 2) 
As a practical matter we are on a fed funds targeting regime now. We have chosen 
not to say that to the world. I think it’s bad public relations, basically, to say that 
that is what we are doing, and I think it’s right not to; but internally we all recognize 
that that’s what we are doing. (Melzer, FOMC transcripts, March 1991, page 4) 
We  will  see  later  why  the  entire  Monetarist  logic  is  flawed.  Monetary  policy  is  always  about 
providing an elastic supply at a given interest rate. There is nothing intrinsically inflationary about 
this. Having an “elastic currency” usually just means supplying whatever quantity of reserves banks 
want, and usually banks do not want much. 
While all this was very well understood by many economists long before Volcker’s experiment (see 
for example Nicholas Kaldor),1 it took FOMC members until the mid‐1990s to get comfortable with 
FFR targeting.  

Q4: WHAT ARE OTHER TOOLS AT THE DISPOSAL OF THE FED? 
Monetary policy is always about setting at least one interest rate. While today the Fed operates 
mostly through the fed funds market, it has other tools at its disposition to help influence interest 
rates.  
One is the (re)discount rate, the rate at which banks can obtain borrowed reserves (see Chapter 3). 
This interest rate is now higher than the FFR target but from the mid‐1960s until 2003 the discount 
rate was usually below the FFR target. The Fed  decided to put the  discount rate above the FFR 
target to put a ceiling on the FFR and so limit upward volatility in FFR (see Chapter 4). 
52 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
Reserve requirement ratios can also help target the FFR. These ratios state how many total reserves 
banks must keep on their balance sheet as a proportion of the bank accounts they issued. While 
these ratios are often discussed in relation to the ability of banks to create checking accounts, their 
actual  purpose  is  once  again  to  help  target  the  FFR.  By  raising  reserve  requirement  ratios,  the 
demand for reserves becomes more predictable given that a  greater proportion of the reserves 
available must be held by banks. With a more stable demand for reserves comes less volatility in 
the FFR. 

Q5: WHAT IS THE LINK BETWEEN QE AND ASSET PRICES? 
The  link  cannot  be  one  where  banks  have  excess  reserves  that  they  use  to  buy  assets  in  the 
secondary market. Chapter 2 explains that banks cannot do this as a whole. They could buy from 
one another, but if they all have reserves they want to get rid of, this is not possible because no 
bank wants to sell assets for reserves. 
The link goes through the following channels: 
1‐ The  Fed  buys  large  quantities  of  securities  from  banks  which  raises  their  prices  and  so 
lowers their yields. 
2‐ As yields on these securities fall, economic units seek assets that provide higher yields. They 
will look for assets with large expected capital gains, especially so knowing that others are 
experiencing the same problems and are “searching for yield.” They will continue to buy 
these securities, which will raise their prices, until all rates of return are equalized once 
adjusted for risks. 
Financial companies have to do the second step because they try to reach the target rates of return 
that they promised to their stakeholders. Pensioners expect a substantial rate of return from their 
pension funds, wealthy individuals expect a substantial rate of return from hedge funds, mutual 
funds shareholders wants a substantial rate of return…and they all check every quarter if financial 
companies stay on course to meet the promised target. Long‐term Treasuries used to provide a 
safe and simple way to meet this promise; no longer so.  
Bill  Gross  (a  well‐known  portfolio  manager  who  specializes  in  bond  trading)  brought  the  point 
forward very clearly. He hopes that the Fed will raise the FFR to make it easier to reach targeted 
rates of return. He notes2 that low FFR prevents savers from earning enough to pay for healthcare, 
retirement and other costs because yields on financial assets are so low compared to the expected 
7% or 8%. If the Fed does not help by raising the FFR, financial‐market participants will take large 
risks on their asset side (speculative, high credit risk, and structured securities) and liability side 
(high leverage) to try to reach their targeted rate of return.  
There is a broad problem though. In an economy in which the growth of the standard of living is 
low, why should anyone expect that demanding 7‐8% be sustainable? Those can only be achieved 
through capital gains and leverage, and the combination of these two is highly toxic (see Chapter 9 
and Chapter 14). Instead of the Fed raising its FFR, it should be the rentiers who should reduce their 
expectations of rates of return. An economy that grows at 2% per year cannot sustainably provide 
a real rate of return higher than 2%; even that is a stretch. Other means3 must be used to meet the 
challenge of an aging economy than increasing the financialization of the economy.  

53 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 

Q6: HOW AND WHEN WILL THE LEVEL OF RESERVES GO BACK 
TO PRE‐CRISIS LEVEL? THE “NORMALIZATION” POLICY 
Normalization policy4 means the willingness of the Fed to do two things: 1‐to raise the FFR to a 
more normal level 2‐ to reduce the size of its balance sheet in order to return the proportion of 
excess reserves to pre‐crisis value. Chapter 4 shows how this would be done for the FFR. Regarding 
reserve balances, Chapter 3 shows that their dollar amount is determined as follows: 
L2 = Assets of the Fed – (L1 + L3 + L4 + L5) 
Most of L2 is now composed of excess reserves, which is unusual. A graphical representation of this 
balance‐sheet identity is Figure 5.2. 

Figure 5.2 Balance sheet of the Fed and reserve balances 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series H.4.1) 

 

The implication of this balance‐sheet identity is that reserves balances will fall either when assets 
of the Fed decline given other liabilities, or when the other liabilities of the Fed rise given assets. 
Let us look at each case in turn. 
Given liabilities other than reserves balances, reserves will not go back down until the following 
happens to the securities held by the Fed: 
1‐ Securities issued by non‐fed‐account holders mature (let us call them “private securities” to 
simplify) 
2‐ The Fed decides to sell some securities to banks. 
If the Fed let Treasuries mature the account of the Treasury (L3), not reserve balances, is debited: 
 

54 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
Treasuries: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
L3: ‐$100 

 
Treasury 
ΔAssets 
L3: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Treasuries: ‐$100 

When private securities held by the Fed, currently agency‐guaranteed MBS,5 mature the following 
occurs: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
Private securities: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 

 
Banks of issuer 
ΔAssets 
Reserve balances: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of issuer: ‐$100 

 
Issuer of private securities 
ΔAssets 
ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of issuer: ‐$100 
Private securities: ‐$100 
If all MBS held by the Fed matured at once, that would reduce reserve balances by almost $2 trillion 
(the Fed does not plan to sell most of the MBS it holds).6 
Given assets, reserve balances will go down if banks need to make payments to other Fed account 
holders  or  if  banks  convert  reserve  balances  into  cash.  For  example,  if  the  Treasury  ran  fiscal 
surpluses, reserve balances would fall as funds would move from L2 to L3. While the Fed may ask, 
and has asked, for the Treasury’s help in managing monetary policy (see Chapter 6), the Fed has 
mostly no control over what happens to liabilities that impact reserve balances.  
One may note to conclude that, besides changes in assets and liabilities, another way to reduce 
excess reserves without reducing the quantity of reserves is to raise reserve requirement ratios. As 
to when the reserves will be back to their usual level, nobody knows. The pace of decline will change 
as the economic environment change, which brings us to a final point. There is no need for the Fed 
to be proactive about normalizing its balance sheet because, with the change in monetary policy 
procedures that occurred in 2008, the Fed can target the overnight interbank rate. 

Q7: IS THERE A ZERO LOWER BOUND? 
This question is so 2013! There is no lower bound. The discount rate is the most straightforward to 
grasp  because  the  Board  of  Governor  has  perfect  control  over  the  discount  rate  and  can  set  it 
wherever it wants whenever it wants. There is no operational constraint that prevents the Board 
from setting a discount rate at ‐1%, ‐10% or even ‐100%, it just needs to announce tomorrow that 
this is what it is and that is it. 

55 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
The federal funds rate is slightly more complicated but not that much. To set a negative fed fund 
rate, the Fed just has to do overnight repos on securities at a premium. If one applies this to zero‐
coupon securities like T‐bills, the present value of a T‐bill is: 
P = FV/(1 + d)t 
P is the market price, FV is the face value, d is the discount factor, and t is time to maturity (let us 
set t = 1 to simplify). Usually, d is positive meaning that the Fed buys T‐bills at $90 and bankers 
agree to buy back the next day at $95 (d = 5%). After the 2008, one can assume that d = 0%, that is, 
if bankers want reserves from the Fed, they sell T‐bills at $90 and promise to buy them back at $90 
the next day. To set d negative, the only thing the Fed has to do is to buy at $95 and resell at $90. 
In this case the federal funds rate target will be negative 5%: 90/95 – 1. If the Fed performs enough 
of these kinds of operations, the federal funds rate will reach the ‐5% target. Remember that the 
Fed sets the price of reserves. It can set it wherever it wants: “It is the Fed’s way or the highway.” 
Which interest rate can be below zero? Any of them as long as the Fed is committed to doing so by 
buying enough of securities at a price consistent with the interest rate it wants to target.  
The interest rates used in the corridor framework (see Chapter 4) are under the total control of the 
Fed so they are easy to make negative. The Swedish central bank shows us how this is done under 
a corridor framework (Figure 5.4). The Swiss central bank shows us how it is done with a negative 
overnight interbank rate range (Figure 5.3).  

 
Figure 5.3 Target overnight rate range and daily overnight rate, Swiss National Bank, percent 
Source: Swiss National Bank 
 

56 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 

 
Figure 5.4 Corridor of the Sveriges Riksbank, percent 
Note: The “deposit rate” is the interest rate on reserve balances, the “lending rate” is the rate 
charged by the central bank for advances (the discount rate of the Fed), the “repo rate” is the 
rate at which the central bank performs open‐market operations (the targeted overnight rate). 
Of course, if a central bank has negative policy rates and is expected to continue to have negative 
rates  for  a  while,  this  enters  into  portfolio  strategies  and  pushes  longer‐term  rates  into/toward 
negative territories (Figures 5.5 and 5.6). But, the European Central Bank is going further and is 
buying  large  quantities  of  long‐term  government  bonds.  And  financial‐market  participants  took 
notice 7 and  bought  government  bonds  in  anticipation  of  the  intervention  of  the  ECB.  Financial‐
market participants are so sure the ECB will buy a lot of securities that they are willing to buy at a 
premium (so yields to maturity are negative) (Figure 5.4). They will sell to the ECB who will be the 
one taking the loss by holding to maturity.  
For example, take a 1‐year zero‐coupon government security with a face value of $1000. Normally, 
this security  will trade at  a discount, that is, economic  units will only buy it for less than  $1000 
because it does not pay any coupon. They will earn an income by keeping the security until the 
Treasury repays the $1000 at maturity. If the security is bought at $800 then the rate of return is 
$200/$800 = 25% (rate of return is what the earning you get for what you paid for it). Rates of 
return  on  Eurozone  government  1‐year  securities  are  now  negative  because  securities  sell  at  a 
premium. For example, if one has to pay $1200 on a 1‐year zero‐coupon security and gets $1000 at 
maturity, the rate of return is ‐$200/$1200 = ‐17%. Nobody will want to buy that unless one expects 
someone else to buy at, say, $1300 in upcoming days or months. The ECB is willing to do so and will 
take  a  loss  of  $300  (‐23%  rate  of  return)  when  the  securities  mature,  while  financial  market 
participants make a return of $100/$1200 = 8%. 

57 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 

Figure 5.5 Yields on government bonds 
Source: The Economist 

 

 

Figure 5.6 Yields on Swedish government securities, percent 
Source: Swedish Central Bank 

58 
 

 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 

Q8: WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF A NEGATIVE INTEREST‐RATE 
POLICY?  
It depends on which rate is concerned. A simplified bank profit is: 
Profit of banks = (ROA*other assets + IOR*R) – FFR*fed funds debt 
ROA is the return on assets held by banks (say you have a $1000 mortgage with an interest rate of 
5%, this 5% is an income for the bank equal to ROA*mortgage = 5%*$1000 = $50). IOR is interest 
on reserve balances and R is reserve balances. There are no other debts than those incurred from 
getting reserves in the fed funds market either from Fed or from other market participants than 
banks. Interest payments on interbank loans cancel out in the aggregate profit of banks, it is an 
income for one bank and an expense for another). 

Given everything else, negative FFR raises the profitability of banks because banks are paid 
to get an advance of reserves.  

Given  everything  else,  negative  IOR  lowers  the  profitability  of  banks.  This  is  especially 
significant today given how large reserve balances are. 

Banks will react to these effects in several ways in order to preserve their profitability. To counter 
a negative IOR, banks may do three things: 

Ask their customers to pay a fee on their checking accounts (either a larger one or raise the 
minimum quantity of funds in an account below which a fee is paid) 

Raise the bank prime rate (i.e. interest rate paid by the most creditworthy economic units) 
or acquire riskier assets so as to raise ROA. 

Raise leverage on the funding of assets with positive ROA. 

If the fee on bank accounts is too large, customers may ask for cash and close their accounts, but 
that is not really a problem for banks given that: 
1‐ If the FFR is negative, banks can borrow all the reserves they need and be rewarded for it. 
Today they have plenty of reserves so this effect is limited, but it also means that meeting 
cash withdrawals is easy. 
2‐ Banks  work  by  granting  advances  and  making  electronic  payments  so  some  individuals 
must have deposits. In addition, nobody can access cash (Federal Reserve notes) if one does 
not  have  an  account  in  the  first  place,  and  banks  create  these  accounts  by  providing 
advances. Advances pay interest. 
The real problem is a negative IOR in the context of a large quantity of excess reserves. It acts like 
a tax and may incentivize banks to take more risks. This effect is all the more strong given that banks 
do not need to borrow in the fed funds market so a negative FFR has a limited ability to offset the 
negative impact of a negative IOR. 
In terms of negative bond rates, the impact is that bondholders make capital gains by selling to the 
central bank (see Q7). The central bank hopes that bondholders will use some of their capital gains 
to consume and so stimulate the economy. Given how unequal wealth distribution is, the ability of 
this channel to work seems doubtful. It is a form of trickle‐down economics. 

59 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 

Q9:  HOW  DID  CENTRAL  BANKERS  JUSTIFY  USING  NEGATIVE 
INTEREST RATES AND QE? 
Here is the logic followed: 
1‐ A negative policy rate in a time of deflation (or low/zero inflation) allows us to keep the real 
interest rate low (allows us to lower the real rate). Economic units pay attention to the real 
rate  (interest  rate  less  inflation)  when  they  decide  to  go  into  debt.  If  policy  rate  goes 
negative that should incentivize economic units to go into debt.  
2‐ By buying a lot of securities from banks, banks will have a lot of excess reserves and will be 
encouraged to provide credit. And there will be a demand for credit given step 1. 
3‐ Now that QE provided banks with lots of excess reserves, banks are supposed “to lend” 
(see money multiplier theory in Chapter 10). By setting IOR negative, banks will have less 
incentive  to  cling  on  their  reserves  and  instead  will  provide  credit.  Indeed,  if  they  keep 
reserves a negative IOR would lead to losses (see Q8).  
4‐ Beyond the positive impact of bank credit, negative policy rates and quantitative easing 
also help push down other rates, which promotes capital gains by securities holders and so 
consumption. 
There are several issues but the three main ones are: 
1‐ The ability of banks to grant credit is unrelated to the quantity of excess reserves they have. 
Chapter  4  shows  that  banks  cannot  do  much  with  reserve  balances  (see  Chapter  10). 
Central banks can feed banks to tons of reserves and may even threaten banks’ profitability 
with negative IOR, but it is just like beating a dead horse; banks are stuck with reserves. 
2‐ In a depressed and over‐indebted economy, incentivizing economic units to go into debt is 
the wrong way to proceed.  
3‐ The  form  of  trickle‐down  economics  that  quantitative  easing  and  negative  yield  rates 
represent has never worked.  
We need a bottom‐up approach8 that focuses on providing jobs, fighting poverty, and meeting the 
needs of the nation. Fiscal policy is the means to do so. 

Q10: SHOULD THE FED FINE‐TUNE THE ECONOMY? 
While the Fed is heavily involved in “fine‐tuning” the economy—i.e. making sure the economy is 
not too hot (inflation) nor too cold (unemployment) by moving the FFR target up and down—one 
may note that the Fed (and other central banks) was not created for that purpose. Central banks 
were created either to finance the crown/state, or to promote financial stability (both goals are 
actually intertwined as shown in Chapter 6). 
Some economists, like Hyman Minsky, think that fine‐tuning and promoting financial stability are 
incompatible goals. A central bank should focus on promoting financial stability through low and 
stable nominal interest rates, as well as proper regulation, supervision and enforcement. The Fed 
could also influence financial innovations by refusing to accept as collateral any financial instrument 
60 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
that  promotes  “Ponzi  finance”  (see  Chapter  14).  Fine‐tuning  the  economy  with  interest  rates 
implies raising interest rate during an expansion, which ultimately contributes to problems with 
servicing debts. Given that decisions to go into debt are not interest‐rate sensitive, raising rates just 
pushes economic units to go more into debt to pay existing debts. The hope is that income and 
capital gains will ultimately enable the full repayment of debts. 
More broadly, the link between FFR and the end goals of employment growth and inflation control 
is tenuous and subject to perverse linkages. For example: 

The link between interest rates and business investment is very weak, with investment by 
companies overwhelmingly dependent on expected net cash flows. 

Higher interest rate raises the cost of doing business and firms may pass that cost to their 
clients, resulting in inflation. 

Higher  interest  rate  also  raises  the  income  of  rentiers  and  so  their  consumption.  If  the 
economy  has  a  large  proportion  of  rentiers  (pensioners,  wealthy  individuals,  etc.)  then 
raising rates may be inflationary. 

Higher interest rate raises the private‐debt burden and promotes financial instability. 

Interest‐rate volatility promotes financial innovations to remove the sensitivity of profit to 
interest‐rate swings. 

Increments  in  FFR  are  small  and  announced  well  in  advance,  giving  plenty  of  time  to 
economic  units  to  adapt  in  order  not  to  let  their  decisions  be  influenced  by  the  cost  of 
credit. 

Instead  of  nudging  incentives  so  that,  maybe,  the  private  sector  will  spend,  some  economists 
promote a more direct approach. In times of crisis, implement large scale fiscal spending to meet 
the needs of the nations (in the US, one of these needs would be infrastructure that is in really bad 
shape).9 At any time, involve the government in direct job creation by employing people in similar 
way it was done in the New Deal; a Job Guarantee program. In times of expansion, constantly check 
financial innovations and forbid financial practices related to Ponzi finance or at least remove any 
safety net for them. 
Finally,  there  have  been  some  debates 10  also  about  how  to  set  the  FFR  target.  In  the  more 
mainstream  literature,  this  issue  boils  down  to  what  to  include  in  the  Taylor  rule  (a  rule  that 
determines what the optimal FFR target should be given a state of the economy) and how much 
weight  to  put  on  each  element  that  influences  the  rule.  In  the  non‐mainstream  approach,  the 
discussion is broader and includes discussions about the distributive and destabilizing impacts of 
monetary  policy.  Some  authors  want  the  central  bank  to  target  a  specific  interest  rate  to  make 
rentiers’ income stable and related to the productivity gains of the economy. Others want to leave 
FFR permanently around zero and let other rates do the job of sorting credit risk, inflation risk, etc. 
A positive FFR just  adds  extra income  to rentiers and does  not reward any risk (see Q5 with Bill 
Gross).  
For your reading pleasure below are three extracts from some Federal Open Market Committee 
meetings that illustrate some of the previous points. First on the lack of interest‐rate sensitivity: 
In addition to the input that we bring to these meetings and the usual sources of 
our own research staff and directors, last Friday when Vice Chairman Schultz visited 
us in San Francisco we called in a special small group of bankers, businessmen, and 
61 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
academicians for a very frank exchange of views. We sounded them out about their 
feelings on the economy and on Fed policy, and I must say, Fred, that I thought the 
reactions  were  quite  candid  and  somewhat  humiliating  in  a  way.  The  bankers 
generally expressed the view that as yet there’s very little evidence that the high 
level  of  interest  rates  is  having  any  significant  total  effect  on  cutting  off  credit 
demand. Now, one has to add to that the expressions we got from them in our 
usual go‐around with bankers and bank directors that these high rates are having 
a cutting effect on the so‐called middle market for business borrowers – the smaller 
firms – and for mortgage loans and some small farmers. That’s where the incidence 
of the high interest rate effect has been felt thus far in our part of the country. But 
as  a  general  matter,  even  if  the  businessmen  present  were  mostly  from  big 
concerns,  they  simply  indicated  that  the  higher  rates  per  se  are  not  having  any 
effect at all on their capital projects. If a project is worthwhile, it‘s not going to get 
cut off by a one or two percentage point increase in the cost of funds. A minority 
expressed the view that this is leading to some greater caution on inventory policy, 
which is already being viewed as quite cautious. One major real estate developer 
present indicated that the higher rates are just built into their projects and aren’t 
having any dampening effect at all. (Balles, FOMC meeting, September 1979, page 
27) 
Second on the cost impact of raising interest rates: 
Interest rates may be [low] after tax, or in real terms, but they are still contributing 
to cost and are creating, I think, some of the upward pressure on prices. (Teeters, 
FOMC meeting, May 1981, page 10) 
There is deterioration in the inflation rate stemming from interest costs and energy 
costs, and those are not trivial sources of deterioration. At the end of the day it 
doesn’t have to be labor costs that are causing the overall inflation deterioration. 
(Greenspan, FOMC meeting, November 2000, page 85) 

Q11: IS THE FED A PRIVATE OR A PUBLIC INSTITUTION? 
Partly due to the culture of the United States, and partly due to strong economic interests against 
centralized  institutions,  the  Federal  Reserve  System  is  an  oddly  organized  public‐private 
partnership. Member banks do hold stocks issued by the System that provide a dividend payment 
but this dividend payment is not guaranteed, the stocks do not provide any voting rights, and they 
cannot  be  traded.  For  example,  recently 11  Congress  decided  to  divert  some  of  the  dividend 
payments to fund highway expenses. 
In addition, all leftover income of the System must be transferred to the Treasury. Note that this 
makes for an odd situation. The Fed holds Treasuries that pay interest, part of this interest income 
ends up going back to the Treasury: the Treasury pays itself interest! In addition, the Treasury tries 
to maximize its earnings from the Fed through cash management.12  
Instead of looking at stock holdings and income payment, a more relevant analysis of the political 
economy of the Fed looks at its structure and who can make decisions regarding monetary policy 
and emergency operations. In terms of monetary policy, the influence of Wall Street is large, with 
strong representation on the Federal Open Market Committee via members with former ties to 
62 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
major banks (in 2016 half the Fed presidents have former ties to two major banks: Goldman Sachs 
and  Citibank).  Financial  sector  members  tend  to  be  more  hawkish  and  more  concerned,  if  not 
obsessed, with price stability. This leads them to want to raise the FFR target early, leading to a 
level  of  employment  lower  than  it  would  otherwise  have  been.  They  are  also  friendlier  to  the 
financial industry and more lenient in terms of regulations and in terms of response to a financial 
crisis. Finally, there is a risk of regulatory capture.  
If one combines this with the fact that economists at the Board are mostly pro‐market supply‐sided 
economists  (economic  growth  is  ultimately  a  supply‐side  thing),  financial  regulation  and 
enforcement do not make much sense and raising rates very early in anticipation of inflation makes 
sense. Many economists, however, doubt that markets are efficient and that demand has no role 
to play in the long run. 

Q12:  WHAT  ARE  NO‐NO  SENTENCES  FOR  WHAT  THE  FED 
DOES? (WILL GIVE YOU A ZERO ON MY ASSIGNMENTS) 
1‐ “The Fed controls the money supply”: No, it does not, it sets an interest rate, what happens 
after that is up to firms and households and their desire for external funds (see Chapter 4). 
2‐ “The Fed injects reserves which lowers the interest rate” or, worse offender, “The Fed injects 
money  which  lowers  interest  rate”.  Under  normal  circumstances  (that  is,  pre‐Great 
Recession, which is what most people have in mind when saying this), the Fed does not 
proactively inject reserves, it waits for banks to ask. And, the Fed’s monetary policy never 
injects money, i.e. never deals directly with the public (M1) (see Chapter 4). 
3‐ “The  Fed  printed  money  during  the  financial  crisis”:  No,  it  just  credited  account  by 
keystroking  dollar  amounts,  no  Federal  Reserve  notes  were  printed.  More  to  the  point, 
none of these funds entered the money supply, that is, funds held by the public. 
4‐ “The Fed used taxpayers’ money during the financial crisis”: No, it just credited accounts of 
banks by keystroking dollar amounts (see Chapter 2). 
5‐ “Banks  use  reserves  to  buy  stocks  and  corporate  bonds”:  No  banks  cannot  do  that  with 
reserves (see Chapter 2). 
6‐ “The large inflow of reserves in banks did not lead to inflation because banks did not lend 
the reserves or based on reserves”: No, banks do not operate that way, bank credit and 
quantity of reserves are unrelated (see Chapter 10) 
7‐  “Central banks lend reserves”: No, the Fed does not lend reserves because reserves are its 
liability (see Chapter 2). 
8‐ “Fiscal deficits raise interest rates”: No, there was a hint about this in Chapter 3. More is 
coming in Chapter 6. 

63 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 

Summary of Major Points 
1‐ Setting an interest rate does not mean supplying an infinite quantity of reserves. It just means 
supplying what banks want. 
2‐ The Volcker experiment aimed at following more closely the Monetarist principles of monetary‐
policy making. In practice, the Fed widened dramatically the target range for the FFR but it never
completely let the FFR respond to market forces. 
3‐ FOMC members did not understand that targeting the FFR was not inflationary until the middle
of the 1990s. 
4‐ Normalizing the balance sheets means returning the quantity of excess reserves back to its pre‐
Great Recession proportion in total reserves. This can be done by selling assets to banks or by letting 
some of the securities held by the Fed mature. 
5‐ Normalizing the balance sheet of the Fed is not necessary given that the Fed has changed its
procedures for setting the FFR.  
6‐ The FFR and discount rate are policy variables completely under the control of the Fed. They can
be set wherever the Fed wants, even in negative territory. 
7‐ In order to set market rate into negative values, the Fed just has to complete enough purchases
of securities at a premium. 
8‐ By providing capital gains and by making it costly to hold reserves, a negative interest rate policy
is supposed to promote economic activity. 
9‐ Fine‐tuning the economy may be difficult and counterproductive because rising interest rates
may promote financial fragility and may be inflationary. In addition, business investment is not very
sensitive to changes in interest rates; the transparent and gradual monetary policy strategies used
since the mid‐1990s have made spending decisions even less sensitive to interest‐rate hikes. 
 
Keywords 
Volcker experiment, premium, fine‐tuning, normalization, excess reserves, total reserves 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: How did the Volcker experiment lead to an increase in the volatility of the FFR? Did the Fed
abandon completely interest‐rate targeting? 
Q2: FOMC members did not believe that setting an interest rate was a sustainable monetary policy 
practice; why not? Why were they wrong? 
Q3: How does QE impact the yields of securities? Why the link cannot be one in which banks buy
securities with reserves? 
Q4: How can banks offset the adverse impact of negative interest rates on the profitability of banks?
Q5: What are the two ways through which QE is supposed to boost economic activity? What are
potential issues with this policy? 
 
Suggested readings 
For an analysis of FOMC meetings during the period 1979‐1999 see chapter 6 of Central Banking, 
Asset Prices, and Financial Fragility by Eric Tymoigne. 
Kaldor, N. (1982) The Scourge of Monetarism, Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
 

64 
 

CHAPTER 5: FAQs ABOUT CENTRAL BANKING 
                                                            
1 A succinct profile of Nicholas Kaldor was written in the central bank of the Slovak Republic BIATEC, Volume XIV, 12/2006 

http://www.nbs.sk/_img/Documents/BIATEC/BIA12_06/26_30.pdf 
 See  “Bill  Gross:  Americans  are  being  "cooked  alive"  by  the  Fed's  zero  interest  rates”  by  Chis  Matthew  at 
http://fortune.com/2015/09/23/bill‐gross‐federal‐reserve‐interest‐rates/ 
3 See Wray, L.R. (2006) “Global Demographic Trends and Provisioning for the Future” Levy Economics Institute, Working 
Paper No. 468 at http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_468.pdf 
4 See “Policy Normalization Principles and Plans As adopted effective September 16, 2014” by the Federal Open Market 
Committee at http://www.federalreserve.gov/monetarypolicy/files/FOMC_PolicyNormalization.pdf 
5
 See  “About  MBS/ABS”  by  the  Securities  Industry  and  Financial  Markets  Association  at 
http://www.investinginbonds.com/learnmore.asp?catid=11&subcatid=56&id=134 
6 See “Policy Normalization Principles and Plans As adopted effective September 16, 2014” by the Federal Open Market 
Committee at http://www.federalreserve.gov/monetarypolicy/files/FOMC_PolicyNormalization.pdf 
7  See  “Euro  Area's  Negative‐Yielding  Debt  Tops  $2  Trillion  on  Draghi”  by  Lucie  Meakin  at 
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015‐11‐23/euro‐area‐s‐negative‐yielding‐debt‐tops‐2‐trillion‐on‐draghi 
8  See  Tcherneva,  P.R.  (2013)  “Reorienting  Fiscal  Policy:  A  Critical  Assessment  of  Fiscal  Fine  Tuning”  Levy  Economics 
Institute, Working Paper No. 772 at http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_772.pdf 
9
 See  the  Infrastructure  Report  Card  by  the  American  Society  of  Civil  Engineers  at 
http://www.infrastructurereportcard.org/ 
10 See Tymoigne, E. (2006) “Asset Prices, Financial Fragility, and Central Banking” Levy Economics Institute, Working Paper 
No. 468 http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_456.pdf. See also  
11  See  “Fed  Money  Tapped  in  Highway  Bill  as  Banks  Get  Dividend  Break”  by  Cheyenne  Hopkins  at 
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015‐12‐01/fed‐surplus‐tapped‐in‐highway‐bill‐as‐banks‐get‐dividend‐
break 
12 Santoro, P.J. (2012) “The Evolution of Treasury Cash Management during the Financial Crisis,” Federal Reserve of New 
York Current Issues in Economics and Finance, 18 (3): 1‐8. 
2

65 
 

 

CHAPTER 6: 

After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
How and why the central bank and Treasury must coordinate their fiscal and 
monetary operations 
How the Treasury helps the central bank implement monetary policy on a daily 
basis 
Why the Treasury is involved in the implementation of monetary policy 
Why the financing of the Treasury by the central bank is not optional and must 
always occur directly or indirectly 
How the central bank gets involved in financing the Treasury 
Why  a  monetarily  sovereign  government  does  not  face  any  financial 
constraint 
What relevant questions a monetarily sovereign government must answer 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
This  Chapter  concludes  the  study  of  central  banking  matters  included  in  this  draft.  The  Chapter 
studies  how  the  Fed  is  involved  in  fiscal  operations  and  how  the  U.S.  Treasury  is  involved  in 
monetary‐policy  operations.  The  extensive  interaction  between  these  two  branches  of  the  U.S. 
government is necessary for fiscal and monetary policies to work properly.  
Once again, the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve provides a simple starting point. The Treasury 
holds an account (called Treasury’ General Account, TGA) at the Fed, which is part of L3. To simplify, 
this Chapter assumes that the Fed still follows the monetary‐policy procedures that it followed prior 
to the 2008 crisis. 

MONETARY POLICY AND THE U.S. TREASURY 
When  Treasury  spends,  the  Fed  debits  the  TGA  and  credits  reserve  balances.  Simultaneously, 
private bank credits the account of private economic units. Say the Treasury buys $100 worth of 
paper from a paper company. 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: +$100 
TGA: ‐$100 

 
Bank 
ΔAssets 
Reserve balances: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of paper company: +$100 

 
Paper company 
ΔAssets 
ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Paper: ‐$100 
 
Account of paper company: +$100 
 
Treasury 
ΔAssets 
TGA: ‐$100 
Paper: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

If Treasury receives $25 of income tax payments, the following happens: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$25 
TGA: +$25 

 
Bank 
ΔAssets 
Reserve balances: ‐$25 
 
 
 
67 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of taxpayer: ‐$25 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
Taxpayer 
ΔAssets 
Account of taxpayer: $25 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Net worth: ‐$25 

 
Treasury 
ΔAssets 
TGA: +$25 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Net worth: +$25 

Therefore, in case of a deficit (taxes less than expenses), there is a net injection of reserves. The 
consolidation of the two previous fiscal operations is: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: +$75 
TGA: ‐$75 

If the Fed does not neutralize the impact of the fiscal deficit by removing the extra reserves, banks 
will dump everything in the Fed Funds market and the FFR rapidly falls toward 0% (see Chapter 4). 
As long as the Fed targets a positive FFR, it has to neutralize the impact of daily fiscal deficits (L3 
falls)—that lower the FFR—and the impact of daily fiscal surpluses (L3 rises)—that raise the FFR.  
The Treasury understood the impact of its fiscal operations on money markets long before the Fed 
was created. In the current set up, the Treasury has helped the Fed to achieve its FFR target through 
two means: 
1‐ Cash  management:  The  Treasury  collects  proceeds  from  taxes  and  bonds  issuances  in 
thousands of private bank accounts called the “Treasury’s Tax and Loan accounts” (TT&Ls). 
Treasury moves funds between its TT&Ls and TGA to help monetary policy. 
2‐ Public‐debt management: The Treasury changes the level of its outstanding Treasuries, or 
changes the structure of its Treasuries (proportion of short‐term vs. long‐term securities). 
Given that fluctuations in the TGA (L3 in Figure 2.1) influence reserve balances (L2 in Figure 2.1), 
until the Great Recession the Treasury limited these fluctuations by keeping the TGA around $5 
billion  (Figure  6.1).  Treasury  employees  met  every  morning  with  Fed  employees  to  discuss  the 
expected net cash flow on TGA for the day and to decide on the quantity of funds to move in or out 
of TT&Ls to meet the $5 billion target.  
For example, say the TGA is currently at $5 and that this is the target of the Treasury. If the Treasury 
expects to spend $2, it would call $2 from its TT&Ls during the day. Cash flows of the TGA are very 
erratic throughout the day so they cannot be offset perfectly. Assume that spending occurs first 
(payment to a paper company): 
Bank 
ΔAssets 
Reserve balances: +$2 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of company: +$2 

 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

68 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: +$2 
TGA: ‐$2 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
The injection of reserves is removed by calling funds from TT&Ls: 
Bank 
ΔAssets 
Reserve balances: ‐$2 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
TT&Ls: ‐$2 

 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve balances: ‐$2 
TGA: +$2 

So overall the net impact on reserve balances is zero and the balance sheet of the Fed is unchanged. 
The only change is on the liability side of private banks. 
Bank 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Account of company: +$2 
TT&Ls: ‐$2 

 

Figure 6.1 TGA, weekly averages until 9/17/2008, billions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (H.4.1. series) 

 

TREASURY’S INVOLVEMENT IN MONETARY POLICY DURING THE 2008 
CRISIS 
Lehman’s  collapse  in  September  2008  led  to  a  large  injection  of  reserves  but  this  injection  was 
partly contained by a rapid increase in other liabilities that peaked in value at $1.7 trillion on the 
week  of  November  5th  2008  (Figure  6.2).  The  cause  of  the  increase  is  a  massive  cash  and  debt 
69 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
management  operation  by  the  Treasury  that  started  late  September  2008.  First,  Treasury 
transferred tens of billions of dollars from its TT&Ls into the TGA, thereby breaking with its attempt 
to maintain TGA at $5 billion. Second, Treasury issued “Supplementary Financing Program” T‐bills 
(SFP  bills),  and  immediately  put  the  proceeds  into  a  new  Treasury’  account  at  the  Fed  called 
“Treasury’s Supplementary Financing Account” (TSFA) (Figure 6.3).  

Figure 6.2 Balance sheet of the Federal Reserve, trillions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (series H.4.1) 

 

Why did the Treasury do this? To help drain reserves in order to maintain the FFR on target. The 
FFR target was positive until December 2008, so reserves had to be drained in order to maintain 
the  FFR  around  the  non‐zero  target.  Chapter  4  explains  that  the  Fed  had  been  neutralizing  the 
impact of emergency programs on reserves since December 2007. It had been doing so by selling 
its holdings of Treasuries to banks and in six months the outstanding value of its holdings fell from 
$780 billion in January 2008 to $480 billion in June 2008. If the Fed had continued to neutralize 
emergency programs in that fashion, it would have run out of Treasuries very quickly with the panic 
of September 2008. It is all the more so that the Fed had started to lend some of its Treasuries, so 
the dollar amount of unencumbered Treasuries actually dropped to $250 billion. 
In order to avoid running out of Treasuries, the Fed asked the Treasury to help drain reserves via 
cash management (TT&Ls to TGA transfers) and debt management (issuance of SFP bills). The T‐
bills  were  issued  at  the  request  of  the  Fed  for  monetary‐policy  purposes,  that  is,  to  help  drain 
reserves. 1  The  outstanding  dollar  amount  of  SFP  bills  peaked  at  almost  $560  billion  in  late 
October/early November 2008. After that, the outstanding dollar amount went down quickly for 
reasons explained below. Combined with its cash management operations, Treasury removed up 
to  slightly  more  than  $600  billion  worth  of  reserves.  As  the  Discount  Window  was  advancing 
reserves to banks in difficulty, the Treasury was simultaneously draining them (Figure 6.4).  

70 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 

Figure 6.3 Treasury’s accounts at the Fed, billions of dollars 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (series H.4.1) 

 

 

 
 
Figure 6.4 Injection (+) and ejection (‐) of reserve balances, trillions of dollars 
Source: Federal Reserve (Series H.4.1) 
In  its  announcement  of  the  Program,  the  Treasury  misrepresented  the  purpose  of  SFP  bills  by 
stating that their purpose was to “provide cash for use in the Federal Reserve initiatives.”2 Of course 
this is incorrect because the Fed does not need cash from anybody, it creates cash.  
71 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
The Treasury rapidly reduced its help through the SFP program by agreeing to roll over only $200 
billion of T‐bills. Treasury did so because its help was no longer as needed (FFR target was at zero), 
and because of the debt‐ceiling debate of the time that almost killed the program in early 2010. 

OTHER  EXAMPLES  OF  TREASURY’S  INVOLVEMENT  IN  MONETARY 
POLICY 
The Treasury has used other debt and cash management techniques in the past in order to help 
monetary policy. For example, Treasury used to be able to have an intraday overdraft on its TGA; 
unlimited from 1914 to 1935 and up  to $5 billion from 1942 until 1979  (Table 6.1).3 As such, at 
times, the TGA would carry a negative balance during the day and, by the end of the day, the TGA 
would  be  replenished  by  direct  financing  of  the  Fed.  The  Treasury  issued  “special  certificate  of 
indebtedness” to the Fed and in exchange the Fed credited the TGA. 
The  Treasury  used  this  overdraft  authorization  exclusively  for  monetary‐policy  purposes.  For 
example, before a major tax season: 
On occasion, the Treasury, in anticipation of heavy tax receipts during heavy tax 
months,  will,  under  statutory  authority,  replenish  balances  at  Federal  Reserve 
Banks  by  borrowing  directly  from  such  banks  through  the  issuance  of  special 
certificates of indebtedness, rather than withdrawing funds from Treasury tax and 
loan  accounts.  These  funds  are  borrowed  for  only  a  few  days  and  enable  the 
Treasury temporarily to make disbursements in excess of its current receipts thus 
providing  the  banks  with  additional  reserves  in  advance  of  a  later  unavoidable 
drain. (U.S. Treasury 1955, 282, italics added)  
This allowed the Treasury to replenish its TGA without having to drain its TT&Ls. The Treasury did 
this not because it was running out of money: 
At the time [Treasury’s administrators] have used the overdraft in the past, it has 
not been when they have had no balances with the banks. They have usually had 
very  substantial  balances  with  the  banks.  And  they  could  have  drawn  on  those 
balances  to  meet  the  overdraft.  That,  however,  […]  would  be  undesirable  and 
unstabilizing to the money market to withdraw the [TT&Ls] for such a very short 
period of time. It would then build up unnecessary balances in the Reserve banks, 
and would create a deficiency of reserves in the banks throughout the country, and 
would compel them to sell securities or to borrow from the Federal Reserve banks 
(Eccles in U.S. House 1947, 7)) 
Throughout most of WWII, the Fed was targeting the entire yield curve (that is, all the interest rates 
on Treasuries) and Treasury helped through debt management (Figure 6.5). The strict targeting of 
T‐bond rate at 2.5% was relaxed a bit toward the end of the war, but Treasury and Fed still did not 
want the rate to deviate too much from 2.5%. After the war, fiscal surpluses removed T‐bonds from 
the market even though there was high demand for them. This situation raised their price and the 
yield on 10‐year T‐bonds declined steadily toward 2%. To bring back the T‐bond rate up toward 
2.5%, more T‐bonds needed to be supplied. Unfortunately, the Fed did not hold enough T‐bonds so 
the Treasury supplied more: 

72 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
At any rate, the effect of a budget surplus at that time was terribly important in all 
of the monetary and debt management operations that went on. […] At that time, 
the  Federal  Reserve  System  owned  practically  no  long‐term  Government  bonds 
and, therefore, in its open‐market operations was unable to supply the market with 
that type of investment. The Treasury Department, however, held large amounts 
of  long‐term  bonds  in  various  investment  accounts.  After  consultations  and 
discussions, both at a staff level and at a policy level, between the Treasury and the 
Federal  Reserve  and  in  full  agreement,  the  Treasury  Department,  through  the 
open‐market committee of the Federal Reserve, sold large amounts of long‐term 
Government bonds so as to fill the demand and to prevent a further decline in the 
long‐term interest rate. During this period, the Treasury sold $1.5 billion of long‐
term bonds. However, the amount was not adequate to satisfy the demand nor to 
increase the market yield on such securities. Thereupon, the Treasury Department, 
after consultation with the Federal Reserve and with full agreement on the part of 
both, sold a nonmarketable 18‐year issue in the amount of $1 billion. The purpose 
of  this  sale  was  to  mop  up  any  remaining  investment  funds  that  were  exerting 
upward pressure on the market. (Wiggins in U.S. Senate, 1952, p. 227, p. 237)) 
From a fiscal perspective this seems strange—a Treasury trying to raise the cost of its indebtedness 
and  a  Treasury  issuing  securities  when  running  a  fiscal  surplus—but  again  all  this  was  done  for 
monetary‐policy purposes, and more broadly for what was considered the social purpose. 
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942

(1)
30
14
15
14
46
20
17
18
18
8
4
19

(2)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6

(3)
156.5
184
182
246
251.5
316
314
218
219.5
32
9
422

1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962

(1)
48
9
2
2
4
30
29
15
2
-

(2)
28
7
2
1
2
9
20
13
2
-

(3)
1,302
484
220
180
320
811
1,172
424
207
-

1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982

(1)
3
7
8
21
9
1
10
1
16
4
N/A
-

(2)
3
3
6
12
7
1
6
1
7
4
N/A
-

(3)
169
153
596
1,102
610
38
485
131
1,042
2,500
2,600
-

 
Table 6.1 Direct financing of the Treasury by the Fed to close the TGA overdraft: Number of 
Days Used (1), Maximum Number of Days Used at any One Time (2), and Maximum Outstanding 
at any Time (Millions of Dollars) (3) 
Sources: U.S. House (1962), U.S. Treasury (1978), Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve 
System (1979) 
 

73 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 

Figure 6.5 U.S. Interest rates in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, percent. 
Sources: NBER, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System  
Note: Grey area is represents U.S. official involvement in World War Two. 

 

There  have  been  other  cash  and  debt  management  techniques  used  by  the  Treasury  but  those 
above should give you a sense that the Fed cannot do it alone given the way it operates in terms of 
monetary  policy  (it  uses  Treasuries  so  Treasury  must  supply  enough  securities),  and  given  that 
Treasury  has  an  account  at  the  Fed  (a  fiscal  surplus/deficit  drains/injects  reserves).  In  other 
countries  the  institutional  details  change,  but  some  coordination  between  Treasury  and  central 
bank is needed for monetary‐policy operations to work properly. 

FISCAL POLICY AND THE FED 
For a government that has monetary sovereignty, one that issues its own currency and securities 
only  denominated  in  its  unit  of  account,  the  central  bank  always  helps  one  way  or  another  to 
finance the budget of the Treasury. After all, central banks were created in part to help finance the 
state, that is, to make sure that the state has the financial means to fulfill its goals expressed in the 
annual budget. Once again, the following focuses on the United States. 
The most straightforward involvement of the Fed into fiscal operations was the availability of an 
overdraft on TGA until the late 1970s. As stated in the previous section, in practice this overdraft 
facility  had  been  strictly  used  for  monetary‐policy  operations,  but  it  could  be  used  for  fiscal 
purposes in case of “national emergency.” The $5 billion limit was, however, very limiting for that 
purpose  and  there  were  Congressional  hearings  in  the  1960s  that  looked  into  the  possibility  of 
expanding that limit and making the overdraft line permanent (authorization of the overdraft had 
to be renewed by Congress every two years). This went nowhere because the use of the overdraft 
for fiscal purposes was seen as inflationary and unsound. The Treasury always justified the use of 

74 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
the  overdraft  as  a  brief  and  occasional  means  to  finance  its  expenditures  in  order  to  avoid 
disruptions in the money market. 
Even  though  direct  financing  was  discouraged  and  later  forbidden,  the  Treasury  uses  Fed’s 
monetary instruments to spend. Thus, one way or another, the Treasury will get financed by the 
Fed because only the Fed supplies the funds that the Treasury uses. Indeed, while TT&Ls are used 
to receive bond and tax proceeds, they are just a tool that allows for smoothing out the impact of 
tax  and  bond  proceeds  on  reserves.  Ultimately,  all  the  proceeds  go  to  the  TGA,  which  drains 
reserves. As a consequence the Fed has to ensure that banks have enough reserves to allow the 
Treasury to be able to make the transfer from TT&Ls to TGA.  
In addition, the Fed also has been heavily involved in treasury auctions4 to ensure that they go on 
smoothly.  Chairman  Eccles  again  provides  an  insightful  insider’s  view  on  the  financing  of  the 
Treasury: 
[In  past  Congressional  hearings]  there  was  a  feeling  that  […]  Government 
[borrowing]  directly  from  the  Federal  Reserve  bank  […]  took  off  any  restraint 
toward  getting  a  balanced  budget.  Of  course,  in  my  opinion,  that  really  had  no 
relationship  to  budgetary  deficits,  for  the  reason  that  it  is  the  Congress  which 
decides  on  the  deficits  or  the  surpluses,  and  not  the  Treasury.  If  Congress 
appropriates more money than Congress levies taxes to pay, then, there is naturally 
a  deficit,  and  the  Treasury  is  obligated  to  borrow.  The  fact  that  they  cannot  go 
directly to the Federal Reserve bank to borrow does not mean that they cannot go 
indirectly to the Federal Reserve bank, for the very reason that there is no limit to 
the amount that the Federal Reserve System can buy in the market. […] Therefore, 
if  the  Treasury  has  to  finance  a  heavy  deficit,  the  Reserve  System  creates  the 
condition  in  the  money  market  to  enable  the  borrowing  to  be  done,  so  that,  in 
effect,  the  Reserve  System  indirectly  finances  the  Treasury  through  the  money 
market, and that is how the interest rates were stabilized as they were during the 
war, and as they will have to continue to be in the future. So it is an illusion to think 
that to eliminate or to restrict the direct borrowing privilege reduces the amount 
of deficit financing. Or that the market controls the interest rate. Neither is true. 
(Eccles in U.S. House, 1947, 8) 
If  the  Treasury  does  not  get  the  funds  it  needs  to  implement  Congressional  mandates,  and  if 
Congress passes a budget in deficit, then the democratic process will not be fulfilled (the budget 
cannot be implemented), and interest rates will rise.  
In terms of auctions of Treasuries, the Fed makes sure they are always successful; “bond vigilantes” 
have no influence. The Fed has done so in many different ways; one way was to buy whatever was 
leftover during an auction. The Fed had to do so, either because until the 1970s T‐bond auctions 
were not well established and so participation was not always as high as needed, or because the 
Fed was targeting the entire yield curve. 
Now today in pricing a new Treasury issue, the Federal [Reserve] is in the position 
of underwriter. During the period of the offering the Federal [Reserve] tries to see 
to it that the Treasury's issue is successful […] It stabilizes the market just the way 
any underwriter does. (Martin in U.S. Senate, 1952, p. 96) 
Another way has been to provide a dependable refinancing channel to the Treasury because the 
Fed is still allowed to participate in auctions to replace its maturing Treasuries.  
75 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
Finally, today the Fed participates indirectly in the financing of Treasury through the Primary Dealer 
System. During an auction, primary dealers must submit a reasonable bid and the Fed ensures that 
they have enough reserves at time of settlement by purchasing, or repoing, outstanding Treasuries. 
Prior to the Primary Dealer System, the Fed also ensured that banks had enough reserves to settle 
an auction. For example during World War Two (see Figure 6.6 for reserve data during that period):  
It was evident that all funds needed for financing the war which were not raised by 
taxation or by the sale of Government securities to nonbank investors would need 
to be raised  by the sale of securities to the banking system. At  first commercial 
banks were able to draw down excess reserves by several billion dollars, but later 
they had to be supplied with a considerable amount of additional reserve funds in 
order  to  purchase  the  necessary  securities  […]  In  general,  further  reserve  funds 
were supplied by Federal Reserve purchases of short‐term Government securities. 
(Martin in U.S. Senate, 1952B, p. 288) 
Thus, one way or another the Fed will ensure that auctions never fail; and in the process it will be 
financing either directly or indirectly the Treasury.  

 
Figure 6.6 Total reserves, Aug. 1917 to Dec. 1958, billions of dollars 
Sources: Banking and Monetary Statistics 1914‐1941, Banking and Monetary Statistics 1941‐
1970. 

A  NECESSARY  COORDINATION  OF  TREASURY  AND  CENTRAL 
BANK ACTIVITIES 
The Treasury and the central bank must work extensively together for fiscal and monetary policies 
to work properly. The central bank cannot be fully independent from the Treasury: 

76 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
The history of central banking, as was brought out earlier by the chairman, is that 
central banking cannot get too far away from the policies of Government too long; 
and that while central banks historically have won battles against the Government, 
they have always lost the war. (Wiggins in U.S. Senate, 1952, p. 235) 
The  central  bank  has  independence  of  tools  (interest‐rate  setting)  and  goals  (inflation,  etc.)  but 
must  work  Treasury  operations  into  its  daily  activities.  Similarly,  the  Treasury  needs  to  work 
monetary‐policy considerations in its daily activities otherwise interest‐rate stability would not be 
maintained and inflationary pressures could more easily materialize.  

TO GO FURTHER: CONSOLIDATION OR NO CONSOLIDATION? 
THAT IS THE QUESTION. 
It should be clear from the previous sections that ultimately all the funds that the Treasury uses 
come from the Fed. Indeed, while taxes and bond issuances debit the account of private economic 
units and credit TT&Ls, ultimately the Treasury needs funds in its account at the Fed (the TGA). And 
these  funds  cannot  exist  before  reserves  exist  unless  the  Fed  directly  provides  funds  to  the 
Treasury. Put in terms of T‐accounts, assumes that the TGA gets credited $100: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
TGA: +$100 

There  are  only  a  few  possible  offsetting  operation.  One  is  that  the  Fed  directly  finances  the 
Treasury: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
Treasuries: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
TGA: +$100 

Another is that other Fed accounts are drained as a results of tax settlement or the settlement of 
auctions of Treasuries: 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
TGA: +$100 
Other Fed accounts: ‐$100 

In the latter case, the Fed previously had to provide those funds to the holders of these accounts, 
either by advancing funds to them or by buying something from them (see Chapter 4). The Fed is 
then indirectly financing the Treasury by working through intermediaries (primary dealers, banks, 
etc.). 
Pushing  a  bit  further,  it  is  quite  clear  that  tax  payments  cannot  be  settled  unless  reserves  are 
injected first in the banking system either by the Fed (through advances or purchases: assets go up, 
L2 goes up) or by the Treasury (via spending: L3 falls, L2 goes up). The same applies to proceeds 
from issuing Treasuries. Monetary financing of the Treasury is not optional, it occurs one way or 
another. Either the Fed buys Treasuries directly from the Treasury, or it buys them indirectly by first 
providing funds to primary dealers through some outright or temporary purchases of Treasuries.  

77 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
Some economists following Modern Money Theory (MMT) have used these conclusions and noted 
that no analytical insight is gained from making a distinction between Treasury and central bank 
when dealing with a monetarily sovereign government. We might as well consolidate them into 
one economic unit, the government. Consolidation is actually not infrequent in economic analysis, 
but MMT pushes for consolidation based on a detailed analysis of the inner workings of Treasury 
and  central  bank  relationships.  It  is  a  theoretical  simplification  that  is  grounded  in  a  detailed 
institutional analysis. More importantly, MMT claims that consolidation has some implications for 
understanding  the  role  of  taxes  and  government‐bond  issuances  for  a  monetarily  sovereign 
government. 
The  balance  sheets  of  Treasury  and  central  bank  look  as  follows  (the  word  “currency”  is  used 
broadly to mean all forms of central bank monetary instruments: cash and reserve balances). 
Treasury Department 
Assets 
Liabilities and Net Worth 
A1T: Physical assets and financial claims on  L1T: Treasuries held by central bank 
the non‐federal sectors  
L2T: Other liabilities plus net worth 
A2T: TGA+ FRNs held by Treasury 
 
Central bank 
Assets 
A1CB: Physical assets and financial claims 
on the non‐federal sectors 
A2CB: Treasuries 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
L1CB: Monetary base 
L2CB: TGA + FRNs held by Treasury 
L3CB: Other liabilities and net worth 

The government balance sheet is: 
Federal government 
Assets 
Liabilities and Net Worth 
A1: Physical assets and financial claims on  L1: Monetary base 
the non‐federal sectors 
L3: Other liabilities held by the domestic 
 
non‐federal sectors and the rest of the 
world plus net worth 
Tax payments lead to:  
-

ΔL1 < 0: government currency is returned to the government  

-

ΔL2 > 0: higher net worth of government (or ΔA1 < 0 if a tax liability is on the balance 
sheet, for example, tax receivables are part of A1) 

Government spending (fiscal policy) and advances (monetary policy) inject government currency: 
ΔL1 > 0.  
Taxes do not fund the (consolidated) government, that is, there is no crediting of a government 
checking account, no accumulation of funds by government: taxes destroy government currency 
(ΔL1 < 0). In addition, injection of government currency (ΔL1 > 0) must occur before taxing because 
tax payment is done by handing over to the government its currency (ΔL1 < 0). This is exactly what 
was said in the previous sections. 

78 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
Government‐bond issuance leads to 
-

ΔL1 < 0: government currency is returned to the government  

-

ΔL2 > 0: interest‐earning securities are issued 

Bond issuances are equivalent to a transfer of funds from a checking account to a savings account. 
They are part of monetary‐policy operations. The previous sections showed that this was illustrated 
in times of stress in the monetary system.  
MMT  authors  tend  to  like  to  work  with  a  consolidated  government  because  they  see  it  as  an 
effective strategy for policy purposes (see next section), but also because the unconsolidated case 
just  hides  under  layers  of  institutional  complexity  the  main  point:  one  way  or  another  the  Fed 
finances  the  Treasury,  always.  This  monetary  financing  is  not  optional  and  is  not,  by  itself, 
inflationary. 

TO  GO  EVEN  FURTHER:  WHAT  ARE  THE  RELEVANT 
QUESTIONS  TO  ASK  FOR  A  MONETARILY  SOVEREIGN 
GOVERNMENT? 
An advantage of the “Taxes don’t pay for anything” position is that it allows one to frame existing 
debates differently. Instead of judging a program in terms of “how are we going to pay for it?”, one 
may now look at what the social needs are and figure out how to implement their production. That 
is the hard part. The financing of production is easy: it is always monetary financing, one way or 
another.  
Focusing  the  political  discussion  on  taxes  and  how  or  who  will  pay,  who  gets  the  benefits,  etc. 
moves  away  from  the  public  purpose  of  government  and  into  an  individualized  benefit/cost 
analysis: “I paid taxes, what do I get for it?” The simplest answer is maybe nothing because the 
purpose of government is not to benefit any specific individual but society as a whole. Or maybe an 
individual asking this question is too narrowly defining his/her benefits to their immediate, material 
and personal aspects. Some families may not have kids and so may not personally benefit from 
paying taxes for public schooling, but a better educated population has immense benefits now and 
for the future, which does impact the quality of life of all. 
In addition, moving away from the “taxes pay for” framework helps to better tackle some problems, 
simply because taxes for a monetarily sovereign government are not meant to pay financially for 
anything, but rather to free up some resources (goods, workers, services, raw materials, etc.) for 
the  public  purposes.  For  example,  the  Social  Security  problem  is  not  a  financial  problem;  Social 
Security cannot go bankrupt. There is no need for a Trust Fund, no need to put dollars in a locked 
box, no need for payroll taxes. Social Security benefits can be paid the day they are due just by 
typing a number on the computer. The funds will come from debiting the TGA. TGA will obtain funds 
directly or indirectly from the Fed.  
The hard part is figuring out how and what to produce to meet the needs of an aging society. We 
will  need  more  infrastructure,  workers,  goods  and  services  that  cater  to  the  needs  of  an  older 
population; we will need to raise the productivity of available workers. That cannot be done by the 
Treasury saving dollars. Instead, the Treasury should probably spend more on making schooling and 
training  easier  to  access,  and  should  provide  some  financial  help  to  individuals  and  businesses 
79 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
willing to be involved in solving the problems of the future. The government should also be involved 
directly  through  infrastructure  spending  and  others.  All  this  means  more  federal  government 
spending today, not less. 
Taxes and tax structures are important but not for financing purpose but to promote price stability, 
to change behaviors and to correct arbitrary inequalities. Payroll tax does none of that. It raises the 
cost of labor, it discourages employment and it is regressive.  
In the end, the problem of paying for something is not a financial issue for a monetarily sovereign 
government, it is a political and productive one. If Congress is willing to do it, it will get funded; if it 
gets funded then comes the problem of finding the resources to implement the project. The really 
relevant  questions  are:  “What  do  we  want  the  government  to  do  for  us?”,  “Do  we  want  a 
government that represents 50% of GDP or 20% of GDP?”, “Do we want the burden of switching 
real resources to schooling, childcare, eldercare, etc. to be shared by society through higher taxes, 
or do we want to individualize that burden through higher personal expenses?”, “Do we prefer a 
society in which everybody fights for himself or do we prefer a cooperative society?” Once these 
questions  are  answered  (hopefully  through  democratic  process),  the  public  purpose  is  clearly 
defined and the point becomes to implement it. Paying for its implementation in financial terms is 
easy; paying in real resources may be hard (especially at full employment). 
Keynes’s How to Pay for the War is a classic example of the correct way to frame the question. He 
notes that: “A government which has control over the banking and currency system can always find 
the cash to pay for its purchases of home‐produced goods.” The problem of how to pay is not a 
financial problem as long as goods and services are available for purchase in the denomination of 
the currency issued by the government. The problem is this at the time: “Every use of our resources 
is at the expense of an alternative use,” “the size of the cake is fixed.” There are opportunity costs 
and if nothing is done inflation will grow out of control as government competes with the private 
sector to access resources to fight the war. The problem is one of production and consumption. In 
peace‐time, the economy is usually below full employment so to produce more one just needs to 
employ more. But at full employment, some choices must be made that involve giving up some 
alternatives and making sacrifices; that is what “paying for” means. The private sector must sacrifice 
some consumption to free resources for government uses. The questions are: who should sacrifice 
the most? How much sacrifice should there be? How should the sacrifice be implemented? 
In the context of the war, priorities are easy to set given the broad political consensus about what 
the public purpose is (winning the war): when three quarters of the cake used to go for private 
consumption, now only one quarter can go for that purpose. People have to live at subsistence level 
to be able to win the war. Government could try to achieve this through voluntary saving (war bond 
issuances), or by rationing, but the most effective way to achieve that is to cut purchasing power at 
the source: if people do not have as big a monetary income they will not go shopping as much. This 
can  be  done  through  taxing  (permanent  sacrifice  of  private  consumption)  or  deferred  pay 
(temporary sacrifice of private consumption), with the aim of reducing private monetary income to 
what is needed to meet subsistence. 
While Keynes puts the choice in front of us in a blunt fashion given the dramatic situation of the 
time,  the  same  applies  in  peace  time.  The  two  main  differences  are  that,  first,  there  is  more 
flexibility in terms of resources given that usually the size of the cake can grow and, second, that a 
political consensus about the public purpose is less easily achieved. Of course, some countries that 
are monetarily sovereign may not have much resources and may not export enough to obtain the 
80 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
foreign goods and services needed to fulfill the public purpose. In that case it is difficult, but not 
impossible, to implement the social purpose. If, in addition, a country is not monetarily sovereign, 
then implementing the public purpose is even harder. 
Summary of Major Points 
1‐ A fiscal deficit leads to an net injection of reserves and so pushes down FFR and other short‐term 
interest rates 
2‐  To  neutralize  the  impact  of  fiscal  operations  on  the  FFR,  the  Treasury  uses  cash  and  debt
management  techniques.  These  techniques  have  varied  in  amount  and  obviousness  overtime
depending on the circumstance and the political appetite for an overt interaction between central 
bank and Treasury. 
3‐ The Treasury has helped to implement monetary policy by issuing Treasuries at the request of 
the Fed, by taking an overdraft at the Fed instead of using funds in its TT&Ls, by targeting a stable
amount of funds in its TGA, among others. 
4‐ The central bank has been involved in financing the Treasury, either directly or indirectly through
the banking system. Monetary financing of the Treasury is not optional, it is required for monetary 
policy to work properly, for the settlement of taxes to be possible and for the settlement of auctions
of Treasuries to be possible 
5‐ The coordination between the Fed and the Treasury is always extensive and ensures that the
Treasury always can finance its budget. Treasuries auctions cannot fail. 
6‐ There is no financial constraint on the federal government, it cannot run out of dollars. There
are, however, political constraints that define the public purposes, and productive constraints that
define how much the government can spend without generating inflationary pressures.  
7‐ During the Great Recession, the Treasury helped the Fed to drain some of the reserves injected
via the Discount Window by issuing Treasuries at the request of the Fed and by moving all the funds 
in a special account at the Fed. 
8‐ The Fed can target perfectly the entire Treasuries yield curve if it wishes to do so. It did so during 
World War Two.  
9‐ Once one understands how deep the coordination between the Fed and the Treasury is, one may
argue that taxes do not finance the government and neither do Treasuries. All financing is monetary 
because reserves must be injected first before taxes can be paid and Treasuries can be bought.  
 
Keywords 
TGA,  TT&Ls,  TSFA,  excess  reserves,  FFR,  cash  management,  debt  management,  tax 
receivable/payable 
 

81 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 

Review Questions 
Q1: If the Fed or Treasury did not neutralize the impact of a fiscal deficit, what would happen to the
FFR? What would happen to other rates? 
Q2: If the Fed did not ensure that banks have enough reserves, how would that create problems 
for tax settlements,  Treasuries auction settlements, and  targeting the FFR?  Explain  each case in
detail. 
Q3: How did the Treasury help the Fed during the Great Recession? Why did the Fed request the
help of the Treasury? 
Q4: Explain how the Fed was and is still involved in the direct financing of the Treasury 
Q5:  Explain  how  the  Fed  has  been  involved  in  the  indirect  financing  of  the  Treasury  and  why
auctions of Treasuries cannot fail. 
 
Suggested readings  
For a more detailed analysis of the cash management technics used during the Great Recession by
the  Treasury  read  Santoro,  P.J.  (2012)  “The  Evolution  of  Treasury  Cash  Management  during  the
Financial Crisis,” Federal Reserve of New York Current Issues in Economics and Finance, 18 (3): 1‐8.
For a discussion of the historical role of the U.S. Treasury in monetary policy and the reasons for its
involvement, see U.S. Treasury (1955) Annual Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State
of  the  Finances  for  the  Fiscal  Year  Ended  June  30  1955.  Washington,  D.C.:  Government  Printing 
Office, 
pages 
275‐290: 
http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/docs/publications/treasar/AR_TREASURY_1955.pdf  
Bruce K.  Maclaury provides an interesting and accessible discussion of the independence of the
central  bank  and  its  necessary  coordination  with  the  U.S.  Treasury.
https://www.minneapolisfed.org/publications/annual‐reports/perspectives‐on‐federal‐reserve‐
independence‐a‐changing‐structure‐for‐changing‐times.  
For an historical analysis of the auctions of long‐term Treasuries and the role the Federal Reserve 
has played, see Garbade, K.D. (2004) “The Institutionalization of Treasury Note and Bond Auctions,
1970‐75,”  Federal  Reserve  Bank  of  New  York  Economic  Policy  Review,  May:  29‐45.
https://www.newyorkfed.org/medialibrary/media/research/epr/04v10n1/0405garbpdf.pdf 
More advanced readings are: 
Bell, S.A. (2000) “Do Taxes and Bonds Finance Government Spending?” Journal of Economic Issues
34 (3): 603‐620. 
Mitchell,  W.  F.,  and  Muysken,  J.  (2008)  Full  employment  abandoned:  Shifting  sands  and  policy
failures. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. (CHAPTER 8) 
Tymoigne, E. (2016) “Government monetary and fiscal operations: Generalising the endogenous 
money approach,” Cambridge Journal of Economics, forthcoming 
Wray, L.R (2007) “The employer of last resort programme: Could it work for developing countries?”
International  Labor  Organization,  Economic  and  Labour  Market  Papers  2007/5. 
http://natlex.ilo.ch/public/english/employment/download/elm/elm07‐5.pdf  
______.  (2015)  Modern  Money  Theory:  A  Primer  on  Macroeconomics  for  Sovereign  Monetary
Systems, Second Edition. New York: Palgrave. 
82 
 

CHAPTER 6: TREASURY AND CENTRAL BANK INTERACTIONS 
 
                                                            
1 See Federal Reserve Bank of New York, “Statement Regarding Supplementary Financing Program,” September 17, 2008 
at https://www.newyorkfed.org/markets/statement_091708.html 
2  See  U.S.  Treasury,  “Treasury  Announces  Supplementary  Financing  Program,”  September  17,  2008,  HP‐1144  at 
https://www.treasury.gov/press‐center/press‐releases/Pages/hp1144.aspx 
3 “Over the years, a variety of provisions had permitted the Treasury to borrow limited amounts directly from the Federal 
Reserve. Options for such loans existed until 1935. Temporary provisions for direct loans were reintroduced in 1942 and 
renewed with varying restrictions a number of times thereafter. Authority for any kind of direct loans to the Treasury 
lapsed in 1981 and has not been renewed.” (Meulendyke 1998, 238, n.3) 
4  The  following  link  brings  you  to  a  video  made  by  two  of  my  students  that  provides  a  visual  explanation: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wgcv_wJOLcA 

83 
 

 

CHAPTER 7: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What leverage is 
What the advantages and disadvantages of leverage are 
How beneficial leverage is for profitability 
Why leverage increases the sensitivity of an economic unit to developments in 
the financial sector 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 
Given that the concept of leverage will be used often in the upcoming Chapters, this Chapter spends 
some time explaining what leverage is and some of its impacts on the balance sheet of economic 
units. 

WHAT IS LEVERAGE? 
Leverage is the ability to acquire assets in an amount that is larger than what one’s own capital 
allows one to buy. Say that an economic unit has a net worth of $100, that it has no debt and that 
the counterpart is $100 in cash (Figure 7.1). The balance sheet looks like this:  

 
Figure 7.1 A balance sheet without leverage 
What is the leverage? Leverage = asset/net worth = asset/equity = A/E = $100/$100 = 1. No debt 
used, all the cash the economic unit has was acquired without the help of any debt (e.g., grandpa 
gave you $100 for Christmas, or you worked to get $100). Now the economic unit decides to use its 
cash to buy a bond that pays 10% yearly (Figure 7.2).  

 
Figure 7.2 Another balance sheet without leverage 
What is the leverage? Leverage = A/E = $100/$100 = 1. Still no leverage but asset portfolio allows 
the economic unit earns interest income: Cash inflow is $10 yearly as interest payment. Of course, 
buying a bond involves additional risks compared to cash: 

Default risk (the bond issuer does not pay the $10 interest and cannot repay part or all the 
principal due) 

Market risk (the market value of the bond declines and one might have to sell it for less 
than what one paid for it) 

Going back to case 1, now the economic unit decides to get a $900 advance from a bank at 1% and 
to buy 10 bonds that pay 10% (Figure 7.3). What is the leverage? Leverage = A/E = $1000/$100 = 
10. The economic unit has acquired 10 times more assets than what its capital allows to buy. It did 
so  by  going  into  debt.  This  example  is  the  simplest  form  of  leverage.  There  are  many  ways  to 
introduce leverage in a financial deal. Some of that leverage does not have to be reflected on the 
balance sheet in the form of a debt to someone. As long as one can acquire an asset by paying 
upfront only a fraction of the value of that asset, there is some leverage.  
85 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 

 
Figure 7.3 A balance sheet with 10x leverage 

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF LEVERAGE? 
A  key  metric  of  profitability  is  the  return  on  equity  (ROE).  This  return  is  the  ratio  of  profit  over 
equity. The ROE can be decomposed as follows: 
Profit/Net worth = (Profit/Assets)*(Assets/Net worth) 
ROE = ROA * Leverage 
Return  on  Assets  (ROA)  measures  the  earning  power  of  the  assets  on  a  balance  sheet;  ROE 
measures how successfully an economic unit used its own capital. Leverage multiplies the impact 
of ROA on ROE because it allows an economic unit to acquire more assets without having to pay 
the full amount due with one’s own funds. Thus leverage gives the following advantages: 
1‐ Better nominal return: 
-

No leverage: income = net income = $10 

-

10x leverage: income = 10 x $10 = $100, Net income = $100 ‐ $9 = $91 > $10 

2‐ Better return 

Return on Asset (ROA)  
-

No leverage: interest/bond = $10/$100 = 10% 

-

10x leverage: net interest/bond = ($100 ‐ $9)/$1000 = 9.1% 

Return on equity (ROE)  
-

No leverage: interest/equity = $10/$100 = 10% = ROA 

-

10x leverage: net interest/equity = ($100 ‐ $9)/$100 = $91/$100 = 91% 

By leveraging 10x, ROE is 10 times higher than ROA (9.1% vs 91%) simply because one could acquire 
ten times more assets.  

WHAT ARE THE DISADVANTAGES OF LEVERAGE? 
INTEREST‐RATE RISK 

86 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 
What if the interest rate on bank debt goes up to 12% in the previous example? 
-

No leverage: cash outflow = $0 => net cash flow = $10 

-

10x leverage: cash outflow = $900 x .12 = $108 => net cash flow = ‐$8. 

This risk is especially high if an economic unit went into debt on a short‐term basis for a long‐term 
portfolio strategy. Assume one plans to hold 10 bonds for 2 years but issued debt with a 6‐month 
term to maturity; then one needs to refinance (i.e. repay the debt and ask for credit again) three 
times. 
But there are more worries because economic units care much more about percentage gains (ROE) 
than nominal gains. In this case, ROE losses are also multiplied by the size of the leverage. 
-

No leverage: ROA = ROE = 10% 

-

10x leverage: ROA = ‐$8/$1000 = ‐0.8% 

-

10x leverage: ROE = ‐$8/$100 = ‐8%  

HIGHER SENSITIVITY OF CAPITAL TO CREDIT AND MARKET RISKS 
The same percentage decline in the value of bonds (due to default or loss of market value) leads to 
much bigger decline in equity (Figure 7.4). 
-

No  leverage:  A  10%  decline  in  the  value  of  the  bond  wipes  out  only  10%  of  net 
worth 

-

10x leverage: A 10% decline in the value of bonds wipes 100% of net worth 

Chapter 9 shows that banks can only tolerate a limited decline in the value of their assets. Indeed, 
not only are they highly leveraged, but there are regulations governing the amount of capital they 
are required to have, as well.  

 
Figure 7.4 Impact on capital of a 10% decline in the value of bonds under no leverage and 10x 
leverage 

REFINANCING RISK AND MARGIN CALLS 
IMPACT ON MORTGAGE DEBT 

87 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 
Say that in 2006 a household wants to buy a house that costs $100k and that the bank states that 
one must provide a 20% down‐payment. How much of the cost of the house is the bank willing to 
fund at the maximum? 
0.8*100000 = $80000 
Now, say that the value of the home goes down to $50000. Assuming the bank is still willing to 
provide up to 80% of the house value, the maximum the bank will provide is: 
.8*50000 = $40000 
For the same house, the bank is willing to provide less of an advance.  
Table 7.1 shows three different contract structures with actual numbers when a household agrees 
to issue an $80k mortgage note:  
Year 
Case 
Structure 

Debt Service 

2006 

A 30‐year fully 
amortized with a fixed 
rate of 10% 
$8,424.69 for 30  years 

2006 
2016 


An 30‐year IO with a 
30‐year 5% fixed‐rate 
10% fixed rate, starts to  fully amortized  
amortize after 10 years 
First 10 Years: $8000 
$5153.49 for 30‐years 
Last 20 years: $9264.21 
 

Table 7.1 Mortgage notes with different terms 

 

In the U.S. the traditional mortgage is a fixed‐rate fully amortized (i.e. for which principal is repaid 
bit  by  bit  every  month)  mortgage  (case  A).  During  the  2000s  housing  boom,  a  lot  of  prime  and 
subprime  households  choose  to  issue  interest‐only  mortgages  (IOs)  (case  B).  With  an  IO,  a 
mortgagor can choose to pay only the interest due for a certain time period (say 10 years), and after 
that the principal must be repaid bit by bit. This means that for a period of time, case B is cheaper 
than case A.  
The proportion of IO issued by non‐prime households in a given year went from virtually 0% to 30% 
of mortgages issued by non‐prime households. As the Fed started to raise interest rate in 2004, the 
proportion of pay‐option mortgages issued by non‐prime households grew (Figure 7.5). Pay‐option 
mortgages allow debtors to pay only part of the interest due. 
The selling point offered by mortgage brokers was that IO are cheaper to service for 10 years and 
that, while it is true that one might not be able to make that additional $1264 payment that will 
come in 10 years, there is no need to worry because refinancing at better terms is always possible 
given that home prices always go up.  
Come 2016 and the household can cannot make the additional $1264 payment. What can be done? 
Let us refinance by issuing an $80000 fixed‐rate mortgage with better terms (option C) and by using 
the funds to repay the $80000 due on the IO mortgage. So the household goes to a bank with the 
intention to get a credit of $80000. Unfortunately, the bank states it can only provide $40000, i.e. 
it refuses to refinance unless the household can come up with $40000. Why? Because the home 
value is now $50000. 
In times of crisis, the refinancing problem induced by the decline in the value of houses is actually 
reinforced by the fact that the loan‐to‐value ratio declines. So instead of granting an advance of up 

88 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 
to 80% of the home value, now a bank will do only 60%, which means that the household can only 
get $30000 from the bank. 

 
Figure 7.5 Share of exotic mortgages in non‐prime mortgage originations, percent. 
Source: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC Outlook, Summer 2006). 

IMPACT ON SECURITY‐BASED DEBT: MARGIN CALL RISK 
A broker allows an economic unit to have outstanding bonds with a nominal value 10 times as large 
as the value of equity. What if suddenly: 
-

The value of bonds declines. Net worth declines so leverage is much higher than 10 and the 
broker demands additional collateral (and so net worth in the balance sheet) to restore a 
10x leverage. 

-

The broker increases the margin requirement (loan‐to‐value ratio declines), that is, decides 
to lower the allowed leverage from 10 to 5. This is equivalent to saying that now in order 
to be able to get external funds to buy $1000 worth of bonds one must put down $200 
instead of $100.  

EMBEDDED LEVERAGE 
Leverage comes in many forms and may not be directly observable in the balance sheet. In fact, 
financial institutions try to hide leverage as much as possible to circumvent regulation, and, in the 
worst cases, to confuse potential clients who are attracted by the high promised ROE.  
A form of leverage that gained attention during the recent crisis is embedded leverage—or leverage 
on leverage. Figure 7.6 presents a “simple” case of embedded leverage. 

89 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 

Households 
Houses 

Subprime 
Mortgages 

 

SPE1 
Subprime 
Mortgages 

High‐rate 
MBSs 

 

SPE 2 
Low‐rate 
MBS 

High 
CDOs 

 
rate 

Mezzanine 
CDOs (14%) 
Equity  (very 
thin or none) 

Low‐rate 
MBSs (5%) 

Low‐rate 
CDOs (10%) 

SPE 3 
Mezzanine 
CDOs 

Senior‐AAA 
CDO2s  
(60 %) 

Other  CDO2
(40%) 

Figure 7.6 Financial layering or embedded leverage. 
The following is going on in this picture: 
1‐ A bunch of households with poor creditworthiness issued mortgages to a bank to finance 
100% of their houses ($100k house is financed by $100k mortgage) (balance sheet A) 
2‐ The bank did not want to keep the mortgages on its balance sheet so the bank created an 
SPE1  (special purpose entity 1)  that purchased the  mortgages. To finance  the purchase, 
SPE1 issued bonds collateralized by the mortgages (mortgage‐backed securities, MBS) of 
two different ratings, low and high, with low representing 5% of the issuance. The debt 
service received from subprime mortgages is used to service the MBSs (balance sheet B) 
3‐ Nobody wanted to buy the low‐rate MBS so the bank created SPE2 to purchase them. SPE2 
issued bonds backed by MBSs (collateralized debt obligations, CDOs). The debt service from 
low‐rate MBSs is used to service CDOs (balance sheet C) 
4‐ Nobody wanted to buy the mezzanine CDOs that represent 14% of all the CDOs issued by 
SPE2. The bank created yet another SPE that bought the mezzanine CDOs by issuing bonds 
backed by them (CDO squared). AAA CDO2s are bought by pension funds, others are bought 
by hedge funds and others. The debt service from the mezzanine CDOs provides the cash 
flow necessary to service the CDO2s (Balance sheet D) 
Taken  in  isolation,  i.e.  looking  at  SPE3  alone,  AAA  CDO2s  seem  very  safe  because  the  value  of 
mezzanine CDOs must fall by 40% before the principal on the AAA CDO2s starts to be impacted 
(other CDO2s act as equity for AAA CDO2s). A pension fund that looks only at that deal does not 
even blink; AAA CDO2s provide higher yield than AAA corporate bonds: Buy! Buy! Buy! 
Of course, the higher yield was achieved by the embedded leverage. Say that households start to 
default, what is the default rate that makes AAA‐CDO2 worthless? 

90 
 

-

A 5% loss on the mortgages makes low‐rate MBS worthless (they are the first to take the 
loss in this SPE structure), which makes SPE2 insolvent and so all CDOs worthless. 

-

CDO2 become worthless much faster. If the mezzanine CDOs are worthless then CDO2 are 
worthless.  Mezzanine CDOs are worthless after a 1.2% decline in the value of subprime 
mortgages (5%*24%)! Suddenly those AAA CDO2 do not seem that safe anymore, especially 
so  knowing  that  delinquency  rates  on  subprime  mortgages  are  way  north  of  1.2%. 
However, one needs to look at the entire chain of securitization to understand that. Most 
buyers of AAA CDO2 did not do that (they usually could not do that given the information 
available) and only looked at the high return of AAA CDO2 relative to AAA corporate bonds, 
together with the 40% buffer against loss provided by other CDO2. 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 
There is a way to estimate what the leverage is in this type of transaction.1 Financial institutions 
created many SPEs that bought from each other.2 

BALANCE‐SHEET LEVERAGE, SOME DATA 
The Financial Accounts of the United States provide simple measures of balance‐sheet leverage that 
are easy to get for the private non‐financial sector because actual balance sheets are provided. We 
are not so lucky for the financial sector for which data about total assets is not available. One can 
get  an  idea  of  the  leverage  used  by  financial  institutions  by  using  the  ratio  (liabilities  + 
equity)/equity, knowing that in theory the sum of liabilities and equity ought to be equal to total 
assets. In practice the sum of liabilities and equity is not very reliable and gives leverage levels that 
sometimes are much too high. Figure 7.8 only presents preliminary data that seems to pass the 
smell test. Chapter 8 presents official leverage data in the banking sector. 
Figures 7.7 and 7.8 give a broad idea of the relative leverage across sectors and of the trend in 
leverage. Clearly, the non‐financial sector is less leveraged than the financial sector with households 
being the least leveraged of all sectors. Overall, leverage in the non‐financial sector grew relatively 
smoothly until the Great Recession, especially so for households. Leverage in the financial sector is 
much more volatile. 

 
Figure 7.7 Balance‐sheet leverage in the nonfinancial private sectors, assets/net worth 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series Z.1) 
 

91 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 

 
Figure 7.8 Balance‐sheet leverage in the financial sector, (liabilities+equity)/equity 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series Z.1) 

THE FINANCIALIZATION OF THE ECONOMY 
The financial industry is in the business of dealing with leverage. Its business is about incentivizing 
other economic unit to go into debt (that is what most of its assets are: claims on others) and the 
financial sector itself uses a lot of leverage to boost the profitability of its business. Banks grant 
credit,  pension  funds  rely  on  financial  claims  to  pay  pensions,  etc.  For  every  creditor  there  is  a 
corresponding debtor and so for every financial asset there is a corresponding financial liability: 
“financialization” also means “debtization” of the economy.  
The  financialization  of  the  economy  means  that  the  financial  sector  has  become  much  more 
important  to  the  daily  operations  of  the  economic  system  than  it  used  to  be.  The  private 
nonfinancial  sectors  have  become  more  dependent  on  the  smooth  functioning  of  the  financial 
sector in order to maintain the liquidity and solvency of their balance sheets, and to improve or 
maintain their economic welfare.  
Households have become more reliant on financial assets to obtain an income (interest, dividends 
and  capital  gains)  and  have  increased  their  use  of  debt  to  fund  education,  healthcare,  housing, 
transportation, leisure, and, more broadly, to maintain and grow their standard of living.  
Nonfinancial businesses also have recorded a very rapid increase in financial assets in their portfolio 
and a growing use of leverage. Some of them, like Ford or GE (until recently), have a financial branch 
that provides more cash balances than their core nonfinancial activity (Figures 7.11) and about half 
of  their  cash  flows.  The  counterpart  of  these  trends  has  been  a  growing  share  of  outstanding 
financial  assets  held  by  private  finance  (Figure  7.9).  From  the  late  1960s,  the  share  of  financial 
assets held directly by households dropped significantly from about 55 percent to about 35 percent. 
Instead, a growing share of assets has been held by private financial institutions, which went from 
92 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 
25 percent in the late 1940s to 40 percent right before the crisis. The rest of the world recorded 
most of the rest of the gains from 2 percent to 10 percent of U.S. financial assets. The share of 
national income going to the financial industry has also grown quite significantly after WWII (Figure 
7.10). A first wave occurred in the 1950s and a second one in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, about 
18% of national income goes to the financial sector, something not seen since the 1920s. 

 
Figure 7.9 Distribution of U.S. financial assets among the different macroeconomic sectors. 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series Z.1) 
 

93 
 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 

Figure 7.10 Proportion of national income earned by the financial sector. 
Sources: BEA, Historical statistics of the United States 

Figure 7.11 Percent of cash balance coming from financial activities 
Source: SEC (10K statements) 
 
 
94 
 

 

 

CHAPTER 7: LEVERAGE 

Summary of Major Points 
1‐ To leverage is the act of going into debt 
2‐ This debt can be on the balance sheet or can be hidden off‐balance sheet 
3‐ Leverage helps to boost the return on equity by multiplying gains but it can also multiply losses. 
4‐ The use of leverage has increased throughout non‐financial economic sectors, while leverage is 
usually  higher  in  the  financial  industry.  The  financial  industry  uses  a  lot  of  off‐balance‐sheet 
leverage. 
5‐ The financial sector has played an ever increasing role in the economic life of the non‐financial 
sector by providing an increasing share of national income and by providing advances to maintain 
existing standards of living. 
 
Keywords 
Financialization,  debtization,  leverage,  embedded  leverage,  return  on  asset,  return  on  equity,
interest‐rate risk, refinancing risk, margin call risk, interest‐only mortgage, pay‐option mortgage 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: Why may a decline in home prices create a problem for refinancing a mortgage? 
Q2: If the leverage is 3X, what does it mean?  
Q3: If the leverage is 3X, what would happen to net worth following a 5% decrease in the value of
assets? What would happen to ROE given ROA? 
Q4: Why does the financialization of the economy implies the debtization of the economy? 
 
Suggested readings 
Chapter 1 of Guns, Traders and Money by Satyajit Das relates personal recollections surrounding 
leverage is a very clear and funny way and present how leverage can be built outside the balance
sheet. 
For  a  more  technical  view  of  leverage  and  its  relation  to  regulation,  the  Basel  III  leverage  ratio
framework  provides  an  example  of  a  regulatory  framework  for  different  forms  of  leverage:
http://www.bis.org/publ/bcbs270.pdf  
 
                                                            
1 Check page 26 of Riddiough, T.J. (2010) “Can Securitization Work? Economic, Structural and Policy Considerations.” At 
https://www.fdic.gov/bank/analytical/cfr/mortgage_future_house_finance/papers/Riddiough.PDF 
2 In 2010, Propublica made a nice visual made with actual data in “Interactive: CDOs’ Interlocking Ownership,” by Jeff 
Larson and Karen Weise at https://www.propublica.org/special/interactive‐cdos‐interlocking‐ownership#cdo/ 

95 
 

 

CHAPTER 8: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What banks do 
How banks make a profit 
What the risks of the banking business are 
How the banking industry has changed over the past four decades 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
The  US  financial  system  is  extremely  complicated  and  this  preliminary  text  shades  light  only  on 
some corners of that system by focusing on the banking sector. Since the beginning of this text, 
Chapters have emphasized the importance of balance sheets to get a solid understanding of the 
mechanics at play in the financial sector. This Chapter continues that trend.  

THE BALANCE SHEET OF A BANK 
Figure  8.1  depicts  the  balance  sheet  of  a  commercial  bank.  Promissory  notes  issued  by  others 
include  any  kind  of  agreement  between  the  bank  and  an  entity  that  promised  to  pay  some 
monetary amount(s). That entity can be a domestic or foreign, household (mortgage note or any 
other  customer  notes),  company  (business  credit,  corporate  securities),  and  government 
(Treasuries,  municipals).  Promissory  notes  may  or  may  not  have  a  market  in  which  they  can  be 
traded. If they have a market they are called “securities”, if they do not they are called “loans and 
leases” (Chapter 2 and Chapter 10 explain that the word “loan” is really inappropriate). Chapter 3 
studied in details reserves, which are themselves a promissory note as explained in Chapter 15, but 
are  singled  out  for  analytical  purposes.  Non‐financial  assets  include  real  estate,  computers, 
goodwill etc. 
Assets 
Reserve balances and vault cash 
Promissory notes issued by others 
(aka “loans and leases,” “securities”) 
Non‐financial assets 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Promissory notes issued by the bank 
(aka “accounts,” “CDs,” etc.) 
Net worth/Equity/Capital 

Figure 8.1. Balance sheet of a typical commercial bank 

 

Promissory  notes  issued  by  the  bank  include  checking  accounts,  savings  accounts  and  other 
transaction accounts. They also include other liabilities such as certificates of deposits (CDs), bonds 
and other securities issued by the bank. One may choose to include shares here or in net worth; for 
our purposes, it is not that important. 
As usual, net worth is the residual item and its main role, as explained in Chapter 2, is to protect 
the creditors of the bank, i.e. those who hold the promissory notes issued by the bank (you and I 
for the accounts, CD holders, etc.).  
Figures 8.2 and 8.3 show how the composition of financial assets and liabilities of US banks has 
changed  since  1945  (quantity  of  non‐financial  assets  is  not  available).  After  WWII,  banks  were 
stuffed with Treasuries and reserves that represented about 75% of their assets. A switch occurred 
progressively toward privately‐issued notes and municipals as banks turned their business activity 
toward supporting the growth of the economy instead of the war effort. Today, percentage‐wise, 
Treasuries and reserves are marginal items in the assets of banks. 
Bank  accounts  (“deposits”)  are  still  the  main  liability  of  commercial  banks  but  the  structure  of 
accounts changed with checking accounts representing about 10% of liabilities in 2010 versus 75% 
after WWII. Time and savings accounts have grown in proportion, and they represented about 55% 
of the liabilities of banks in 2010. Figure 8.2 also clearly shows the rise of the federal funds market 
from the 1960s (see Chapter 4). Figure 8.2 does not show interbank lending debt given that it is the 
balance sheet of the banking sector. Indeed, if bank X owes to bank Y, when they are put together 
in  one  balance  sheet  the  consolidation  removes  debt  owed  to  each  other.  Federal  funds  and 
repurchase agreements (RPs) are liabilities with other participants of the federal funds market. 
97 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
Figure 8.3 shows how the predominance of “private depository institutions” (commercial banks and 
thrifts) in the financial sector has changed through time. From 1980 until 2000, the share of financial 
assets held by banks fell dramatically from 50% of all financial held by the financial industry to about 
20%;  this  has  been  a  stable  proportion  since  2000.  Instead,  money  managers  (mutual  funds, 
pension funds, etc.) have gained in importance as did financial institutions related to securitization 
that together held about 55% of the financial assets held by the financial industry in 2015. Money 
lenders (pay‐day loans, etc.) have also recorded an increase in the proportion of financial assets 
they hold since the 1970s.  

 
Figure 8.1 Financial assets of US‐chartered commercial banks 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (series Z.1) 
Note: Other securities includes corporate and foreign bonds, mutual funds shares, corporate 
shares, and open‐market papers. 
 

98 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 

 
Figure 8.2 Financial liabilities and corporate shares of US‐chartered commercial bank 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (series Z.1) 
Note: Others include net taxes payables, corporate bonds, open‐market papers, net interbank 
transactions, and miscellaneous liabilities. 

Figure 8.3 Allocation of financial assets within the financial sector 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (series Z.1) 
 
99 
 

 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 

WHAT DO BANKS DO? 
The previous balance sheet hints that banks are involved in many crucial activities including: 

Credit  services:  Swapping  promissory  notes  to  allow  liquidity,  creditworthiness,  and 
maturity transformation 

Payment services: Transferring funds between bank accounts  

Retail  portfolio  services:  Providing  income‐earning  opportunities  for  small  entities  with 
excess monetary balances and providing cash at will. 

A central aspect of the balance sheet of banks is that the promissory notes issued by banks have a 
shorter  term  to  maturity  than  the  promissory  notes  on  their  asset  side.  Banks  are  involved  in 
maturity  transformation.  They  accept  promissory  notes  from  their  customers  for  which  the 
principal will not be repaid for a long time. In exchange, they give their customers some promissory 
notes that are due relatively quickly. Checking accounts are due at the demand of their bearers and 
CDs come due at most in a few years, whereas the principal on mortgage notes will be fully repaid 
in decades.  
A central implication of maturity transformation is that banks have an inherent need for a stable 
refinancing source because they must fund long‐term positions in assets with short‐term liabilities. 
To limit the refinancing risk (that was exemplified with households in Chapter 7) that comes with 
this balance‐sheet structure, a central bank that provides stable low‐cost refinancing channels is 
crucial. 
Some  of  the  promissory  notes  that  banks  issue  have  another  other  interesting  property  for 
potential clients. Chapter 15 explains that their financial characteristics are such that they ought to 
trade at par if they do not carry any credit risk and if the financial structure is properly set up. Today, 
transfers between bank accounts are done at par, conversions into Federal Reserve note are done 
at  par,  and  in  case  of  default  FDIC  guarantees  the  funds  in  bank  accounts,  and  the  interbank 
payment system works smoothly. The main takeaway is that banks provide to their customers a 
reliable means of payments that is widely accepted. By contrast, the promissory notes issued by 
clients are not widely accepted so making payments with them is difficult, if not impossible.  

WHAT MAKES A BANK PROFITABLE? 
Like  any  other  for‐profit  business,  a  bank  operates  to  meet  its  profitability  target  while  being 
constantly on the look‐out to maintain its liquidity and solvency. At least, that is the hope. When 
banks  are  run  by  fraudsters  or  are  focused  on  short‐term  results,  concerns  about  liquidity  and 
solvency go out of the window.1 The profit of a bank depends on the following components: 
Profit of a bank = Net capital gains + Net interest income + Other income – Other expenses than 
interest payments 
Net capital gains is the difference between capital gains and capital losses. This net change can be 
positive  (net  capital  gain)  or  negative  (net  capital  loss).  Net  interest  income  (aka  net  interest 
margin)  is  the  difference  between  interest  earned  on  bank  assets  and  interest  paid  on  bank 
liabilities. Other income include fees and other charges imposed on customers. Net interest income 
100 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
is the biggest source of income for banks but its proportion in bank income has declined since the 
early  1980s  for  reasons  explained  in  the  last  section.  In  2014,  net  interest  income  represented 
about 60% of the income earned by banks compared to 80% from about the mid‐1940s to the early 
1980s (Figure 8.4). Net interest income is the lowest proportion of profit for the largest banks. 

Figure 8.4 Sources of income of FDIC‐insured banks. 
Source: FDIC Annual Financial Data 

 

Banks, however, are not interested in monetary profit per se. Instead, a key measure of profitability 
is the return on equity (ROE), the ratio of monetary profit over net worth. Chapter 7 explains that 
this ratio can be decomposed into the return on assets (ROA) and leverage (Figure 8.5). ROE and 
ROA averaged 9.7% and 0.84% respectively from 1984 to 2014. The ROA of the largest banks is 
more volatile and has been relatively higher since the late 1990s (Figure 8.6). The larger the bank, 
the higher the leverage (Figure 8.7), but balance‐sheet leverage has mostly fallen over time and 
Tier‐1 leverage has converged to 9 for all banks, 11 for the biggest banks, 8 for the smallest. 
Banks have a ROE target (among other targets) in mind to which bonuses of employees are related 
(if a bank reaches or passes the target, employees can expect a good bonus). Bank employees have 
two means whereby to reach the target if ROE is falling away from it: raise ROA and/or increase 
leverage. 
Raising  ROA  means  charging  a  higher  interest  rate  on  customers’  notes  (higher  mortgage  rate, 
higher  consumer  credit  rate,  etc.),  charging  more  fees,  buying  higher‐yield  securities,  trading 
securities  more  aggressively  to  make  bigger  capital  gains,  and/or  reducing  expenses.  Given 
expenses,  all  this  means  taking  more  credit  risk  and  market  risk,  because  raising  ROA  implies 
catering to less creditworthy economic units or being involved in more volatile trading strategies.  
Raising leverage means increasing the size of liabilities relative to net worth. Chapter 7 explores the 
concept of leverage more carefully in  terms of its advantages and risks. Chapter 9 explains that 
banks are limited at any point in  time in  their ability to leverage by regulation, but they always 
“innovate” over time to bypass regulations. 
101 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
 

Figure 8.5 ROA, ROE, leverage of all FDIC‐insured institutions 
Source: FDIC Graph Book 

 

 

 
Figure 8.6 Annual return on assets 
Source: FDIC Aggregate Time Series Data 
Note: Banks with over $10 billion in assets represent about 10% of the FDIC‐insured banks (595 
institutions). Most FDIC‐insured banks (62% or 3800 institutions) are between $100 and $1 
billion. 
102 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
 

Figure 8.7 Tier‐1 leverage (inverse of tier‐1 leverage capital ratio) 
Source: FDIC Aggregate Time Series Data 
Note: Tier‐1 capital is a component of capital. 

 

RISKS ON THE BANK BALANCE SHEET 
The profitability of a bank critically depends on the following: 

The ROA which depends on: 

Creditworthiness  of  the  issuers  of  promissory  notes  (credit  risk):  households, 
businesses,  and  government  may  not  be  able  to  service  their  promissory  note, 
which means that a bank does not receive its expected income and instead records 
a loss. 

Actual and expected market value of securities (market risk): capital gain and losses 
are recorded on a daily basis for some assets. 

The cost of funding the banking business (refinancing risks induced by interest‐rate risk, 
maturity mismatch risk): cost of acquiring reserves and cost of holding accounts (i.e. giving 
incentive to account holders not to withdraw their funds in order to avoid having to borrow 
reserves  or  to  sell  interest‐earning  assets  to  get  reserves).  If  the  Fed  raises  FFR  quickly, 
banks that have fixed‐rate long‐term assets see their net interest income dwindle quickly. 

Creditworthiness, capital gains and losses, and bank‐funding costs are influenced by the state of 
the economy, expected interest rates, future monetary and fiscal policies and many other factors. 
For example, if it is expected that economic activity will slowdown, then one may expect that layoffs 
will rise and so that some debtors will have problems servicing their debts. Chapter 4 explains how 
expected monetary policy impacts current asset prices and refinancing cost. 

103 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
This means that, to run a banking business properly, a banker must form expectations about a wide 
range of factors. Of course, these expectations usually turn out to be incorrect. When expectations 
are under‐optimistic, bankers are pleasantly surprised and may double‐down on the risks they take. 
When expectations are over‐optimistic, things can turn sour very quickly if credit analysis was not 
done  properly,  if  capital,  liquidity,  and  loss‐reserve buffers  are  inadequate,  or  if  fraud  has  been 
prevalent.  
Figure  8.8  shows  the  impact  of  credit  and  market  risks.  The  value  of  promissory  notes  falls  as 
economic units default or the value of securities falls. This impacts net worth and so the ability to 
meet the capital requirements presented in Chapter 9 (in the example a 15% loss on promissory 
notes leads to a decline in the capital ratio from 20% to 5%). If a bank is unable to meet its capital 
requirements, regulators may demand that the bank be closed.  
Figure 8.9 shows the value of non‐tradable promissory notes that were past due by at least 30 days 
relative to the value of tier‐1 capital and loan‐loss reserves. Loan‐loss reserves are not the same 
thing as bank reserves, they are extra capital that banks keep to buffer against expected losses on 
the non‐tradable promissory notes of their clients. In general, the larger the banks the worst the 
performance, that is, the larger the bank, the higher the proportion of past due loans. This can be 
explained by looking at Figure 8.6. Major banks (those with assets worth at least $1 billion) have 
increased their ROA to maintain their ROE. Raising the ROA means acquiring more risky assets, that 
is, assets that have a higher likelihood of defaulting. 

Figure 8.8 Impact of default and/or capital losses 
 

104 
 

 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 

 
Figure 8.9 Noncurrent loans & leases as a percent of tier‐1 capital plus loan‐loss reserves 
Source: FDIC Aggregate Time Series Data 

BANKING ON THE FUTURE 
A study of the profitability of banks clearly shows that this business is all about “banking on the 
future.” There is a myriad of future economic events that influences the assets and liabilities of 
banks and so how profitable, solvent and liquid banks are. In terms of assets, the role of banks is to 
judge and validate (or not) the expectations that are brought to the table by their clients. As the 
saying goes in the banking industry, “I’ve never seen a pro forma I didn’t like.” Economic units that 
want to go into debt with a bank always present a very favorable view of their project and future 
economic prospects. The role of bankers ought to be to tame that vision of the future into a more 
realistic view, in the sense that the view conforms more closely to past economic trends and past 
history of probable success. 
Bankers are supposed to do this by requesting documents that provide evidence that an economic 
unit will be able to fulfill the requirement of the promissory note (usually pay interest and principal 
due on time), and by requesting some guarantees in terms of covenants (e.g., ability to check how 
a business is run or ability to influence business management if needed) and collateral (ability to 
seize assets held by the economic unit in case of default). Bankers are then supposed to check this 
information against a given set of standards that defines what a creditworthy economic unit is. Such 
standards include among others: 

The debt‐service to income ratio: what is a sustainable amount of interest and principal 
payment relative to the income earned? 20%, 30%, 40%? 

The value of monetary balances relative to the value of debt: what is a sustainable amount 
of liquid savings that an economic unit should have relative to an amount of debt? 10%, 
50%, 60%? 

105 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 

The loan‐to‐value ratio: What is the maximum amount of credit a customer can ask relative 
to the value of a collateral? Is it ok to have a mortgage that represents 50% of the house 
value, 80%, 100%? 

In practice, given that the future is uncertain and given the elastic nature of the standards used, 
assessing  creditworthiness  is  not  always  easy.  In  addition,  banking  is  a  competitive  sector  so 
assessing creditworthiness is influenced, not only by the need to check carefully an economic unit’s 
ability to pay, but also by the need to maintain and grow market shares. If a TV maker has sold all 
the black‐and‐white TVs that could be sold, the next step is not to close shop or to rely only on 
repairs and replacements. The next step is to invent color‐TVs, flat‐screen TVs, 3D‐TVs, etc. so that 
consumers have an incentive to ditch their old TVs and buy new ones. The same dynamics are at 
play in banking. Maintaining market share may require banks to “innovate”: 

By pushing existing and new clients into new “low cost” products. A typical example of that 
was the mid‐2000s, when clients were incentivized to go into interest‐only mortgages, pay‐
option mortgages, cash‐out refinance mortgages, home‐equity advances. 

By incentivizing existing clients to go further into debt or to refinance. A typical example of 
that is the 2001 refinancing wave of prime mortgagors when they refinance into fixed‐rate 
mortgages with lower rates. 

By loosening credit standards when the pool of what is deemed a creditworthy client is 
shrinking and new business opportunities must be sought to maintain ROE. After the 2001 
refinancing wave among prime households, banks turned toward non‐prime households 
for new business opportunities. 

Thus, over time, credit standards may loosen. When previously one had to have a debt‐service to 
income  ratio  of  at  most  30%  to  be  considered  creditworthy,  now  banks  are  ok  with  40%.  The 
mortgage boom of the mid‐2000s broke all standards of creditworthiness, with bankers willing to 
provide  high‐interest‐rate  mortgages  to  customers  with  no  proof  of  income,  job  or  assets  (the 
infamous “NINJA loans”) in an amount that represented over 100% of the value of a house. Even 
prisoners could get a mortgage.2 The only way to make that type of mortgage profitable was to 
resell the house at a price high enough to cover the repayment of all the principal and interest due. 
This implies finding another person willing to go into debt to buy the house at this higher price. A 
typical Ponzi game was at play.  
Some bank managers thought that “the whole system was based on raping the public” and refused 
to lower their credit standards; but, this came at the cost of accepting a massive loss of market 
share.3 Most bankers, especially on Wall Street, cannot accept such a decline; in fact they cannot 
even accept stable market shares, as Mr. Blankfein noted: 
It should be clear that self‐regulation has its limits. We rationalised and justified 
the  downward  pricing  of  risk  on  the  grounds  that  it  was  different.  We  did  so 
because  our  self‐interest  in  preserving  and  expending  our  market  share,  as 
competitors,  sometimes  blinds  us—especially  when  exuberance  is  at  its  peak. 
(Blankfein 2009) 
Wall‐street  financial  institutions  are  growth‐oriented  businesses  and  so  must  find  ways  to 
constantly expand their business. The loosening of credit standards will occur all the faster given 
that the banking structure is such that it rewards bankers based on the volume of promissory notes 

106 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
accepted instead of the quality of promissory notes. As explained below, the banking industry has 
moved in that direction since the 1980s at least. 
This pressure to loosen credit standards has been illustrated neatly quite a few times. For example 
Wojnilower noted in 1977: 
In  the  1960s,  commercial  bank  clients  frequently  inquired  how  far  they  could 
prudently go in breaching traditional standards of liquidity and capitalization that 
were  clearly  obsolescent.  My  advice  was  always  the  same—to  stick  with  the 
majority. Anyone out front risked drawing the lightning of the Federal Reserve or 
other regulatory retribution. Anyone who lagged behind would lose their market 
share.  But  those  in  the  middle  had  safety  in  numbers;  they  could  not  all  be 
punished, for fear of the repercussion of the economy as a whole. […] And if the 
problem  grew  too  big  for  the  Federal  Reserve  and  the  banking  system  were 
swamped,  well  then  the  world  would  be  at  an  end  anyhow  and  even  the  most 
cautious of banks would likely be dragged down with the rest. (Wojnilower 1977, 
235‐236) 
John  Maynard  Keynes  noted  more  than  eighty  years  ago  while  talking  about  financial‐market 
participants: “Worldly wisdom teaches that it is better for reputation to fail conventionally than to 
succeed unconventionally.”4 

EVOLUTION OF BANKING SINCE THE 1980s 
The  promotion  of  competition  and  short‐run  rewards,  together  with  the  lack  of  regulatory 
enforcement  (see  Chapter  9)  and  a  monetary  policy  focused  on  fine‐tuning  the  economy  (see 
Chapter  4),  have  pushed  banks  to  move  away  from  a  business  model  that  promotes  careful 
underwriting and toward market‐share growth. Figure 8.4 gives a hint of that trend. This banking 
system is more unstable because it promotes an increase in the size of leverage (indebtedness is 
bigger)  and  a  decline  in  the  quality  of  leverage  (more  dangerous  financial  products,  fewer 
guarantees, less verification).  
Within  banks,  there  are  two  important  desks,  the  loan‐officer  desk  (whose  task  is  to  judge  the 
quality of the projects proposed by potential clients and to tame optimism) and the position‐making 
desk  (whose  task  is  to  finance  and  to  refinance  the  asset  positions  taken  by  the  bank).  In  the 
originate‐and‐hold banking model, the point of a bank is to establish long‐term relationships with 
clients  based  on  trust  and  recurring  credit  agreements,  and  to  make  a  profit  based  on  the  net 
interest  margin.  A  bank  carefully  checks  the  3Cs  of  credit  analysis:  cash  flow,  collateral,  and 
character. Think of George Bailey in It’s a Wonderful Life as the stereotypical banker of this type of 
banking model: he knows his neighborhood well and does business there, he knows most of his 
clients personally, he keeps his clients’ promissory notes in the bank vault, he makes a profit by 
waiting patiently for debts to be serviced; if a client has a problem they sit down and try to work it 
out given that George’s success depends on his client’s success.  
This  form  of  banking  always  exists  at  any  point  in  time  (that  is  what  banking  is  after  all),  but  it 
thrived after the Great Depression when competition in the financial industry was reduced and the 
central  bank  kept  its  refinancing  cost  stable  and  low.  With  increased  competition  from  other 
financial institutions and changes in the monetary policy practices of the Fed, this banking model 
became less viable as the interest‐rate risk became too great. Chapter 5 shows that the Volcker 
107 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
experiment led  to a very  large increase in the level and volatility of the federal funds rate.  This 
occurred at a time when banks had a lot of fixed‐rate long‐term assets on their balance sheet (think 
mortgages) so their net interest margin shrank. This is all the more so given that rising short‐term 
rate  pushed  banks  to  raise  the  rate  on  their  savings  accounts.  Regulation  Q  (a  Fed  regulation 
regarding the maximum interest rate that savings account and certificates of deposit could carry) 
limited  banks’  ability  to  do  so,  and  so  lots  of  economic  units  removed  funds  from  their  savings 
accounts and put them into more lucrative, but still liquid, financial instruments. Regulation Q was 
relaxed as FFR rose and was ultimately abandoned. 
Banks pushed for—and obtained—a deregulation of their business to allow them to diversify the 
assets they could buy and to allow them to provide more attractive rates on their liabilities. This 
ultimately led to the savings and loan (S&L) crisis when savings and loan institutions (banks that 
specialized in holding mortgage notes) were hit by massive credit risk. From the early 1980s, they 
had taken positions in more risky assets to offset the higher cost of their liabilities induced by the 
Volker  experiment,  and  widespread  fraud  by  top  bank  managers  followed  deregulation. 5  Other 
banks were not immune from the crisis and also recorded large defaults (Figure 8.9). The S&L crisis 
marks the end of the originate‐and‐hold banking model. 

 
Figure 8.10 Trading revenues from cash and derivative positions 
Source: OCC Quarterly Report on Bank Derivatives Activities 
Note: Data discontinued for all banks as of Q2 2014 
Note: The number and composition of “Top Banks” vary through time. Currently there are four 
top banks: JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Citibank, and Goldman Sachs. 
This  model  has  now  been  replaced  by  an  originate‐and‐distribute  banking  model.  Profit‐making 
activities have been shifted toward the position‐making desk. While net interest margin is still a 
significant source of profit for banks, its importance has diminished substantially (Figure 8.4). Banks 
no longer look for a long‐term individualized relationship with recurring borrowers; the relation is 
impersonal and judged in minutes through a credit‐scoring method. Promissory notes of customers 
108 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 
are  packaged  and  sold  to  special  purpose  entities  that  fund  the  purchase  by  issuing  bonds 
(mortgage‐backed  securities,  collateralized  debt  obligations,  etc.).  Banks  make  money  from  the 
fees that come from passing the debt service to the SPEs, and have been more involved in trading 
activities, especially top banks that currently get between 6% and 9% of their gross revenue from 
trading (Figure 8.10).  
Summary of Major Points 
1‐  The  main  assets  of  commercial  banks  are  mortgages,  consumer  credit  and  other  promissory 
notes of economic units resulting in advances provided to the private sector. 
2‐  The  main  liabilities  of  commercial  banks  are  deposits  of  all  sorts,  with  small  time‐deposits 
(certificates of deposits) and savings accounts representing the majority of the liabilities. 
3‐ Over the past 30 years, the importance of commercial banks and other depository institutions
has  declined,  with  a  greater  share  of  financial  assets  held  within  the  financial  industry  going  to
money managers and issuers of securitized products. 
4‐ The business of banking involves settling payments between private non‐bank economic units, 
providing  opportunities  for  small  savers  to  access  higher  earning  financial  assets,  supplying  the
currency to the non‐bank sectors, and helping economic units to finance economic and speculative
activities. 
5‐ While the majority of the income of banks comes from interest receipts, the share of that income 
has declined by 20 percentage points since 1980.  
6‐ The size of leverage in the banking industry has declined. Major banks (those with over $1 billion 
in assets) take more risks on their liability side (more leverage) and asset side (reliance on riskier 
financial assets that provide higher ROA). 
7‐ The business of banking is influenced by all sorts of internal and external factors that influence
the value of their assets, default risk, and the interest rate they pay on their liabilities. On one side, 
banks try to anticipate adverse changes in these factors to protect their balance sheet, but on the
other side each bank also will tend to ignore those factors, or to discount them, if anticipating them
decreases its current market share. 
8‐  Banking  is  about  anticipating  the  future  while  also  keeping  up  with  the  competition  to  avoid
losing  market  shares.  As  such,  credit  standards  are  elastic  and  tend  to  loosen  over  a  period  of
economic prosperity and to sharply tighten during a recession. 
9‐  Banks  have  moved  away  from  a  business  structure  that  involves  acquiring  non‐tradable 
promissory  notes  and  keeping  them  until  they  mature.  Much  more  emphasis  is  put  on  trading
securities. 
 
Keywords 
Bank  profit,  promissory  note,  loan  and  lease,  security,  certificate  of  deposit,  mortgage,  credit 
service, payment services, retail portfolio services, credit standards, maturity transformation, net
interest income, net capital gain, return on equity, return on assets, leverage, loan‐to‐value ratio, 
debt service, originate and hold model, originate and distribute model 
 

109 
 

CHAPTER 8: THE PRIVATE BANKING BUSINESS 

Review Questions 
Q1: What is the impact of a decline in the value of bank assets on the net worth of banks? Why is
that a problem for banks? 
Q2: Why do banks exist? 
Q3: If interest rates on the liabilities of banks go up, what happens to their profit? 
Q4: In order to provide an advance of funds, what does a bank do? Why does it need to do that? 
Q5:  Why  does  the  profitability  of  a  bank  depend  on  the  ability  of  its  customers  to  fulfill  their 
promissory notes? 
Q6: Have banks become more or less dependent on the ability of their customer to service their 
debts? 
Q7: Do big banks take more or less risk than small banks? How so? 
Q8:  Why  is  it  important  for  a  bank  to  loosen  its  credit  standards  at  about  the  same  pace  as  its 
competitors? What happens if it is more conservative than others? Less conservative then others?
 
Suggested readings  
For  a  succinct  view  of  the  evolution  of  banking  since  the  1960s  and  a  bullish  view  of  its  recent
development,  read  “Banking”  a  2004  speech  by  Chairman  Greenspan: 
http://www.federalreserve.gov/BOARDDOCS/Speeches/2004/20041005/default.htm  
Hyman, H.P (1984) “Banking and industry between the two wars: The United States,” Journal of 
European Economic History, 13 (Special Issue): 235‐272. 
 
                                                            
1 See Black, W.K. (2005) The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One. Austin: Texas University Press. 
2  See  Part  4  of  Klein,  A.  and  Goldfarb,  Z.A.  (2008)  “The  bubble,”  The  Washington  Post,  June  15,  16,  17  at 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp‐dyn/content/article/2008/06/14/AR2008061401479_4.html 
3  See  Schwartz,  N.D.  (2007)  “Can  the  Mortgage  Crisis  Swallow  a  Town?”  The  New  York  Times,  September  2  at 
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/02/business/yourmoney/02village.html 
4
 In 
Chapter 
12 
of 
the 
General 
Theory. 
Available 
at 
https://www.marxists.org/reference/subject/economics/keynes/general‐theory/ch12.htm 
5 See Black, W.K. (2005) The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One. Austin: Texas University Press. 

110 
 

 

CHAPTER 9: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
Why banks need to be regulated and supervised 
How banks are regulated and supervised  
What has led to a decline in the ability and willingness to regulate banks and
to enforce existing regulations 
Why  economists  may  have  different  views  about  the  more  relevant  way  to 
perform bank regulation 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 
It may surprise you to know that the banking sector is one of the most regulated industries in the 
United  States,  with  each  bank  having  to  file  regulatory  documents  with  several  agencies.  These 
regulations determine how banks should and should not operate their business in terms of many 
aspects;  from  disclosure  of  information  to  potential  customers,  to  means  of  determining 
creditworthiness of a potential client, to the quantity of reserves to hold, to management issues, 
among others. For example the National Association of Mortgage Brokers noted in 2006 
Mortgage  brokers  are  governed  by  a  host  of  federal  laws  and  regulations.  For 
example,  mortgage  brokers  must  comply  with:  the  Real  Estate  Settlement 
Procedures Act (RESPA), the Truth in Lending Act (TILA), the Home Ownership and 
Equity  Protection  Act  (HOEPA),  the  Fair  Credit  Reporting  Act  (FCRA),  the  Equal 
Credit  Opportunity  Act  (ECOA),  the  Gramm‐Leach‐Bliley  Act  (GLBA),  and  the 
Federal Trade Commission Act  (FTC Act), as well as fair lending and fair housing 
laws. Many of these statutes, coupled with their implementing regulations, provide 
substantive  protection  to  borrowers  who  seek  mortgage  financing.  These  laws 
impose  disclosure  requirements  on  brokers,  define  high‐cost  loans,  and  contain 
anti‐discrimination  provisions.  Additionally,  mortgage  brokers  are  under  the 
oversight of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the 
Federal Trade Commission (FTC); and to the extent their promulgated laws apply 
to mortgage brokers, the Federal Reserve Board, the Internal Revenue Service, and 
the Department of Labor. 
Let us focus on four examples of regulation. 

EXAMPLES OF BANK REGULATIONS 
RESERVE REQUIREMENT RATIOS 
The  reserve  requirement  ratio  (RRR)  dictates  the  quantity  of  total  reserves  banks  must  have  in 
proportion to the accounts they issued (see Chapter 3). Table 9.1 shows what the ratios look like 
today in the US. If a bank issued less than $15.2 million of transaction accounts (checking accounts 
and others) it does not have to have any reserves, 3% between 15.2 to $110.2 million worth of 
outstanding transaction accounts, and 10% beyond that. Some countries do not have any reserve 
requirements. 

112 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 

Liability Type 

Requirement 
% of liabilities 

Effective date 

$0 to $15.2 million2  

0

1‐21‐16

More than $15.2 million to $110.2 million3

3

1‐21‐16

More than $110.2 million 

10 

1‐21‐16 

Nonpersonal time deposits 

12‐27‐90 

Eurocurrency liabilities 

0

12‐27‐90

Net transaction accounts 1  

Table 9.1 Reserve requirement ratios for the United States. 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System 

 

CAPITAL ADEQUACY RATIOS 
Say that a bank has the following balance sheet: the value of assets is $100, bank accounts are $90 
and net worth is $10. The net worth acts has a buffer for account holders against losses on assets, 
i.e. as long as, the value of assets falls by 10% or less, the bank can fully repay all account holders 
by liquidating its assets (assuming, of course, that at time of liquidation markets are well behaved 
and allow quick liquidation at low  cost).  Regulators want to  make sure that banks have enough 
capital to protect their creditors against a substantial decline in the value of bank assets. This is all 
the more so given that the government may guarantee that customers will get the funds in their 
bank accounts even if a bank goes bankrupt.  
Since  1988,  with  the  Basel  Accords,  central  banks  have  tried  to  make  capital  regulation  more 
uniform  across  the  world.  Table  9.2  shows  the  current  capital  adequacy  ratios  (CAR)  for  FDIC‐
insured banks. We will focus on the total risk‐based CAR (Total RBC ratio column). In the US, a bank 
should have at least 8% of capital, preferably at least 10%, relative to its risk‐weighted assets. This 
means that the maximum weighted balance‐sheet leverage ought to be 12.5 (A/E = 1/0.08) and 
preferably 10. 

Table 9.2 Capital adequacy ratios. 
Source: FDIC Capital Regulation Manual. 

 

Assets are weighed according to the risk that their nominal value falls. Assume that a bank has the 
following balance sheet (Figure 9.1): 

113 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 

Assets
Mortgage notes = $40          (100%) 
Municipal bonds = $30         (80%) 
U.S. Treasuries = $30             (0%) 
Reserves = $10                        (0%) 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank accounts = $104 
Capital = $6 

Figure 9.1 Bank balance sheet with weights 

 

The ratio capital/assets is $6/$110 = 5.45%, which is below the 8% minimum CAR. However, assets 
weigh more heavily if they have a higher chance of generating losses. Mortgage notes are illiquid 
and contain credit risk so they are attached a 100% weight, municipals contain credit risk but are 
somewhat liquid so they have a weight of 80%, U.S. Treasuries contain no credit risk and trade in 
the most liquid financial market in the world so they are attached no weight. Same with reserves. 
So the actual capital ratio is $6/($40 + $24) = 9.38%, not ideal but adequate.  
Basel Accords have evolved over time as central banks have tried to account for changes in the 
financial industry and for drawbacks of the previous versions of the Accords (the Accords are in 
their third version). As one may expect, the way to set the weights and proper value of assets can 
get very complicated. The last section will explain why one may doubt that this type of regulation 
will be successful. 

CAMELS RATING 
Beside the well‐known RRR and CAR, regulators such as the FDIC also calculate a CAMELS rating for 
each bank: 

C: Capital adequacy 

A: Asset quality 

M: Management quality 

E: Earnings level and quality 

L: Liquidity 

S: Sensitivity to market risk (change in the nominal value of securities) 

CAMELS rating goes from 1 (strong business) to 5 (highly troubled). A rating of 4 or higher leads 
regulators to check carefully a bank and if necessary to issue a cease and desist order 
In  a  cease  and  desist  order,  a  bank  must  stop  immediately  its  dangerous  activities  (risky  credit, 
improper management, too low capital ratio, etc.) and must find means to restore its soundness 
permanently (as measured by the CAMELS rating). Restoring permanent soundness (i.e., desisting 
from dangerous activities) may imply significant changes in management and business strategies, 
and may involve finding reliable sources of funding, and other relevant restructuring operations. 
The board of a troubled bank is given a limited amount of time (e.g., 60 days) to comply with the 
demands of its regulator. If the board cannot comply, the bank is closed and the regulator uses the 
least costly procedure to take care of the problem bank: liquidation or facilitation of acquisition by 
another bank. 
 

114 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 

UNDERWRITING REQUIREMENTS 
One would think that banks carefully check the creditworthiness of a customer before they accept 
her  promissory  note.  They  would  ask  for  proof  of  income  and  verify  with  the  Internal  Revenue 
Services (nobody inflates his income on an income‐tax statement), carefully determine the value of 
available collateral, and judge ability to pay based on the overall debt service that would come due. 
After all, this is what banks are supposed to do; their job is precisely to judge ability to pay and to 
tame expectations.  
As  noted  in  Chapter  8,  during  the  housing  boom  all  this  went  out  of  the  window,  banks 
manufactured creditworthiness by inflating it on credit application (sometimes raising the income 
stated on a mortgage application without the knowledge of the applicant), they did not bother to 
check with the IRS even though it can be done easily (they did not do so for the obvious reason that 
they lied on the application), they maintained a black list of house appraisers who were honest and 
would  not  provide  an  inflated  valuation  of  a  house,  they  qualified  households  on  the  basis  of 
interest payments calculated from a very low interest rate (aka teaser rate) that would prevail only 
for a few months. It is as if your mechanic did everything to wreck the engine of your car. So it 
turned out regulations had to be put in place to tell bankers what they are supposed to do!  
This is included in Title 14 of the Dodd‐Frank act. It forces mortgagees to determine the capacity to 
pay of mortgagors on the basis of other means than the expected refinancing sources and expected 
equity in the house, as well as to verify income and to qualify individuals based on the full debt 
service: 
A determination under this subsection of a consumer’s ability to repay a residential 
mortgage loan shall include consideration of the consumer’s credit history, current 
income, expected income the consumer is reasonably assured of receiving, current 
obligations, debt‐to‐income ratio or the residual income the consumer will have 
after  paying  non‐mortgage  debt  and  mortgage‐related  obligations,  employment 
status,  and  other  financial  resources  other  than  the  consumer’s  equity  in  the 
dwelling  or  real  property  that  secures  repayment  of  the  loan.  A  creditor  shall 
determine the ability of the consumer to repay using a payment schedule that fully 
amortizes the loan over the term of the loan. (Dodd‐Frank Act, 768) 
While Title 14 is limited to residential mortgages (commercial mortgages were a big problem during 
the S&L crisis and other promissory notes should also follow the same underwriting methods), this 
Title  is  a  great  contribution  to  financial  stability…if  enforced.  The  need  for  such  a  regulation 
suggests how much the banking industry has changed for the worse.  

WHY  ARE  THERE  STILL  FREQUENT  AND  SIGNIFICANT 
FINANCIAL CRISES IF REGULATION IS SO TIGHT? 
This  is,  at  least,  a  three‐part  answer:  1‐  there  was  some  deregulation  that  has  promoted 
competition and concentration, 2‐ the willingness and ability to enforce the law has diminished, 3‐ 
regulatory arbitrage and regulatory apathy. 

DEREGULATION, COMPETITION AND CONCENTRATION 
115 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 
The  Great  Depression  put  in  place  financial  regulations  that  compartmentalized  the  financial 
industry. Banks were forbidden to perform some activities related to financial markets, they were 
limited  in  the  types  of  assets  they  could  hold,  and  they  had  access  to  a  low  cost  and  stable 
refinancing source via the central bank. This led to a very stable banking system with very few and 
limited problems. Table 9.3 shows the gross saving of depository institutions grew at a slower but 
steadier pace compared to the post‐1970s period. The number of failures and assistances was also 
dramatically smaller—around 4 failures and assistances per year versus 113 from the 1980s—and 
represented only 2.8 percent of all failures and assistances that occurred between 1945 and 2010. 
Taking a broader historical perspective, Figure 9.2 shows that the stability of the banking from 1940 
to 1980 also stands out.  
Gross Saving, Average 
Growth Rate 
1945‐1971 
1982‐2010 
Gross Saving, Std. 
Deviation 
1945‐1971 
1982‐2010 
Insured Bank Failures 
and Assistances 
1945‐1971 
1982‐2010 

U.S. 
Depository 
Institutions 
8.2% 
24.0% 

Credit 
Unions 

Commercial 
Banks 

15.1% 
14.1% 

9.1% 
11.7% 

 

 

 

15.1% 
225.8%

20.1% 
31.2% 

16.4% 
26.1% 

Number (% of total) 

Yearly Average 

100 (2.8%) 
3266 (93.5%) 

3.7 
112.6 

 
Table 9.3 Gross saving and failures of FDIC‐insured depository institutions. 
Sources: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation. 
Note: Gross saving is defined as undistributed profit plus consumption of fixed capital 
Chapter 8 notes that the enthusiasm of banks for the originate‐and‐hold model declined sharply in 
the 1980s. They pushed for a deregulation of their industry to be able to offer higher interest rate 
on  their  liabilities  and  to  widen  the  type  of  assets  they  could  hold  (1980  Depository  Institution 
Deregulation  and  Monetary  Control  Act,  1982  Garn  St.  Germain  Act).  Then,  banks  lobbied  to 
deregulate  branching  restrictions  (1994  Riegle‐Neal  Interstate  Banking  and  Branching  Efficiency 
Act), to be able to participate in broader financial activities (1999 Financial Modernization Act), and 
to limit regulation in the derivative markets (2000 Commodity Futures Modernization Act).  
Today, the U.S. banking industry is highly concentrated (Figure 9.3) and a few large financial holding 
companies dominate the industry. 80% of the assets of the banking industry are concentrated in 
the 595 largest banks that account for about 10% of FDIC‐insured banks. Among these, the top 5/7 
banks hold almost all the derivative contracts held by banks. Table 9.4 shows the recent data about 
derivative  holding  concentration  among  FDIC‐insured  institutions;  the  seven  biggest  institutions 
hold  97%  of  derivate  contracts  held  by  FDIC‐insured  institutions,  worth  almost  $170  trillion 
notionally. The high concentration of the industry means that if one of the banks fails, it may have 
a major impact on the financial system. Banks may become “too big to fail,” and so must be saved 
even  though  they  are  not  economically  viable.  This  may  promote  moral  hazard  and  increase 
financial instability over time. 

116 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 

 
Figure 9.2 Annual number of bank suspensions (1892‐1941) and bank failures (1934‐2015) 
Sources: FDIC (Bank failures) and Monetary and Banking Statistics 1914‐1941 (Bank 
suspensions) 
Note: Bank suspensions include banks that closed temporarily or permanently on account of 
financial difficulty; excludes times of special bank holiday. Bank failures refer to banks that 
closed permanently. 
 

117 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 

 
Figure 9.3 Concentration of the banking industry 
Source: FDIC Graph Book 
Note: Largest FDIC Insured Bank have over $10 Billion of Assets (595 institutions in 2016 or 10% 
of the industry) 
 

Report Date

Derivative
Contracts
(Trillions)

Percent of
Total
Derivative
Contracts

Number of
Banks

Spot Foreign
Exchange
Contracts
(Billions)

Size
Grouping

December
31, 2015

$169.3

97%

7

$928.0

7 Largest
Participants

December
31, 2015

$4.7

3%

1,400

$105.5

All Other
Participants

Table 9.4. Concentration of derivatives notional amounts 
Source: FDIC Graph Book 

 

DEENFORCEMENT AND DESUPERVISION 
Overall,  there  was  a  deregulatory  trend  but  the  fact  remains  that  this  industry  is  still  heavily 
regulated. However, for a set of regulations to work properly it has to be enforced. With the return 
of free‐market thinking as a dominant framework of thought in the 1970s, enforcement took a toll. 
Free‐market thinkers who do not believe in government intervention were put in charge of major 
regulatory bodies; individuals such as Alan Greenspan at the Fed, Robert Rubin at the Treasury, and 
Christopher  Cox  at  the  SEC.  These  are  individuals  who  believe  in  the  self‐cleansing  and  self‐
stabilizing properties of market.1 As such, according to them, there is no need to do anything to 
prevent fraud and dangerous financial practices, or to make sure that banks do not get involved in 
118 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 
predatory business practices. Markets take care of it, after all, as the thought goes, a business is 
judged by its clients so if the clients do not like what a business does, the business will close.  
Thus, in recent years, regulators like the Federal Reserve deliberately loosely implemented existing 
regulations  or  chose  “to  not  conduct  consumer  compliance  examinations  of,  nor  to  investigate 
consumer complaints regarding, nonbank subsidiaries of bank holding companies”.2 In addition, the 
Federal Reserve and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) blocked efforts of federal 
regulators, and states like Georgia and North Carolina were prohibited by OCC and the OTS from 
investigating local subsidiaries of nationally chartered banks. Chairman Bair at the FDIC worked with 
Federal Reserve Governor Gramlich to raise concerns about predatory mortgage practices starting 
in 2001 but their effort did not lead anywhere. Chairman Born at the Commodity Futures and Trade 
Commission  (CFTC)  raised  concerned  about  derivatives  and  wanted  to  make  them  more 
transparent but was shut down by Congress.3 
In 1994, a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report strongly criticized the existing derivatives 
legislation. It noted that “no comprehensive industry or federal regulatory requirements existed to 
ensure  that  U.S.  OTC  derivatives  dealers  followed  good  risk‐management  practices”  and  that 
“regulatory gaps and weaknesses that presently exist must be addressed, especially considering the 
rapid growth in derivatives activity”.4 None of the recommendations was implemented and instead 
large cuts were made by Congress to the budget of the GAO. These cuts were estimated to reduce 
the staff of the GAO by 850 persons (20 percent of its employees).  
Other  regulators  also  suffered  large  cuts  to  their  staff.  The  FDIC  staff  was  cut  drastically  and 
constantly from 20,000 employees in the early 1990s to 5,000 employees right before the Great 
Recession  (Figure  9.4).  This  occurred  at  the  same  time  as  the  financial  industry  became  more 
concentrated and more complex. In addition, the cut in staff was much more rapid than the decline 
in  the  number  of  FDIC  insured  institutions  to  be  supervised,  thereby  increasing  the  burden  of 
supervision on each employee. This double trend of increasing complexity and increasing burden 
on supervisors drastically decreased their capacity to perform effective supervision and regulations.  
The SEC, under Christopher Cox (who, like Alan Greenspan, is a follower of Ayn Rand’s economic 
thinking), also decreased its staff and, by 2009, the Securities and Exchange Commission had 400 
people to examine 11000 investment advisers, which led it to contract with private auditors and 
other  external  reviewers.  In  addition,  the  SEC  did  not  develop  the  necessary  tools  it  needed  to 
perform effective regulation.  

REGULATORY ARBITRAGE 
Beyond  deregulation,  desupervision  and  deenforcement,  banks  themselves  have  always  found 
means to bypass partly some of the regulations that they have found too constraining. An example 
of that are capital regulations that banks have bypassed partly through securitization. Securitization 
allows banks to remove highly‐weighted assets (that is carrying high risks) from their balance sheet 
without compromising their profitability. Regulatory arbitrage is a common response of banks to 
new regulations. To counter it, regulation needs to be flexible and broad enough, and regulators 
need  to  act  quickly;  both  requirements  are  lacking  with  regulators  today  focused  on  limiting 
intervention to avoid hurting bank profits and competitiveness with foreign institutions. In addition, 
a bank can choose its main regulator, and a bank can change its regulator if it thinks another one 
will  be  more  lenient.  This  “regulator  shopping”  is  all  the  more  prevalent  given  that  regulators 

119 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 
compete to get the most banks under their wings because regulators are funded partly through the 
fees they charge for supervision. 

 
Figure 9.4 Number of employees at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. 
Source: FDIC. 

THEORIES  OF  BANK  CRISES  AND  BANKING  REGULATION: 
TWO VIEWS 
The way  the  banking system is regulated heavily depends on regulators’ understanding of what 
causes  banking  crises.  There  are  two  broad  views  regarding  the  origins  of  banking  crises  and 
financial  crises  more  generally;  one  states  that  crises  are  random  events  in  an  otherwise  self‐
stabilizing economic system based on  market principles, another states  that  bank  crises are the 
result of the inner working of markets. 

LAISSEZ FAIRE, LAISSEZ PASSER: CRISES AS RANDOM EVENTS 
Greenspan summed up neatly the first view when he characterized the 2008 financial crisis as a 
“once‐in‐a‐century  credit  tsunami.”  Crises  are  equivalent  to  weather  calamities  that  affect  the 
return  on  assets  (see  Chapter  7).  These  adverse  random  shocks  are  amplified  by  individual 
imperfections  (think  of  any  deviation  from  the  cold  rational  homo  economicus)  and  market 
imperfections (lack of information, etc.). Market imperfections can themselves contribute to the 
growing risk of financial crises if they contribute to the mispricing of securities, which leads rational 
agents to take too much risk on their assets and liabilities given the price signal. Thus, according to 
this view, the recent crisis is the product of mispriced assets (like CDOs) that led to the issuance of 
too many of them (see discussion about embedded leverage in Chapter 7), and of a “black‐swan” 

120 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 
event, that is, an unusually large negative shock. One might call this view the “shit‐happens” view 
of financial crises. 
In this type of view, there is no point in trying to promote a regulatory framework that proactively 
helps prevent crises and limit their strength—in the same way no one can proactively prevent the 
occurrence  and  reduce  the  strength  of  tsunamis.  Market  mechanisms  weed  out  problems  by 
themselves  because,  with  enough  disclosure,  financial‐market  participants  will  not  engage  in 
fraudulent  practices,  and  unsustainable  business  will  be  closed  down.  Anything  that  promotes 
market  mechanisms  is  praised  and  that  includes  the  recent  innovations  in  derivatives  and 
securitization.  Policy  makers  such  as  Alan  Greenspan  and  academics  such  as  Philip  Das  made 
statements in the mid 2000 that illustrate well this position: 
Development of financial products, such as asset‐backed securities, collateral loan 
obligations, and credit default swaps, that facilitate the dispersion of risk… These 
increasingly complex financial instruments have contributed to the development 
of a far more flexible, efficient, and hence resilient financial system than the one 
that existed just a quarter‐century ago. (Greenspan 2004, 2005) 
Financial  risks,  particularly  credit  risks,  are  no  longer  borne  by  banks.  They  are 
increasingly  moved  off  balance  sheets.  Assets  are  converted  into  tradable 
securities, which in turn eliminates credit risks. (Das 2006) 
Given  that  markets  usually  get  it  right,  instead  of  having  regulations  that  constrain  market 
mechanisms,  regulation  should  focus  on  limiting  the  destructive  impact  of  financial  crises  on 
economic activity and improving disclosure of information and market mechanisms. Following the 
tsunami analogy, the goal is to build high enough seawalls so that protection is available against 
most tsunamis. If there is a “once‐in‐a‐century” tsunami…well…too bad…at least we tried!  
In terms of banking regulation, the goal is to put in place large enough liquidity and capital buffers 
in the balance sheets of banks. The Basel accords are an example of such regulatory view: 
Given the scope and speed with which the recent and previous crises have been 
transmitted around the globe as well as the unpredictable nature of future crises, 
it is critical that all countries raise the resilience of their banking sectors to both 
internal and external shocks. (Basel 2010a: 2) 
With enough capital, banks will be able to protect their creditors against most declines in the value 
of their assets. With enough liquid assets, the value of assets will decline less than it would have 
otherwise. At the same time, having too much capital and liquidity puts downward pressures on 
the ROE that banks can earn because leverage declines and ROA is lowered (the more liquid an 
asset, the lower the ROA). The point, therefore, becomes to find the optimal level of capital and 
liquidity.  The  move  toward  risk  management  is  the  ultimate  expression  of  this  belief.  It  uses 
complex  mathematical  algorithms  to  determine  what  the  appropriate  level  of  buffers  is  given 
existing risks on‐ and off‐balance sheets. The goal has been to refine the measurement of different 
risks as well as the methods used to calculate the appropriate level of each buffer. The government 
has a limited role to play in determining appropriate buffers, especially for “sophisticated” financial 
institutions. The government also has not much to say about the way banks should be managed, 
the proper underwriting procedures, and the types of assets that banks should be allow to hold. 
Bankers know best. 

121 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 

SAVE  CAPITALISM 
CONTRADICTIONS 

FROM 

ITSELF: 

CRISES 

AS 

INTERNAL 

Another view of financial crises argues that they are the normal result of profit‐seeking operations 
of  banks,  and  that  the  way  the  banking  system  is  structured  greatly  dampens  or  amplifies  the 
destabilizing  effect  of  profit‐seeking  operations.  While  an  unstable  banking  system  can  be 
attributed in part to greed and irrational or “bad” people, the most important contributor is the 
way the banking system is set up. The more of a role is given to market mechanisms, the more 
unstable the financial system will be. The issue is not one of mispricing, lack of disclosure, black 
swan, massive tsunami, or imperfections. Tsunamis are created by the very practices of banks when 
trying to make a buck and, if banks are left alone, their practices will lead to a “once‐in‐a‐century 
tsunami.” Put differently, financial crises are not the results of “bad luck” because nature threw a 
tantrum; banks make their own luck. As such, one may also doubt that capital regulation and other 
buffer‐requirement  approach  will  do  much  to  prevent  financial  crises. 5  They  are  too  passive 
regulations. 
As  explained  in  Chapter  8,  over  a  period  of  stability,  banks  are  incentivized  to  change  their 
underwriting  practices  by  lowering  credit  standards  and/or  deemphasizing  income  as  the  main 
means of servicing debts. Some of this loosening is welcomed when banks have tightened credit 
standards so much that economic growth cannot proceed well. This tends to happen after financial 
crises,  when  bankers  become  too  careful. 6  However,  credit  standards  are  elastic  and,  when 
profitability is threatened, loosening credit standards is the easy road, especially during a period of 
economic  stability  when  economic  news  is  good.  Periods  of  economic  stability  feed  the  models 
used by bankers with information that suggests that leverage is safe and risk‐taking is warranted.  
Beyond banks, other financial institutions such as pension funds have an incentive to buy CDOs and 
other  risky  financial  assets  (even  a  non‐investment  grade  securities)  in  order  to  maintain  the 
targeted ROE they promised their pensioners; this is so especially when interest rates are very low. 
More broadly, corporate businesses have some profitability target to meet that is largely invariant 
to the growth of their assets, thereby pushing them to innovate and to use leverage to reach that 
target. Again, a very rational response to profitability pressures defined by a target ROE.  
As such, risk‐management tools may provide information that suggests that it is safer not to engage 
in  certain  activities,  but  this  information  will  be  ignored  if  it  threatens  market  shares  and 
profitability: 
To  some  extent  […]  all  risk  management  tools  are  unable  to  model/present  the 
most  severe  forms  of  financial  shocks  in  a  fashion  that  is  credible  to  senior 
management  […].To  the  extent  that  users  of  stress  tests  consider  these 
assumptions to be unrealistic, too onerous, […] incorporating unlikely correlations 
or having similar issues which detract from their credibility, the stress tests can be 
dismissed  by  the  target  audience  and  its  informational  content  thereby  lost. 
(Counterparty Risk Management Policy Group III 2008: 70, 84) 
This is so especially in an environment where it is difficult to reach the target ROE and the search 
for yield is intensive. Chapter 8 illustrates how the banking system (and financial system as a whole) 
is driven by competitive pressures and the need to stick with the majority to avoid losing market 
shares. As such, financial institutions will engage in unsustainable financial practices if that means 
keeping profitability up. Given that profit is the only relevant metric to judge a business, market 
122 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 
mechanisms will not weed out unsustainable practices if they sustain profit. As these accumulate, 
the economic system becomes more fragile and ultimately collapses under a debt‐deflation (see 
Chapter 14).  
The point is that the weeding out of bad apples that market proponents argue occurs to prevent 
crises does not happen. The problem comes from too much focus on profit as the key metrics of 
health for a business. From the bank managers’ standpoint, if the business is profitable, it means 
they do what customers want and so are fulfilling a need (never mind that this may involve “raping 
the public” as shown in Chapter 8). Regulators see profit as a key measure of health because profit 
grows  capital  (see  Chapter  1)  and  so  improves  buffers  against  crises.  However,  from  a  financial 
stability perspective, a key issue is not merely if profit is generated but how that profit is generated. 
If this second question is ignored, the weeding out mechanism used by markets is the crisis itself, 
and that ends up destroying the entire economy and wiping out any buffer available. So much for 
a smooth self‐stabilizing mechanism. 
Given that credit standards are elastic concepts, one may wonder if there is a means to know what 
a sustainable credit practice is and how to use that for regulatory purpose. Fortunately yes. Hyman 
P.  Minsky  provides  us  with  a  useful  categorization  of  underwriting  practices  in  terms  of  Hedge, 
Speculative and Ponzi finance. Chapter 14 studies this categorization more carefully. The main point 
is that if debt is underwritten on the basis of income (income‐based credit), it is much less likely to 
lead to financial instability. If, instead, banks grant advances by qualifying clients on the basis of the 
expected rise in the value of a collateral or other assets (asset‐based credit), then the economic 
system  is  prone  to  financial  instability.  The  recent  housing  boom  with  its  dangerous  mortgage 
practices, presented in Chapter 8, is an example of such unsustainable underwriting practices.  
The problem is not merely one of knowing if a customer will be able to service his debt (the main 
concern  of  banks),  but  also  how  a  customer  will  service  his  debt:  servicing  debt  with  income  is 
sustainable,  debt  servicing  by  liquidating  assets  is  not.  It  is  not  sustainable  because  while  an 
individual may be able to do it by relying on a bonanza (asset prices went up as expected and can 
be liquidated easily), for the system as a whole it is impossible to liquidate assets. Markets rely on 
a balance of buyers and sellers and if  a significant  proportion of debtors rely on a strategy that 
involves selling assets to service debts, asset prices will plunge when liquidation occurs. A Ponzi 
strategy is sustainable only for so long, given that the number of participants (and indebtedness) 
must exponentially grow to keep the strategy going. 
With  the  H/S/P  categorization  in  mind,  the  point  is  to  discourage,  and  if  necessary,  forbid  any 
economic growth process that is not based on sound financial practices (income‐based credit), even 
if everybody is profiting from the continuation of this process in the short term, and even if the 
financial  community  ends  up  considering  those  practices  acceptable  and  a  normal  way  to  do 
business. In order to do so, the financial practices of economic agents should be checked carefully 
and growing signs of asset‐based credit should be tackled immediately, even if there is no bubble, 
no rising default rate, rising wealth and profit.  
This policy agenda is, of course, much broader and more ambitious than the previous one, but its 
relevance has been demonstrated many times. For example, prior to the savings and loan crisis, 
several  in‐field  supervisors  wanted  to  shut  down  some  thrifts  that  were  recording  large  profits, 
because  they  were  suspected  of  being  involved  in  Ponzi  finance  sustained  by  massive  frauds. 
However, there were strong pressures from their bosses and politicians not to close these thrifts 

123 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 
because  their  profitability  made  them  models  for  the  industry. 7  Those  thrifts  were  allowed  to 
continue to operate but ended up costing hundreds of billions of dollars when they failed.  
Similarly,  during  the  housing  boom  of  the  mid‐2000s,  households’  wealth  grew  very  rapidly, 
financial companies registered record‐high profits, and homeownership also reached a record high, 
but all these gains were wiped out once the economy collapsed. Homeownership is back to its level 
prior to the housing boom, and is still falling (Figure 9.5). 

Figure 9.5 Homeownership rate in the U.S. (Percent). 
Source: U.S. Census Bureau 

 

Steps  should  have  been  taken  since  at  least  2003  to  prevent  the  unsustainable  growth  of 
homeownership and dangerous business practices. This should have been done by forbidding no‐
doc mortgages, by limiting access to pay‐option mortgages to households with enough cash buffer 
and income, by not allowing financial institutions to create Ponzi‐generating financial innovations, 
and  by  regulating  closely  all  new  financial  activities.  Instead,  in  2004,  Greenspan  praised  the 
dynamic mortgage market and argued that rising mortgage debt among U.S. households was not a 
problem because households’ wealth was rising thanks to rapidly rising home prices; precisely what 
asset‐based credit is all about.8 
Finally, asset‐based credit is impossible to buffer properly in an economically profitable way and so 
should not be allowed at least by banks. An alternative is to remove any government backing from 
economic  activities  that  rely  on,  or  promote,  asset‐based  credit,  which  implies  isolating  the 
payment system from those activities.  
In  the  end,  CDOs  and  other  financial  innovations  were  problematic  not  because  they  were 
mispriced (although they surely were), but because they were encouraging financial practices that 
are  unsustainable  even  if  priced  correctly.  Asset‐based  credit  always  fails  because  there  is 
ultimately no income to meet the debt service and assets must be liquidated in distress. Financial‐
market participants are always willing to pay for something if that means more profit (even more 
so when bonuses are based on short‐term profitability), and they will get a better idea of what to 
124 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 
pay with more information. But profit‐seeking activity is different from financial‐crisis avoidance 
activity. In fact, these two activities usually are complete opposite activities and the latter is never 
on the radar of any particular firm (“if we fail, we fail together, nobody gets blamed; let me focus 
on my profit” is the thought as Wojnilower illustrates in Chapter 8).  
Summary of Major Points 
1‐ Banks are heavily regulated because they are at the core of the payment system. If they fail en 
masse,  the  economy  freezes  because  other  economic  units  cannot  get  paid,  cannot  make 
payments, and cannot obtain currency. 
2‐ Banks must have a certain proportion of capital relative to the weighted value of their assets. 
This  is  supposed  to  allow  banks  to  be  able  to  sustain  large  unexpected  adverse  shocks  on  their
assets, while still being able to pay their creditors 
3‐ Banks must have a certain proportion of reserves relative to the outstanding value of the bank 
accounts that they have issued. This is supposed to allow them to meet unexpected large demand
for cash by customers. 
4‐ If banks do not comply with regulations, regulators may issue a cease and desist order and give
a limited amount of time for a bank to comply. After that time, the bank is either sold to another 
bank or its assets are liquidated to pay the creditors. 
5‐ The banking industry has become highly concentrated and highly dependent on derivatives and
capital  gains  to  maintain  its  profitability.  This  is  the  results  of  a  period  of  deregulation,
desupervision and deenforcemnt that have allowed major banks to broaden their activities.  
6‐ Some economists believe that markets self‐regulate and that, at most, banks only need to be 
protected against the most probably shocks that may adversely impact their balance sheet. This 
can be done by passive regulation such as capital regulation. Other economists believe that banks
make  their  own  luck,  that  is,  that  financial  crises  are  the  product  on  the  loosening  of  credit 
standards during period of economic prosperity. As such, regulation of the banking business must 
be more thorough, flexible and proactive, and must focus on the type of assets acquired by, and
underwriting methods used by banks. 
 
Keywords 
Reserve  requirement,  capital  requirement,  CAMELS  rating,  efficient  markets,  financial  instability
hypothesis, risk management techniques, underwriting requirements 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: What is the role of capital regulation? Underwriting regulation? 
Q2: What does a CAMELS rating measure and how does it do it? 
Q3: What has happened to the banking industry over the past 30 to 40 years and why? 
Q4: What can be done in terms of regulation if one believes that financial crises are random events,
aka black‐swan events?  
Q5: What type of regulation should be put in place if one believes that financial crises are the result
of the way banks conduct their business? 
Q6: How can an increase in the concentration of the banking industry, together with deregulation 
and lack of enforcement, promote the occurrence of financial crises? 
 

125 
 

CHAPTER 9: BANKING REGULATION 

Suggested readings  
For a relative easy read with a compelling narrative about saving & loan white collar crimes and the
fight  of  some  regulators  to  stop  them  read  The  Best  Way  to  Rob  a  Bank  Is  to  Own  One:  How 
Corporate Executives and Politicians Looted the S&L Industry by William K. Black. 
More advanced readings: 
Cargill,  T.F.  and  Garcia,  G.G.  (1982)  Financial  Deregulation  and  Monetary  Control:  Historical
Perspective and Impact of the 1980 Act. Stanford: Hoover Institution Press. 
Campbell, C. and Minsky, H.P. (1987) “How to Get Off the Back of a Tiger or, Do Initial Conditions
Constrain Deposit Insurance Reform?” In Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago (ed.) Proceedings of a 
Conference on Bank Structure and Competition, 252‐266. Chicago: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
Minsky, H.P. (1975) “Suggestions for a cash flow‐oriented bank examination,” in Federal Reserve 
Bank of Chicago (ed.) Proceedings of a Conference on Bank Structure and Competition, 150‐184, 
Chicago: Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. 
Knutsen, S. and Lie, E. (2002) “Financial fragility, growth strategies and banking failures: The major
Norwegian banks and the banking crisis, 1987‐92.” Business History, 44 (2): 88‐111. 
 
                                                            
1 When the full blown crisis occurred in the September 2008, Greenspan and others conceded that they went too far in 
believing in the efficiency of markets—it was the time for a public mea culpa. Donald Kohn, former Vice Chairman of the 
Federal  Reserve,  stated:  “I  placed  too  much  confidence  in  the  ability  of  the  private  market  participants  to  police 
themselves” (Kohn in House of Commons 2011: Ev3). A humble Greenspan was asked to testify to Congress and created 
some stir by stating: 
I made a mistake in presuming that the self‐interest of organizations, specifically banks and others, 
were such is [sic] that they were best capable of protecting their own shareholders and their equity 
in the firms. (Greenspan in U.S. House of Representatives 2008b: 34) 
Similar remarks were made in the United Kingdom by Adair Turner, chair of the U.K. Financial Services Authority (FSA): 
In the past, in the years running up to the crisis, it was the strong mindset of the FSA—shared with 
securities  and  prudential  regulators  and  central  banks  across  the  world,  it  was  almost  part  of  our 
DNA—that we assumed that financial innovation was always beneficial, that more trading and more 
liquidity creation was always valuable, that ever more complex products were by definition beneficial 
because they completed more markets, allowing a more precise matching of instruments to investor 
demand for liquidity, risk and return combinations. And that mindset did affect our approach—and 
the approach of the whole world regulatory community—to the setting of capital requirements on 
trading  activity;  it  affected  our  willingness  to  demand  risk  reduction  in  the  CDS  market;  and  it 
influenced the degree to which we could even consider short‐selling bans in conditions of exceptional 
market volatility.[…] [Stepping out of that mindset] poses for regulators the challenge of complexity, 
because  it  involves  rejecting  an  intellectually  elegant  but  also  profoundly  mistaken  faith  in  ever 
perfect and self‐equilibrating markets, ever rational human behaviors. (Turner 2009) 
2 Appelbaum, B. (2009) “Fed held back as evidence mounted on subprime loan abuses,” The Washington Post, September 
27 at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp‐dyn/content/article/2009/09/26/AR2009092602706.html 
3 Watch “The Warning” by PBS Frontline at http://www.pbs.org/video/1302794657/ 
4 Government Accountability Office (1994) Financial Derivatives: Actions Needed to Protect the Financial System, Report 
No. GAO/GGD‐94‐133, May, at http://www.gao.gov/assets/160/154342.pdf  
5
 http://www.levyinstitute.org/conferences/minsky2015/minsky2015_tymoigne.pdf 
6 In  2014,  Chairman  Bernanke  could  not  refinance  his  mortgage  http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2014‐10‐
03/why‐even‐ben‐bernanke‐cant‐refinance‐his‐mortgage‐chart 
7 See Black, W.K. (2005) The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One. Austin: Texas University Press. 
8  “The  mortgage  market  and  consumer  debt,”  remarks  by  at  America’s  Community  Bankers  Annual  Convention, 
Washington, D.C., October 19, 2004. http://www.federalreserve.gov/boardDocs/speeches/2004/20041019/default.htm 

126 
 

 

CHAPTER 10: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What banks do before providing credit 
How banks create their monetary instruments 
How banks destroy their monetary instruments 
How banks make a profit 
What the limits to the monetary creation process by banks are 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
The last three Chapters have explained how the operations of banks are constrained by profitability 
and regulatory constraints, and how banks operate to try to bypass these constraints. It is now time 
to go into the details of how banks provide credit and payment services to the rest of the economy. 

MONETARY  CREATION  BY  BANKS:  CREDIT  AND  PAYMENT 
SERVICES 
Bank A just opened for business and its balance sheet looks like this: 
Bank A 
Assets 
Building: $200  

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Net worth: $200 

Now comes household #1 who wants to buy a house worth $100 from household #2. #1 sits down 
with  a  banker  (a.k.a.  loan  officer)  who  asks  a  few  questions  regarding  annual  income,  available 
assets, monetary balances, the down‐payment #1 is willing to make, among others. The banker asks 
for documentation that corroborates the answers provided by #1.  
The banker also shows #1 what financing options are available; that is, the banker shows #1 what 
type of mortgage note household #1 has to issue to be accepted by bank A. Figure 10.1 is taken 
from an actual website. 

For 100% financing (no down‐payment by household), the bank is prepared to provide up 
to $330,000 and it will only accept a 30‐year 5.125% fixed‐rate mortgage note. The bank 
will not accept a 20‐year mortgage note, or a 3.875% note for 100% financing. 

For up to 97% financing (household provides at least a 3% down‐payment), the types of 
mortgage note that a household can issue to the bank widen. The bank is willing to accept 
a 30‐year 3.875% fixed‐rate note, or a 15‐year 3.125% fixed‐rate note, among others. The 
maximum face value of the note that the bank will accept is $417,000 unless the household 
is able to provide a 20% down‐payment. 

#1 picks one of the options and fills up a credit application that is attached to all the documentation 
provided by #1. The credit application is then sent to the credit department for further analysis 
(check the 3Cs of Chapter 8) and either approved or not. 
All this is similar to bond issuances by corporations, except that mortgage notes do not have an 
active market in which they can be traded. In the case of a bond, a corporation may issue a bond 
with terms that are different than what market participants want. The bond will trade at a discount 
or  a  premium  in  that  case.  If  Ford  issues  a  10‐year  5%  corporate  bond  but  the  market  yield  is 
currently 6% (i.e. market participants want a 6% rate of return), market participants will only buy 
the bond from Ford at a discount. To simplify, assume a bond with a $1000 face value and a 5% 
coupon rate (every year the bond pays $50 of interest income), then to get a 6% yield someone 
should pay $833 (50/833=6%); a 17% discount.  
Unfortunately for #1, there is no active market for its promissory notes, so if #1 does not issue a 
mortgage note with the terms required by A, its note will trade at 100% discount; A will not buy it 
(#1 could always check what another bank would offer). That is the disadvantage of non‐tradable 
promissory notes over securities; the issuer is completely bound by what potential bearers require 
in terms of the characteristics of the promissory note (interest rate, term to maturity, etc.). 
128 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 

 

Figure 10.1 Example of types of mortgage note a bank will accept 

 

Figure 10.2 shows what a mortgage note looks like. It is a legal document that formalizes a promise 
made by a household to a bank. The household issued a 30‐year fully‐amortized fixed‐rate 7.5% 
note  to  a  bank  called  “Shelter  Mortgage  Co.,”  which  means  that,  over  30  years,  the  household 
promises to pay an annual interest representing 7.5% of the outstanding note value and to repay 
some  of  the  principal  every  month.  That  comes  down  to  a  monthly  payment  of  $1896.27.  The 
mortgage note is accompanied by a mortgage deed (and many other documents). The deed is a 
legal document that establishes the right of the bank to seize the house if the household does not 
fulfill the terms of the mortgage note.  

129 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 

Figure 10.2 A mortgage note 

 

Going back to our household #1 that wants to buy a $100 house, suppose that bank A agrees to 
acquire from #1 a 30‐year 5% mortgage note with a $100 face value. How does A pay for it? Bank 
A issues its own promissory note, called “bank account,” to #1. 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Building: $200 
Or, in terms of t‐account, we have the following first step: 
 
 
130 
 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $100 
Net Worth: $200 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: +$100 
 

#1 then pays #2 and, for the moment, let us assume #2 opens an account at A (we will see what 
happens below when #2 has an account at a different bank): 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $0 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Net Worth: $200 

Or in terms of t‐accounts, we have the following when the payment occurs: 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: ‐$100 
Bank account of #2: +$100 

 
Household #1 
ΔAssets 
House: +$100 
Bank account at A: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

 
Household #2 
ΔAssets 
House: ‐$100 
Bank account at A: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

While the above shows the logic of what goes on when a bank provides credit services, the bank 
also provides payment services. This means that, in practice, the accounting is simpler because A 
makes the payment on behalf of #1, it does not let #1 touch any funds. Instead, A directly credits 
the account of #2 so the first step is actually: 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #2: +$100 
 

And the final balance sheet is (#1 does not need to have a bank account for the payment to go 
through, A just credits the account of #2 by typing “100” on the computer) 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Net worth: $200 

The  promissory  note  of  the  bank  called  “bank  account”  is  one  type  of  monetary  instrument  as 
explained in Chapter 15.  
131 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 

WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE EXAMPLE ABOVE? 
POINT  1:  THE  BANK  IS  NOT  LENDING  ANYTHING  IT  HAS:  WHEN 
PROVIDING CREDIT SERVICES, THE BANK SWAPS PROMISSORY NOTES 
WITH ITS CLIENTS 
The accounting of the previous section is commonly referred to as “bank lending,” i.e. the A is said 
to lend $100 to #1. As stated in Chapter 2, when studying central banking, “lending” means giving 
up temporarily an asset, “I lend you my pen for a minute.” This is clearly not what is going on. Banks 
are not in the business of allowing customers to temporarily use some of the banks’ assets: that is 
a loan shark business. The bank is not lending anything it owns. Lending would mean this: 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: +$100 
Reserves: ‐$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

Household#1 is borrowing cash from the bank. But what happened is this: 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: +$100 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: +$100 
 

One may ask: Is there not an indirect lending of reserves though? After #1 gets its account credited, 
it could withdraw reserves and make a cash payment to #2. #1 would then have to get reserves 
back to A. The answer is no for two reasons: 

We have just seen that in practice the bank makes the payment for #1. That payment does 
not need to result into any reserve drainage (it did not above).  

As  shown  below,  #1  does  not  have  to  give  back  reserves  to  A  to  repay  its  debt,  and  #1 
rarely, if ever, does so in practice.  

So not only is #1 not borrowing reserves from A, but also #1 is not giving back reserves to A. There 
is no lending or borrowing of reserves going on between A and #1, either directly or indirectly. What 
a bank does do is to swap promissory notes with economic units and to make payments for them. 
Reserves may enter the picture at the time of the provision of payment services, never at the time 
of the provision of credit services. 

POINT  2:  THE  BANK  DOES  NOT  NEED  ANY  RESERVES  TO  PROVIDE 
CREDIT SERVICES 
While it may need reserves to provide payment services (that is to transfer funds to #2), A does not 
need any reserves to provide credit services to #1. All it does with household #1 is to exchange 
promissory notes: 

132 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 

The household makes the following promise: pay 5% interest on the outstanding mortgage 
value for 30 years and repay some of the principal every month. 

The bank makes the following two promises:  
o

To  convert  bank  accounts  into  Federal  Reserve  notes  at  the  will  of  the  account 
holders 

o

To accept its own promissory note when #1 services the mortgage. 

All these are promises and none of the issuers has to have what is needed to fulfill the promise right 
away when he issues his promissory notes. That is the point of finance; it is about banking on the 
future (see Chapter 8). 
Think of a pizza shop that issues coupons for a free pizza. The shop does not have to make pizzas 
first  before  it  issues  the  coupons;  it  will  make  pizzas  only  if  people  show  up  with  coupons. 
Converting  the  coupons  into  pizzas  is  costly  for  the  shop  and  so  affects  its  profitability,  but  the 
issuance of coupons is not constrained by the current availability to pizzas. The shop is just making 
a  promise  and  anybody  can  make  any  kind  of  promise.  The  hard  parts  are,  first,  to  convince 
someone of the genuineness of this promise and, second, to fulfill the promise once it has been 
accepted by someone.  
In the same way, a bank does not have to have any Federal Reserve notes now to be able to issue 
a bank account that promises Federal Reserve notes on demand. A bank will need reserves only if 
account holders request cash or make payments to someone who has an account at another bank. 
The Fed will provide reserves on demand, i.e. at the will of solvent banks, so banks never worry 
about being unable to get reserves (see Chapter 4). Reserves will never run out. What banks do 
need to worry about is the cost of acquiring reserves. In normal times, this cost is predictable and 
relatively  stable  but  the  Volcker  experiment  shows  that  a  central  bank  may  make  reserves 
prohibitively expensive.  

POINT  3:  THE  BANK  IS  NOT  USING  “OTHER  PEOPLE’S  MONEY”:  IT  IS 
NOT A FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARY BETWEEN SAVERS AND INVESTORS 
This  is  a  development  of  the  first  and  second  point.  A  view  of  banking,  from  which  the  word 
“lending”  probably  comes  from,  is  that  banks  are  intermediaries  between  savers  and  investors. 
Some people come to deposit cash and then banks lend the cash. It is quite clear that a bank is not 
lending any funds that some deposited (nobody deposited anything in our example). And, worse 
offender, a bank is certainly not using others’ bank accounts to grant credit. Assume that household 
#3 comes to bank A to get a $100 credit, A never does this: 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #2: ‐$100 
Bank account of #3: +$100 

That is, it does not take the funds of #2 and give them to #3. This t‐account would be a payment 
from #2 to #3, not a credit by bank A. To provide a credit is exactly what credit means, it is about 
crediting accounts. The crediting is done by typing a number on the computer. Once this number is 
entered, the bank is liable to the account holder for the two reasons presented above. 
133 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
Banks  do  not  wait  for  depositors  before  they  engage  in  the  provision  of  credit  services.  Say 
household #3 comes to open an account by depositing $50 worth of Federal Reserve notes. The 
following occurs: 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
Reserves: +$50 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #3: +$50 

This deposit does not enhance the ability to provide credit services because A is not in the business 
of lending reserves to non‐bank economic units. The ability of the bank to acquire non‐bank private 
promissory notes is unrelated to the quantity of reserves on its balance sheet because a bank pays 
for them by issuing its own promissory notes.  
There is one case where a bank does need reserves to acquire a promissory note: if a bank buys the 
note from an institution with a Federal Reserve account. For example: 

If a bank participates in an auction of Treasuries, the Treasury only accepts federal funds in 
payment. In the past, the Treasury sometimes allowed banks to pay for the Treasuries by 
crediting the TT&Ls (another cash management method used for monetary‐policy purpose 
beyond the ones presented in Chapter 6), but it no longer does since 1989.  

if it buys promissory notes from another bank  

In the first case, the balance sheet changes as follows (says the bank buys $10 worth of Treasuries 
from the Treasury) 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
Reserves: ‐$10 
Treasuries: +$10 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
 

And on the balance sheet of the Fed the following occurs 
Fed 
ΔAssets 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Reserve: ‐$10 
TGA: +$10 

And the Treasury: 
Treasury 
ΔAssets 
TGA: +$10 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Treasuries: +$10 

Chapter  6  showed  that  the  Fed  always  ensures  that  banks  have  enough  reserves  to  make  the 
auction successful. The supply of Federal Reserve notes by savers is irrelevant for the success of 
auctions of Treasuries. 

POINT 4: THE BANK’S PROMISSORY NOTE IS IN HIGH DEMAND 
Why did #1 enter in an agreement with A? Because nobody else would accept #1’s promissory note 
and a large number of economic units accepts A’s promissory note (if someone does not, A offers 

134 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
conversion  into  cash  that  most  accept  in  payments).  Chapter  15  explains  why  bank  monetary 
instruments are widely accepted.  
If #2 had been willing to accept #1’s promissory note then none of the previous agreement would 
have been needed. The problems with #1’s promissory note are two fold: 

There is a credit risk: #2 is not sure that it will get paid the interest due and that it will be 
able to make payments to #1 by giving back to #1 its promissory note. If #2 knew that it 
would  become  heavily  indebted  ($100  is  a  lot  in  our  example)  to  #1  in  the  future,  then 
assuming that #1 is creditworthy, #2 may be willing to accept #1’s promissory note for the 
payment of the house. Later #2 could use #1’s promissory note to pay debts owed to #1. 

There is a liquidity risk: the promissory note only comes due in 30 years so household #1 
does not have to take it back before that time (though it could because mortgage notes 
usually allow accelerated repayment of principal). In the meantime, #2 is stuck with this 
promissory note that nobody else will accept. 

Bank A’s promissory note is due at any time the bearer wants (it converts into cash on demand and 
it can be used to pay the bank at any time) and the creditworthiness of a bank is strong. This is all 
the  more  so  given  that  the  government  guarantees  that  A’s  promissory  note  can  always  be 
converted into Federal Reserve notes at par, and that the (nominal) value of A’s promissory note 
will not fall even if A goes bankrupt. All this makes the A’s promissory note free of credit risk and 
perfectly liquid. 

HOW  DOES  A  BANK  MAKE  A  PROFIT?  MONETARY 
DESTRUCTION 
Banks are dealers of promissory notes: banks take non‐bank non‐federal promissory notes and in 
exchange give their own promissory note. Banks make a profit by taking back their own promissory 
notes. At the beginning of the second month, #1 starts to honor its promise made to A by servicing 
the  mortgage  note.  The  monthly  principal  due  is  27  cents  ($100/(30*12),  assuming  linear 
repayment of principal) and the first interest payment is 41 cents (the annual interest rate is 5% so 
on a monthly basis the rate is 0.407% = (1.05)1/12 – 1) making the total debt service for the first 
month $0.68. How does #1 pay this? 
There are two ways this amount can be paid; one is by giving $0.68 in cash to the bank. Another 
more common solution is to follow up on the promise embedded in the bank’s promissory note: 
Bank A promised to take back its promissory note as means of payment of debts owed to Bank A. 
Thus, another means to pay the mortgage is to debit $0.68 from the account of #1. Let us assume 
that #1 has an account at A, that account first needs to be credited: 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Building: $200 
How can household #1 get funds credited to its account? 

135 
 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $0 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Net worth: $200 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 

o

Case 1: #1 receives a $1 payment from the federal government either by selling 
something  to  the  government  or  by  receiving  a  transfer  payment.  The  balance 
sheet of the bank would look like this (Chapter 6 shows that transactions with the 
federal government lead to reserve crediting and debiting) 

Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Reserves: $1 
Building: $200 
o

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $1 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Net worth: $200 

Case 2: #1 works for business α that produces widgets. Business α just started. It 
has not sold anything yet but must purchase raw materials and pay #1 (the only 
employee) to be able to produce widgets. In order to do that, α asked for a $10 
operating line of credit from A (an operating line of credit is an off‐balance sheet 
item unless it is used). When α pays #1 the following happens: 

Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Credit line payable by α : $1 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $1 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Net worth: $200 

Business  α  has  gone  into  debt  by  $1  to  be  able  to  pay  the  monthly  wage  of 
household #1. Note how similar case 2 is to the first section: business gets credit, 
banks makes payment, business does not touch any funds.  
o

Case 3: #1 receives a $1 from #2. Why? I will let you decide.  

One  may  note  that  any  payment  made  to  #1  that  does  not  come  from  the  government  (or  an 
institution that has a federal reserve account) (case 1), or from funds that got created previously 
by #1 going into debt (case 3), requires that someone other than #1 goes into debt toward a bank 
(Case 2). Otherwise #1 cannot get access to the payment services offered by A. 
Let assume that case 2 prevailed so now #1 has enough funds to pay A the first monthly service of 
$0.68. How is that recorded? It is exactly the same procedure as debt‐service payments by banks 
to the central bank.  
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $99.73 
Credit line payable by α : $1 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $0.32 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Net worth: $200.41 

Or in terms of t‐accounts: 
Bank A 
ΔAssets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: ‐$0.27 

136 
 

ΔLiabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: ‐$0.68 
Net worth: +$0.41 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
Again, as in the case of a central bank presented in Chapter 2, the bank is not gaining any cash flow 
from the transaction. Its profit does not increase the quantity of reserves on the asset side. What 
profit  does  is  to  raise  the  net  worth  of  the  bank.  As  noted  in  the  first  Chapter,  profit  is  just  an 
addition to net worth, the monetary gain that profit represents may not translate into any cash 
flow  gains.  What  the  servicing  of  debts  owed  to  banks  does  is  to  destroy  bank  monetary 
instruments, that is, bank liabilities.  
While there is no cash flow gain for A, profit is extremely important for the viability of its business. 
Indeed, the bank needs to meet its capital ratio and making a profit improves net worth. In addition, 
capital is extremely important to allow any bank to further develop its credit service because it can 
now create more promissory notes, given that it has more capital to protect its creditors.  
Let us look at how the capital position of A evolved through time (to simplify the unweighted capital 
ratio is calculated): 
1‐ After it opened:  
Bank A 
Assets 
Building: $200  
 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Net worth: $200 

Capital ratio = net worth/assets = $200/$200 = 100% 
2‐ After it granted credit to #1:  
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Net worth: $200 

Capital ratio = $200/$300 = 66.7% 
3‐ After it granted credit to α and made the payment to #1: 
Bank A 
Assets 
Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $1 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Credit line payable by α : $1 
Net worth: $200 
Building: $200 
Capital ratio = $200/$301 = 66.4% 
4‐ After it received the mortgage service payment from #1: 
Bank A 
Assets 
Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $0.32 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $99.73 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Credit line payable by α : $1 
Net worth: $200.41 
Building: $200 
Capital ratio = $200.41/$300.73 = 66.64% 
Until A receives the mortgage service payment, its capital position worsens as A grants more credit. 
Profit  allows  a  bank  to  restore  its  capital  position  and  to  further  pursue  the  provision  of  credit 
services. It also allows a bank to pay its own employees without further lowering its capital position. 
137 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
So  if  A  has  one  employee  (household  #3)  who  receives  a  monthly  salary  of  20  cents,  then  the 
following is recorded: 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $99.73 
Credit line payable by α : $1 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $0.32 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Bank account of #3: $.2 
Net worth: $200.21 

Bank A pays #3 by typing a number on the computer. The capital ratio is 66.57%, still better than 
the 66.4% that prevailed after A granted credit to α. 

INTERBANK 
PAYMENTS, 
WITHDRAWALS, 
RESERVE 
REQUIREMENTS, AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS: 
THE ROLE OF RESERVES 
Reserves are conspicuously absent from the previous discussions but banks do need reserves as 
explained in Chapter 3. Reserves enter the picture with payment services (interbank payments), 
retail  portfolio  services  (withdrawals  and  deposits),  the  law  (reserve  requirements)  and  federal 
government  operations  (taxes,  government  spending,  and  auctions  of  Treasuries),  as  well  as 
transactions with other Fed account holders (we will leave that aside). 
Let us go back to the point where #1 pays #2 and now let us say that #2 has an account at bank B 
instead  of  bank  A.  In  that  case,  A  instructs  B  to  credit  the  account  of  #2  on  behalf  of  A  and  A 
acknowledges it is indebted to B:  
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Debt to bank B: $100 
Net worth: $200 

 
Bank B 
Assets 
Promissory note: $170 
Debt of bank A: $100 
Building: $80 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Other bank accounts: $50 
Net worth: $200 

Interbank debts are settled with reserves but there is a small problem: bank A does not have any 
reserves! How could A get them right now? There are several possibilities: 
1‐ Selling  non‐strategic  tradable  assets  to  another  bank  or  the  Fed,  say  Treasuries:  bank  A 
does not have any (the building is a strategic assets because A cannot operate without it, 
the mortgage note of #1 is not tradable). 
2‐ Getting reserves in the interbank market: borrow from a fed funds market participant with 
excess funds (see Chapter 4). 
3‐ Getting reserves from the Fed: swap promissory note with Fed via the Discount Window 
138 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
4‐ Recording an overnight overdraft on its reserve balance. 
Over time there will be other means for A to get reserves because: 
5‐ Other banks will ask A to make payments on their behalf to economic units with accounts 
at A. 
6‐ Some economic units will come to deposit Federal Reserve notes at A 
7‐ The government will make payments to economic units with accounts at bank A (see case 
1 above). 
But right now bank A does not have the reserves so it needs to use sources 1 through 4. Recording 
an  overnight  overdraft  is  the  costliest  solution  because  it  requires  the  payment  of  very  high 
penalties.1 Going at the window is possible but, in normal times, there is a large stigma in the US 
and it is costly. Borrowing reserves in the federal funds market is usually the preferred means to 
get reserves. Assume that, first, Bank A uses the overdraft facility to pay Bank B: 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Reserves: ‐$100 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Net worth: $200 

As long as the balance is negative only during the day, bank A does not have to pay any interest on 
it. Before the end of the day, bank A borrows reserves in the interbank market from bank C: 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $100 
Reserve: $0 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Debt to bank C: $100 
Net worth: $200 

This debt is due the next morning and, at the end of the next day, bank A will need to borrow again 
from  bank  C  or  another  bank  until  it  receives  enough  reserves  from  sources  5,  6,  or  7.  While  it 
borrows  from  other  banks,  it  must  pay  the  interest  rate  that  prevails  on  the  interbank  market, 
which,  to  simplify,  is  the  Federal  Funds  rate  target.  Say  bank  A  has  to  borrow  every  night  for  a 
month, then its profit for the first month, assuming a FFR of 2%, is: 
Profit = Interest received – interest paid = 0.41%*100 – 0.083%*100 = $0.327 
As long as the FFR stays below the interest rate on the mortgage note, the bank is profitable. It is 
not as profitable as it would have been had it not borrowed reserves, but it is profitable.  
Beyond the need to make interbank payments, in some countries banks are also required to meet 
some reserve requirements. Bank A has the following balance sheet if we continue from the last 
balance sheet of the previous section: 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $99.73 
Credit line payable by α : $1 
Building: $200 
139 
 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $0.32 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Bank account of #3: $.2 
Net worth: $200.21 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
The outstanding value of bank accounts is $104.93 so A now needs to get $10.49 of reserves on its 
balance sheet if the reserve requirement ratio is 10%. Again the sources of reserves are 1 through 
7 but if A needs them right away only sources 1‐3 are available for reserve requirement purpose (A 
cannot have an overdraft in that case). The accounting implications and profit implications are the 
same as just presented. For example if it borrows from bank B: 
Bank A 
Assets 
30‐year 5% mortgage note of #1: $99.73 
Credit line payable by α : $1 
Reserve: $10.49 
Building: $200 

Liabilities and Net Worth 
Bank account of #1: $0.32 
Bank account of #2: $100 
Bank account of #3: $.2 
Debt to bank B: $10.49 
Net worth: $200.21 

Beyond reserves needed for interbank debt settlements and reserve requirements, Chapter 6 also 
looks at the need to get reserves to settle auctions of Treasuries and to pay taxes.  
In all these cases (and the case of withdrawals of cash by account holders), the central bank always 
accommodates the needs of the banking system to ensure that the payment system works properly 
(economic units get paid and debts are settled), to ensure that banks follow the law (only the Fed 
can provide the reserves that banks need to meet reserve requirements), and to ensure that non‐
bank economic units can get the cash they need (see Chapter 4). Banks are never constrained by 
the quantity of reserves available, as long as a central bank merely targets an interest rate.  
While the quantity of reserves does not constrain bank A in any way, the Fed does set a price on 
the supply of reserves and this price impacts the profitability of bank A. As such, banks try to find 
the cheapest sources of reserves, which usually means attracting and keeping depositors. Banks 
also try to economize on reserve needs by net clearing interbank debts before settling them, among 
other means.  
Finally, banks do not try to hold more reserves than what they need. As shown in Chapter 3, in 
normal  times,  most  reserves  are  held  because  banks  are  required  to  do  so.  Demand  for  excess 
reserves is very small and virtually zero. As shown in Chapter 4, banks have almost no incentive to 
keep excess reserves because they can get any quantity of reserves they want at any time, because 
they cannot do much with reserves, and because keeping excess reserves lowers ROA. Banks do 
not proactively try to get reserves ahead of credit activities and, if credit activity slows, they slow 
their demand for reserves and may want to avoid attracting new depositors to avoiding building 
excess reserves. They may keep a slight quantity of excess reserves to avoid having to record an 
overnight overdraft.  

WHAT  LIMITS  THE  ABILITY  OF  A  BANK  TO  PROVIDE  CREDIT 
SERVICES? 
Say that a bank really wants to increase aggressively its market share; this will tend to draw the 
attention of regulators for several reasons: 
1‐ In order to grow fast, the best strategy is to provide credit to economic units that other 
banks  do  not  want  to  qualify;  for  short  non‐prime  economic  units.  This  can  be  done  by 
loosening  credit  standards  faster  than  other  banks  and/or,  as  shown  in  Chapter  8,  by 
140 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
offering to accept promissory notes with initial low monthly payments but upcoming large 
payment shocks (hopefully refinancing will be possible down the road). Both cases lead to 
a higher chance of default and so a higher probability of loss of net worth for a bank. The 
decline in the quality of assets may attract the attention of regulators.  
2‐ The proportion of liquid assets relative to illiquid assets declines faster than its peers. 
3‐ Its  interbank  debt  will  balloon  rapidly  as  payments  made  on  behalf  of  the  bank  grow 
quickly, which pushes down its profitability and so its ability to build its capital base. 
4‐ The quality of its earnings declines. If a bank grants a lot of pay‐option mortgages to non‐
prime economic units, these units will usually only pay part of the interest due. However, 
accrual accounting allows a bank to record the whole debt service due as received and to 
record  “phantom  profits.”  This  may  again  attract  the  attention  of  regulators  if  accrual 
interest income grows out of proportion (accrual accounting is not a problem per se and is 
a convenient means to smooth business operations if used properly). 
Basically, if a bank grows faster than the rest of the industry, its CAMELS rating tends to increase 
relative to others and its interbank debt becomes unsustainable. Ultimately regulators will issue a 
cease and desist order. Note that if a bank grows fast by providing credit to non‐prime clients at a 
premium interest rate, then, given interbank debt, its short‐run profitability rises as leverage and 
ROA rise. However, such  a bank will then experience  massive losses in the near future that will 
lower  rapidly  profit  and  capital.  As  such,  there  are  two  limits  to  the  monetary  creation  process 
induced by the swapping of promissory notes: 

The credit standards: if A considers that #1 does not meet the 3Cs of credit analysis, A will 
not accept #1 promissory note and so will not credit #1’s bank account (or #2’s).  

Regulation, but not through reserve requirements given that the Fed will provide all the 
reserves needed to fulfill the requirements, but, rather, through regulatory elements that 
impact CAMELS rating, that constrain the loosening of credit standards, and that limit the 
types of assets banks can hold (see Chapter 9). 

MOVING IN STEP 
As noted in Chapter 8, there is safety in numbers. As long as banks grow in step, that is, as long as 
they  create  bank  accounts  at  about  the  same  speed  (and  so  acquire  assets  at  the  about  same 
speed), they may not attract the attention of regulators: 
1‐ Interbank debt for a bank will not balloon out of control: requests to make payments on a 
bank’s behalf are offset by requests to make payments of behalf of others banks.  
2‐ Leverage may rise, at least until debt servicing starts, and liquidity may fall but all this occurs 
at the industry level so no bank is singled out. 
As long as underwriting is done properly, ultimately, banks will make a profit and capital will be 
gained and so leverage will decline overtime. However, as explained in a Chapter 8, things may get 
out of hand if most banks aggressively pursue growth in market shares and search for yield. 

141 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 

LIMITS  TO  MONETARY  CREATION  BY  THE  CENTRAL  BANK 
AND PRIVATE BANKS 
Finance is not a scarce resource as long as the government is monetarily sovereign. Banks and the 
central bank can create an unlimited quantity of monetary instruments whenever they want. While 
they can create an unlimited quantity of monetary instruments, they will not do so for the following 
reasons: 

-

For the central bank: under normal circumstances (see Chapter 4), the main limit to the 
reserve  creation  process  is  the  need  to  maintain  the  overnight  interbank  rate  positive, 
which  basically  implies  that  the  central  bank  must  supply  whatever  banks  demand;  no 
more, no less. 

-

For  banks:  core  limits  to  the  monetary  creation  process  are  profitability  and  regulatory 
concerns. 

I will finish this Chapter with Figure 10.4, which illustrates the points made above. The supply of 
credit  is  slightly  upward  sloping  and  then  becomes  vertical  as  banks  ration  credit  given  a  set  of 
credit  standards.  The  supply  slopes  upward  to  reflect  the  fact  that,  at  a  point  in  time,  as  credit 
grows, the creditworthiness of the remaining pool of acceptable economic units falls. A given set 
of credit standards defines what a minimum level of creditworthiness is and anybody below that 
level  will  not  be  granted  credit  (hence  the  vertical  supply  of  credit).  The  demand  for  credit  is 
downward sloping but not very elastic. As explained in Chapter 5, demand for credit by businesses 
is very insensitive to interest‐rate conditions.  

Figure 10.4 The market for bank credit 

 

TO  GO  FURTHER:  A  SIDE  NOTE  ON  ALTERNATIVE  VIEWS  OF 
BANKING: THE MONEY MULTIPLIER THEORY AND FINANCIAL 
INTERMEDIATION. 

142 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
A  now  discredited  view  of  monetary  creation  by  banks  argues  that  banks  actively  seek  excess 
reserves to be able to provide credit. The logic goes as follows with a 10% reserve requirement 
ratio: 
1‐ The central bank injects excess reserves by buying $100 worth Treasuries from bank A 
2‐ Reserves do not earn any interest, so Bank A provides a credit of $100 to household #1 who 
makes a $100 payment to households #2 at bank B. Bank B now has $100 of extra bank 
account on its liability side and $100 of extra reserves on its asset side. Bank B has $90 of 
excess reserves. It grants a credit of $90 to household #3 who pays $90 to household #4 at 
bank C. Bank C has now $90 of extra reserves and has issued $90 of extra bank account so 
excess reserves is $81, upon which Bank C provides $81 credit to household #5, etc. This 
continues until there are no excess reserves left in the banking system. 
3‐ The sum of bank accounts created is $100 by bank A, $90 by bank B, $81 by bank C, $72.9 
by bank D, etc., which amounts to $1000: With $100 of excess reserves banks could create 
$1000 of bank accounts. 
4‐ Conclusion: bank credit is constrained by the quantity of excess reserves and the reserve 
requirement ratio. Both can be used by the central bank to target the money supply and 
ultimately inflation. 
There  are  several  issues  with  this  view  of  how  banks  provide  credit  and  so  create  monetary 
instruments: 
-

Step 1 never happens under normal monetary policy set up (see Chapter 4): any unwanted 
excess  reserves  are  drained  out  of  the  banking  system  to  prevent  a  fall  of  FFR  to  zero. 
Chapter 3 notes that banks have very little need for reserves. The Volker experiment (see 
Chapter 5) tried to move toward reserve targeting with the goal of targeting money supply, 
but this was a failure. 

-

It is just not how banks operate (step 2): Banks are profit‐seeking institutions; they do not 
wait for reserves to grant credit. They grant credit first and look for reserves afterwards, in 
the  same  way  a  pizza  shop  prints  coupons  first  and  then  make  the  pizzas  as  needed. 
Flooding banks with reserves just reduces their ROA; it acts like a tax.  

-

Banks cannot force economic units to go into debt. Bank credit is demand‐driven so even if 
banks have a lot of reserves that does not improve their ability to provide credit. Bank A 
had to wait for #1 to show up before anything could happen. And while bank A could have 
tried to entice #1 to come to the bank for financing, ultimately it is #1 who decides to take 
a credit.  

-

Milton Friedman himself recognized the problem with this approach: “Given the monetary 
policy of supporting a nearly fixed pattern of rates on government securities [during WWII], 
the  Federal  Reserve  System  had  no  effective  control  over  the  quantity  of  high‐powered 
money. It had to create whatever quantity was necessary to keep rates at that level. Though 
it is convenient to describe the process as running from an increase in high‐powered money 
to an increase in the stock of money through deposit‐currency and deposit‐reserve ratio, 
the chain of influence in fact ran in the opposite direction—from the increase in the stock 
of money consistent with the specified pattern of rates and other economic conditions to 
the increment in high‐powered money required to produce that increase.” (Friedman and 
Schwartz 1963, 566). There are two main problems with his view: 

143 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 
-

He seems to view the WWII experience as a special case instead of the general case: 
a central bank always targets interest rates, at least the overnight interbank rate 
and at least within a band (see Chapter 4). 

-

His  theoretical  position  is  untenable:  if  causality  is  known  with  certainty  to  be 
reversed (money supply to reserves instead of reserves to money supply), then one 
cannot proceed as if the opposite were true because “it is convenient.” 

Another view of banking is that banks lend “other people’s money.” People save and deposit cash 
in the bank, and the bank proceeds to lend the cash deposited. The Chapter touched on this above 
but here are the problems: 

Banks do not lend the savings of households: banks do not temporarily take Paul’s funds 
and given them to Pierre. 

Banks do not lend reserves to non‐banks: they do not look if Paul deposited enough cash 
before granting credit to Pierre.  

Banks are not in the business of lending anything they have: Pierre does not temporarily 
take cash from the bank, and, usually, does not give back cash to a bank when he services 
his debt. 

Savers can deposit cash, but savers are not the source of cash, cash comes from the Fed. 
And the Fed creates cash at the demand of banks so saving does not constraint credit. 

144 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 

Summary of Major Points 
1‐ Banks are  not money lenders because their monetary instruments are their liability  not their 
assets. One cannot lend one’s own debt. 
2‐ Banks are promissory note dealers. They take non‐bank promissory notes and in exchange give 
their own promissory notes. Contrary to most non‐bank promissory notes, bank promissory notes 
are widely accepted and perfectly liquid.  
3‐ If customers’ default on their promissory notes, the value of the assets of banks falls and they do 
not earn a profit, so banks are very interested in making sure that customers are creditworthy. 
4‐ Monetary creation by banks merely involves accounting entries. These accounting entries make 
banks liable because their promissory notes are convertible in cash and can be used to paid debts
owed to banks. 
5‐ The money supply does not fall from the sky; it involves a simultaneous debt creation. Banks 
promise  to  pay  customers,  customers  promise  to  pay  banks.  Banks  accept  their  customers’
promissory  note  because  banks  think  that  their  customers  are  involved  in  activities  that  are 
profitable. As such, monetary creation moves in sync with the needs of the economic system; these
needs may or may not be related to production and the purchase of goods and services. 
6‐ Banks are not bound by the quantity of reserves when they create monetary instruments. Their 
monetary instruments are just promises to obtain reserves at the demand of the bearers. Banks do 
not have to what they promise to deliver when they create monetary instruments. In addition, the 
central bank  provides reserves at the demand of solvent banks, so solvent banks never have to 
worry about not getting the reserves they need when needed (at a price). 
7‐  Monetary  creation  by  banks  is  limited  by  regulatory  and  profitability  concerns.  They  have  to
comply with capital requirements and asset quality requirements, among others, and promissory
notes that have a poor creditworthiness negatively impact their profitability. 
8‐ The money multiplier theory and the financial intermediary theory of banks are no longer seen
as valid by most of the academic community. 
 
Keywords 
Credit standards, promissory notes, overdraft, capital ratio, credit service, payment service, retail
portfolio services, net worth, interbank debt, withdrawals, reserves, money multiplier, credit line,
credit receivable/payable 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: When banks provide credit what is the accounting side of this operation? 
Q2: If a customer comes to ask for a bank credit what will the bank do? Why? 
Q3: When customers service their promissory notes what happens to the quantity of reserves held 
by banks? 
Q4: What do banks do with the cash that some customers deposit? 
Q5: Why is bank credit not limited by the quantity of reserves? Why are savers irrelevant for credit 
operations? 
Q6: How does profit help to meet capital requirement? And why is that allowing banks to continue
to keep their business going? 
Q7: What are the problems with the money multiplier theory at each stage of the argument? What 
about the financial intermediation theory of banking? 
 
145 
 

CHAPTER 10: MONETARY CREATION BY BANKS 

Suggested readings 
For  an  oldie  but  goodie  video  that  explains  correctly  how  banks  grant  advances  watch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJMJ24U0Jp4#t=136  
Following the failure of reserves injection to boost bank credit (or inflation), the Bank of England
published  a  paper  that  explains  correctly  banking  operations  and  rejects  other  theories:
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/publications/Documents/quarterlybulletin/2014/qb14q1prerel
easemoneycreation.pdf  
More advanced reading: 
Carpenter, S. and Demiralp S. (2012) “Money, reserves, and the transmission of monetary policy:
Does the money multiplier exist?” Journal of Macroeconomics 34 (1): 59‐75. 
Dow,  S.C.  (2006)  “Endogenous  money:  Structuralist,”  in  P.  Arestis  and  M.C.  Sawyer  (eds)  A 
Handbook of Alternative Monetary Economics, 35‐51, Northampton: Edward Elgar. 
Moore,  B.J.  (1988)  Horizontalists  and  Verticalists:  The  Macroeconomics  of  Credit  Money. 
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
Keister, J. and McAndrews, J. (2009) “Why are banks holding so many excess reserves?” Federal 
Reserve  Bank  of  New  York  Current  Issues  in  Economics  and  Finance  15  (8):  1‐10: 
www.newyorkfed.org/research/current_issues/ci15‐8.pdf  
Lavoie, M. (2006) “Endogenous money: Accomodationist,” in P. Arestis and M.C. Sawyer (eds) A 
Handbook of Alternative Monetary Economics, 17‐34, Northampton: Edward Elgar. 
Wray, L. R. (1990) Money and Credit in Capitalist Economies: The Endogenous Money Approach, 
Aldershot: Edward Elgar. 
Wray,  L.  R.  (2007)  “Endogenous  money: 
http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_512.pdf  

Structuralist 

and 

Horizontalist” 

 
                                                            
1 Federal Reserve’s policy on Overnight Overdrafts at http://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/oo_policy.htm 

146 
 

 

CHAPTER 11: 

After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
Why  economists  disagree  about  how  the  financial  system  contributes  to 
economic prosperity 
How  the  financial  system  can  benefit,  or  be  detrimental  to,  economic 
prosperity 
How  different  views  about  how  money  supply  is  created  lead  to  different 
understandings of how money supply can contribute to economic prosperity 
What the role of monetary incentives is in influencing economic outcomes 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
The previous Chapter concludes the study of banking operations. The next step is to incorporate 
them  into  the  analysis  of  macroeconomic  issues  and  this  Chapter  begins  the  discussion  of  such 
topics by focusing on economic growth.  
Money is the life‐blood of capitalist enterprise and finance is about money now for money later. As 
such, a well‐developed financial system is essential for economic activity in a capitalist economy. 
The  broader  the  range  of  promissory  notes  that  can  be  issued,  the  more  accommodative  the 
financial system is to the demands of the productive system. Households cannot fund the purchase 
of a house with a credit card and there is no point in buying groceries with a 30‐year mortgage. 
While all this may seem obvious, economists have been divided about the relevance of finance for 
economic activity. This divide ultimately rests on different premises on how to do economics, which 
John  Maynard  Keynes  characterized  as  Real  Exchange  Economy  versus  Monetary  Production 
Economy. 
Before  I  go  further,  a  word  of  caution.  Economists  and  national  income  accounts  use  the  word 
“investment” in a specific way. Investment means adding to the quantity of real assets, i.e. growing 
productive capacities. One cannot invest in shares, bonds, and other financial assets but merely in 
machines  and  raw  materials  (knowledge  is  also  an  area  emphasized  by  economists).  Portfolio 
choice, which is usually what people have in mind when talking about (financial) investment, is not 
the same thing as (physical) investment. 

THE REAL EXCHANGE ECONOMY 
MONEY SUPPLY IS A VEIL 
Until  at  least  the  1980s,  most  economists  believed  that  finance  is  neutral, 1  i.e.  irrelevant  for 
economic  activity.  The  study  of  exchange  within  a  barter  economy  with  small  independent 
producers—think  of  farmers  with  their  own  plot  of  land—is  regarded  as  a  satisfactory  proxy  to 
understand the basics of capitalism: 
Despite the important role of enterprises and of money in our actual economy, and 
despite the numerous and complex problems they raise, the central characteristic 
of the market technique of achieving co‐ordination is fully displayed in the simple 
exchange economy that contains neither enterprises nor money. (Friedman 1962, 
13) 
The point is to understand how market exchange helps economic units to manage the prevailing 
natural scarcity of resources by allocating resources according to given sets of initial allocations, 
preferences and techniques of production. Once this is understood, money supply can be added to 
the  analysis  but  it  does  not  substantially  change  anything.  It  merely  smooths  exchange,  is  not 
sought after for itself, and so does not influence allocation, production, and distribution. Capitalism 
is  equivalent  to  a  barter  economy  with  money.  In  addition,  monetary  instruments  are 
conceptualized  as  commodities  used  as  medium  of  exchange.  As  such,  a  willingness  to  hoard 
monetary instruments and to reduce spending on other things is merely changing the structure of 
demand for goods and services; it does not change its level. As a consequence, the level of economic 
activity is not impacted by monetary incentives and the willingness to hoard monetary instruments. 

148 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
Put in terms of the financial industry, one may think of financial markets and banks as institutions 
used  by  economic  units  to  borrow  and  lend  current  production;  finance  is  a  market  for 
intertemporal output:  
It may be supposed in theory that the entrepreneur borrows these consumption 
goods from the capitalists in kind, and then pays them out in kind in the shape of 
wages and rents. At the end of the period of production he repays the loan out of 
his own product, either directly or after exchanging it for other commodities. […] If 
this  procedure  were  adopted  by  all  entrepreneurs  who  work  with  borrowed 
capital, competition would bring about a certain rate of interest that would have 
to be paid to the capitalists in the form of some commodity or other. […] Now if 
money is loaned at this same rate of interest, it serves as nothing more than a cloak 
to cover a procedure which, from the purely formal point of view, could have been 
carried on equally well without it. (Wicksell 1898, 103‐104) 
Assume a barter economy in which the only product is potatoes and in which workers and other 
income earners are paid in potatoes. Some economic units may have too many potatoes for current 
consumption, so they save potatoes. Potato savers can go into a market in which they lend their 
potatoes to economic units who plant potatoes—the potato investors. The following year, there 
will be more potatoes than what was planted, as each potato is a seed that can be used to produce 
more potatoes, the marginal product of potatoes. This marginal product is at the foundation of the 
interest rate earned by the potato savers; their reward is more potatoes in the future, which means 
that interest and principal servicing creates an automatic demand for output (as did payment of 
wages). Monetary considerations can be added to this story, but they do not add anything to the 
understanding of what goes on in the financial industry. Money supply and other financial claims 
are just claims on production, that is, the money supply is a mere medium of exchange.  
Monetary considerations are irrelevant and “the objectives of agents that determine their actions 
and plans do not depend on any nominal magnitudes. Agents care only about ‘real’ things, such as 
goods […] leisure and effort” (Hahn 1982, 34). As such, economic units strive to get involved in the 
most productive economic activities in order to produce as much as possible in relation to their 
preferences. Markets are there to help them discover the most productive economic activities in 
the most efficient way. This way of thinking goes back at least to 19th century Austrian economists 
such as von Böhm‐Bawerk and Menger. 
In many current macroeconomic models, this reasoning is simplified even further by getting rid of 
any  market  and  assuming  a  farmer  who  is  both  a  saver  and  an  investor  (as  well  as 
producer/consumer and employer/employee). He saves potatoes today to plant them. The amount 
he  saves  (and  so  invests)  depends  on  the  reward  received  to  be  next  year.  The  reward  is  the 
marginal product of potatoes.  

FINANCE AND THE ECONOMY 
This understanding of finance is grafted to a specific theory of economic growth. Economic growth 
is driven by “supply factors”, i.e. the growth rate of inputs: physical capital (“machines”) and labor. 
Finance helps economic growth because the ability to invest (that is, to grow physical capital: Kt = 
Kt‐1 + It‐1) depends on the ability to save and the point of finance is to allocate saving—saving drives 
investment. 
149 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
Going back to the potato economy, in order to have more potatoes next year, one needs to save 
more today. Say that if one plants a potato at year 0 one gets two potatoes at year 1. To get three 
potatoes at year 2, one must not consume one and half potatoes at year 1. Of course, saving is 
painful because one gets fewer potatoes to eat, so saving must be rewarded (one more potato next 
year). The question becomes: is the reward worth the pain? The graphical way to represent all this 
is the loanable funds market (Figure 11.1). 

Figure 11.1 The loanable funds market 

 

Economic units meet in a market to borrow and lend current output, “potatoes.” The higher the 
interest  rate  provided  to  reward  saving,  the  more  saving  there  is,  i.e.  the  more  economic  units 
reduce their current consumption and supply potatoes to economic units who invest. The interest 
rate needs to rise because each additional unit of saving is increasingly painful. The interest rate is 
of course a physical reward, a real interest rate, more potatoes in the future. Savers/lenders are 
not interested in monetary earnings so their credit standards are set in real terms. 
The opposite goes on with the planters of potatoes/borrowers. The incentive to invest decreases 
as the reward to pay out increases. The reason for that is found in the production process. As more 
potatoes are planted, the nutritive quality of a given quantity of soil declines and so each additional 
potato seed will produce fewer potatoes. As such, investors can afford to pay a smaller reward for 
each additional potato that is invested. In technical terms, the marginal product of capital falls as 
more capital is used in the production process given other inputs. 
The government may come in the market to borrow real resources too: 
The  government's  fundamental  objective  is  to  borrow  a  given  amount  of  real 
resources, not a given amount of money. (Friedman 1952, 690) 
This  leads  to  the  well‐known  “crowding  out”  effect  (Figure  11.2).  As  government  enters  the 
loanable  funds  market,  the  real  interest  rate  rises  and  private  investment  declines.  Assume  a 
market  without  a  government  that  is  at  equilibrium  (Figure  11.1).  As  the  government  comes  to 
borrow potatoes (Figure 11.2), it competes with the private sector for the current quantity of saved 
potatoes. As in any other “well‐behaved” market, a higher demand for something increases the 

150 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
price of that thing. This is the market to borrow potatoes, so the real interest rate (i/P) will rise until 
the market finds a new equilibrium. A higher interest rate reduces the incentive to invest. 

ΔI < 0
Figure 11.2 The crowding out effect 

 

CONCLUSIONS 
In the end, finance is a mere intermediary between savers and investors and what finance does is 
to help barter intertemporal output. There are several conclusions one can draw from this view: 
1‐ The amount of current investment is constrained by the amount of current output that has 
been  saved.  To  encourage  more  investment  today,  one  must  discourage  present 
consumption  (that  is,  promote  saving  today),  and  saving  allows  the  transfer  of  current 
output through time: saving is just delayed consumption. 
2‐ The whole point of finance is to allocate saving to the most deserving investment projects, 
which  are  the  ones  who  are  involved  in  the  most  productive  activities  (the  investment 
projects with the highest marginal product).  
3‐ Banks  are  just  intermediaries  between  savers  and  investors:  banks  lend  unconsumed 
output on behalf of savers.  
4‐ When government deficit spends, it discourages investment and so discourages the growth 
of the economy. Government should avoid deficit spending. 
5‐ While  the  financial  system  works  with  money,  money  is  just  a  veil,  a  mere  medium  of 
exchange  to  smooth  market  mechanisms.  What  is  really  going  on  is  the  borrowing  and 
lending  of  current  output.  Monetary  payments  generated  by  financial  contracts  are 
irrelevant for the course of the economy because all contracts are real contracts, that is, 
account for inflation or deflation to maintain purchasing power constant; Valorism prevails 
(see Chapter 15) 
6‐ The economy is always at full employment because saving is just delayed consumption, and 
firms know this given that there is a market for intertemporal output (financial markets) 
151 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
that signals future consumption. As such, a decline in current consumption does not lead 
firms  to  reduce  their  production.  Instead,  firms  increase  their  productive  capacities  to 
respond to the higher future demand for goods and services induced by the payment of 
interest income. 
7‐ Monetary  results  are  driven  by  real  results:  nominal  interest  rates  are  driven  by  the 
marginal  product  of  capital  and  expected  inflation,  economic  growth  is  driven  by  the 
growth of inputs  
In  the  end,  finance  and  its  monetary  dealings  do  not  matter.  The  real  exchange  economy 
perspective  has  changed  slightly  since  the  early  1990s.  What  makes  finance  matter  are  market 
imperfections.  Finance  can  specialize  in  circumventing  imperfections  such  as  asymmetries  of 
information. In that case, finance can be rationed, which prevents the occurrence of the equilibrium 
that  would  prevail  under  a  perfectly  competitive  set  up  (fewer  potatoes  are  saved  and  so 
investment  is  lower  than  it  would  have  been  otherwise).  Asymmetry  of  information  can  also 
reinforce negative shocks on the economy and create financial crises (see Chapter 14). 

THE MONETARY PRODUCTION ECONOMY 
MONEY IS EVERYTHING 
Some economists argue that capitalism is not merely a barter economy with money. Capitalism is 
a  monetary  economy,  that  is,  an  economy  in  which  allocation,  production,  and  distribution  are 
influenced by monetary/nominal incentives. While economic units may adjust nominal rewards to 
account for inflation and taxes, the nominal gains are not driven by underlying physical variables. 
Instead, it is the other way around, nominal outcomes drive real outcomes.  
As such, while the REE view sees limited or no role for the inclusion of monetary considerations in 
its core theoretical framework, Keynes noted that this is at odds with the way capitalism functions: 
The classical theory supposes that […] only an expectation of more product […] will 
induce  [an  entrepreneur]  to  offer  more  employment.  But  in  an  entrepreneur 
economy  this  is  a  wrong  analysis  of  the  nature  of  business  calculation.  An 
entrepreneur  is  interested,  not  in  the  amount  of  product,  but  in  the  amount  of 
money  which  will  fall  to  his  share.  He  will  increase  his  output  if  by  so  doing  he 
expects to increase his money profit, even though this profit represents a smaller 
quantity of product than before. […] Thus the classical theory fails us at both ends, 
so to speak, if we try to apply it to an entrepreneur economy. For it is not true that 
the entrepreneur’s demand for labour depends on the share of the product which 
will fall to the entrepreneur; and it is not true that the supply of labor depends on 
the share of the product which will fall to labour. (Keynes 1933c (1979): 82–83) 
Monetary  considerations  are  crucial  at  the  beginning  and  at  the  end  of  the  economic  process. 
Businesses  need  monetary  instruments  to  start  the  production  process  because  employees  and 
sellers of raw material demand monetary payments. Businesses judge the relevance of an economic 
activity—and so employ people in this activity—in relation to its ability to generate a large enough 
monetary profit. Firms and their employees are not interested in consuming what they produce; 
they are interested in selling their production for monetary gains. Going back to our potato farmer, 
152 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
his  employees  do  not  want  to  be  paid  in  potatoes  and  the  farmer  is  not  merely  interested  in 
producing potatoes. As such, even if an individual is highly motivated and highly experienced in 
producing  potatoes  (his  marginal  product  is  very  high),  the  individual  will  not  be  hired  if  it  is 
expected  that  the  output  he  will  produce  cannot  be  sold  at  a  high  enough  price.  Indeed,  while 
lowering  the  price  of  potatoes  may  allow  to  sales  more  of  them,  deflation  comes  with  its  own 
problems given the existence of debts that require fixed monetary payments (see Chapter 14). 
Thus,  monetary  incentives  have  a  strong  influence  on  the  level  and  organization  of  production. 
Veblen made this point that by focusing on the difference between the engineer’s perspective and 
the  businessman’s  perspective.  From  an  engineer’s  perspective,  the  goal  is  to  produce  as  many 
potatoes as possible to solve a physiological problem (hunger). As such, the goal is to find the most 
efficient ways to produce an abundance of potatoes. From a businessman’s perspective, the only 
thing that matters is that a monetary profit be generated. This may entail a sabotage of production 
(leaving  fields  idle,  letting  potatoes  rot)  in  order  to  maintain  an  artificial  scarcity  of  potatoes. 
Indeed, capitalist techniques of production are so productive that letting them loose would drive 
the price of potatoes to zero. The supply of potatoes must be constrained. In addition, the demand 
side  must  constantly  be  aroused  to  create  new  needs  and  wants  because  people  do  not  have 
naturally  unlimited  preferences.  They  get  contented  quickly  unless  invidious  comparisons  and 
consumption habits are constantly stimulated through advertisement and other means. As such 
scarcity is not a natural state; it is rather a requirement of an economy that is managed by capitalist 
businesses.2 While abundance is possible, it is not a viable economic state for capitalism.  

WHY  MONETARY  INCENTIVES  MATTER?  AND  WHAT  ARE  OTHER 
IMPLICATIONS? 
Part of the answer is that banks are in the business of dealing with promissory notes that involve 
monetary  payments  not  in‐kind  payments.  Another  has  to  do  with  state’s  involvement  in  the 
monetization  of  economies  via  the  imposition  of  monetary  dues.3 If  one  focuses  on  the  role  of 
banks, the emphasis on monetary incentives is initiated at two stages of credit operations: 
1‐ Banks judge ability to pay based on credit standards set in monetary terms (see Chapter 8): 
a  “normal”  nominal  debt  service  to  monetary  income,  or  “normal”  nominal  value  of 
collateral relative to bank advances, a “normal” nominal amount of liquid assets.  
2‐ Debtors to a bank must make payments in monetary terms; they cannot pay banks with 
potatoes.  
Beyond  the  impact  on  incentives,  bank  operations  have  several  important  macroeconomic 
implications: 
1‐ Banks are not constrained by the level of current saving to grant credit. As noted in Chapter 
10, banks are not in the business of lending anything they own. They do not lend other 
people’s money, they  do not lend reserves, and they do not lend potatoes on behalf of 
savers; not even “as if.” 
2‐ Servicing the debts due to banks does not create an automatic demand for current output: 
payments to banks destroy monetary gains of non‐banks (see Chapter 10); that is it. Again 
there are no savers behind banks asking for their potatoes back with interest (in potatoes).  

153 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
3‐ The  expected  demand  for  goods  and  services  becomes  key  to  economic  activity.  Firms 
employ workers and use existing productive capacities only if they believe they will be able 
to sell their product to make a high enough monetary gains.  
4‐ In  this  type  of  economy,  purchasing  power  concerns,  even  though  relevant,  are  usually 
outweighed by liquidity and solvency concerns. Economic agents are happier if their buying 
power increases but, usually, economic agents pay a lot more attention to balance sheet 
risks:  “Liquidity  is  a  fundamental  recurring  problem  whenever  people  organize  most  of 
their income receipt and payment activities on a forward money contractual basis. For real 
world  enterprises  and  households,  the  balancing  of  their  checkbook  inflows  against 
outflows to maintain liquidity is the most serious economic problem they face everyday of 
their life.” (Davidson 2002: 78). Say that workers labor for one hour and earn a wage rate 
of w = $5, and that they have to pay a debt commitment of CC = $2 each month to service 
their  debts,  and  assume  that  the  general  price  level  is  P  =  $1.  The  real  wage  earned  by 
workers is w/P = 5 and the net wage of workers is w – CC = $3. Assume that workers get a 
raise  that  doubles  their  wage  so  that  w  =  $10,  and  that  the  general  price  level  is  also 
doubled P = $2. The real wage is unchanged but the capacity of workers to meet their debt 
commitments is much improved, w – CC = $8. 
5‐ “Neutrality  is  […]  restricted  to  the  realm  of  ‘helicopter  economics’”  (Gale  1982:  15).  In 
capitalism, banks do not suddenly allocated bags of money with which individuals do not 
know what to do; monetary creation by banks is endogenous to the economic process. In 
addition,  bank  monetary  creation  comes  with  a  simultaneous  creation  of  a  debt  that 
requires monetary payments (see Chapter 10). These monetary payments force economic 
units to focus their attention on monetary considerations in their decision‐making process. 
One can extend that point to monetary creation by the Treasury via fiscal policy. Automatic 
stabilizers  generate  an  endogenous  monetary  creation  by  the  state  that  comes  with  a 
simultaneous creation of net financial wealth (see Chapter 13). The state also imposes of 
tax liabilities that involves future monetary payments (see Chapter 15).  
6‐ Eliminating a market surplus by lowering output prices may not be a viable solution. Firms 
must  make  sure  that  they  can  sell  their  output  at  a  high  enough  price  to  generate  a 
monetary gain that allow them to pay their creditors and to realize a monetary profit. If 
prices  fall  too  much,  a  debt‐deflation  occurs  and  market  mechanisms  promote  financial 
instability (falling prices lead to higher surpluses of output) (see Chapter 14). 
7‐ Current  saving  does  not  incentivize  current  investment;  saving  discourages  investment: 
Firm  will  not  invest  if  current  spending  (and  so  sales)  is  falling.  Saving  is  not  delayed 
consumption because savers are not paid in kind. This is all the more so given that a fall in 
sales leads to layoffs and so losses of income by employees.  
Thus, economic growth is driven by demand conditions because of monetary considerations. As 
such, expected sales are usually too low to justify employing everybody willing to work, so there is 
a chronic underemployment of resources. In addition, there is no given state of the economy out 
there (a “natural” growth rate) that is independent of current demand conditions. If productive 
capacities become too heavily used, firms invest.  

FINANCE AND THE ECONOMY 

154 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
The first phase of the economic process is to ask for credit at banks (the financing phase). The role 
of banks is to judge if the expectations of firms are reasonable (see Chapter 8). Banks provide credit 
to  anybody  who  shows  up  and  is  deemed  creditworthy.  The  standards  of  creditworthiness 
accommodate a range of economic units (think economic units with different credit scores). Banks 
charge more to less creditworthy economic units and ration credit (Figure 11.3). 

Figure 11.3 The market for bank credit 

 

Once  they  have  been  granted  credit,  businesses  can  buy  the  resources  needed  to  start  the 
production required to meet the expected demand. Will that raise inflation? Chapter 12 notes that 
if the growth of credit raises the output gap or pushes up the growth rate of unit cost of labor then 
yes; however, usually the economy operates below full employment and can adjust to an increase 
in the wage bill and spending.  
The next step (the funding phase) is to sell what was produced. If expectations are correct or are 
too pessimistic, then all output is sold; otherwise there are some inventories. Once they have sold 
their product, firms repay their debts to banks. Once debts and expenses have been paid, firms 
realize a profit, that is, their net worth rises. If monetary gains are not realized or are too small, a 
business  may  ultimately  close.  Households  also  save  some  of  the  incomes  they  received,  which 
increases their net worth but reduces firms’ potential profits. Firms may try to capture some of the 
income  saved  by  households  by  issuing  securities  to  fund  the  acquisition  of  assets  and/or  to 
refinance their debts.  
Thus,  saving  is  the  end  result  of  the  economic  process  not  the  beginning.  It  matters  during  the 
funding phase but not the financing phase. At that time, like at any other time, interest rates are 
driven  by  monetary  conditions.  One  of  these  monetary  conditions  is  the  policy  rate  of  the  Fed, 
which has a strong influence on all other nominal rates through cost and portfolio channels (and of 
course, economic units do care about nominal interest rates because of their impact on liquidity 
and solvency).4 As such, government deficit and investment may not have much of an impact on 
interest rates. 

BEYOND INCENTIVES: THE ROLE OF MACROECONOMIC FORCES 
While monetary incentives are central to the dynamics at play in a capitalist economy, the MPE 
approach also argues that one cannot use microeconomic analysis to draw conclusions about the 
155 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
economy as  a whole. By relying on conclusions drawn from studying how economic units make 
decisions in isolation (microeconomy), one misses the financial interdependences that exist among 
economic  units.  When  these  financial  interdependences  are  taken  into  account,  they  lead  to 
counterintuitive conclusions relative to personal experiences.  
For example, at the individual level, income is independent of spending (a household does not earn 
more if it shops more); however national income is not independent of spending. The more is spent, 
the more is earned: GDP = C + I + G + NX. To simplify, the more people shop, the more people are 
employed and so the greater the number of people who draw an income, and so the higher national 
income. When someone spends, that creates incomes for others. 
As such, saving cannot be the beginning of the economic process for an economy. Income allows 
saving, but, at the macroeconomic level, spending creates income and so spending creates saving. 
The  Kalecki  equation  of  profit  more  is  a  neat  way  to  show  that  for  business  saving.  National 
accounting identities tell us that gross domestic product can be determined in three ways, two of 
which are the income approach and the expenditure approach: 
W + Z + UnD + TU ≡ C + I + G + NX 
With U gross profit of firms, UnD the disposable net profit of firms (i.e. profit after accounting for 
business income tax, distribution, and subsidies), W employees’ compensations, Z the gross non‐
wage incomes paid by firms (dividends, interests, rental income), and TU business income tax (tax 
on profit), C the consumption level, I the level of investment, G the level of government spending, 
and NX net exports. Accounting for net tax payments induced by taxes and transfer payments in all 
sectors one gets: 
WD + ZD + UnD ≡ C + I + DEF + NX 
With the subscript D indicating disposable income (i.e. after tax and transfer payments), and DEF 
the government budget deficit (including transfer payments). Subtracting WD + ZD from each side 
and defining CU as the consumption out of disposable net profit one has: 
UnD ≡ CU – SH + I + DEF + NX 
With SH (= SW + SZ = (WD – CW) + (ZD – CZ)) the saving level of households (wage earners and rentiers). 
Kalecki  argues  UnD  is  not  under  the  control  of  firms,  whereas  variables  on  the  right  side 
(expenditures) depend on discretionary choices, so the causality runs from spending to profit so: 
UnD = CU – SH + I + DEF + NX 
More spending leads to more business saving (profit). 
Saving is clearly differentiated from investment contrary to the REE approach. Saving is an increase 
in net worth; it is financial accumulation (see Chapter 1). It is different from physical accumulation, 
which  is  investment.  In  the  REE  approach  saving  and  investment  are  the  same  thing—physical 
accumulation.  For  the  MPE  approach,  this  is  not  appropriate  because  capitalist  economies  are 
monetary economies so income is earned in monetary form and saving is done in monetary form.  
More  importantly,  at  the  macroeconomic  level,  it  is  not  possible  to  transfer  national  income 
through time by saving it. Indeed, given that national income is driven by spending, as thriftiness 
goes up national income falls. The only way to transfer income through time is by investing it, i.e. 
by buying goods and services for the purpose of maintaining or increasing productive capacities; 

156 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
however, not consuming (saving) depresses investment. If people consume fewer potatoes, there 
is no incentive to plant the resulting excess inventory of potatoes to produce more potatoes. 

CONCLUSIONS 
Money supply is never neutral in a monetary production economy. The money supply is not only 
used as a medium of exchange but also as a means of payment, so it must be present at every step 
of the economic process for that process to work smoothly. Several conclusions can be drawn from 
this view: 
1‐ There is no saving constraint on the economic system. At the macroeconomic level, saving 
is created by spending. 
2‐ The financial system exists to provide financial resources to the most profitable economic 
activities. These activities may or may not be productive, may or may not be efficient, may 
or may not be useful; these criteria are not relevant to the decision to provide funds. The 
financialization of the economy has pushed businesses away from the production of goods 
and services (see Chapter 8). 
3‐ Banks are not intermediaries: they do not lend on behalf of savers. A bank does not lend 
anything  to  non‐bank,  it  is  not  a  potato  lender  nor  a  money  lender;  it  is  a  dealer  in 
promissory notes that require monetary payments (see Chapter 10). 
4‐ When government increases deficit spending, it boosts sales and creates more monetary 
income, which promotes economic activity unless the economy is at full employment (in 
which case prices go up). There is no crowding out effect from government deficits because 
finance is not a limited resource (it is not based on saving) and production is demand driven 
(if government demands more output, more is produced). 
5‐ Monetary incentives are crucial because debts owed to banks and government create a 
need  to  have  reliable  streams  of  future  monetary  incomes;  Nominalism  prevails  (see 
Chapter 15). 
6‐ The economy is usually below full employment because it usually goes against monetary 
incentives to be at full employment (it is not profitable, or as profitable, in money terms). 
Promoting  thriftiness  discourages  economic  activity  because  profit  declines  as  sales 
decline. A market for intertemporal output does not exist. 
7‐ Real  results  are  driven  by  monetary  results:  Anything  that  is  monetarily  profitable  and 
anyone  who  meets  standards  of  creditworthiness  will  be  financed.  The  financing  stage 
allows  the  creation  of  output,  and  the  output  is  used  potentially  to  increase  productive 
capacities during the funding stage. 
Beyond all these implications, Chapter 13 shows that economic activity requires that at least one 
economic sector goes into debt for economic activity to proceed.  

CONCLUSION 
The  way  one  should  include  finance  into  economic  analysis  is  subject  to  sharp  divisions  among 
economists. These divisions ultimately rest of very different premises used to do economics. This 
157 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
division is old and can be found in debates between Malthus and Ricardo in the early part of the 
19th century: “I cannot agree with Adam Smith, or with Mr. Malthus, that it is the nominal value of 
goods,  or  their  prices  only,  which  enter  into  the  consideration  of  the  merchant”  (Ricardo  1820 
(1951): 26). These different premises lead to very different policy prescriptions that rest on a very 
different understanding of how the financial system works with the rest of the economy. Chapters 
15 and 16 shows that many of these differences can be boiled down to a different understanding 
of the nature of monetary instruments: For the REE, monetary instruments are a mere commodity 
and so demanding money is also demanding output; for MPE, monetary instruments are financial 
instruments. 
Summary of Major Points 
1‐ The economic profession can be divided according to the premises it uses regarding the role of 
monetary  incentives  and  monetary  outcomes  on  the  direction  of  economic  activity.  The  real
exchange economy view argues that monetary aspects are irrelevant, except for imperfections, and 
that capitalism can be understood without including monetary aspects. The monetary production 
economic view argues that monetary aspects are crucial and must be included at the beginning, the
middle and the end of the analysis of capitalist economies.  
2‐ In the real exchange economy, credit standards are set in real terms, finance is constrained by 
the  amount  of  output  saved,  and  finance  is  about  moving  output  through  time  by  incentivizing
people not to consume. The economy is a giant market for current and future output and the role
of finance is to allocate output between the present and the future. 
3‐ In the intertemporal market, if government borrows real resources then it removes access to
real resources by the private sector, which crowds out investment. There is a given size of output
and any use by one economic unit is at the expense of others. 
4‐ Monetary instruments are a mere medium of exchange; they help to make transactions more 
efficient but they do not alter the structure of transactions, which is determined by relative prices.
5‐ In the monetary production economy, credit standards are set in nominal terms, finance is not 
constrained by saving of output or by saving by depositors of cash. There is no way to transfer real
output by saving it, i.e. by not consuming it. A decline in consumption depresses economic activity
so reduces current output and future output. The only way to transfer output through time is by
investing,  but  investment  is  not  constrained  by  saving  and  is  discouraged  by  thriftiness.  Put
differently, the size of the pie is not fixed so more demand leads to more output; and if individuals 
increase their thriftiness then sales fall and that discourages the expansion of productive capacities.
6‐  Given  that  monetary  aspects  are  crucial  in  the  monetary  production  view,  the  economy  is
demand‐led not supply‐led. Sales drive production not the other way around, so a decline in sales 
(higher saving) leads to a decline in production. 
7‐  There  are  two  phases  of  economic  activity:  the  financing  phase  and  the  funding  phase.  The 
former involves the financial sector in the production of output; the latter involves the financial 
sector in the acquisition of output. Saving is created by income and income is financed by credit; 
therefore, saving cannot exist before credit. Saving may have a role to play in the second phase by
reducing the demand for current output and by providing additional financial funds to acquire long‐
term assets. 
7‐  This  difference  of  opinion  about  how  do  to  do  economics  is  old  and  involves  very  different
paradigms. 
 

158 
 

CHAPTER 11: ECONOMIC GROWTH AND THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM 

Keywords 
Crowding  out  effect,  intertemporal  output,  saving,  investment,  credit  standards,  demand‐led, 
supply‐led, financing phase, funding phase 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: What is the crowding out effect and how does it work? 
Q2: What are the arguments against the crowding out effect, both in terms of resources as well as 
finance? 
Q3: Why does saving not lead to a decline in economic activity in the real exchange economy? Why
does it do so in the monetary production economy? 
Q4: What is the financing phase? How is finance involved in that phase? What about the funding 
phase? 
Q5: Does investment create saving or does saving create investment? 
Q6: Is saving needed for banking or is it not? 
Q7: Is economic activity demand driven or supply driven? How is that related to the views regarding
the role of finance in the economy? 
Q8:  According  to  John  Maynard  Keynes:  “Dishoarding  and  credit  expansion  provides  not  an
alternative to increased saving, but a necessary preparation for it. It is the parent, not the twin, of
increased saving.” Explain that sentence by using the monetary production economy view. 
Q9:  In  order  to  promote  economic  growth,  should  policymakers  promote  saving  or  should  they
promote spending? 
Q10: If economic units suddenly increase their willingness to hoard monetary instrument, will that
lower economic activity? Why? Why not? 
 
Suggested readings 
Chapter 1 of Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman is a very clear and concise presentation
of the real exchange economy framework. 
Dudley, D. (1980) “A Monetary Theory of Production: Keynes and the Institutionalists,” Journal of 
Economic Issues 14 (2): 255‐273. 
Dugger, W.M. and Peach, J.T. (2008) Economic Abundance: An Introduction, Armonk: M.E. Sharpe.
Keynes, J.M. (1933) “The characteristics of an entrepreneur economy,” reprinted in D.E. Moggridge 
(ed.) (1979) The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes, vol. 29, 87‐101, London: Macmillan. 
 
                                                            
1 See Gertler, M. (1988) “Financial structure and aggregate economic activity: An overview,” Journal of Money, Credit and 

Banking, 20 (3), Part 2: 559‐588.  
2 See Galbraith’s Affluent Society, especially Chapters 10, 11 and 13. 
3 Forstater, M. (2005) “Taxation and Primitive Accumulation: The Case of Colonial Africa.” In The Capitalist State and Its 

Economy: Democracy in Socialism, Research in Political Economy, Volume 22, 51‐65. 
4 Tymoigne, E. (2006) “Fisher's Theory of Interest Rates and the Notion of 'Real': A Critique,” Levy Economics Institute, 
Working Paper No. 456 http://www.levyinstitute.org/publications/fisher‐theory‐of‐interest‐rates‐and‐the‐notion‐of‐real 

159 
 

 

CHAPTER 12: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
How economists are divided about what causes inflation 
Why inflation occurs according to different approaches 
What the policy implications are of the different views of inflation 
 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 
When inflation is mentioned, it is usually in relation to the cost of buying newly produced goods 
and  services  for  consumption  purposes.  Another  type  of  inflation  concerns  asset  prices,  i.e.  the 
price of non‐producible commodities and old producible commodities. This Chapter does not study 
asset‐price  inflation,  which  concerns  theories  of  interest  rate.  There  are  two  broad  ways  to 
categorize  existing  explanations  of  inflation  (and  deflation);  monetary  explanations  and  real 
explanations (“real” means related to production). Below are two popular theories based on such 
a categorization. 

THE  QUANTITY  THEORY  OF  MONEY:  MONETARY  VIEW  OF 
INFLATION 
The quantity theory of money (QTM) is a logical extension of the real exchange economy framework 
presented in chapter 12. It starts with the identity MV ≡ PQ with M the money supply, V the velocity 
of money (the speed at which the money supply circulates to complete all necessary transactions), 
P  the  price  level,  and  Q  the  quantity  of  output.  The  identity  is  a  tautology;  it  just  says  that  the 
monetary value of transactions on goods and services (PQ) is equal the monetary value of financial 
transactions needed to complete the transactions on goods and services. To get a theory of output 
price  (the  QTM),  one  must  make  some  assumptions  about  each  variable  and  make  a  causal 
argument. The QTM assumes that: 

H1: M is constant (or grows at a constant rate) and is controlled by the central bank through 
a money multiplier (see Chapter 10). 

H2: V is constant (habits of payments are stable). 

H3: Q is constant at its full employment level (Qfe) or grows at its constant “natural” rate 
(gQfe).  Supply  conditions  (productive  capacities)  are  supposed  to  be  independent  of  the 
demand conditions (spending on goods and services). 

Given this set of hypotheses we have: 
P = MV/Qfe 
Or, in terms of growth rates (V is constant so its growth rate is zero): 
gP = gM – gQfe 
If the money supply grows faster than the natural rate of economic growth, there is some inflation 
(gP > 0). If gM = 2% and gQfe = 1% then gP = 1%. If the central bank increases the growth rate of the 
money supply, inflation rises by the same percentage points while the growth rate of production is 
unchanged. Inflation has monetary origins. 
The economic logic is the following in terms of price level. First, suppose some money falls into the 
hands of economic units. How? Milton Friedman is famous for arguing that economists do not need 
to care about how the money supply enters the economy; one can merely assume that it falls from 
a helicopter. Following H1, one may say that the central bank injects reserves, which leads to a large 
increase in the amount of bank credit. 
So now economic units have additional monetary instruments. They could save them but H2 implies 
that  economic  units  have  hoarded  everything  they  wanted  to  hoard  so  economic  units  rush  to 
stores to spend. Given that the economy is at full employment, the only way the economic system 
161 
 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 
can adjust to the large increase in the  demand for goods and services is through an  increase in 
prices. Money is “neutral,” it does not impact production. 
The main policy implication is that central banks are best suited to tackle inflationary problems, 
while  productive  issues  are  best  left  to  relative  price  adjustments  via  market  mechanisms.  The 
central bank can manage output prices by targeting the quantity (growth rate) of reserves and by 
setting the reserve requirement ratio. This will constrain the quantity (growth rate) of the money 
supply and set a specific price level (inflation). Controlling inflation is an easy job; a central bank 
just needs to decide what its inflation target is (gPT) and to determine what the natural growth rate 
of the economy is (gQfe). If, for example, a central bank has an inflation target of gPT = 2% and the 
natural growth rate of the economy is gQfe = 3%, the growth rate of the money supply should be gM 
= 5%. Assuming a stable multiplier, this means that the growth rate of reserves should be 5%. 
This  argument  has  been  extended  to  a  central  bank  that  targets  an  interest  rate.  Most  central 
bankers now recognize that monetary stimulus is not neutral in the short‐term, hence the ability to 
fine‐tune the economy—that is, to make sure the economy is neither too hot (rising inflation) nor 
too cold (rising unemployment)— through an interest‐rate policy. However, in the medium to long‐
run,  the  neutrality  of  money  is  argued  to  prevail,  hence  the  importance  of  inflation  targeting. 
Central  bankers  can  use  that  to  guide  their  short‐run  policy.  Central  banks  should  determine  a 
reference value for the growth of money supply (gM*). This value should be consistent with the 
inflation target (gPT), the prevailing natural growth rate, and the existing trend of velocity (gV): 
gM* = gPT + gQfe – gV 
If gM > gM*, a central bank is too lax (i.e., its interest rate target should be higher) and inflation will 
be above target in the medium term. 
There  are  several  issues  with  that  approach  that  relate  to  the  hypotheses  made  to  reach  the 
conclusion, and to the causality at play: 

The money supply is not controlled in any way by the central bank. Not only does the money 
multiplier theory not apply, but also the growth of the money supply is driven primarily by 
the demand for bank credit by private economic units (banks cannot force feed credit to 
economic units) and by government spending and taxing (see Chapter 10 and Chapter 6).  

Interest‐rate targeting has only a remote and uncertain effect on the growth of the money 
supply, even more so on inflation (see Q.10 in Chapter 5).  

The economy is rarely at full employment so if the demand for goods and services increases 
the supply of goods and services increases.  

Measuring the natural growth rate of the economy is actually difficult. More importantly, 
the  demand  for  goods  and  services  and  the  supply  of  goods  and  services  are  not 
independent  factors.  Demand  matters  even  in  the  “long  run.” 1  Greenspan  put  it  nicely 
during an FOMC meeting: 
Let me just say very simply – this is really a repetition of what I’ve been 
saying in the past – that we have all been brought up to a greater or lesser 
extent on the presumption that the supply side is a very stable force. […] 
In  my  judgment  our  models  fail  to  account  appropriately  for  the 
interaction between the supply side and the demand side largely because 

162 
 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 
historically  it  has  not  been  necessary  for  them  to  do  so.  (Greenspan, 
FOMC meeting, October 1999, pages 46–47) 

In  terms  of  basic  empirical  evidence,  the  strong  correlation  between  money  supply  and 
price that one should expect were this theory to be correct does not exist, even in the long‐
run  (Figures  11.1  and  11.2).  While  correlation  improves  as  the  length  of  time  increases 
(one‐year correlation is 0.55, five‐year correlation is 0.67, ten‐year correlation is 0.71), the 
correlation is weaker than what the theory suggests. 

The fact that inflation and money supply growth are positively correlated does not tell us 
the direction of causality. One may doubt that the causality goes from M to P given the 
strong  assumptions  required  for  that  to  be  the  case.  The  next  section  will  develop  this 
point. 

 
Figure 12.1 Annual growth rate of CPI and of the money supply, percent 
Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. 
 

163 
 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 

 
Figure 12.2 Five‐year growth rate of CPI and of the money supply, percent 
Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System 

INCOME DISTRIBUTION AND INFLATION: A NON‐MONETARY 
VIEW OF INFLATION 
Another theory of the price level starts with an identity grounded in macroeconomic accounting: 
PQ ≡ W + U 
This is the income approach to GDP. It says that nominal GDP (PQ) is the sum of all incomes. For 
simplicity, there are only two incomes: wage bill (W) and gross profit (U). All of them are measured 
before tax. Divide by Q on each side: 
P ≡ W/Q + U/Q 
W is equal to the product of the average nominal wage rate (w) and the number of hours of labor 
(L): W = wL (for example, if w is $5 per hour and L is equal to 10 hours, then W is equal to $50). 
Thus: 
P ≡ wL/Q + U/Q 
Q/L is the quantity of output per labor hour, the average productivity of labor (APL): 
P ≡ w/APL + U/Q 
w/APL is the unit cost of labor. U/Q is a macroeconomic mark‐up over the labor cost. To get to a 
theory, the following assumptions are made: 

164 
 

H1: the economy is usually not at full employment and Q (and economic growth) changes 
with expected aggregate demand (this is Keynes’s theory of effective demand). 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 

H2: w is set in a bargaining process that depends on the relative power of wage‐earners 
(the conflict claim theory of distribution underlies this hypothesis) 

H3:  U,  the  nominal  level  of  aggregate  profit,  depends  on  aggregate  demand  (Kalecki’s 
theory of profit underlies this hypothesis, see below) 

H4: APL moves with the needs of the economy and the state of the economy; it is procyclical 
to the state of aggregate demand for goods and services.2 In general, in periods of labor‐
time  scarcity  gAPL  goes  up  while,  during  an  economic  slowdown,  gAPL  goes  down  before 
employees are laid off. 

Thus: 
P = w/APL + U/Q 
The price level changes with changes in the unit cost of labor and the size of the macroeconomic 
mark up. In terms of rates of growth:  
gp ≈ (gw – gAPL)sW + (gU – gQ)sU 
With sW and sU the shares of wages and profit in national income (sW + sU = 1). Thus, inflation has 
two sources: 

Cost‐push inflation: the growth rate of the unit labor cost of labor (gw – gAPL) depends on 
how  fast  nominal  wage  grows  on  average  relative  to  the  growth  rate  of  the  average 
productivity of labor. The correlation between the unit cost of labor and inflation is very 
strong both in the “short‐run” (0.82 for yearly growth rates) and “long‐run” (0.93 for five‐
year growth rates) (Figure 12.3). 

Demand‐pull inflation: U follows Kalecki’s equation of profit which states that the level of 
profit in the economy is a function of aggregate demand (see Chapter 11). Thus, the term, 
gU – gQ represents the pressures of aggregate demand on the economy; it is an output gap. 
If gU (the growth of aggregate demand) goes up and gQ (the growth of aggregate supply) is 
unchanged, then gP rises given everything else. However, to assume that gQ is constant is 
not  acceptable  unless  the  economy  is  at  full  employment.  Usually,  a  positive  shock  on 
aggregate demand growth leads to a positive increase in aggregate supply growth because 
the rate of utilization of productive capacities is below one (that is, less than 100%) even in 
“the long run.” 

Note that the money supply is absent from this equation. The money supply does not directly affect 
output prices. Spending may impact inflation but it depends on the state of the economy. 
One may note that the growth rate of wages is by itself not as relevant. It is its relation to the growth 
rate of the average productivity of labor that matters. Time‐series data provides another insight 
into the role of the unit cost of labor (Figure 12.4). From the mid‐1960s to the early 1980s, unit cost 
of labor was a main source of high inflation. Nominal wage growth outpaced productivity growth; 
both grew on average. The former was in the 5‐10% range whereas the latter was mostly in the 0‐
5%  range.  In  the  late  1960s,  wage  growth  outpaced  productivity  growth  because  of  workers’ 
strength in wage bargaining due to low unemployment and strong unions. The 1970s oil shocks 
boosted  inflation  and  workers  tried  to  maintain  their  real  wage  (they  failed)  by  demanding  an 
increase in nominal wages. This further reinforced inflation because productivity could not keep up 
with wage demands. The internationalization of production processes and the decline in the power 

165 
 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 
of unions have tamed the ability of wages to outpace productivity, even in periods of prolonged 
economic growth. 

 
Figure 12.3 Annual growth rate of unit cost of labor and growth rate of PCE, percent 
Sources: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System 
 

Figure 12.4. Unit cost of labor growth rate and PCE inflation, percent 
Sources: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Bureau of Labor Statistics 

166 
 

 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 
When combined with the explanation of monetary creation presented in Chapter 10, this theory of 
inflation provides an explanation of the correlation between price and money supply that involves 
a  reversed  causality  compared  to  the  QTM.  Higher  costs  of  production  and  higher  demand 
pressures push up the price of goods and services, which increases the size of the bank advances 
that economic units request: higher P (gP) leads to higher M (gM).  
A broader point is that the growth of the money supply is not by itself inflationary because money 
supply grows with the needs of the economic system; economic units are not suddenly allocated 
bags of money supply with which they do not know what to do: 

Firms request bank credit to start production (pay workers, buy raw material) and repay 
their  bank  debts  (which  destroys  money  supply)  once  production  is  sold:  money  supply 
moves in part with the need of the productive system 

Federal government spending (that injects money supply) and taxing (that destroys money 
supply)  move  automatically  in  a  countercyclical  fashion  to  tame  inflationary  pressures 
(“automatic stabilizers”): during an expansion (a recession), the growth rate of government 
spending  falls  (rises)  and  the  growth  rate  of  taxes  rise  (falls).  In  the  US,  most  of  the 
automatic stabilizer effect comes from wild fluctuations in the growth rate of taxes (in a 
recession economic units have less income so they are taxed less) (Figure 12.5).  

So the money supply is not something that falls from the sky, its injection and destruction in relation 
to the production process must be explained and the debts incurred by monetary creation must be 
included  in  the  analysis  (See  Chapter  10).  If  the  economy  is  growing,  money  supply  grows,  if 
economic units do not want to hold monetary instruments they may just use them to accelerate 
the repayment of their bank debts. 

Figure 12.5 Automatic stabilizers. 
Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis. 

167 
 

 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 
In terms of policy, the theory means that inflation is managed best by  buffer‐stock  policies  and 
income policies, or a combination of both such as a job‐guarantee program.3 Monetary policy does 
not have much of a direct impact on inflation, and an increase in interest rates can contribute to 
inflation through the cost and demand impacts of higher interest rates (see below and Chapter 5). 
The role of a central bank is to preserve financial stability through the provision of a stable low cost 
refinancing source and through regulation. 

TO  GO  FURTHER:  KALECKI  EQUATION  OF  PROFIT,  INTEREST 
RATE AND INFLATION 
For readers who want to know more, this section develops a few points. The income‐approach to 
GDP can be developed further to account for rentiers’ income, which, to simplify, only comes from 
the distribution of profit. Gross profit is the sum of net profit, non‐wage income distribution, and 
taxes on profit: 
PQ ≡ W + U ≡ W + Z + UnD + TU  P ≡ w/APL + Z/Q + UnD/Q + TU/Q 
With U gross profit of firms, UnD the disposable net profit of firms (i.e. profit after accounting for 
business income tax, distribution, and subsidies), W employees’ compensations, Z the gross non‐
wage incomes paid by firms (dividends, interests, rental income), and TU business income tax (tax 
on profit). For small values of gQ and gAPL, we have: 
gP ≈ (gw – gAPL)sW + (gZ – gQ)sZ + (gUnD – gQ)sUnD + (gTu – gQ)sTu 
The assumptions are that gw results from a bargaining process between employees and firms. gZ 
depends  on  monetary  policy  and  the  state  of  liquidity  preference  (Z  depends  on  the  level  and 
structure  of  interest  rates).  gAPL  is  procyclical  to  the  state  of  the  economy.  gQ  is  determined  by 
expectations of monetary profits (Keynes’s effective demand). As shown below, gUnD is determined 
by the Kalecki equation of monetary profit. Finally, the growth of profit taxes depends on the tax 
structure  and  economic  activity.  For  the  sake  of  the  argument,  one  can  assume  that  national 
income shares are constant and sum to one (sW + sZ + sUnD + sTu = 1). 
Inflation  can  go  up  and  down  as  gUnD,  gw,  gZ  and  gTu  go  up  and  down,  but  their  effects  will  be 
mitigated by changes in productivity growth and output growth. Only when the latter two are fixed 
or sluggish relative to the former four can inflation permanently take place; this is a state of “true 
inflation” to use Keynes’s terminology. One economic condition during which this can occur is full 
employment, but this is not the only one. Prices may go up quickly because of, for example, an 
uncontrolled  wage‐price  spiral  induced  by  high  expectation  of  inflation,  competition  between 
unions for relative wage improvements, or a rise in costs not controlled by residents (e.g., an oil 
shock for net oil‐importing countries). Rising interest rates also can promote inflation by raising 
costs of production (Chapter 5 noted that FOMC members are aware of this inflationary channel). 
This explanation of inflation does not discard the possibility of a monetary source of inflation, but 
it requires that several conditions be met because the relation between money supply and inflation 
is highly indirect. First, if funds are injected via portfolio transactions (swapping of non‐monetary 
assets for monetary assets), output‐price inflation  may occur only if desired stocks of monetary 
assets are fulfilled, if receivers of monetary assets decide to spend their excess funds on existing 
goods and services, and if the economy is in a sluggish state. Economic units may want to hoard 
more, may use excess funds to buy financial assets (which would lower interest rates) and/or to 
168 
 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 
repay their bank debts (which would lower the money supply), and the economy usually is able to 
increase production when demand increases. 
Second, if funds are injected into the private domestic sector via income transactions (e.g., wage 
payments), inflation will occur only if the economy is slow to respond (so that UnD/Q increases). The 
Kalecki equation of profit expresses this more formally. Chapter 11 showed that  
UnD = CU – SH + I + DEF + NX 
Thus: 
gUnD = (gCusCu – gShsSh + gIsI + gGsG – gTsT + gXsX – gJsJ)/sTu 
Where si is the share of variable i in national income (or GDP) which is assumed to be constant. As 
the  economy  gets  to  full  employment,  any  type  of  spending  (public  or  private,  consumption  or 
investment)  will  tend  to  be  inflationary.  Higher  interest  rates  can  contribute  to  demand‐pull 
inflation if the growth of consumption by rentiers increases too fast as a result of higher interest 
income.4 The inflationary tendencies can be mitigated by the growth rate of tax, the growth rate of 
production, the growth rate of the average productivity of labor and the growth rate of saving. 
Summary of Major Points 
1‐  The  quantity  theory  of  money  asserts  that  inflation  has  monetary  origins.  The  money  supply 
grows too fast relative to the productive capacities of the economy. 
2‐ According to the QTM, the main role of a central bank is to keep inflation under control either
by  targeting  monetary  aggregates  through  a  money  multiplier  process  (reserve  targeting)  or
through variations in the cost of reserves (FFR targeting). Modern proponents of that view work
the argument through a FFR‐targeting view. 
3‐ According to some economists, the QTM makes some extreme hypotheses and has an inaccurate
understanding of the monetary creation process. The economy is usually not at full employment
and  productive  capacities  are  driven  by  demand  conditions.  The  money  supply  is  created  and
destroyed according to the needs of the economic system. It is not something that suddenly drops 
from  the  sky—and  exogenously  determined  occurrence—that  the  system  must  find  a  way  to 
assimilate. 
4‐ Some economists view the root of inflation in the conflict over the distribution of income. This 
creates  cost‐push  and  demand‐pull  sources  of  inflation.  As  such,  raising  interest  rates  may  be
inflationary.  
5‐ According to that approach, the job of a central bank is to promote financial stability. Other tools
must be used to deal with inflation that have more fiscal aspects. 
 
Keywords 
Natural  growth  rate,  velocity  of  money,  unit  labor  cost,  output  gap,  money  multiplier,  Kalecki
equation of profit, inflation, income distribution 
 

169 
 

CHAPTER 12: INFLATION 

Review Questions 
Q1: In the QTM, if the level of money supply suddenly rises what happens to the price level? What
is the economic logic behind that result? What if it is the growth rate of the money supply that rise?
Q2: If the central bank increases the growth rate of reserve what happens according to the quantity 
theory of money? 
Q3: What are the empirical and theoretical problems with the notion of natural growth rate? 
Q4: What is the view of monetary creation underlying the quantity theory of money and how is that
at odd with the way money supply is actually injected in the economic system? 
Q5: If wage rate grows faster than the unit cost of labor, what happens to inflation? What is the
economic logic behind that result? 
Q6:  If  aggregate  demand  growth  faster  than  aggregate  supply,  what  are  the  means  for  the 
economic system to adjust in the quantity theory and in the distribution theory? 
Q7: Rising interest rates can be inflationary according to the distribution theory; why? 
 
Suggested readings 
Friedman, M. (1987) “The quantity theory of money,” in Eatwell, J., Milgate, M. and Newman, P
(eds) The New Palgrave: A Dictionary of Economics,. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 
Kalecki, M. (1971) “The determinants of profits,” in M. Kalecki (ed.) Selected Essays on the Dynamics 
of the Capitalist Economy, 78–92, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
Lavoie,  M.  (2014)  “Inflation  theory,”  chapter  8  Post‐Keynesian  Economics:  New    Foundations. 
Northampton: Edward Elgar 
Rowthorn, R. (1977) “Conflict, inflation and money” Cambridge Journal of Economics 1 (3): 215‐
239. 
 
                                                            
1 See Chapter 6 of Marc Lavoie’s Post‐Keynesian Economics: New Foundations for a formal overview of the literature. 
2

 See  Matias  Vernango’s  “Is  labor  productivity  still  pro‐cyclical?  Okun's  Law  is  still  fine”  at 
http://nakedkeynesianism.blogspot.com/2015/03/is‐labor‐productivity‐still‐pro.html 
3 See Bill Mitchell’s “What is a Job Guarantee?” at http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=23719 
4
 See 
Scott 
Fullwiler’s 
“Functional 
Finance 
and 
the 
Debt 
Ratio—Part 
IV” 
at 
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2013/01/functional‐finance‐and‐the‐debt‐ratio‐part‐iv.html 

170 
 

 

CHAPTER 13:

After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What balance sheet interrelations are  
What the basic principles of national accounting are 
Why not all sectors of the economy can be in surplus at the same time 
Why  a  government  deficit  is  sustainable  as  long  as  monetary  sovereignty 
prevails and other sectors want to net save 
Why  taking  proactive  actions  to  reduce  the  public  debt  is  unnecessary  and 
counterproductive 
How  business  cycles  can  be  explained  partially  by  looking  at  balance‐sheet 
interrelations 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
Earlier Chapters have focused on the mechanics of a specific balance sheet, specifically that of the 
central bank and of private banks. This Chapter looks at the balance‐sheet interrelations between 
the  three  main  macroeconomic  sectors  of  an  economy:  the  domestic  private  sector,  the 
government sector and the foreign sector. This macro view provides some important insights about 
issues  such  as  the  public  debt  and  deficit,  policy  goals  that  are  more  likely  than  others  to  be 
achieved, the business cycle, among others. 

A PRIMER ON CONSOLIDATION 
The balance sheet of the domestic private sector puts together the balance sheets of all domestic 
private economic units. This means that claims that these sectors have on each other are removed 
(that is, cancel each other out) from the balance sheet of the domestic private sector. For example, 
assume that the following two balance sheets exist 
Households 
Assets 
Bank accounts 
Foreign currency held by households 
Real assets of households 

Liabilities and Capital 
Mortgages 
Net worth of households 
 
Banks 

Assets 
Mortgages  
Treasuries held by banks 
Real assets of banks 

Liabilities and Capital 
Bank accounts  
TT&Ls 
Net worth of banks 

If they are consolidated we have as a first step: 
Households + Banks 
Assets 
Bank accounts 
Foreign currency held by households 
Real assets of households 
Mortgages 
Treasuries held by banks 
Real assets of banks 

Liabilities and Capital 
Mortgages 
Net worth of households 
Bank accounts  
TT&Ls 
Net worth of banks 

The terms in bold appear on both sides of the balance sheet and are eliminated in the consolidation 
process so the balance sheet of households and banks is: 
Households + Banks 
Assets 
Foreign currency held by households 
Treasuries held by banks 
Real assets of households and banks 

Liabilities and Capital 
TT&Ls 
Net worth of households and banks 

The only financial claims left are those issued to, and issued by, sectors of the economy other than 
households  and  banks.  Thus,  the  consolidation  process  eliminates  some  important  financial 
172 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
interlinkages.  This  is  fine  as  long  as  one  is  merely  interested  in  looking  at  relationship  between 
sectors,  but  one  should  be  mindful  that  this  is  a  simplified  picture  that  hides  some  important 
aspects of the economy. 

THE THREE SECTORS OF THE ECONOMY 
The analysis of financial interlinkages among the three main sectors can be done by starting from 
the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA), but the derivation from the Financial Accounts 
of the United States is more intuitive (the derivation from NIPA is done at the end of this Chapter). 
The following is a quick refresher from Chapter 1. A balance sheet is an accounting document that 
records what an economic unit owns (assets) and owes (liabilities) (Figure 13.1).  

Assets 
Financial Assets (FA) 
Real Assets (RA)  

Liabilities and Net Worth
Financial Liabilities (FL) 
Net Worth (NW)  

 

Figure 13.1 A basic balance sheet. 

Financial assets are claims issued by other economic units and real assets are things that have been 
produced.  Financial  liabilities  are  claims  issued  to  other  economic  units.  A  balance  sheet  must 
balance, that is, the following equality must hold all the time: FA + RA ≡ FL + NW. Or put differently: 
NW ≡ NFW + RA 
This means that the wealth of any economic sector comes from two sources, net financial wealth 
(NFW = FA – FL) and real wealth (RA).  
Each macroeconomic sector has a balance sheet (Figure 13.2). DP is the domestic private sector, G 
is the government sector, F is the foreign sector also called the “rest of the world.” The government 
sector includes all the levels of domestic government (local, state, federal) and the central bank. 
While the Financial Accounts of the United States include the balance sheet of the central bank in 
the domestic financial sector—the domestic financial sector includes domestic financial businesses 
and monetary authority—, it is more relevant to include the central bank in the government sector 
(see Chapter 6). The domestic private sector includes domestic households, domestic non‐profit 
organizations,  domestic  financial  businesses,  domestic  non‐financial  businesses,  and  domestic 
farms. The foreign sector includes anything else (foreign governments, foreign businesses, foreign 
households, etc.). Note that the adjective “domestic” is always used for the reference country that 
is studied. “Foreign” includes all other countries. 

ADP 

LDP  

FADP 

FLDP   

RADP 

NWDP 

 

AG 

LG 

FAG 

FLG   

RAG 

NWG 

 

 
 

AF 

LF 

FAF 

FLF 

RAF 

NWF 

Figure 13.2 Balance sheets of macroeconomic sectors 

 

For every creditor there is a debtor, so if one adds together the claims of the creditors and the 
debtors they must cancel out. For the world economy (all sectors consolidated together): 
(FADP – FLDP) + (FAG – FLG) + (FAF – FLF) ≡ 0 
173 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
This implies that the sum of all net worth equals the sum of all real assets, that is, only real assets 
are a source of wealth for the world economy (NW = RA):  
(NWDP – RADP) + (NWG – RAG) + (NWF – RAF) ≡ 0 
For a domestic economy (government and domestic private sectors are consolidated), there are 
two sources of wealth: real wealth and net financial wealth obtained from the foreign sector. The 
public debt is not a source of financial wealth (or poverty) for the domestic economy because it is 
an  asset  for  the  domestic  private  sector  but  a  debt  of  the  domestic  government.  The  domestic 
money supply is not a source of financial wealth for the domestic economy because it is an asset of 
a domestic holder and a liability of a domestic issuer.  
Given that the previous identities hold in terms of levels at any point in time (aka “stocks”), they 
also hold in terms of changes in levels over a period of time (aka “flows”):  
Δ(FADP – FLDP) + Δ(FAG – FLG) + Δ(FAF – FLF) ≡ 0 
And, knowing that the Financial Accounts defines saving as a change in net worth (S = ΔNW) and 
investment as a change in real assets (I = ΔRA), it is also true that: 
(SDP – IDP) + (SG – IG) + (SF – IF) ≡ 0 
This last identity is similar to the  NIPA  identity (S –  I) + (T –  G) + CABF ≡ 0  (see below for some 
differences). (S – I) and Δ(FA – FL) are both officially called “net lending”, one measured from the 
capital account, (S – I), and the other measured from the financial accounts, Δ(FA – FL).  
A few words on the way all this is sometimes presented by economists. Beware that economists 
may change the name of these two items. (S – I) may be called “net saving” (which is different from 
how the Financial Accounts define net saving) or “surplus” (if S > I) and “deficit” (if S < I), and Δ(FA 
– FL) may be called “net financial accumulation” (NFA). Thus, we have:  
NFADP + NFAG + NFAF ≡ 0 
If an economic sector accumulates more claims on other sectors than the other sectors accumulate 
claims  on  the  economic  sector  in  question,  the  economic  sector  records  a  positive  net  financial 
accumulation, it is a net creditor (aka “net lender”) during the period—Δ(FA – FL) > 0. If the opposite 
is true, the sector is a net debtor (aka “net borrower”) during the period. Finally, this identity is 
sometimes rewritten as: 
DPB + GB + FB ≡ 0 
With  DPB  the  domestic  private  balance,  FB  the  foreign  balance  (the  opposite  of  the  domestic 
current  account  balance),  GB  the  government  balance,  and  “balance”  being  measured  either 
through  the  capital  accounts  (net  saving)  or  through  the  financial  accounts  (net  financial 
accumulation).  
Finally one may note that given that NW – RA ≡ FA – FL, then: 
(S – I) ≡ Δ(FA – FL) 
The operations on goods and services are mirrored by financial operations. Thus, a deficit, or net 
dissaving, is mirrored by a net financial disaccumulation; to spend more than what is earned one 
must sell assets or go into debt. Similarly, a surplus, or net saving, is mirrored by a net financial 
accumulation for the sector. 

174 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
No theory, behavioral equations and statements of causal relations, was used above to explain the 
accounting  identities  (a  bit  of  this  is  done  below  to  examine  the  business  cycle).  The  identities 
simply state that a net injection of funds by a sector must be accumulated in another sector. Every 
dollar must come from somewhere and must go somewhere.  

SOME IMPORTANT IMPLICATIONS 
They  are  many  implications  but  the  main  one  is  that  one  must  not  study  a  sector  in  isolation. 
Anything that a sector does has an impact on other sectors. When a forecast about the budgetary 
trend of the government is made, the forecaster must recognize the implications for other sectors 
to see if the forecast is realistic. This is usually not done. For example, the Congressional Budget 
Office  in  the  early  2000s  expected  the  federal  government’s  surplus  to  continue  to  grow  but 
neglected to look at the implication in terms of the domestic private sector.1 A continuously rising 
government surplus implies continuously rising domestic private deficit given the foreign balance, 
which is not sustainable. Only the federal government of a monetarily sovereign government can 
sustain  permanent  deficits  (see  Chapter  6).  There  are  many  other  implications  and  uses  of  this 
framework such as macroeconomic theory, the madness of fiscal austerity, among others. 2 

POINT  1:  THE  BEGINNING  OF  THE  ECONOMIC  PROCESS  REQUIRES 
THAT SOMEONE GOES INTO DEBT. 
Let us start with an economy in which nothing has been produced or acquired yet. 
ADP 
FADP = 0 
RADP = 0 

LDP  
 
AG 
LG 
FLDP = 0    FAG = 0 FLG = 0     
NWDP = 0 
RAG = 0 NWG = 0

AF 
LF 
FAF = 0  FLF = 0 
RAF = 0  NWF = 0 

Say  that  someone  in  the  economy  wants  to  build  a  house  that  costs  $10  to  build.  In  order  for 
domestic production to start, workers must be paid, raw material must be purchased (those had to 
be produced first by the way).  
If a private business is in charge of doing all this, it must obtain funds and Chapter 10 explains how 
this is done. The balance sheet of the domestic private sector would look like this once the house 
is built: 
ADP 
RADP = 10 

LDP  
NWDP = 10 

Consolidation eliminates the debt owed by the homebuilder to a bank, as well as wages and raw 
material  payments,  because  they  are  all  internal  to  the  sector.  Once  produced,  if  the  house  is 
acquired by a domestic household for $11, the following is recorded at the macro level: 
ADP 
RADP = 11 

LDP  
NWDP = 11 

Again all this hides quite a few underlying financial transactions: 
1‐ Households got a mortgage and paid the homebuilder who made a $1 profit 

175 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
2‐ Firm repaid its $10 debt with interest 
3‐ House was transferred from firms’ balance sheet to household’s balance sheet. 
The next period the process would start all over again. This time the firm may have some savings 
from the previous period to finance part of the production. 
If, instead, the government buys the house, it must first fund the purchase by using a promissory 
note (FLG): 
ADP 
FADP = 11 

LDP  
NWDP = 11   

 

AG 
RAG = 11 

LG 
FLG = 11 

Spending by the government has allowed the domestic private sector to acquire a financial claim. 
It is a claim on the government.  
If a foreign economic unit buys the house and the housebuilder requires payment in US dollars, 
there are several ways the payment can be done but all of them involve the foreign sector going 
into debt in dollars. For example: 

The foreigner may ask for a bank advance in US dollars at a domestic bank 

The foreigner may write a check in a foreign currency (say euros) but when the domestic 
bank of the housebuilder receives the check, it will send the check back to the foreign bank 
of the buyer to request a dollar payment. The foreign bank will need to borrow US dollars 
to settle its debt with the domestic bank. 

Once the house is sold, the firm makes a $1 profit that it uses to pay interest, dividend and taxes. 
What is left over is retained earnings, the saving of the firm. Households will also save some funds. 
But none of that can occur unless someone goes into debt to start production. And for savings to 
be bigger, debt must increase. 

POINT  2:  NOT  ALL  SECTORS  CAN  RECORD  A  SURPLUS  AT  THE  SAME 
TIME 
It is quite straightforward to notice that not all sectors can be net creditors at the same time. At 
least one sector must be a net debtor if another sector is a net creditor because for every creditor 
there  must  be  a  debtor.  Most  of  the  time,  the  domestic  private  sector  is  in  surplus  and  the 
government sector is in deficit (Figure 13.3, Figures 13.4). From 2000 to 2010, New Zealand was a 
particularly odd case where the private sector was in deficit while government and foreign sectors 
were in surplus. To simplify, let us assume that NFAF = 0, therefore:  
NFADP ≡ ‐ NFAG 
That is, in a closed economy, for the private domestic sector (households and private companies) 
to be able to record a surplus (NFADP > 0), the government must run a fiscal deficit (NFAG < 0).  
Put differently, when the government spends, it injects funds into the economy, and when it taxes 
it withdraws funds from the economy (see Chapter 6). If the government spends more than what 
it taxes, there is a net injection of funds by the government in the economy and this net injection 
must be accumulated somewhere. In the simple case, it is the private domestic sector that must 
accumulate the funds injected.  
176 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
Of  course,  the  reverse  logic  applies  too.  When  the  private  sector  deficit  spends,  it  injects  a  net 
quantity of funds into the economy that can only go to the government. This allows the government 
to run a surplus. A powerful consequence of this simple accounting rule is that a policy that aims at 
achieving a government surplus implies, in a closed economy, that this policy aims at achieving a 
domestic private sector deficit.  
One  way  to  avoid  this  is  to  try  to  achieve  a  domestic  current  account  surplus,  in  which  case,  a 
country can achieve domestic surpluses across the board—let us call that the “golden state.” The 
green area on Figure 13.4b shows how small the golden state is relative to all other possibilities. 
Among OECD countries, it has been achieved mainly by northern European countries during the 
first decade of the new millennium (Figures 13.4b and Figure 13.4c). The Great Recession has led 
most government to deficit spend and only Norway has been able to maintain the golden state 
(Figure 13.4d). 
This state is difficult to achieve because a domestic current account surplus means that the foreign 
sector records a current account deficit (FB < 0). Again, not all sectors can be in surplus at the same 
time because for every net exporter (and/or net foreign income earner) there must be at least one 
net  importer  (and/or  at  least  one  net  foreign  income  payer).  Thus,  for  a  domestic  economy  to 
achieve the golden state on a regular basis, there must be at least one foreign country that is willing 
to  deficit  spend  vis‐à‐vis  the  domestic  economy.  This  is  hardly  possible  to  sustain  given  that 
countries strive to reach current account surplus most of the time.  
More  importantly,  the  golden  state  is  not  achievable  at  the  world  level.  If  all  economies  try  to 
achieve a current account surplus, the best they can achieve is a balanced current account (FB = 0), 
which brings us back to the identity:  
NFADP ≡ ‐ NFAG 
Ultimately  policy  makers  should  confine  themselves  to  trying  to  manage  what  goes  on  in  their 
domestic economy. If a country is lucky, developments in the rest of the world may ultimately allow 
that country to reach the golden state; but basing policy choices on the goal of reaching the golden 
state is a very long shot. In addition, policies that aim at achieving the golden state limit the ability 
of domestic sectors to deficit spend, which constrains the ability of the domestic economy to grow. 
Indeed, the goal becomes to constraint domestic spending by curtailing wage growth, by curtailing 
government spending and by raising taxes. This keeps costs down (and so keeps the price of exports 
low  to  attract  foreign  buyers)  and  limits  imports  (a  growing  domestic  spending  usually  requires 
more imports and so makes it difficult to reach a domestic current account surplus).  

177 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 

 
Figure 13.3 Net financial accumulation in the United States, percent of GDP. 
Source: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Series Z.1) 
 

 
Figure 13.4a Sectoral balances, an international perspective, 1995‐2000 average, Percent of GDP 
Source: OECD 
 

178 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 

Figure 13.4b 2000‐2005 average 
Source: OECD 

 

 

Figure 13.4c 2005‐2010 averages. 
 

179 
 

 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 

Figures 13.4d 2010‐2014 averages 
Note: 2010‐1015 average for Italy, Norway, Sweden and the UK 

 

POINT 3: PUBLIC DEBT AND DOMESTIC PRIVATE NET WEALTH 
The public debt of  the  United States is the face value of outstanding  U.S.  Treasury securities. It 
includes both marketable (T‐bills, T‐notes, T‐bonds, TIPSs, and a few others) and non‐marketable 
securities  (United  States  notes,  gold  certificates,  silver  certificates,  U.S.  savings  bonds,  Treasury 
demand deposits issued to States and Local Gov., all sorts of government account series securities 
held by Deposit Funds).  
In the early 2000s, the expectation of the day was that fiscal surpluses would continue to go on and 
rise even more.3 Figure 13.5 shows the projected path of the public debt and the monetary base. 
What are the implications of such a trend of the public debt? 
To simplify the analysis, assume that: 1‐ the government sector only includes the federal Treasury 
and the central bank 2‐ at the moment the only liability of the government is Treasuries (no central 
bank liability is outstanding) 3‐ a closed economy (no foreign sector) 4‐ the following balance sheets 
prevail: 
ADP 
FADP (Treasuries): $100 
RADP: $350 

LDP  
FLDP (tax receivables): $50 
NWDP: $400 

AG 
FAG (tax receivables): $50 
RAG: $1150 

LG 
FLG (Treasuries): $100 
NWG: 1100 

 

 
180 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 

 
Figure 13.5 Public debt and monetary base.  
Source: Marshall’s Origins of the Use of Treasury Debt in Open Market Operations: Lessons for 
the Present 
Now the Treasury wants to eliminate all its financial liabilities: no more public debt! What are the 
means to do so? 

Case 1: Let Treasuries mature and do not repay holders of Treasuries: 100% tax on principal 
=> FADP = 0, the domestic private sector losses all its financial assets.  
ADP 
FADP: $0 
RADP: $350 

LDP  
FLDP (tax receivables): $50 
NWDP: $300 

Case  2:  Switch  to  a  Treasury’s  financial  instrument  not  considered  a  liability  (Coins  are 
treated as equity by the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board):  
ADP 
FADP (Coins): $100 
RADP: $350 

LDP  
FLDP (tax receivables): $50 
NWDP: $400 

AG 
FAG (tax receivables): $50 
RAG: $1150 

LG 
FLG: $0 
NWG: 1200 

 

Case 3: Switch to another liability of the government that is not included in the public debt: 
repay with Federal Reserve’s liabilities:  
 

181 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 

ADP 
FADP (Reserves): $100 
RADP: $350 

LDP  
FLDP (tax receivables): $50 
NWDP: $400 

AG 
FAG (tax receivables): $50 
RAG: $1150 

LG 
FLG (reserves): $100 
NWG: 1100 

 

All these cases are detrimental to the domestic private sector because they remove a default‐free, 
liquid,  interest  earning  security  from  the  balance  sheet—Treasuries.  Treasuries  are  essential  to 
create wealth in the domestic private sector, to meet capital requirements, to earn interest income 
in a safe way, and to access the refinancing channels of the central bank. So be careful what you 
wish for when arguing for repaying the public debt.  

POINT 4: BUSINESS CYCLE AND SECTORAL BALANCES 
One can get a partial understanding of the business cycle just by studying the interactions between 
the three balances. First, one may note that usually all three sectors wish to be in surplus: 

Domestic private sector needs to record a surplus to avoid bankruptcy. 

State and local governments need to record a surplus to avoid bankruptcy. 

Federal government 

o

strives to be in surplus to show that government is fiscally responsible like other 
domestic sectors. 

o

tends toward a surplus during an expansion because of the automatic stabilizers. 

Foreign sector: Political and financial stability reasons to reach a surplus. 

Of course it is not actually possible for all of them to be in surplus at the same time, but all of them 
usually want to be in a surplus at the same time. 
Start with a situation where the non‐government sector (NG is the consolidation of DP and F) is at 
the surplus it desires (NGBd): 

Step 1: there is a growing economy with NGB = NGBd > 0: Non‐government sector net saves 
what it desires. In that case it must be true that GB < 0, the government is in deficit. 

Step 2: Government wants to be in surplus (GBd  >  0). In a growing economy, automatic 
stabilizers lower the deficit of the government, which is what the government wants. But, 
if the government is dissatisfied with the pace of return toward a surplus, it may implement 
austerity  policies  that  raise  taxes  (T)  and/or  lower  spending  (G)  (“the  country  must  live 
within its means”), which compounds the effect of automatic stabilizers. Thus ∆GB > 0 and 
so ∆NGB < 0. 

Step 3: NGB < NGBd so the non‐government sector tries to find ways to increase its net 
financial accumulation:  
o

182 
 

If DPB < DPBd : consumption and investment decline  

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
o

If FB < FBd: Domestic exports decline (i.e. foreign imports decline) 

Step  4:  Decline  in  non‐government  spending  (C,  I,  X),  together  with  the  decline  in 
government spending (G), lead to a decline in aggregate income (GDP = C + I + G + NX). The 
decline in aggregate income leads to an automatic rise in G and an automatic decline in T, 
so the government balance falls (∆GB < 0). Income stabilizes. 

Step 5: the fall in the government balance leads to a rise of the non‐government balance 
(∆NGB > 0) until NGB = NGBd. Back to step 1.  

The  only  two  ways  to  get  a  short‐term  stationary  state  (that  is,  a  situation  where  the  level  of 
aggregate income does not change) are: 

Way 1: For GBd to be negative, i.e. the government is willing to be in deficit, and the deficit 
equals the equilibrium deficit level (GB*). The equilibrium deficit level is the one compatible 
with  the  desired  net  saving  of  the  non‐government  sector:  GB*  =  NGBd.  This  is  a  viable 
solution for a monetarily sovereign government, but politicians are reluctant to argue for a 
permanent  fiscal  deficit  given  the  lack  of  understanding  of  how  a  monetarily  sovereign 
government  operates  by  the  general  population,  politicians  and  most  economists. 
Bankruptcy, accelerating inflation, and bond vigilantes are usually invoked, although none 
of them are relevant (See Chapter 6). 

Way 2: For NGBd to be negative: 

183 
 

o

DPBd  negative:  this  did  happen  in  the  late  1990s  and  early  2000s  in  the  United 
States (Figure 13.3), which made GB > 0 possible. Australia, New Zealand and some 
European  countries  also  have  recorded  a  negative  domestic  private  balance 
(Figures 13.4a, 13.4b, and 13.4c). However, domestic private sector in deficit is not 
sustainable because it implies, ultimately, Ponzi finance (see Chapter 14). The Great 
Recession led to massive government deficits that allowed the  domestic private 
sector to reach a positive net saving in all OECD countries on record (Figure 13.4d). 

o

FBd negative (desired negative current account balance by foreigners so domestic 
current account is positive and large enough to fulfill the desired net saving of the 
government  and  domestic  private  sector):  A  negative  FB  can  be  tolerated  by  a 
foreign sector if it is a developing country, or if the foreign country understands the 
need to provide the international reserve currency to satisfy the needs of the rest 
of the world. However: 

If a country needs to deficit spend vis‐a‐vis the rest of the world, it means 
that either the domestic private sector or the government do so, or both. 
If the domestic private sector does it, it is unstable, if the government does 
it, it depends on the denomination of the debt (if in domestic currency, no 
problem). 

For  the  country  supplying  the  international  reserve  currency,  negative 
domestic  CAB  is  sustainable  only  if  the  currency  in  unconvertible.  If  the 
currency is convertible, then the Triffin dilemma holds. The dilemma is that 
the country must have a deficit in its current account balance in order to 
supply the currency that the rest of the world needs, but the country faces 
threats  of  conversion  demands  as  the  supply  of  reserve  currency  grows 
among other countries. 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 

CONCLUSION 
The  macroeconomic  sectoral  balance  identity  shows  that  some  desires  are  not  compatible  or 
extremely  hard  to  achieve.  As  such,  regardless  of  the  number  of  economic  adjustment—
devaluation, change in interest rate, aggregate income fluctuation, etc.—some desires can never 
be  achieved  and  it  is  highly  destructive  to  continue  policies  that  aim  at  achieving  incompatible 
desires. It is best to set policy goals and desires that are compatible with accounting rules and to 
be aware that: 
-

One’s surplus is someone else’s deficit 

-

One’s saving is someone else’s dissaving 

-

One’s export is someone else’s import 

-

One’s spending is someone else’s income 

-

One’s financial asset is someone else’s debt 

-

One’s credit is someone else’s debit 

Accounting rules can be combined with insights from the way monetary systems work to draw some 
important conclusions: 

Private domestic sector should avoid being a net debtor because it tends to lead to financial 
instability (see Chapter 14) 

A monetarily sovereign federal government usually needs to be in deficit, unless a domestic 
current  account  balance  can  be  achieved,  because  such  a  government  is  always  able  to 
service debts denominated in its unit of account. 

Some economies need to be net importers: 

-

If  they  have  limited  economic  development  and  resources.  In  that  case,  direct 
foreign aid instead of private lending is the way to go. 

-

If they provide the international currency (United States today). In that case, the 
rest of the world wants to net save in that currency and so the currency‐issuing 
country must record a current account deficit. 

Given that some countries need to be net importers, others need to be net exporters: there 
may be a need to clear debt overtime if it accumulates too fast, and to set the interest rate 
low relative to growth. 

TO GO FURTHER: SECTOR BALANCES FROM THE PERSPECTIVE 
OF THE NATIONAL INCOME AND PRODUCT ACCOUNTS 
At the aggregate level, the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) managed by the Bureau 
of Economic Analysis records all economic operations on goods and services. NIPA shows us that 
the expenditure approach to gross domestic product (GDP) holds as a matter of accounting: 
GDP ≡ C + I + G + NX 
184 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
The gross domestic product is the sum of all final expenditures on goods and services, including 
domestic private final consumption (C), domestic private investment (I), government spending on 
goods and services (G), and net exports (NX). We also know that the income approach to GDP holds 
as a matter of accounting: 
GDP ≡ YD + T 
That is, with minor discrepancies, the gross domestic product is the sum of all gross incomes, or, 
stated alternatively, the sum of all domestic disposable incomes (YD)—wages, profits, interest and 
rent—and the amount of overall taxes (net of transfers) on income and production (T). This means 
that: 
YD + T ≡ C + I + G + NX 
We  also  know  that,  when  accounting  for  international  income  sources,  the  U.S.  International 
Transactions Accounts (USITA) (that accounts for the relation between the United States and the 
rest of the world) tells us that: 
CABUS ≡ NX + NRA 
The current account balance (CAB) is the sum of the trade balance (net exports) and net revenue 
from abroad (NRA) (net of unilateral current transfers).  
If one combines the NIPA and USITA and now includes in T the taxes earned on foreign income 
(NRAD is disposable net revenues from abroad) we get the following: 
YD + NRAD + T ≡ C + I + G + CABUS 
We also know that, in the NIPA, aggregate saving (S) is defined as the difference between disposable 
income and consumption, S ≡ YD + NRAD – C, therefore: 
(S – I) + (T – G) – CABUS ≡ 0 
Or, given that for every net exporter there is a net importer (CABF = ‐CABUS): 
(S – I) + (T – G) + CABF ≡ 0 
This last identity is similar to the one obtained from the Financial Accounts except that it is derived 
from  GDP  and  so  is  merely  concerned  with  current  output  (that  is,  newly  produced  goods  and 
services).  

TO  GO  EVEN  FURTHER:  NIPA  AND  FA  DEFINITIONS  OF 
SAVING 
The  National  Income  and  Product  Accounts  (NIPA)  definition  of  saving  is  different  from  that  of 
Financial  Accounts  (FA)  and  they  are  compatible  only  under  specific  conditions. 4  NIPA  saving  is 
defined as unconsumed income. For example, households saving is defined as disposable income 
minus spending on consumption goods: S = YD – C. FA saving is defined as the increase in net wealth: 
S = ΔNW. 
This difference reflects the different purpose of each account. NIPA is focused on measuring current 
economic activity with gross domestic product (GDP) at the core of the analysis. So, for example, 
say that an economy produces apples and some of the apples are used to make apple tarts. GDP is 
185 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
the dollar value of apples left for final consumption and the dollar value of apple tarts. This is the 
production for the year. NIPA saving is the value of whatever income was paid less purchases of 
apple tarts and apples for final consumption.  
FA is broader in its perspective, given that it aims at measuring what goes on in balance sheets. 
Balance sheets are impacted by many more things than just current production because, among 
others: 
1‐ They contain real assets that were previously produced 
2‐ They contain financial assets  
3‐ The value of assets changes overtime because of changes in prices (capital gains/losses) 
instead of addition to the stock of assets via production or issuance of new securities. 
4‐ Some consumption goods are durable. 
5‐ Liabilities require principal repayment. 
For example, say that a household owns nothing and owes nothing. The household starts to work 
and gets paid $10 so its balance sheet is now: 
AH 
FAH (bank account): $10 

LH  
NWH: $10 

Saving is equal to $10 according to FA because net wealth increased by $10, and here NIPA would 
also agree given that nothing has been consumed. Now the household goes to the store and buys 
$2 worth of apples and that is the only spending for the month: 
AH 
FAH (bank account): $8 
Apples: $2 

LH  
NWDP: $10 

According to NIPA, saving is $8 whereas it is still $10 for FA. Once the household eats the apples, 
the definitions give the same value again: 
AH 
FADP (bank account): $8 

LH  
NWDP: $8 

The source of difference in this case is that NIPA measures consumption by the amount of spending 
done for that purpose (buying the apple at the store). Consumption in a balance sheet means that 
the value of real asset falls (the apples have been eaten). Recently the Bureau of Economic Analysis 
created the Integrated Macroeconomic Accounts that aim at integrating the two approaches into 
one single accounting framework. 
Kenneth Boulding5 developed an entire  framework based on  definitions  consistent with  balance 
sheets. A clear difference is made between “spending” (using funds to buy the apples: real assets 
go  up  and  financial  assets  fall)  and  “consuming”  (eating  the  apples:  real  assets  depreciate). 
Developments in economic theory have also aimed at making sure that the accounting of a model 
is tight. Stock‐flow consistent macroeconomic modeling ensures that a model accounts for all the 
interdependences between the sectors that the model contains.6 

186 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 

Summary of Major Points 
1‐  Balance  sheets  of  different  economic  sectors  are  interrelated  by  a  web  of  financial  claims.
Economic units owe and own claims on each other. 
2‐ In order for an economic sector to accumulate  financial instruments, i.e.  to record a surplus,
another  sector  must  issue  some  financial  instruments,  i.e.  record  a  deficit.  There  cannot  be  a
creditor without a debtor. 
3‐  If  the  government  sector  wants  to  reach  a  surplus,  this  necessarily  means  that  it  effectively 
desires that at least one sector be in deficit. Unless the foreign sector is willing to deficit spend, the 
previous statement means that the domestic private sector must deficit spend. 
4‐ A fiscal surplus leads to a decline in the public debt, which means that other sectors lose Treasury
securities.  Treasury  securities  are  central  to  maintaining  the  liquidity  and  profitability  of  other 
economic units. 
4‐  Deficit  spending  by  the  private  sector  is  not  sustainable  because  it  means  that  the  sector  is
continuously dishoarding assets or going into debt. Both ultimately lead to insolvency. 
5‐ A business cycle can be explained in part by the fact that all sectors try to reach a surplus at the
same time. 
6‐ In order to start the economic process, one sector must deficit spend.  
 
Keywords 
Public debt, surplus/deficit, net financial accumulation/disaccumulation, net saving/disaving, net
lending/borrowing, golden state, Triffin dilemma 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: If the government runs a surplus, what does that usually mean for the domestic private sector?
Q2: If the government runs a deficit, under what condition is it sustainable financially? 
Q3: What are the impacts of a government surplus on the cash flow and net saving of the domestic
private sector? 
Q4: Why does a government surplus tend to create the condition for a recession? And why does a 
deficit tend to promote prosperity? 
Q5:  What  do  national  accounts  tell  us  about  the  feasibility  of  a  budgetary  policy  that  aims  at
achieving a surplus? 
Q6: If a sector records a deficit what does it imply for its net financial accumulation? What happens 
to financial assets given liabilities? What happens to liabilities given financial assets? Find concrete
example of what would happen if you recorded a deficit? 
Q7:  Why  is  the  golden  state  of  a  fiscal  surplus,  domestic  private  sector  surplus,  and  domestic 
current account surplus hard to achieve? 
 

187 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 

Suggested readings 
Papadimitriou D., Chilcote, E. and Zezza, G. (2006) “Are housing prices, household debt, and growth
sustainable?,” Levy Economics Institute, Strategic Analysis, January. 
Papadimitriou, D., Shaik A., dos Santos, C. and Zezza, G. (2002) “Is personal income sustainable?,”
Levy Economics Institute, Strategic Analysis, November. 
Godley, W. and Wray, L.R. (1999) “Can Goldilocks survive?,” Levy Economics Institute, Policy Note
No. 1999/4. 
More advanced readings: 
Godley, W. and Lavoie, M. (2007) Monetary Economics: An Integrated Approach to Credit, Money,
Income, Production and Wealth, New York: Palgrave Macmillan. 
Ritter, L.S. (1963) “An exposition of the structure of the flow‐of‐funds accounts,” Journal of Finance, 
18 (2): 219‐230. 
 
Database Exploration 
How to retrieve time series data about the sectoral balance? There are three ways to do this; NIPA, 
IMA, and FA. All methods are presented (Tip: Summing across sector at a point in time must give 
you a value of zero, unless there is a statistical discrepancy, otherwise you did not select all the 
necessary sectors) 
With the Financial Accounts  
Step 1: Go to http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/z1/ (Note: Series Z.1 is a complicated and 
constantly changing dataset) 
Step 2: Click on “Data download program.” 
Step 3: Select Category A. “Build your package.” 
Step 4: Select “FA 
Flow, SA” 
Step 5: Select “Rest of the world (S2)”, “General government (S13)” and “Private domestic sectors”  
Step  6:  Select  “Net  lending  (+)  or  borrowing  (‐)  (capital  account)”  (Note:  net  lending  data  from 
financial account contains a large statistical discrepancy) 
Step 7: Select frequency and others and then download  
 
With the National Income and Product Accounts 
Step 1: Go to http://www.bea.gov/iTable/index_nipa.cfm and click “Begin using the data…” 
Step 2: Click on “Section 5” and then “Table 5.1 Saving and Investment by Sector” 
Step  3:  Select  “Net  lending  or  net  borrowing”  for  the  domestic  private  sector  and  for  the 
government. The discrepancy will be the result of statistical discrepancies and the rest of the world. 
 
With the Integrated Macroeconomic Accounts 
Step 1: Go to http://www.bea.gov/national/nipaweb/Ni_FedBeaSna/Index.asp  
Step 2: Select “Table S.2.a Selected Aggregates for Total Economy and Sectors (A)” 
Step 3: Select “Net lending (+) or net borrowing (‐)” either from the capital account of the financial 
account. The capital account has less statistical discrepancy. 
 

188 
 

CHAPTER 13: BALANCE‐SHEET INTERRELATIONS AND THE MACROECONOMY 
                                                            
1 Papadimitriou, D., Shaik A., dos Santos, C. and Zezza, G. (2002) “Is personal debt sustainable?,” Levy Economics Institute, 

Strategic Analysis, November. http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/sa/perdebt.pdf 
 See  Scott  Fullwiler’s  “The  Sector  Financial  Balances  Model  of  Aggregate  Demand  and  Austerity” 
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2011/06/sector‐financial‐balances‐model‐of.html 
See Rob Parenteau’s “Leading PIIGS to Slaughter, Part 2” http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2010/03/parenteau‐leading‐
piigs‐to‐slaughter‐part‐2.html 
3 Papadimitriou, D., Shaik A., dos Santos, C. and Zezza, G. (2002) “Is personal debt sustainable?,” Levy Economics Institute, 
Strategic Analysis, November. http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/sa/perdebt.pdf 
4  See  “Alternative  Measures  of  Personal  Saving”  by  Maria  G.  Perozek  and  Marshall  B.  Reinsdorf  at 
http://www.bea.gov/scb/pdf/2002/04April/0402PersonalSaving.pdf 
5 See A Reconstruction of Economics by Kenneth Boulding  
6  Watch  two  lectures  by  Marc  Lavoie  on  stock‐flow  modeling  at  http://neweconomicperspectives.org/tag/stock‐flow‐
consistent‐modeling 
2

189 
 

 

CHAPTER 14: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What happens during a major financial crisis 
Why financial crises exist 
What can be done to stop an on‐going financial crisis 
How financial crises can be prevented or tamed 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
While visiting the London School of Economics at the end of 2008, the Queen of England wondered 
"why did nobody notice it?" In doing so, she echoed a narrative that had been promoted among 
some prominent economists: the Great Recession (“it”) was an accident, a random extreme event 
that no‐one saw coming.1 This narrative is false. Quite a few economists saw it coming and it was 
not an accident.2 Chapter 9 shows how different theoretical frameworks about financial crises lead 
to different regulatory responses. This Chapter studies more carefully the mechanics of financial 
crises and how an economy gets there.  

DEBT DEFLATION 
Definitions of financial crises can be more or less broad. Some economists restrict the definition to 
banking  crises,  others  may  use  a  statistical  definition  that  takes  a  specific  percentage  fall  in  a 
financial index as an indication of a financial crisis. In any case, financial instability has increased 
since the 1980s.3 
The most serious financial crises involve reinforcing feedbacks between asset prices and leverage, 
leading to a downward spiral of debt write offs and decreases in asset prices. These financial crises 
are  called  “debt  deflations”  after  Irving  Fisher’s  analysis  of  the  Great  Depression.  The  main 
implication of a debt deflation is that market mechanisms break down under the combination of 
over‐indebtedness and deflation: lower prices do not clear markets but make matter worse.  

Figure 14.1 An unstable equilibrium 

 

One way to represent that graphically is with the supply and demand diagram of Figure 14.1. The 
demand curve is upward sloping because higher prices lead to higher wealth and so higher demand 
for  goods  and  services.  There  is  an  equilibrium  point  but  it  is  an  unstable  equilibrium,  i.e.  price 
mechanisms do not bring the market to equilibrium. For example, at P1 there is a surplus of goods 
and services, this leads to a fall in prices. Deflation decreases the quantity supplied and the quantity 
demanded  in  such  a  way  that  the  surplus  grows.  A  similar  result  can  be  found  by  postulating  a 
downward sloping supply curve. As prices fall, more goods and services are supplied to try to service 
debts. There are many feedback loops involved in a debt deflation but the process starts with some 

191 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
economic units that become “overindebted.” The following presents Fisher’s argumentation in his 
1932 Booms and Depressions.4  

STEP 1: OVERINDEBTEDNESS AND DISTRESS SALES 
Some  economic  units,  e.g.  (non‐financial)  businesses,  are  unable  to  pay  their  debts  with  their 
available monetary assets (cash and bank accounts). If refinancing options are not available—banks 
severely  ration  credit—businesses  in  difficulty  must  find  ways  to  sell  non‐monetary  assets  to 
recover enough funds to service their debts. They liquidate their inventories, sell other types of 
financial assets than monetary assets, and sell some superfluous real assets (Figure 14.2).  

 
Figure 14.2 Distress sales 
Note: The “+” sign means that things move in the same direction: more overindebtedness leads 
to more distress sales (and less overindebtedness leads to less distress sales). 

STEP 2: DISTRESS SALES AND DEFLATION, THE “DOLLAR DISEASE” 
The sudden massive sales of non‐monetary assets lead to a decline in their prices. The lower prices 
of assets lowers the ability of businesses to recover funds from the sales. Businesses are then forced 
to sell more at distress, which further pushes down prices. This is the first reinforcing feedback loop 
of a debt‐deflation. 

 
Figure 14.3 Dollar disease 
Note: the sign “‐“ means that things move in the opposite direction: higher distress sales lowers 
prices, leading to higher distress sales. 

STEP 3: DEFLATION AND DEBT LIQUIDATION; THE “DEBT DISEASE” 
Once they have recovered some funds, businesses service debts owed to banks and government—
which reduces the money supply—and service debts owed to others (e.g., corporate bonds held by 
192 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
households). Some businesses may have to default and ultimately their debts are written off by 
creditors,  which  negatively  impacts  the  creditworthiness  of  businesses  and  the  net  worth  of 
creditors (see Chapter 8).  
Following the quantity theory of money (which Fisher promoted), the decline in the money supply 
lowers prices even further, so there is a second reinforcing feedback loop: more distress sales lead 
to more debt liquidation, which leads to a lower quantity of money and so lower prices and then 
more distress sales. 

Figure 14.4 Debt disease 

 

STEP 4: PRICES AND PROFIT AND NET WORTH, THE “PROFIT DISEASE” 
The debt and dollar diseases create a deflationary spiral that is reinforced by additional feedback 
loops. First, as asset prices fall, the profit from sales and net worth of business fall given everything 
else, which further increases their overindebtedness and so feeds back into the dollar and debt 
diseases. Prices of assets fall even more. 

Figure 14.5 Profit disease 

193 
 

 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 

STEP 5: THE “AMPLIFIER EFFECT” 
Declines in profit and net worth mean that non‐financial businesses have an incentive to lay off 
employees. Some banks may also have to close because losses from debtors are too high to be 
sustained by their balance sheet (see Chapter 8). Households, who record shrinkage of their income 
and  prospects  of  unemployment,  lower  their  consumption.  Rising  unemployment  reduces 
aggregate spending, which further reduces profit and aggregate income. In addition, the decline in 
spending  further  pushes  down  the  value  of  goods  and  services  and  other  real  assets.  Now 
households, in addition to businesses, have problems in servicing their debts, which reinforces the 
debt write offs and decline in the net worth of banks. 

Figure 14.6 Amplifier effect 

 

STEP 6: PESSIMISM 
As  the  economy  records  falling  prices,  declining  economic  activity,  rising  unemployment,  rising 
defaults, and shrinking balance sheets, confidence among economic units declines and hoarding 
rises. Higher hoarding lowers the velocity of money and so prices are pushed further down (again 
this  presentation  follows  the  quantity  theory  of  money).  Lower  confidence  also  decreases  the 
willingness of banks to grant credit, and increases their willingness to hang onto their reserves to 
meet withdrawals, interbank payments and other dues at the lowest cost possible; the overnight 
interbank market freezes (see Chapter 4). 

194 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 

Figure 14.7 Confidence crisis 

 

STEP 7: INTEREST‐RATE SPREAD 
With the crisis of confidence spreading and with raging deflationary pressures and economic crisis, 
interest  rates  shoot  up.  This  quickly  spreads  through  the  outstanding  debts  if  interest  rates  on 
financial contracts are floating rates, which squeezes net profit (profit – debt commitments) and so 
increases overindebtedness. 

195 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 

Figure 14.8 Risk premium disease 

 

CONCLUSION 
Overindebtedness  and  deflation  feed  on  each  other  through  several  feedback  loops.  All  these 
feedback loops make things worse and worse: difficulty to service debt leads to lower prices, which 
increases the difficulty to service debts. 
If left alone, a debt deflation stops only when the face value of outstanding debts has been lowered 
sufficiently through repayments and write offs to make the servicing of debts bearable. The decline 
in the debt burden loosens the need for distress sales (Figure 14.9). Of course, in the process banks 
close, households lose their savings and their economically active members become unemployed, 
businesses close, and resources are wasted (output is left to rot, labor power and knowledge are 
left  unused  and  decay  quickly,  capital  equipment  depreciates,  etc.).  According  to  market 
proponents,  this  is  fine  because  a  debt  deflation  punishes  all  economic  units  that  made  “bad” 
decisions.  Banks  that  overextended  credit,  businesses  that  did  not  satisfy  their  customers, 
households who are not flexible enough, etc. As Treasury Secretary Andrew Mellon stated during 
the Great Depression: “liquidate labor, liquidate stocks, liquidate farmers, liquidate real estate…it 
will purge the rottenness out of the system. High costs of living and high living will come down. 
People will work harder, live a more moral life. Values will be adjusted, and enterprising people will 
pick up from less competent people.” 
There are two main problems with this view. First, Chapter 8 explains that what is considered in 
hindsight a “bad”/incompetent  decision may have  been necessary prior  to the crisis in order  to 
keep  up  with  the  competition  and  to  avoid  losing  market  share  and  income.  Second,  a  debt 
deflation  is  not  a  selective  process.  It  destroys  economic  status  indiscriminately  by  spreading 
through declines in net wealth, job losses, losses of savings, declines in confidence, shutdowns of 
196 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
financing opportunities, and an overall sharp decline in economic activity. Think of a fire that starts 
because  someone  smoked  in  bed.  This  person  may  “deserve”  to  have  a  destroyed  home  but,  if 
nothing is done to stop the fire, the entire town may be destroyed. 

 

Figure 14.9 A stabilizing loop 

ORIGINS OF DEBT DEFLATION 
While the mechanics of a debt deflation are well known and widely accepted, what causes them is 
subject to debate: why do economic units become overindebted in the first place? Again, keeping 
with the distinction of previous Chapters on macroeconomic topics, this section makes a distinction 
between the real exchange view and the monetary production view.  

REAL  EXCHANGE 
IMPERFECTIONS 

ECONOMY: 

EFFICIENT 

MARKETS 

AND 

In this view, money and finance are neutral and financial markets are efficient. The Efficient Market 
Hypothesis  (EMH)  states  that  markets  allocate  scarce  resources  toward  the  most  productive 
economic activities, and allocate financial risks toward economic entities that are most able to bear 
them. The EMH also states that market mechanisms self‐correct and eliminate any disequilibrium 
such as bubbles or crashes. In order to introduce the possibility of financial crises, either markets 
have to be imperfect, or market participants have to behave imperfectly/irrationally. 
In  terms  of  market  imperfections,  a  lot  of  emphasis  is  put  on  the  existence  of  asymmetries  of 
information.  Banks  have  much  less  information  about  the  quality  of  a  project  than  potential 
197 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
customers. Bankers try to protect themselves by requiring collateral. This is supposed to give an 
incentive to economic units who request an advance of funds to do their best to make their project 
successful (otherwise economic units lose the collateral).  
Following a negative random shock, the value of collateral declines, which leads debtors to limit 
their entrepreneurial effort—because a decline in the value of the collateral means that they have 
less to lose by defaulting—, which increases the chances of financial difficulties. Banks take notice 
and  start  to  ration  credit.  This  generates  a  credit  crunch,  which  leads  to  further  declines  in  net 
worth and collateral and so less effort and a greater risk of default.  
Recent research efforts by scholars who follow the REE approach have focused on the reversion 
mechanisms  (how  a  crisis  occurs)  instead  of  the  propagation  mechanisms  (how  a  crisis  spreads 
following a shock). Crises are rendered endogenous by linking effort to the business cycle. The more 
effort individuals put into their business, the more productive they are, which leads to a greater 
supply of commodities and so lower prices. Lower prices lead to lower net gains, which leads to 
lower effort and so to a greater risk of default.  
Given that the mathematical models developed to back this view are all set in real terms, and given 
that the random shock is applied to the productivity of an input (e.g., land), this type of analysis 
applies  well  to  a  pre‐capitalist  agricultural  economy  (see  Chapter  11).  Nature  decides  which 
economic state occurs (good or bad weather). Financial crises are equivalent to weather calamities 
that decrease agricultural output.  
The imperfection view can be complemented by the Monetarist view of financial crises and by the 
irrational approach developed by behavioral economics. The former states that financial crises are 
due to the incompetence of policymakers, and the latter states that behavioral imperfections of 
individuals  contribute  to  the  emergence  of  crises.  People  have  limited  cognitive  capacities  that 
restrict  their  capacity  to  acquire  and  interpret  information,  and  market  participants  care  about 
things that a “rational economic man” should not care about. As a consequence, a market economy 
is prone to bubbles, herd behavior, cascade of information, and misallocation of resources, leading 
to overindebtedness and ultimately a debt deflation. One may try to correct for these behavioral 
problems by creating markets that provide signals that allow market participants to make the right 
decisions. 

MONETARY  PRODUCTION  ECONOMY:  THE  FINANCIAL  INSTABILITY 
HYPOTHESIS 
According to the MPE view, the previous type of analysis ignores important aspects of capitalist 
economies. For example, government deficits do promote financial stability, which is seen as an 
empirical puzzle in the REE view, given that deficits ought to crowd out investment and so make 
things worse. The REE view is also too micro‐oriented and lacks a system‐view of financial crises 
that recognizes major sources of instability outside the realm of individual behavior/effort.  
The Financial Instability Hypothesis (FIH) is an alternative to the EMH. The main claim of the FIH is 
that periods of economic stability are fertile grounds for the growth of financial fragility, i.e. the 
growth of the risk of debt deflation. Hyman P. Minsky, who relies on the work of Fisher, Keynes and 
Schumpeter,  is  the  main  developer  of  the  FIH  and  provides  a  more  detailed  analysis  of  what 
“overindebtedness” means and its impacts. He concludes that stability is destabilizing. 

198 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 

FINANCIAL FRAGILITY 
According to Minsky, the degree of financial fragility of economic units—how badly overindebted 
they are—can be classified as hedge finance, speculative finance or Ponzi finance. Hedge finance 
means that an economic unit is expected to be able to meet its liability commitments with the net 
cash flow it generates from its routine economic operations (work for most individuals, profit from 
going  concerns  for  companies)  and  monetary  balances.  Even  though  indebtedness  may  be  high 
(even relative to income), an economy in which most economic units rely on hedge finance is not 
prone to debt deflation, unless unusually large declines in routine cash inflows and/or unusually 
large increases in cash outflows occur. Even then, monetary savings are usually available in a large 
enough quantity to provide a buffer against unforeseen problems. As such, it is not expected that 
the servicing of debts will be problematic and so no refinancing (going into debt to service existing 
debts) and/or sales of non‐monetary assets is expected. 
Speculative finance means that routine net cash flow sources and monetary balances are expected 
to be sufficient to pay the income component (interest, dividend, among others), but too low to 
pay  the  capital  component  (debt  principal,  margin  calls,  cash  withdrawals,  among  others)  of 
liabilities. As a consequence, an economic unit needs either to go into debt or to sell some non‐
monetary assets in order to service the principal due. Economic units usually expect that rolling 
debts over (i.e. paying the principal on old debts by issuing new debts) will be possible instead of 
liquidating assets. The length of time during which routine cash flows are expected to fall short of 
capital repayment depends on the economic unit. Chapter 8 explains that the business model of 
banks is such that refinancing is usually needed to service the capital component of liabilities; as 
such banking requires a reliable and cheap refinancing source. Other businesses may only have a 
temporary need to roll over their debts. 
Ponzi  finance,  also  called  interest‐capitalization  finance,  means  that  an  economic  unit  is  not 
expected  to  generate  enough  net  cash  flow  from  its  routine  economic  operations,  nor  to  have 
enough  monetary  savings  to  pay  the  capital  and  income  service  due  on  outstanding  financial 
contracts. As a consequence, in order to service a given level of outstanding debts, Ponzi finance 
relies  on  the  growing  availability  of  refinancing  sources,  and/or  an  expected  liquidation  of  non‐
monetary  assets  at  rising  prices.  At  the  microeconomic  level,  an  economic  unit  that  uses  Ponzi 
finance to fund its assets is highly financially fragile. At the macroeconomic level, if key economic 
units  behind  the  growth  of  the  economy  are  involved  in  Ponzi  finance,  the  economic  system  is 
highly prone to a debt deflation. 
Note that this categorization is not merely a measure of the use of external funding, i.e. of the size 
of  leverage.  It  is  also  a  measure  of  the  quality  of  the  leverage.  At  the  core  of  this  analytical 
categorization is an analysis of the means that are expected to be used to fulfill financial contracts. 
Hedge finance is not expected to require any refinancing operation or liquidation of non‐monetary 
assets  to  service  debts;  Ponzi  finance  requires  a  growing  use  of  refinancing  and  liquidation  to 
service debts. This has important regulatory implications as shown in Chapter 9, because knowing 
how one can service debt becomes as important, if not more important, than knowing if one can 
service debts: low default probability (if) does not mean low financial fragility (how).  
Ponzi  finance  should  be  differentiated  from  the  existence  or  non‐existence  of  a  “bubble.”  The 
categorization does not aim at measuring the accuracy (however, defined) of the price of assets 
used to service debts. Ponzi finance means that leverage and asset prices end up going up together 
and feed on each other on the upside. Higher leverage requires higher collateral value and so higher 
199 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
asset prices, and the funding of assets at a price that grows faster than income rises requires higher 
leverage.  This  is  the  crucial  dynamic  regardless  of  the  correctness  of  the  value  of  asset  prices 
because, bubble or not, the size of a potential debt deflation grows with the duration of the use of 
Ponzi finance. Without Ponzi finance there cannot be a debt deflation because there is no leverage 
involved in the asset‐price appreciation. Without a debt inflation (that is a situation in which asset 
prices and debt become highly interdependent on the upside), there cannot be a debt deflation. 
Ponzi finance is also different from fraud (which can prevail at hedge, speculative or Ponzi stage). 
Ponzi finance is an unsustainable financial process regardless of the legality of a financial structure. 
Indeed, in order to persist, it requires an exponential growth of financial participation, which is not 
possible  because,  ultimately,  there  is  a  limited  number  of  economic  agents  that  can  or  will 
participate.  
The H/S/P categorization does not apply to monetarily sovereign governments, i.e. governments 
that  issue  their  own  nonconvertible  currency  and  that  issue  public  debt  denominated  in  their 
currency.  Examples  of  monetarily  sovereign  governments  are  the  United  States  Federal 
Government,  the  Japanese  national  government,  the  United  Kingdom  national  government,  the 
Chinese  and  Mexican  central  governments.  Examples  of  non‐monetarily  sovereign  governments 
are national governments of the Eurozone, the United States under the gold standard before 1933, 
state  and  local  governments  in  the  United  States  and,  any  country  that  issues  securities 
denominated in a foreign currency. When a government is monetarily sovereign, it has a monopoly 
over the currency supply and so always can meet payments denominated in its currency as they 
come  due.  Hedge  finance  applies  to  any  sovereign  government  that  is  monetarily  sovereign 
because such a government cannot be forced to default; default is purely voluntary. In addition, 
the federal government may provide bonds and other default‐free liquid securities that boost the 
liquidity  of  the  balance  sheets  of  the  private  sector.  The  long  period  of  financial  stability  in  the 
United States after World War II was the result of highly liquid balance sheets in the private sector 
due  to  large  government  deficits  during  World  War  II  that  flooded  the  private  sector  with  safe 
assets (see Chapter 8). 

THE FINANCIAL INSTABILITY HYPOTHESIS 
According to the FIH, during a period of prolonged expansion, the proportion of economic units 
involved in speculative and Ponzi finance grows, and so the risk of a debt deflation increases. The 
period of expansion may record minor recessions—e.g., the 1991 and 2000 downturns in the United 
States—that do not significantly tame the state of expectations of private economic units and so 
do not significantly make underwriting practices more prudent. As such, the FIH is not a theory of 
the business cycle but rather focuses one what causes significant recessions.  
Contrary to the behavioral explanation, irrationality is not at the heart of instability. The boom, with 
its  mania,  just  amplifies  the  dynamics  that  emerged  previously  during  a  period  of  prolonged 
expansion.  Contrary  to  the  market  imperfection  explanation,  market  mechanisms  promote 
instability not stability. The heart of the problem is not found in individuals making dumb/irrational 
decisions  but  rather  in  the  system  in  which  they  operate.  Capitalism  is  a  much  more  financially 
unstable  economic  system  than  those  that  previously  existed.  Capitalism’s  incentives  and 
mechanics push economic units into Ponzi finance. 
There are several channels through which financial fragility grows and they have to do with anything 
that changes the relation between income and debt service. Anything that pushes an economic unit 
200 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
from a state in which income is greater than debt service to a state in which income is less than 
debt service represents such a channel. This can happen either because income level (or growth) 
falls and/or debt service level (or growth) rises. Factors that impact both are described briefly: 

Structural causes: 
-

Banks  are  speculative  units:  the  maturity  of  banks’  liabilities  is  short  relative  to  the 
maturity  date  of  banks’  assets  so  they  need  to  refinance  all  the  time.  Banks  aim  at 
lowering the maturity of their assets to limit the maturity mismatch, which promotes 
speculative  finance  in  the  non‐bank  sectors.  For  example,  in  the  US,  the  30‐year 
mortgage is not a product of private banking but of government intervention and it 
must  be  subsidized  to  persist.  Banks  much  prefer  shorter‐term  mortgages  (say  10 
years)  that  require  households  to  refinance,  which  creates  a  dependence  on  the 
direction of home prices (Chapter 7 explains that if home prices fall refinancing may 
not happen). 

-

Changes  in  banking  business:  move  away  from  the  originate‐and‐hold  model  to  the 
originate‐and‐distribute  model,  which  creates  adverse  incentives  in  terms  of 
underwriting and debt reworking (see Chapter 8). 

Economic causes 
-

Search for profit and market share, and market saturation: ROE = ROA x leverage (see 
Chapter 8). 

-

Inequalities: the need to use debt to sustain a given standard of leaving has increased 
(student debt, healthcare debt, etc.) 

-

Unexpected  events:  The  FIH  leaves  some  room  for  adverse  random  shocks  (say  a 
hurricane destroyed many houses and businesses, which triggers massive payments by 
insurance companies) 

Policy reasons: 
-

Deregulation,  desupervision  and  deenforcement  (see  Chapter  9):  fraud  grows  and 
underwriting worsens.  

-

Fiscal  policy:  A  period  of  prolonged  expansion  that  is  led  by  a  monetarily  sovereign 
government will not lead to financial instability. Fiscal deficits boost macroeconomic 
profit (see Chapter 11) and personal savings and provides cash flows as well as safe 
financial assets to the private sector. However, as shown in Chapter 13, government’s 
desire to reach a surplus, combined with the automatic stabilizers, means that non‐
government sectors may be forced to deficit spend. 

-

Monetary policy: During a period of expansion, the central bank raises interest rates 
and  that  increases  the  debt  burden.  Minsky  is  of  the  opinion  that  fine  tuning  and 
preserving  financial  stability  are  not  compatible  and  argues  for  a  central  bank  that 
focuses on financial stability. 

Socio‐psychological reasons 
-

201 
 

Long period of prosperity leads to a decline in risk perception because economic news 
is good and it is too costly to look too much backward (see Chapter 9).  

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
-

Uncertainty means that economic units rely on norms to make decisions. These norms 
are rationalized through a convention, which is a mental construction about the current 
economic trends and about what to expect. There is a strong incentive to stick to the 
convention to avoid losing market share or drawing the attention of regulators (see 
Chapter  8).  So  if  Ponzi  finance  is  considered  normal,  a  bank  will  do  it  and  will  find 
comfort in the fact that “everybody else is doing it so it is ok.” 

HOW TO DEAL WITH FINANCIAL CRISES 
Financial  crises  that  are  severe  create  a  lot  of  damages  if  they  are  not  managed  through 
government intervention. This government intervention involves both quick fixes to deal with the 
immediate problems and long‐term policies to prevent moral hazard and promote stability. The 
recent responses to the Great Recession provide examples of what not to do: 

Stop the liquidity crisis: central bank provides funds at penalty rate, against safe collateral, 
to  solvent  institutions.  One  may  argue  that,  during  a  crisis,  a  lot  of  financial  assets  that 
previously looked safe may now be unsafe because of the lack of confidence and because 
of poor economic prospects. For example, prime mortgagees may default because they lost 
their job. There is a way around this issue. Central banks should accept only financial assets 
that  were  created  by  following  strict  underwriting,  that  is,  those  that  involved  hedge 
finance and speculative finance prior to the crisis. Central banks may record losses on them 
given that a debt deflation also impacts economic units with strong creditworthiness, but 
that should be minimal. Do not provide liquidity against Ponzi finance inducing financial 
instruments, even if they are not in default. 

Stop the solvency crisis: Bank holiday to examine the books of financial institutions in detail 
for a given period of time (say a week like during the Great Depression) and close insolvent 
banks.  Act  to  sustain  income  and  to  lower  the  debt  burden.  Lower  the  debt  burden  by 
reworking debts of economic units who would be solvent with the reworking (during the 
great  depression,  government  bought  interest‐only  mortgages  from  banks  and  replaced 
them with 30‐year fixed rate fully‐amortized mortgages). To sustain income, create large‐
scale  long‐term  fiscal  policy  such  as  a  job  guarantee  program  (Great  Depression  work 
programs were started in a matter of days). 

202 
 

Recent  crisis:  Fed  provided  advances  at  near  0%  rate,  against  poor  to  toxic 
collateral (accepted at par), to questionable institutions, to non‐bank entities 

Recent crisis: no significant analysis of accounting books (only 2 Fed people sent at 
Lehman  Brothers,5 superficial  stress  tests),  insignificant  and  slow  fiscal  action  to 
stabilize income  (700  billion was not enough and was implemented over years), 
hide  losses  of  financial  institutions  by  widening  level‐3  valuation,  injection  of 
capital in banks via Treasury without any real congressional oversight, no significant 
reworking of debts on non‐bank agents. 

Change  incentives  and  regulation,  supervise  and  enforce:  prosecute  top  managers  for 
fraud, issue cease and desist orders, major reworking of regulation and supervision to deal 
with problems, promote hedge finance and if necessary forbid Ponzi finance. 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 

Recent  crisis:  Not  a  single  prosecution  of  top  executives,  even  though  fraud  is 
obvious (ask the Federal Bureau of Investigation and rating agencies that finally had 
a  look  at  mortgage  contracts),  civil  instead  of  criminal  cases  (the  financial 
institution pays fines and promises not do it again), no major reregulatory trends, 
no enforcement of existing laws prior and during crisis. 

Even though a financial system may be on the brinks of collapse and panic is generalized, regulatory 
institutions or agencies must follow the law. If necessary, regulators may use emergency executive 
powers (bank holiday) to shut down the financial system temporarily and to get to the bottom of 
the problem. Lenience leads to long‐term instability because the existence of a government safety 
net promotes moral hazard. Without a safety net, such as a central bank acting as lender of last 
resort, economic crises would be very severe. 

TO GO FURTHER: PONZI FINANCE AND THE BALANCE SHEET 
When an economic unit is involved in Ponzi finance, it has to go into debt to service principal and 
interest. Say that there is a balance of $100 on a credit card that represents expenses for the month 
and that there is also $10 of interest due. To service the credit card debt, one must open a new 
credit card to pay $110 due on credit card #1. The following month $110 + $11 of interest is due on 
the second credit card. The dollar amount of financial liabilities grows. Another way to service credit 
card #1 is to sell some assets worth $110. So Ponzi finance implies that the quantity of real assets 
(RA) falls and/or net financial accumulation (NFA) declines because either the quantity of financial 
assets falls or the quantity of financial liabilities rises. We know that RA and NFA are related to net 
wealth (see Chapter 13): 
ΔNW = ΔRA + NFA 
Given everything else, Ponzi finance leads to a fall in net worth. There are two ways to mitigate this 
decline: 
1‐ Overtime  the  assets  funded  in  a  Ponzi  way  may  start  to  generate  enough  cash  flows  to 
cover debt services. Say that a company was just created and needs some time to get its 
business to earn an income. In the meantime, it needs financing to pay employees, to get 
the business set up, etc. During that time, the net worth of the company will fall but it is 
expected that ultimately the business will be profitable and will generate enough cash flows 
to  pay  creditors.  One  may  call  this  income‐based  Ponzi  finance;  for  a  while  income  is 
insufficient but there is an expectation that this is only temporary. 
2‐ The price of real assets and the price of financial assets that are still on the balance sheet 
go up fast enough to more than offset the rise in debt and the liquidation of assets. The 
recent  housing  boom  that  allowed  households  to  record  massive  increase  in  net  worth 
while  they  were  going  massively  into  debt  is  an  example  of  such  dynamics.  The 
underwriting worsened so much  (see  Chapter 8)  that the only  way to make a mortgage 
profitable was to sell the house at a high enough price to cover interest and other payments 
due to creditors. One may call that asset‐based Ponzi finance, or a pyramid scheme; there 
is no expectation that income will ever be enough to service debts. The liquidation of the 
collateral and other assets at rising prices is the only expected means to make the Ponzi 
financing profitable and to keep net worth rising. 

203 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 

TO  GO  EVEN  FURTHER:  MINSKY  AND  INCOME  VS.  CASH 
INFLOW 
In  most  presentation  of  the  FIH,  income  and  cash  inflow  are  not  distinguished  carefully.  For 
example, the FIH is often presented from the point of view of the business sector with profit (U) 
reflecting the ability or inability to fulfill debt service (CC) so that U > CC is hedge finance. At the 
macroeconomic level, U is determined by the Kalecki equation of profit (see Chapter 11).  
At the theoretical level that might be good enough, but it is not so at the empirical level. Income 
and cash flows are two different things (see Chapter 1). Income is about measuring gains in net 
worth, cash flow is about measuring change in monetary assets. The Kalecki equation of profit does 
not say anything about gains of monetary balances. For example, an increase in unsold inventories 
raises  profit  because  higher  inventories  increase  real  assets.  Similarly  for  households,  personal 
income includes quite a few items that are unrelated to monetary gains. Vegetables grown in the 
garden, service provided by owning a house, among other things, are counted as imputed income. 
Unfortunately,  as  explained  in  Chapter  12,  creditors  demand  monetary  payments  so  earning  an 
income in real terms, as opposed to monetary terms, does not help an economic unit to service its 
debts. 
What is really important is what Minsky called the “cash box condition” and expectations based on 
it: how does the sum of cash inflows and monetary balances compare to cash outflows now and in 
the future? That may or may not be related to profit and personal income. The cash‐flow statement, 
rather than the income statement, together with the cash‐flow expectations embedded in financial 
contracts, give a better idea of the financial fragility of an economic unit. 
Summary of Major Points 
1‐ During a major financial crisis, i.e. a debt deflation, there are several feedback loops that may 
develop, which reinforce the deflationary forces at play. A debt deflation is not self‐stabilizing; the 
longer it is allowed to proceed, the more destructive it gets. 
2‐ A debt deflation is not self‐cleansing; it destroys economic value indiscriminately until enough
debt has been liquidated to tame the deflationary forces. 
3‐ How an economy is pushed to the brink of a debt deflation is subject to debate. Some economists 
believe  that  a  debt  deflation  is  the  result  of  a  very  large  adverse  random  shock  that  risk
management models did not account for because it was too costly to do so. Other economists argue 
that the search for profit  and the  increased reliance of market mechanisms lead to an unstable 
economy.  
4‐ In order to deal with a financial crisis, one must promote short‐term stability by stopping the 
liquidity  crisis  and  must  promote  long‐term  stability  by  dealing  with  the  solvency  crisis  and  the 
outdated regulatory framework. 
5‐  According  to  the  efficient  market  hypothesis,  markets  tend  to  allocate  resources  and  risks
properly and the only thing the government can do is to help protect against the most common 
adverse shocks that may impact markets. Profit is a good indicator of financial health. According to
the financial instability hypothesis, markets tend to promote Ponzi finance and some regulations
must be put in place about financial practices and financial innovations. Profit alone is not a good 
indicator of financial health because one must ask through what financial practices this profit was
achieved. 
 
204 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 

Keywords 
Efficient  market  hypothesis,  financial  instability  hypothesis,  debt  deflation,  hedge  finance, 
speculative finance, Ponzi finance, income‐based credit, asset‐based credit, debt liquidation, profit 
disease, debt disease, dollar disease, pessimism, irrational behavior 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: Why is the dollar disease a reinforcing feedback loop? What about the debt disease?  What 
about the profit disease?  
Q2: When does a debt deflation stop if left to market mechanisms? Why is that not a smooth and 
effective way to cleanse the economy? 
Q3:  What  are  the  amplifier  mechanism  and  reversion  mechanism  used  in  the  real  exchange 
economy view of financial crisis?  
Q4: What are the sources of financial crisis in the monetary production economy view? Is it mostly
about irrational individual behaviors and improper incentives?  
Q5: What can be done to deal with a financial crisis? Did the recent response to the 2008 crisis
follow the proper guidelines? 
Q6: Why Ponzi finance intrinsically unstable? What is the difference between income‐based Ponzi 
finance and asset‐based Ponzi finance? Does Ponzi finance necessarily, or even mostly, imply fraud 
or irrational behaviors? 
 
Suggested readings 
Fisher, I. (1932) Booms and Depressions: Some First Principles, New York: Adelphy. 
Minsky, H.P. (1982) “The financial‐instability hypothesis: Capitalist process and the behavior of the 
economy,” in C.P. Kindleberger and J.‐P. Lafargue (eds) Financial Crises: Theory, History, and Policy, 
13‐39, New York: Cambridge University Press. 
Mishkin, F.S. (1991) “Asymmetric information and financial crises: A historical perspective,” in R.G. 
Hubbard (ed.) Financial Markets and Financial Crises, 69‐108, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
More advanced readings: 
Charles,  S.  (2016)  “Is  Minsky’s  financial  instability  hypothesis  valid?”  Cambridge  Journal  of 
Economics 40 (2): 427‐436. 
Keen,  S.  (2013)  “A  monetary  Minsky  model  of  the  Great  Moderation  and  the  Great  Recession”
Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 86 (1): 221–235.  
Schwartz,  A.J.  (1988)  “Financial  stability  and  the  federal  safety  net,”  in  W.S.  Haraf  and  R.M.
Kushmeider (eds) Restructuring Banking and Financial Services in America, 34‐62, Washington, DC: 
American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy and Research. 
Shiller, R.J. (2000) Irrational Exuberance, Princeton: Princeton University Press. 
Suarez,  J.  and  Sussman,  O.  (1997)  “Endogenous  cycles  in  a  Stiglitz‐Weiss  economy,”  Journal  of 
Economic Theory, 76 (1): 47‐71. 
 

205 
 

CHAPTER 14: FINANCIAL CRISES 
                                                            
1  Bezemer, 

D.J.  (2010)  “Understanding  financial  crisis  through  accounting  models,”  Accounting,  Organizations  and 
Society, 26 (7): 676‐688. 
2 See “Got it Right Project” at http://afee.net/?page=heterodox_economics&side=got_it_right_project 
3 Bordo, M., Eichengreen, B., Klingebiel, D. and Martinez‐Peria, M.S. (2001) “Is the crisis problem growing more severe?,” 
Economic Policy, 16 (32): 51‐82. 
4  An 
electronic  copy  of  Fisher’s  book  can  be  found  at  the  St.  Louis  Federal  Reserve: 
https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/docs/publications/books/booms_fisher.pdf  
5 A  blunt  testimony  by  William  K.  Black  at  the  hearings  regarding  the  failure  of  Lehman  Brothers  can  be  found  here: 
https://www.c‐span.org/video/?c2113/clip‐2008‐lehman‐brothers‐failure‐panel‐4  

206 
 

 

CHAPTER 15: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What a monetary system is 
How a monetary system works 
Why a monetary system may be dysfunctional 
Why monetary instruments are accepted 
What determines the nominal value at which a financial instrument circulates 
What promises are made by issuers of monetary instruments and how that 
determines their fair price 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
Throughout this textbook, Chapters have used balance sheets extensively to get an understanding 
of  the  monetary  operations  of  developed  economies,  but  nothing  has  been  said  about  what  a 
monetary instrument is. It is time to spend some time on the nature of monetary instruments and 
the inner workings of monetary systems. A monetary system is composed of two core elements: 

A  unit  of  account  that  provides  a  common  method  of  measurement:  the  euro  (€),  the 
pound sterling (₤), the yen (¥), the dollar ($), etc. 

Monetary instruments: specific financial instruments denominated in the unit of account 
and issued by the government and the private sector. 

This Chapter first explains what financial instruments are and how monetary instruments fit within 
the existing range of financial instruments. It then delves into what determines the nominal and 
real value of monetary instruments, and into what makes them accepted. 

FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS 
Balance  sheets  contain  many  types  of  financial  instruments.  Some  of  them  are  issued  by  an 
economic unit (financial liabilities), others are held by that same economic unit (financial assets). 
Financial instruments are just formal promises to make monetary payments. The way a promise is 
structured  varies  widely  depending  on  the  needs  of  the  issuer,  but  common  questions  that  a 
promise must answer are: 

Who is the issuer? The mark of the issuer (name, head, etc.) is present so bearers know 
who is supposed to fulfill the promise embedded in the financial instrument. 

What is the unit of account used? Financial instruments cannot exist before there is a unit 
of measurement for monetary transactions and outstanding balances. 

At what price will the issuer take back its promissory note? There is a face/par value that 
specifies the number of units of account the financial instrument carries ($100, $10, $1, 25 
cents, etc.). 

When will the issuer take back its promissory note? There is a term to maturity: The length 
of  time  it  will  take  to  fulfill  the  promise,  at  which  point  the  issuer  must  take  back  the 
financial instrument it issued (and then destroy it to make sure nobody can reacquire it to 
have a claim on the issuer). The term can go from zero (issuer takes it back whenever it is 
presented by bearers) to infinity (issuer takes back at its discretion, maybe never). 

How will the issuer take back its promissory notes? The expected means that will be used 
by  the  issuer  to  fulfill  his  promises,  called  more  technically  the  “reflux 
mechanisms/channels.” (Chapter 14 shows that the way this question is answered is crucial 
for financial stability) 

What  is  (are)  the  reward(s)/benefit(s)  for  those  willing  to  trust  the  issuer?  Financial 
instruments may reward their bearers: income, voting rights, avoid prison, etc. 

Are  there  any  guarantees  in  case  the  issuer  is  unable  or  unwilling  to  fulfill  the  promise? 
Financial instruments may be secured/collateralized: if the issuer defaults on its promises, 
the bearers get paid by taking ownership of assets of the issuer (house for mortgages, etc.) 

208 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 

Is it possible to transfer the promissory note to another bearer? Financial instruments may 
be negotiable, i.e. the person to whom the promise has to be fulfilled can be changed by 
transferring  ownership  of  the  financial  instrument.  Some  financial  instruments  are  not 
transferable because they name the beneficiary (e.g. savings bonds issued by U.S. Treasury) 
and cannot be endorsed to someone else. Some, like checks, have limited transferability.1  

Depending on how these questions are answered, the name of a financial instrument changes, in 
the same way dogs and cats have different names depending on their height, color of their fur, etc. 
For example, a Treasury bill does not provide any reward and is due within a year. A common share 
provides a reward depending on the profit of the issuing company, gives a voting right, and the 
company does not promise to take back its shares. 
As  stated  in  Chapter  10,  anybody  can  make  any  kinds  of  promise.  The  hard  parts  are,  first,  to 
convince  others  of  the  genuineness  of  the  promise  so  they  are  willing  to  accept  a  financial 
instrument and, second, to fulfill the promise once it has been accepted. Finance establishes a legal 
framework  to  record  the  creation  and  fulfillment  of  promises,  and  it  measures,  more  or  less 
accurately, the credibility of these promises at any point in time. 
Finally, within a country, there is a hierarchy of financial instruments in the sense that some are 
more  easily  accepted.  The  most  widely  accepted  financial  instruments  are  those  that  are 
negotiable,  of  the  highest  creditworthiness,  of  the  highest  liquidity,  and  of  the  shortest  term  to 
maturity.  In  contemporary  economies  with  a  monetarily  sovereign  government,  central‐bank 
monetary  instruments  are  at  the  top  of  the  hierarchy.  They  are  followed  by  bank  monetary 
instruments that were made perfectly liquid following the emergence of interbank par‐clearing and 
settlement  and  deposit  guarantee.  Below  the  previous  monetary  instruments  are  financial 
instruments traded on an organized exchange (issued mostly by governments and corporations: 
shares, bonds, notes, bills, etc.). At the bottom of the hierarchy, there are all sorts of promises such 
as  local  currencies  and  personal  promissory  notes.  This  hierarchy  is  not  fixed  and,  throughout 
history, the top monetary instrument was not always a government monetary instrument.  

A  SPECIFIC  FINANCIAL 
INSTRUMENTS 

INSTRUMENT: 

MONETARY 

Some issuers make the following promise to bearers: 

I will take back my promissory note whenever you want me to do so: Term to maturity is 
instantaneous/zero. 

I will take back my promissory note from anybody who presents it to me: Only the issuer’s 
mark is on the instrument and no beneficiary is named (either no name or “the bearer”).  

I will take back my promissory note at par in payment of debts owed me: By handing to me 
my promissory notes, I will reduce any debt you owe me by the face value of the note. The 
government accepts reserves to settle taxes at face value (the government does not accept 
cash from the public in payment of taxes for security and tractability reasons, instead it 
works through banks), banks accept at face value the funds in bank accounts to settle what 
is owed to them (see Chapter 6 and Chapter 10). 

The promise may contain two additional clauses: 
209 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 

I will exchange my promissory note for something else whenever the bearer wants me to 
do so: there is a conversion clause. Banks promise to convert bank accounts (and banknotes 
when  they  used  to  issue  them)  into  government  monetary  instruments  on  demand. 
Governments may promise conversion into gold or a foreign currency. 

I will use gold or another precious metal to make the promissory note: the promissory note 
is secured. In the same way a house is collateral for a mortgage, gold may be collateral for 
a coin.  

This  type  of  financial  instruments  are  monetary  instruments.  Similarly  to  any  other  financial 
instrument, the creation of monetary instruments involves someone becoming liable (the issuer of 
the monetary instrument) because monetary instruments embed a financial promise. 

AT  WHAT  PRICE  SHOULD  A  FINANCIAL  INSTRUMENT 
CIRCULATE AMONG BEARERS? 
The nominal value, P, at which a financial instrument ought to circulate among bearers is called the 
fair price or fair value. The present value of expected financial rewards is a common way to judge 
the fair price of many financial instruments. It is the sum of all the discounted streams of payments 
that are expected by bearers until a financial instrument matures:  

1

1

Where  the  subscript  t  indicates  the  present  time,  Pt  is  the  current  fair  value,  Yn  is  the  nominal 
income promised at a future time n, FVN is the face value that will prevail at maturity,  Et indicates 
current  expectations  about  income  and  face  value,  dt  is  the  current  discount  rate  imposed  by 
bearers, N is the time lapse until maturity (n = 0 is the issuance time) (The Σ character means “sum 
of”).  
There  is  a  wide  variety  of  financial  instruments  that  use  this  formula.  One  can  classify  financial 
instruments according to the term to maturity (Figure 15.1). 

Figure 15.1 Financial instruments and term to maturity 
Note: C is the coupon payment, a form of income 
At one extreme are modern government monetary instruments that provide no income (Y = 0), are 
redeemed at the discretion of bearers (N = 0), and are expected to be taken back by the government 
at their initial face value at any time, Pt = FV0. Government issued monetary instruments ought to 
circulate at par all the time because they are  zero‐term zero‐coupon financial instruments. At the 
other extreme are consols that have a given expected income and are redeemed at the discretion 
of the issuer (N → ∞),  Pt =  Et(Y)/dt. They are  infinite‐term positive‐coupon financial instruments. 
Shares have the same term to maturity as consols. If a collateral exists, in case of default, the fair 
value depends on the expected ability of creditors to recover some of the unpaid dues embedded 
210 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
in a promise. Thus, in case of default, the fair value is equal to the expected value of the collateral 
and available recourses discounted back to the present. 
For example, say that company X issues 3‐year bonds with a face value of $1000 and a coupon rate 
of 10%. This means that company X will buy back its bonds for $1000 in three years and will pay a 
$100 coupon during three years. In that case, what market participants are willing to pay for the 
bond today is (assuming an annual coupon payment to simplify): 
100

100
1

1

100
2

1

3

1

1000
1

3

 
There is a missing element that prevents the determination of the fair price: what is the value of d 
today? d represents the interest rate that market participants want (the market rate). The market 
rate may be different from the interest rate offered by company X (the coupon rate): 

If d = 20% then P = $789.35. The bond trades at a discount (i.e. below face value). For the 
first  $100  provided  next  year,  market  participants  are  willing  to  pay  today  $83.33 
($100/1.2) because $83 placed at 20% today provides $100 next year, etc.  

If d = 10% then P = $1000. Bond trades at par. Market participants agree that the interest 
rate proposed by company X is enough, so they pay full price for the bond.  

If d = 5% then P = $1136.16. Market participants are getting more reward from the coupon 
than  what  they  wish,  so  they  are  willing  to  buy  the  bond  at  a  premium  (i.e.  above  face 
value). The value of the premium is just enough to make the rate of return on the bond 
equal to 5%.  

As explained in Chapter 4, the value of d depends on a number of factors including the risk of default 
by  the  issuer.  The  higher  the  probability  that  coupons  and/or  principal  cannot  be  honored,  the 
steeper the discount rate, and so the further below par the 3‐year bond trades.  
For a $20 unconvertible Federal Reserve note, the government does not promise any coupon and 
promises to take back the FRNs at any time at $20, so: 
20

20

0

1

 
The $20 FRN ought to trade at parity all the time. The discount factor does not matter because the 
term to maturity is instantaneous. 
These two examples assume that the issuer does not default. Say that right after the issuance of 
the 3‐year bonds, company X announces that it cannot make neither the $100 coupon payments 
nor  the  principal  payment.  Some  negotiation  with  bondholders  leads  to  an  agreement  that 
company X will pay $70 coupons and $500 of principal. Then the new fair value of the bond is: 

70
1

70
1

1

70
2

1

500
3

1

3

 
Again,  the  fair  value  depends  on  d,  and  d  must  have  increased  tremendously  following  the 
announcement of default, which pushes down P even further.  
The  same  applies  with  Federal  Reserve  note  and  other  monetary  instruments.  Say  that  the 
government announces it only accepts $20 FRNs for $10 at any time, i.e. a $20 FRN only redeems 
211 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
$10 of debts owed to the government. Then the new face value is actually $10 and so the fair price 
is $10. In the economy, the $20 circulates among bearers for $10. Shops take the $20 note only for 
$10  worth  of  items,  banks  that  receive  a  $20  note  only  credit  $10  to  the  bank  accounts  of  the 
persons who hand the $20 FRNs, and repaying bank debts with a $20 FRNs only clears $10 of bank 
debts. Holders of FRNs take a 50% haircut. This may seem strange but only because we are not 
accustomed to that anymore. In the Middle Ages, kings used to change the face value of their coins 
all the time as explained in Chapter 17. Until the late 19th century, private bank notes were applied 
a discount that varied overtime. 

FAIR VALUE AND PURCHASING POWER 
There are situations in which the value of all financial instruments changes at the same time relative 
to the value of goods and services (output‐price inflation or deflation) or relative to another unit of 
account (exchange‐rate depreciation or appreciation). These changes in purchasing power are due 
either  to  the  decisions  of  a  monetary  authority  (e.g.,  the  government  decides  to  devalue  its 
currency) or to mechanisms at work in a monetary system. 
The changes in the value of the unit of account should be differentiated from the changes in the 
fair  value  of  a  monetary  instrument.  While  both  changes  lead  to  the  same  result  (changes  in 
purchasing  power),  the  mechanisms  at  play  are  different.  Changes  in  the  value  of  the  unit  of 
account  relate  to  expected  and  actual  changes  in  macroeconomic  conditions  (see  Chapter  11). 
Changes in the fair value relate to expected and actual changes in the characteristics of a financial 
instrument (e.g., default) or in the financial infrastructure (e.g., disruption in the payment system). 
For  bank  and  government  monetary  instruments,  this  second  type  of  changes  has  not  occurred 
since government guarantees have been put in place, interbank bank settlement at par has been 
done efficiently, and inconvertible currency has become common and its supply made elastic. 
One major debate of monetary history concerns the question of whether if the issuer of a monetary 
instrument,  and  more  generally  any  other  financial  instrument,  is  liable  for  the  decline  in  the 
purchasing power of what is owed to the bearers. Say that you owe $100 to someone; should you 
be liable if the purchasing power of that $100 declines? More broadly, should the principal amount 
you owe rise/fall to compensate for inflation/deflation? Legal scholars discuss this issue in terms of 
Nominalism (that answers no) versus Valorism (that answers yes). Recently, this question has been 
of greater  concern for creditors, given  that  there has been an  inflationary bias since the  end of 
World  War  Two.  Governments  around  the  world  have  been  unwilling  to  let  deflationary  forces 
develop following the horrible experience of the Great Depression (Figure 15.2). 
Nominalism has prevailed throughout history. As such, financial instruments cannot be considered 
to be claims on goods and services. Creditors bear the inflation risk, debtors bear the deflation risk. 
While debtors may choose to issue inflation‐protected financial instruments (e.g., Treasury inflation 
protected bonds), it is their discretion not their obligation. 
An  implication  of  the  prevalence  of  nominalism  is  that  the  creditworthiness  of  an  issuer  is  only 
related  to  the  ability  to  make  the  nominal  payments  promised  (the  Ys  and  FV  in  the  fair  price 
formula)  and  creditworthiness  cannot  be  judged  by  looking  at  purchasing  power.  As  such, 
inflation/deflation does not represent a decline/increase in the creditworthiness of a government, 
or banks, or any other issuer of monetary instruments. 

212 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 

 
Figure 15.2 Consumer price index in the United States: 1774‐2015 (base: 1982‐84). 
Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics and Historical Statistics of the United States. 
A simple way to understand why Nominalism has prevailed is that issuers of financial instruments 
have very little control over output‐price dynamics. Businesses can try to be more efficient to meet 
the  demands  of  their  creditors,  and  households  have  some  influence  over  their  income  and 
expenditure sources. Governments have some part to play in the inflationary bias, and could do 
more to promote price stability by having structural policies that deal with employment and price 
stability, but even governments only have limited control over macro price dynamics. It would be 
unfair to ask the issuers of financial instruments to protect their creditors for something over which 
they have little control and which they have limited ability to influence.  
While cases of hyperinflation are often attributed to the government running the printing press, 
one  needs  to  look  at  the  underlying  economic  conditions  to  get  to  the  bottom  of  the  problem. 
Political, technological and natural causes are usually underpinning problems because inflation is 
usually not a monetary issue (see Chapter 11). The government printing monetary instruments en 
masse is just a last desperate response to a deeper underlying problem. For example, the German 
post‐World  War  One  hyperinflation  had  its  root  in  the  costly  Versailles  agreements.  The  recent 
episode  of  hyperinflation  in  Zimbawe  has  its  root  in  colonialism,  land  reform  and  decaying 
infrastructure.2 Table  11.1  shows  inflation  rates  for  several  countries,  all  around  the  two  world 
wars.  
 
Period 
Average monthly 
growth of prices 

Austria 
10/1921‐
8/1922 

Germany 
8/1922‐
11/1923 

Greece 
11/1943‐
11/1944 

Hungary 
8/1945‐
7/1946 

Poland 
1/1923‐
1/1924 

Russia 
12/1921‐
1/1924 

47.1% 

322% 

365% 

19800% 

81.4% 

57% 

Table 11.1 Examples of hyperinflation. 
Source: Studies in the Quantity Theory of Money. 
213 
 

 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
To conclude, the financial characteristics of monetary instruments lead to a stable nominal value 
(parity) in the proper financial environment (see Chapter 16 for improper financial environments). 
This  stable  nominal  value  plays  a  crucial  role  in  the  stability  of  the  financial  system  because  it 
provides  a  reliable  means  of  payment,  which  promotes  liquidity  and  solvency.  However,  these 
characteristics do not guarantee a stable purchasing power and so a monetary instrument may not 
be a reliable medium of exchange. A good part of the story of monetary systems has been to try to 
establish  a  smoothly  working  monetary  system  based  on  a  financial  instrument  that  is  both 
perfectly  liquid  and  of  stable  purchasing  power.  This  quest  has  been  unsuccessful  (only  perfect 
liquidity  has  been  achieved),  but  it  has  had  a  tremendous  influence  on  the  views  of  scholars, 
politicians and the general population about “money.” 

ACCEPTANCE OF MONETARY INSTRUMENTS 
Anybody can create monetary instruments. There are many websites that allow one to do so, and 
Figure 15.3 shows a monetary instrument that I created. Let us call it the E.T. note. My name is 
present and the note is worth 5 cities. The “City” is the unit of account. I deliberately chose a weird 
name for the unit of account to make the point that the unit of account is an abstract and arbitrary 
unit of measurement that has no essential relation to anything. While some units of account find 
their origins in weight measures,3 they  rapidly lost  that  connection (e.g., a pound sterling is not 
represented by a pound of fine silver, a pound sterling is just a pound sterling).4 Other names of 
units of account are just made up, sometimes to reflect political or cultural aspirations (the “Euro”), 
and have never had anything to objectify them.  
The E.T. note is a formal promise. By issuing it to bearers, I promise to take the note at par whenever 
it is presented to me. How can I get others to accept in payments that piece of paper? The answer 
depends on how credible my promise is to others: When will bearers have the opportunity to hand 
it back to me and what are the benefits for doing so? If potential bearers never see any opportunity 
to give the note back to me or if the reward for doing so is negligible, they will not accept the note 
in payment. As such, there are three ways to make bearers realize that my promise is credible: 

Forced  acceptance:  I  kill  you/cut  your  hands/put  you  in  prison/(fill  up  the  blank  for  any 
other miserable things I could to do to you) if you do not take it. The problem with force is 
that it is difficult and costly to enforce, and not a very effective way to promote confidence 
in the promise I made. Persuasion always works better than force so below are two ways 
to persuade. 

Convertibility into something valuable:  

214 
 

o

If you are one of my students: you automatically get an A in a course I teach if you 
hand  me some  E.T.  notes (the higher the  dollar amount in notes to  provide the 
higher the demand for the notes). This is good as far as it goes, but very few people 
take my courses. 

o

If you are not one of my students: When you give the note back to me, I will give 
you some gold worth 5 cities. That will help to widen acceptance provided that 5 
cities worth of gold is significant, and provided that others believe that I have the 
means to get the gold I promised. 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 

Impose  a  debt  on  bearers  that  can  be  paid  with  E.T.  notes  together  with  penalties  if 
payment is not performed: 
o

If  you  are  one  of  my  students:  handing  me  some  notes  counts  for  a  certain 
percentage of your grade. Acceptance will depend on how much doing so counts. 
For  example,  if  handing  back  a  certain  number  of  notes  counts  for  100%  of  the 
grade, then demand for E.T. notes will be high, if 1% demand will be low. I imposed 
a tax on my students. Some economics departments have done such a thing with 
great success to promote community services performed by students (DVDs and 
Buckaroos).5 

o

If you are not one of my students: Any debt you owe me can be paid by handing 
me some E.T. notes. Acceptance by potential bearers will depend on the extent to 
which others are indebted to me, as well as my ability to enforce the payments of 
dues  owed  to  me  (and  to  punish  if  payment  is  not  made).  Limited  number  of 
debtors, ability to evade dues, and lack of effective enforcement mechanisms will 
reduce the acceptance of my notes.  

These means of creating an initial and basic demand for monetary instruments can be combined 
but today, the ability of an issuer to entice, or to force, other economic units to become indebted 
to the issuer is the main means used to create an acceptance for a monetary instrument.  
In my classroom, my ability to do so is very high and, as such, I can acquire many things from my 
students (including their labor power) by paying them with E.T. notes. I can then use that power for 
my own selfish interest (to buy stuff from my students for my own enjoyment) or for more social 
goals (community services to be performed by students). Beyond my classroom, I have no ability to 
make others indebted to me and my ability to impose force or to provide something valuable in 
exchange for my note is limited. As such the demand for E.T. notes is small outside the classroom.  
The  same  applies  to  a  government  within  its  borders,  provided  it  is  credible;  as  such  the 
government can use that power to spend however it likes (hopefully for the benefits of its citizens) 
to fulfill the demand for its currency. Outside a country, leaving aside international arrangements 
that may promote a currency, the demand for a national currency will also be limited because the 
ability of a national government to impose debts on foreigners is limited. If the currency allows 
foreigners  to  obtain  something  valuable,  either  through  conversion  or  because  the  economy 
produces  things  that  foreigners  want  (see  below  for  other  sources  of  demand  for  a  monetary 
instrument), foreigners will net save the currency.  
The broader your “captive” population, the greater your ability to impose debts on that population 
and to punish it if it does not comply, and the more widely your monetary instrument is accepted. 
Guaranteeing convertibility into something else valuable will help further. 

215 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 

Figure 15.3 A E.T. note worth five cities. 

 

The monetary instruments issued by the government and banks are in high demand because they 
have a large number of debtors. Government’s ability to impose tax liabilities and other dues (and 
to throw people in jail if the tax is not paid) has been the preferred method to create an initial 
willingness to hold government monetary instruments. The higher the ability to enforce the dues 
and the lower the ability to evade the dues, the higher the demand for the government monetary 
instruments. When the credibility of a state is low, the state may introduce a conversion clause that 
promises gold or foreign currency on demand. While this occurred quite frequently in the past, the 
financial  basis  for  this  conversion  clause  decreased  dramatically  with  greater  political  stability, 
greater  monetary  stability,  and  better  enforcement  mechanisms.  Chapter  17  shows  why 
convertibility  into  gold  used  to  be  an  important  means  to  create  a  demand  for  government 
monetary instruments. 
Banks  create  monetary  instruments  by  swapping  promissory  notes  with  their  customers  (see 
Chapter 10). As such, the issuance of bank monetary instruments simultaneously creates debtors 
of banks. These debtors have an automatic demand for bank monetary instruments as long as banks 
have the ability to enforce the claims they have on non‐bank agents (banks can seize assets or have 
other recourses if payment is not honored). For those who are not indebted to banks, the bank also 
promises conversion at par into government monetary instruments. Today, the credibility of the 
convertibility clause is strong, given that governments guarantee the bank’s ability to convert (FDIC 
deposit guarantee, lender of last resort, and maintenance of an efficient payment system).  
To conclude, in the broadest terms, the greater the credibility of the issuer, the greater its ability 
to  find  people  willing  to  hold  its  promissory  notes.  The  acceptance  of  a  monetary  instrument 
depends crucially on the credibility of the issuer in terms of fulfilling the promise it made. Indeed, 
more people will have to make payments to that issuer or can get something valuable from that 
issuer. This provides the core reason why a specific monetary instrument is accepted. Of course, 
the same applies to any other financial instruments. Bonds with a higher credit rating are more 
widely accepted, companies who are about to go bankrupt see their share price fall toward zero as 
demand for them plunges. Beyond this core reason, bearers may hold a monetary instrument to 
perform transactions now and in the future with other bearers (see last section). However, if the 
issuer  decides  to  demonetize  its  promissory  note,  these  other  reasons  to  hold  a  monetary 
instrument do not maintain its fair value. 

TRUST  AND  MONETARY  SYSTEM:  TRUST  IN  THE  ISSUER  VS. 
SOCIETAL TRUST 

216 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
Acceptance introduces the central role of trust for a well‐functioning monetary system. Whenever 
there is promise, there is trust. But one needs to be careful to understand how trust matters. The 
answer  to  “why  do  you  accept  a  $20  note?”  is  usually  “because  I  trust  others  to  do  so.”  To 
understand why this does not go far enough (beyond the fact that this answer is circular), let us 
start with another financial instrument. 
Going back to the fair value example presented above. We saw that the nominal value at which a 
bond trades is critically dependent on the ability of the issuer to fulfill the promises made. Say that 
company X now declares it cannot make any of the payments owed on the bond. In that case the 
fair value of the bond is $0—there is no demand for the bond—, unless bondholders have the ability 
to seize assets of company X. Similarly, if the government states that it will not accept its $20 FRN 
whenever presented by bearers, the fair price of the $20 FRN is now $0—the demand for it falls to 
nothing. There is actually a complication for FRNs because they are secured by the assets of the 
Fed, so, during the time of bankruptcy proceedings, FRNs will have a value equal to the expected 
value of the assets of the Fed that are used to back the FRNs. Regarding monetary instruments 
issued by banks, bearers must trust that: 1‐ banks will convert at par into government monetary 
instruments  at  any  time,  2‐  that  they  can  clear  debts  owed  to  banks  with  bank  monetary 
instruments.  
This brings forward an important point. While societal trust (trust of bearers about other bearers’ 
willingness  to  hold  a  monetary  instrument)  may  help  financial  instruments  to  circulate  more 
broadly, the trust at the core of the circulation of a financial instrument is the financial credibility 
of the issuer (trust of bearers about the issuer’s willingness and ability to fulfill its promise). Without 
the latter, the fair value of an unsecured non‐recourse inconvertible financial instrument falls to 
zero. As one may expect, Chapter 17 shows that this trust is hard to earn. 
While all this necessarily follows from the logic of finance, it is not hard to find historical cases that 
illustrate it. The most recent one is the transition to the Eurozone. Figure 15.4 shows a 50 French 
franc note that the French government used to accept at face value in payments. From January 1 
2002,  the  French  economy  moved  to  the  Euro  and  its  government  refused  French  franc  in 
payments. To make the transition smoother, for the next ten years, the Banque de France allowed 
conversion of its notes into euro‐denominated notes at the rate of 1 euro for 6.55957 French francs 
(people could go to any branch of the Banque de France to get their francs converted into euros). 
Since 2012, the French franc notes are no longer convertible into euro notes and their fair value is 
now zero units of account. French franc notes may still have a value as collectible objects but not 
as monetary instruments, they have become commodities.  

Figure 15.4 A 50 French franc note. 
217 
 

 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
In the Middle Ages, coins did not have any face value marked on them. Bearers of the coins would 
have to periodically listen to royal proclamations in public spaces to know at what value the King 
would take his coins in payments, i.e. to know the face value. Chapter 17 shows that there were 
some drawbacks to that system. 
During the free banking era in the US in the mid‐1800s, Banks discouraged or refused conversion in 
species on demand: 
Banks sometimes used remote locations as their redemption points in order to avoid having 
to redeem their notes in specie. Another method used by the banks to discourage specie demands 
was to refuse to accept their own notes, except at a large discount. Customers were 
told  that,  if  they  waited,  the  notes  would  be  later  redeemed  at  par,  but  such 
promises were not always kept. The states attempted to require the banks to re‐
deem at par, but those efforts did not meet with success. (Markham 2002, 169) 
This problem was compounded by widespread forgery that reinforced the reluctance of banks to 
take their notes immediately at par, even in payments from debtors, because the truthfulness of 
the  notes  could  not  be  established.  As  such,  given  that  both  the  convertibility  promise  and  the 
payment  promise  embedded  in  banknotes  were  violated,  banknotes  traded  at  a  discount.  This 
problem was compounded by the absence of an interbank par‐clearing and settlement mechanism, 
which prevented the holders of banknotes to exercise their right of immediate maturity. 
While  none  of  us  thinks  about  the  ability  to  pay  the  issuer  at  face  value  with  its  monetary 
instrument  when  we  accept  them,  without  this  ability  there  would  not  be  a  well‐functioning 
monetary system. The credibility of the issuer, if strong, creates an anchor toward which bearers’ 
expectations about Ys and FV converge and provides stable nominal value. 

WHY ARE MONETARY INSTRUMENTS USED? THE MONETARY 
FUNCTIONS 
We now know why economic units accept a monetary instrument. While the necessity to pay the 
issuer and the availability of conversion create a demand for monetary instruments, economic units 
also want to use monetary instruments for other purposes, namely daily expenses, private debt 
settlements, portfolio choices, and precautionary savings. A monetary instrument can be used as: 

Means of payments: paying debts 

Medium of exchange: buying things 

Store  of  value:  keeping  some  purchasing  power  for  the  future  by  saving  monetary 
instruments 

The ability to perform these functions is not limited to monetary instruments as defined above. 
Also, some authors, who define monetary instruments according to their functions (see Chapter 
16), broaden the definition of monetary instruments to anything used as means of payment, and/or 
medium of exchange, and/or store of value. 
In any case, the ability of a monetary instrument to perform the previous functions is tied to the 
creditworthiness  of  the  issuer  of  that  monetary  instrument;  otherwise,  monetary  instruments 
would be a poor means of payment, a poor medium of exchange even the short run, and an even 

218 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
more terrible long‐term store of value than they currently are. This would be the case not because 
of inflation (or depreciation), but because their fair value would not be constant.  
Note that a monetary instrument cannot perform the function of unit of account because there 
cannot be monetary instrument without a unit of account. As such, the unit of account cannot be 
a medium of exchange, a store of value, or a means of payment. Stated another way, a monetary 
system necessitates a unit of account and carriers of this unit of account, but they have separate 
roles—one measures, the other records the measurement. 
A unit of account can take the name of an object but it has an independent existence from the 
object. This manifests itself in two ways. First, the object may disappear but the unit of account 
persists; or, second, the relationship between  the  unit of account and  the object  can  change. A 
cowry unit of account may exist without any cowry shell being used in transactions. If cowries are 
used, their value in terms of the cowry unit may change—one cowry shell may be worth one cowry 
at one time and three cowries at another time. 
Finally, going back to Chapter 13, if a  monetary instrument  is demanded for purposes and uses 
other than paying the issuer, then the issuer must issue more monetary instruments than what it 
gets back from its debtors. A net financial accumulation of monetary instruments by bearers means 
either that the issuer must be in deficit or that it provides more advances than what is repaid. Again, 
balance sheets are an easy way to explain this. To simplify, we may assume that there is only one 
monetary instrument in an economy that it is issued by the government, and that the government 
does not issue any other liabilities than its monetary instrument. We know that: 
ΔFLG ≡ (IG – SG) + ΔFAG 
(IG – SG) is the size of the fiscal deficit and ΔFAG is the net change (acquisition minus reduction) in 
the quantity of financial assets held by the government. In order for the net injection of monetary 
instrument to be positive (ΔFLG > 0) there are two possibilities: 
-

One, the government spends (I) more than it taxes (S) (taxes raise the net worth of the 
government as explained in Chapter 6). 

-

Two,  the  government  advances  (ΔFLG  >  0)  more  funds  than  what  refluxes  to  the 
government (ΔFLG < 0). That is, the government must acquire more promissory notes from 
the non‐government sectors (ΔFAG > 0) than the quantity of principal repaid by the non‐
government  sectors  (ΔFAG  <  0).  This  means  that  the  non‐government  sectors  are 
increasingly indebted to the government sector. 

Treasury  issues  government  monetary  instruments  by  spending  and  it  destroys  government 
monetary  instruments  by  taxing.  The  fiscal  deficit  is  a  net  injection  of  government  monetary 
instruments in the non‐government sectors (financial asset go up) without a net increase in the 
financial liabilities of the non‐government sector (financial liabilities stay the same) (see Chapter 6 
and Chapter13). This permanent net injection is possible because economic units want to net save 
the government monetary instruments for the purposes cited above. If economic units only want to 
hold government monetary instruments for tax purposes, the equilibrium fiscal position is zero; 
economic units have no desire to net save the government monetary instruments. 
This  point  is  very  well  illustrated  by  the  Massachusetts  Bay  colonies  that  issued  inconvertible, 
unsecured bills that they promised to accept in payment of taxes. The provincial government noted 
the importance of a tax system for the stability of its monetary system (this allowed circulation at 
par of the bills); but the government also noted that taxes tended to drain too many bills out of the 
219 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
economy  compared  to  what  was  desired  by  private  economic  units  (which  created  deflationary 
forces). This created a dilemma: 
The  retirement  of  a  large  proportion  of  the  circulating  medium  through  annual 
taxation, regularly produced a stringency from which the legislature sought relief 
through postponement of the retirements. If the bills were not called in according 
to the terms of the acts of issue, public faith in them would lessen, if called in there 
would be a disturbance of the currency. On these points there was a permanent 
disagreement between the governor and the representatives. (Davis 1900, 21) 
Private sector desired to hold bills for other purposes than the payment of tax liabilities, but, by 
draining most of the bills via taxes, the government prevented the domestic private sector from 
accumulating its desired dollar amount of bills. At the same time, taxes were at the foundation of 
that monetary system so they needed to be implemented as expected. Ultimately, the provincial 
government  was  unsure  about  how  to  proceed  in  terms  of  the  dollar  amount  in  bills  to  recall. 
Chapter 13 shows that some knowledge of national accounting helps to solve this dilemma: the size 
of the fiscal position (surplus, balanced, or deficit) should be left to be determined by what non‐
government sectors want to net save. 
Summary of Major Points 
1‐ A monetary instrument is a financial instrument. All financial instruments follow the same basic
rule of finance: the creditworthiness of the issuer is at the foundation of the nominal value of those
instruments. This creditworthiness is about the expected ability of the issuer to fulfill the promises
he made. 
2‐ A government promises to take back its monetary instrument at any time at face value and does
not  promise  to  pay  any  income.  This  means  that  the  fair  price  of  a  government  monetary 
instrument is face value. A government may also a promise a conversion of its monetary instrument
into something else. The same logic applies to any other issuer. 
3‐ Anybody can issue monetary instruments, i.e. zero‐coupon zero‐term securities; the point is to 
get  them  accepted.  This  can  be  done  by  convincing  others  of  the  credibility  of  the  promise
embedded in a monetary instrument. 
4‐  The  acceptance  of  current  monetary  instruments  at  par  is  mostly  based  on  the  ability  of  the
issuers to make others indebted to them and to enforce that debt. Banks make others indebted to 
them when they create monetary instruments because they acquire a promissory note at the time 
of the bank credit. Governments impose tax liabilities on most of their citizens. 
5‐ Monetary instruments are used mostly in transactions with other economic units than the issuer.
They can be used as a medium of exchange, store of value, and means of payment. In such cases, 
the issuer of monetary instruments must run a deficit or the non‐government sector must increase 
its indebtedness toward the government sector. 
6‐ While creditworthiness enables the creation of perfectly liquid financial instruments, this does
not  guarantee  a  stable  purchasing  power.  A  stable  purchasing  power  is  not  a  promise  made  by 
issuers of monetary instruments, but at long as relative price stability prevails this is not a problem 
for monetary system. 
7‐  There  are  two  means  for  a  monetary  instrument  worthless.  One,  it  circulates  at  par  but  its 
purchasing power is poor (hyperinflation). Two, prices of goods and services do not change but it
circulate at a very deep discount (default by the issuer or problem with the financial infrastructure).
8‐ A net injection of monetary instrument requires that the issuer deficit spends or that others have 
a growing amount of debt owed to the issuer.  
220 
 

CHAPTER 15: MONETARY SYSTEMS 
 
Keywords 
Unit  of  account,  medium  of  exchange,  store  of  value,  means  of  payment,  fair  price,  face  value,
redeemable,  convertible,  societal  trust,  reflux  mechanisms,  nominalism,  valorism,  secured, 
unsecured, recourse, term to maturity 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: What do you have to do if you want to issue a monetary instrument that functions properly? 
Q2: Why is societal trust not a satisfactory explanation of why monetary instruments are accepted?
Q3: If the creditworthiness of the issuer of a financial instrument evaporates, what happens to the
fair  price  of  that  financial  instrument,  if  it  collateralized?  If  there  is  no  collateral  but  there  are
recourses? If it is an unsecured, non‐recourse financial instrument? 
Q4: If the purchasing power of face value falls, how does that impact the creditworthiness of the
issuer of a monetary instrument? 
Q5: Can a unit of account be a medium of exchange? 
Q6: Can there be monetary instruments without a unit of account? 
Q7:  What  are  the  two  means  for  the  non‐government  sector  to  obtain  government  monetary 
instruments? 
 
Suggested readings 
Bell,  S.A.  (2001)  “The  role  of  the  state  and  the  hierarchy  of  money,”  Cambridge  Journal  of 
Economics, 25 (2): 149‐163 
Innes, A.M. (1913) “What is money?” Banking Law Journal 30(5): 377‐408.  
________. (1914) “The credit theory of money,” Banking Law Journal 31(2): 151–168. 
MacLeod, H.D. (1889) The Theory of Credit. London: Longmans and Green. 
Mann, F.A. (1992) The Legal Aspect of Money. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 
Olivecrona, K. (1957) The Problem of the Monetary Unit. New York: Macmillan. 
Smith, T. (1832) An Essay on Currency and Banking. Philadelphia: Jasper Hardin.  
Tymoigne,  E.  (2014)  “A  financial  analysis  of  monetary  systems.”  In  Papadimitriou,  D.P  (ed.) 
Contributions to Economic Theory, Policy, Development and Finance. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Wray, L.R. (ed.) (2004) Credit and State Theories of Money, 223‐262, Northampton: Edward Elgar 
 
                                                            
1 A  check  drawn to  pay  Mr. X  can  be  used  by  Mr.  X  to pay  Mr. Y.  See  “How  to endorse  a  check  to  someone  else”  at  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSE6RwPOlNM 
2 See Bill Mitchell’s “Zimbabwe for hyperventilators 101” http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=3773 
3  See  “Origins  of  currencies:  from  jagged  edges  to  flowers”  http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014/02/origins‐
currencies/ 
4 Olivecrona, K. (1957) The Problem of the Monetary Unit. New York: Macmillan. 
5  For  the  DVD  program  see  http://depts.drew.edu/econ/DVD/.  For  the  Buckaroo  program  see 
http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2009/07/berkshares‐buckaroos‐and‐bear‐dollars.html 

221 
 

 

CHAPTER 16: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
Why a gold ingot is not and has never been a monetary instrument 
Why money is not what money does 
Why monetary logic is not circular 
Why monetary instruments circulate at face value even if they are unsecured 
and inconvertible.  
What errors have been made in the past when setting up monetary systems 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
The following answers a few question in order to illustrate Chapter 15 and to develop certain points. 

Q1: CAN A COMMODITY BE A MONETARY INSTRUMENT? OR, 
DOES MONEY GROW ON TREES? 
Let us tackle the idea that “gold is money”. Clearly, a gold ingot is not a monetary instrument. There 
is  no  issuer,  no  denomination  in  a  unit  of  account,  no  term  to  maturity  or  any  other  financial 
characteristic. A gold ingot is just a commodity, a real asset, not a financial asset. Gold coins have 
been monetary instruments and are still issued at times (Figure 16.1).  

            Gold ingots 

 
 
 
                2009 $50 American buffalo gold coin 
 
Figure 16.1 Gold vs. gold coin 
 

Similarly, it is incorrect to state that “salt was money” because salt is a commodity that embeds no 
promise; however, Marco Polo noted that in the Chinese province of Kain‐du:1 
There are salt springs, from which they manufacture salt by boiling it in small pans. 
When the water is boiled for an hour, it becomes a kind of paste, which is formed 
into cakes of the value of two pence each. […] On this latter species of money the 
stamp of the grand khan is impressed, and it cannot be prepared by any other than 
his own officers. Eighty of the cakes are made to pass for a saggio of gold. But when 
these cakes are carried by traders amongst the inhabitants of the mountains, and 
other parts little frequented, they obtain a saggio of gold for sixty, fifty, or even 
forty of the salt cakes, in proportion as they find the natives less civilized. 
It seems that salt cakes issued by an emperor (“grand khan”) might have circulated as monetary 
instruments. However, a lot of details are missing from this description: 
1‐ What were the unit of account and face value? (definitely not the pound, it is China) 
2‐ What was the term to maturity? Were the cakes accepted in payment of dues at any time 
by the emperor? 
3‐ What  were  the  means  for  the  emperor  to  make  the  previous  financial  characteristics  a 
reality? I.e., what were the reflux mechanics? Did the emperor levy dues that could be paid 
with salt cakes at par? Did the cakes provide conversion into something? Etc. Bearers need 
to be convinced, so trust about the issuer must be established. 
223 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
4‐ The bit about the amount of gold that salt cakes could buy is irrelevant. Polo is just telling 
us that a commodity (gold bullions) was cheaper in the mountains. He might as well have 
told us about how different the price of apples and potatoes are in different parts of the 
country. 
The broad point is that monetary instruments can be made of a commodity but that commodity 
itself is not a monetary instrument. We all know the expression “money does not grow on trees.” 
Monetary instruments are not a natural occurrence and for a commodity to become a monetary 
instrument some specific financial characteristics must be added: a unit of account, a face value, a 
term  to  maturity,  among  others.  All  this  requires  an  issuer  who  promises  to  implement  these 
financial characteristics.  
Say a gold miner wants his gold nuggets to be a monetary instrument, for that to be the case the 
goldminer must promise: 
1‐ To distinguish his gold nuggets from other gold nuggets  
2‐ To declare what their face value is in terms of a unit of account  
3‐ To implement that face value by promising to take back at any time the gold nuggets in 
payments at the stated face value. 
Now the third condition introduces a problem because it means that the gold miner; must be willing 
to be paid in gold nuggets for his gold nuggets. A dubious business strategy, indeed!  
Most economists that work within the Real Exchange Economy framework, do consider monetary 
instruments to be commodities. Monetary instruments do grow on trees—there are fruits—and all 
debt payments are denominated in fruit.2 This creates difficulties to convincingly include “money” 
in models, and pushes to ignore the financial side of the economy (see Chapter 10 and 13) and the 
role of nominal aspects (see Chapter 11).  

Q2:  CAN  A  MONETARY  INSTRUMENT  BECOME  A 
COMMODITY? 
Yes. Numismatists are specialists at treating current and former3 physical monetary instruments as 
commodities  by  determining  the  price  of  banknotes  and  coins  as  a  function  of  their  rarity, 
peculiarity,  etc.  For  example  the  $1  FRN  in  Figure  16.2  is  worth  $1200  currently  because  of  its 
peculiar serial number. But that is not its fair value as a monetary instrument. If one buys this note 
and goes to a store or to a government office, the person to whom one hands the note will only 
take it for $1. The same applies to the buffalo gold coin above. One can use it to pay debts owed to 
the government but only $50 worth, not more nor less, even though the coin is worth thousands 
of dollars as a collectible item.  

224 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 

Figure 16.2 A $1 FRN worth $1200 as collectible items 
Source: www.collectorscorner.com 

 

The same applies also to gold and silver certificates. Here is how the U.S. Treasury puts it: 
Although gold certificates are no longer produced and are not redeemable in gold, 
they still maintain their legal tender status. You may redeem the notes you have 
through  the  Treasury  Department  or  any  financial  institution.  The  redemption, 
however, will be at the face value on the note. These notes may, however, have a 
"premium" value to coin and currency collectors or dealers. (U.S. Treasury) 
One can redeem them at the Treasury (to pay debts owed to the Treasury or to get Federal Reserve 
notes) or deposit them at banks, but only at face value. That is their value as monetary instrument. 
Their value as a collectible item is sometimes much higher. 
Finally, a fun example is the current case of the penny, which brings us back to darker times of 
monetary history (see Chapter 17). A while back, National Public Radio ran a segment on penny 
hoarders.4 These are people whose hobby is to hoard pre‐1982 pennies. Some even go to their local 
banks and spend their evenings triaging boxes of pennies. Why would they do that would you ask? 
Pre‐1982 pennies were made mostly of copper and, given that the price of a pound of copper tripled 
over the past ten years, the face value of a penny is half the intrinsic value (i.e. value of the content 
of copper): face value is 1 cent, intrinsic value is 2 cents, 100% profit from selling pennies for their 
copper content! Currently, there is one small problem with this portfolio strategy: It is illegal to 
destroy  government  currency.  However,  the  government  is  considering  the  possibility  of 
demonetizing the penny coin because it costs more to make than its face value, and because US 
residents mostly find it cumbersome to use. If the government ever demonetizes the penny coin, 
penny hoarders are ready to rush to their local scrap metal dealers. 

Q3: IS MONEY WHAT MONEY DOES? 
Francis Amasa Walker concluded in the late 19th century that “money is what money does.” This 
has been an extremely influential way of analyzing monetary systems in many different disciplines: 
economics, anthropology, law, among others.  
It  is  used  in  a  narrow  way  by  economists  who  use  the  Real  Exchange  Economy  framework  (see 
Chapter 11) and who focus on the function of medium of exchange. In order to avoid the problem 
225 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
of double coincidence of wants induced by barter (Joe has apples and wants pears, Jane has pears 
but  wants  peaches),  a  unique  commodity  was  progressively  sorted  out  as  best  for  market 
exchanges, the story goes. Thus, a monetary system can be detected by checking for the presence 
of a medium of exchange. Anthropologists, among others, reject this narrow functional approach. 
In primitive societies, exchange was not done principally, or even at all, for economic reasons and 
so the nonexistence of a double coincidence of wants was not a problem.5 The broad functional 
approach  classifies  anything  as  a  monetary  instrument  as  long  as  it  performs  all  or  parts  of  the 
functions attributed to monetary instruments. The distinction between “all‐purpose money” and 
“special‐purpose money” follows. 
A  main  issue  with  the  functional  approach  is  that  it  does  not  explicitly  define  what  “money”  is, 
which creates several issues: 

Inquirer may pick and choose depending on the circumstances, which may lead the inquirer 
to impose inappropriately his own experience to explain the inner workings of completely 
different societies.  

Inquirer may tend to assume that monetary instruments must take a physical form when 
they may be immaterial. 

Inquirer may exclude things that are monetary instruments but are not used for any of the 
preferred functions. Collectible coins and notes are monetary instruments as long as the 
issuer does not demonetize them.  

More broadly, too much emphasis is put on detecting things that fulfill the selected function and 
not enough effort will be devoted to a detailed account of the financial mechanics at play and their 
relation  to  the  socio‐politico‐economic  context:  unit  of  account  used,  how  the  fair  value  was 
determined and if it fluctuated, how the reflux mechanisms were implemented, etc. The example 
of the salt cakes above is an illustration of that point. Just noting that something is used as medium 
of exchange  or means of payment, and moving on  to something else, is a poor way to perform 
monetary analysis. 
Finally, inquirers using this approach may confuse monetary payments and in‐kind payments, may 
assume that there is a monetary system where there is none, may make a truncated analysis of 
monetary systems consisting mostly in a mere recollection of objects, and may miss the presence 
of a monetary system. For examples, by relying on the words of an Arab merchant and an Arab 
historian of the 9th and 10th century, Quiggin reports that more than a thousand years ago cowry 
shells: 
formed the wealth of the royal treasury […] [and] when funds were getting low, the 
sovereign sent out servants to cut branches of coconut palm and throw them into 
the  sea.  The  little  mollusks  climbed  on  to  the  branches  and  were  collected  and 
spread out on the sand to dry until only the empty shells were left. So the royal 
bank  was  filled  again.  Ships  from  India  brought  goods  to  the  Maldives  and  took 
back  millions  of  shells  packed  up  in  thousand  in  coconut  palm  leaves.  It  was  a 
profitable trade, for even in the seventeenth century we hear of 9,000 or 10,000 
cowries being bought for a rupee and sold again for three or four times as much on 
the mainland of India. (Quiggin, 1963, 25‐26) 
However, from this description, one cannot conclude that cowries were monetary instruments used 
by the king to finance the purchase of foreign goods and services. Indeed, it is not explained what 
226 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
the unit of account of the Maldives was and how cowries were monetized, that is, who, if anybody, 
issued them as financial instruments (did the royal authority issue them and was the royal bank 
ready to accept cowries in payments?), and what their relation the unit of account was. In addition, 
the role of cowries as monetary instruments is doubtful for the Maldives because cowry shells were 
worth nothing against goods “except by shipload” (Polanyi 1966, 190)—an extremely inconvenient 
means of payment and medium of exchange. What one can conclude from the description is that 
the Maldives authorities were involved in the trade of cowries with Indian and Arab merchants. 
They were exporting cowries against imports of other goods—a situation of bilateral trade, not a 
situation of a cowry monetary system.  

Q4:  ARE  CONTEMPORARY  GOVERNMENT  MONETARY 
INSTRUMENTS  IRREDEEMABLE?  OR,  IS  THE  FAIR  VALUE  OF 
CONTEMPORARY  GOVERNMENT  MONETARY  INSTRUMENTS 
ZERO?  
No.  A  well‐functioning  monetary  system  requires  that  all  monetary  instruments  be  redeemable. 
Federal Reserve notes are redeemable, silver certificates are redeemable even though they are no 
longer convertible in silver (see the Treasury in Q2), and bank accounts are redeemable. They are 
redeemable as long as they can be returned to the issuer, hopefully at their initial face value (see 
Chapter 15). They can be returned to the issuer through two channels: 

Bearers demand conversion into something else at a given rate: government currency for 
bank accounts, foreign currency for government currency, etc. 

Bearers pay the issuer: governments take their currency in payments of dues owed to them, 
as do banks. The payment allows bearers to avoid jail time and other legal problems. 

So to be redeemable a monetary instrument does not have to be convertible. As such, the fair value 
of  a  monetary  instrument,  its  present  value,  is  face  value  (see  Chapter  15).  In  the  past,  some 
governments did forget to include, or removed, a redemption clause: 
Paper money has no intrinsic value; it is only an imputed one; and therefore, when 
issued,  it  is  with  a  redeeming  clause,  that  it  shall  be  taken  back,  or  otherwise 
withdrawn, at a future period. Unfortunately, most of the governments, that have 
issued  paper  money,  have  chosen  to  forget  the  redeeming  clause,  or  else 
circumstances have intervened to prevent their putting it into execution; and the 
paper has been left in the hands of the public, without any possibility of its being 
withdrawn from circulation (Smith 1832, 49) 
Probably,  no  government  paper  money  was  ever  sent  forth  which  was  not 
expected  to  be  redeemed  in  full  value,  at  some  time,  although  that  might  be 
distant.  […]  Nevertheless,  the  issues  of  government  money  that  have  not  been 
redeemed, or the payment of which has been either formally or tacitly renounced, 
have been very numerous. (Langworthy Taylor 1913, 309) 
In that case, the fair value of a monetary instrument is indeed zero because its term to maturity is 
infinity, which means that its fair value is (see Chapter 15): 
P = C/i 
227 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
Given that no coupon was paid, P = 0. But this does not apply today because monetary instruments 
are redeemable on demand by bearers at a stable face value. 
All this does not seem to be well understood. For example, recently Adair Turner wrote (and he is 
far from the only one to have said so): 
Monetary  base  is  an  asset  for  the  private  sector,  but  for  the  government  it  is  a 
purely notional liability (with NPV equal to Zero) since it is irredeemable and non‐
interest‐bearing. (Turner 2015)  
This confuses irredeemable and inconvertible. The monetary base is redeemable, that is, it can be 
returned to the issuer at face value at anytime. This point of view also raises other problems: 

Remember that balance sheets are interrelated (see Chapter 13) so if a financial liability is 
worth  zero  in  one  balance  sheet,  then  a  financial  asset  must  be  worth  zero  in  another 
balance sheet. Turner makes an accounting error. 

Why would the private sector be willing to hold something that is worth zero? There is no 
benefit that comes from accepting such a monetary instrument, not even avoiding prison, 
because taxes cannot be paid with such government monetary instruments. 

If valued at zero then balance sheets should record a large loss of assets (and net worth) 
for  banks,  firms,  and  households:  Your  monetary  balances  would  be  worth  nothing  in 
nominal terms! 

Q5: IS MONETARY LOGIC CIRCULAR? 
No. As with any other financial instrument, the acceptance of a monetary instrument by anybody 
ultimately rests on the confidence in the issuer, not on the confidence that other potential bearers 
will  accept  it.  While  bearers  may  never  think  about  the  creditworthiness  of  the  issuer  when 
accepting  a  monetary  instrument  from  another  bearer,  one  cannot  infer  from  that  that 
creditworthiness is not essential for acceptance. One merely has to study the stock market to see 
that  this  conclusion  is  incorrect.  Most  trading  of  stocks  is  done  just  for  the  sake  of  trading  by 
humans  or  by  computers  focused  on  millisecond  price  movements.  This  does  not  neglect  the 
central role of the creditworthiness of the firm that issued the stock in sustaining the fair price of 
the stock. Financial mechanics cannot be denied. 

Q6:  DO  ISSUERS  OF  MONETARY  INSTRUMENTS  PROMISE  A 
STABLE PURCHASING POWER? 
No. If that were the case, issuers of monetary instrument would have defaulted on their promise 
continuously  since  the  beginning  of  financial  times.  They  never  were  able  to  provide  a  stable 
purchasing power, even less so since the end of World War Two (see Chapter 15). As such, the 
demand  for  monetary  instruments  would  be  nil  if  a  stable  purchasing  power  was  a  promise 
embedded in monetary instrument because the creditworthiness of the issuer would be nil.  
A stable purchasing power is not a promise of any issuer of monetary instruments. This is fine for 
most bearers as long as the purchasing power of monetary instruments is relatively stable in the 

228 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
short‐term. If one wants something that holds purchasing power over the medium to long run, then 
one should switch to other assets. 

Q7: ARE MONETARY INSTRUMENTS NECESSARILY FINANCIAL 
IN NATURE? 
Yes, remember: “money does not grow on trees.” While monetary instruments can be made of a 
commodity that commodity, does not tell us anything about the monetary nature of a thing. A gold 
coin  is  a  monetary  instrument  not  because  it  is  made  of  gold  but  because  of  its  financial 
characteristics. Gold is the collateral embedded in the coin. Similarly a house is not a mortgage, a 
house  is  the  collateral  for  a  mortgage  and  nothing  can  be  learned  about  the  inner  workings  of 
mortgages by studying how a house is made. 
The “primitive moneys” would need to be studied much more carefully to determine if some of 
them were monetary instruments. Just checking if they passed hands in exchange of goods and 
services, if they were used to pay for a bride, etc. is a poor means of determining the “moneyness” 
of  something,  given  that  one  cannot  differentiate  between  in‐kind  payments  and  monetary 
payments. We saw above that cowry shells were not monetary instruments in the Maldives but 
they were in Africa and a detailed analysis was necessary and done to establish that fact. 

Q8:  ARE  CREDIT  CARDS  MONETARY  INSTRUMENTS?  WHAT 
ABOUT  PIZZA  COUPONS?  WHAT  ABOUT  PRETEND‐PLAY 
BANKNOTES AND COINS? WHAT ABOUT BITCOINS? 
No to all questions. 
A credit card is not a financial instrument—it does not have a maturity (issuers of credit cards do 
not accept credit cards in payment) and it is not related to a unit of account (it is not a carrier of 
the  unit  of  account).  The  underlying  credit  line  is  not  a  financial  instrument  either.  The  line 
represents  the  maximum  dollar  value  of  a  customer’s  promissory  note  (called  credit  card 
receivables) that a credit company is willing to take on its balance sheet.  
Say  that  household  #1  wants  to  get  a  credit  card  from  Bank  A.  #1  fills  up  the  required 
documentation so A can check #1’s creditworthiness. #1 is approved by A and gets a $1000 credit 
line. Where is that recorded on the balance sheet? Nowhere, it is an off‐balance sheet item. The 
line is just saying that A will take on its balance sheet up to $1000 of #1’s promissory notes without 
asking again to check #1’s creditworthiness. Chapter 10 shows what happens when a credit line is 
used: A’s assets rise by the amount of the credit line drawn by #1, #1’s liabilities rise by that same 
amount. 
What about a pizza coupon? It has an instantaneous maturity (one can go to the pizza shop at any 
time to claim a pizza), it is a convertible, but it is not a financial instrument because it does not 
involve  monetary  payments  but  merely  in‐kind  payments:  it  converts  into  a  commodity.  If  the 
coupon could be used to pay debts owed to the pizza shop at any time and, if the pizza shop stated 
at what value it would take the coupon in payments, then it would be a monetary instrument. 

229 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
Figure 16.3 shows a set of play notes that my son got with his toy cash register. In order for the 
notes to become monetary instruments, the company that created  them would need to  do the 
following:  
1‐ Change the design: too close to the design of Federal Reserve notes even though it is a 
crude imitation. “The United States of America” should be eliminated because they are not 
issued by the United States Government.  
2‐ Promise to take the notes in payment: Bearers can pay the company with the notes to buy 
things from, and clear debts owed to, the company. 
Finally, bitcoins do not have any issuer and are irredeemable. The first problem prevents them from 
being  a  monetary  instrument,  the  second  problem  makes  them  valueless  as  monetary 
instruments.6 Bitcoins are commodities/real assets, not financial assets.  

Figure 16.3 Pretend‐play monetary instruments 

 

Q9:  WHAT  WERE  SOME  ERRORS  MADE  IN  PAST  MONETARY 
SYSTEMS? 
Given  the  characteristics  of  monetary  instruments,  they  should  circulate  at  parity  all  the  time; 
however, actual circulation at par does not define a monetary instrument. Par circulation is only 
the result of the inner characteristics of a financial instrument, the ability and willingness of the 
issuer to implement these characteristics, and the existence of a proper financial infrastructure that 
230 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
allows these characteristics to be expressed in the fair value. Only recently have there been well‐
functioning  monetary  systems.  They  are  not  without  problems,  but,  in  general,  they  ensure  a 
smooth processing of payments (see Chapter 14 when that is not the case) and can be used as a 
reliable medium of exchange (see Chapter 12 when that is not the case), both of which help to 
promote economic prosperity to some extent.  
For reasons related to poor techniques of production, inexperience, political instability, frauds, and 
poorly  developed  banking  systems,  it  took  quite  a  long  time  for  the  proper  characteristics  and 
infrastructure to be established. Below are some errors that were made along the way: 

No stamped face value: In the Middle Ages, kings cried up or down (i.e. changed by decree) 
the face value too many times. 

Free‐coinage: Anybody with gold can go to the mint and get coins stamped out of ingots 
(government keeps a portion of the ingots: seigniorage) 

231 
 

What is the problem? The term to maturity is no longer instantaneous as promised 
but  depends  on  the  expectations  of  bearers.  As  such  the  discount  factor  comes 
back into the valuation of the fair price and so the fair price is unstable and varies 
with the confidence of bearers about the issuer. 

Full‐bodied coins: At issuance the face value (FV) is the same as the market value of the 
gold content (PgG with PG the price of gold per ounce and G the ounces of gold in the coin)  

What is the problem? Fair price is zero unless there is a collateral or a recourse. 

There is a redeeming clause but no actual means to implement it because no payment is 
due to the issuer (Chapter 17 shows that taxes during the time of colonial bills were not 
always implemented when they were supposed to be), or conversion is very difficult (banks 
during the free‐banking era). 

What is the problem? Kings legalized counterfeiting. Anybody with gold could issue 
a  debt  of  the  king,  i.e.  make  the  king  liable.  Today,  in  the  United  States,  an 
equivalent  would  be  for  the  Bureau  of  Engraving  and  Printing  to  print  Federal 
Reserve  notes  for  anybody  who  came  with  paper  that  respected  the  Bureau’s 
specifications! 

No redeeming clause: There is no way to return to the issuer its monetary instruments  

What is the problem? Nobody had any idea what face value was: “there were so 
many edicts in force referring to changes in the [face] value of the coins, that none 
but an expert could tell what the [face] value of various coins of different issues 
were, and they became highly speculative commodities” (Innes 1913, 386).  

What is the problem? if ∆Pg > 0 => PgG > FV => coins disappear from circulation 
(melted into ingots or exported as commodities) 

Lack of a proper interbank payment system: in that case interbank debts are difficult to 
clear  and  settle.  This  creates  all  sorts  of  problems  going  from  delays  in  processing 
payments, to loss of purchasing power because some bank monetary instruments trade at 
a  discount  relative  to  other  bank  monetary  instruments,  to  full  blown  financial  crises 
because payments cannot be processed and so creditors do not receive what they are owed 
and in turn cannot pay their own creditors.  

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 

Q10:  DO  LEGAL  TENDER  LAWS  DEFINE  MONETARY 
INSTRUMENTS? WHAT ABOUT FIXED PRICE? 
Legal tender  laws state that, in court settlements, creditors must accept whatever is defined as 
legal tender in payments of what is owed to them. If they do not accept it, they cannot sue their 
debtors for unpaid dues. This does not mean that a legal tender cannot be refused during petty 
transactions. The current legal tenders in the United States are Federal Reserve notes, but plenty 
of shops and government offices refuse cash payments.  
Something that is legal tender is not necessarily a monetary instrument. In the past, commodities 
have been included in the legal tender laws, thereby, compelling creditors to accept payments in 
kind. Chapter 17 develops the case of tobacco leafs in the United States, which came about because 
of a shortage of monetary instruments. 
Something that has a fixed price is also not necessarily a monetary instrument. It may just be a 
commodity  managed  by  an  economic  unit  via  the  use  of  a  buffer  stock;  the  economic  units 
accumulates large inventories of the commodity to offset downward pressures of its price, and sells 
off its inventories to offset upward pressures of its price. 

Q11:  IS  IT  UP  TO  PEOPLE  TO  DECIDE  WHAT  A  MONETARY 
INSTRUMENT  IS?  WHO  DECIDES  WHEN  SOMETHING  IS 
DEMONETIZED? 
Public opinion about what is or what is not a monetary instrument does not matter and popular 
belief by itself cannot turn something into a monetary instrument. To use an analogy, one can use 
a shoe to hammer nails but it does not make the shoe a hammer. The fact that everybody thinks 
that shoes are hammers does not turn shoes into hammers. If everybody is delusional enough to 
believe the contrary, there will be many more work‐related accidents and productivity will drop 
because shoes are not built properly to hammer nails. In a similar fashion, if everybody wants to 
believe that gold nuggets, tobacco leafs, or grains of salt are monetary instruments, the payment 
system will not work smoothly and economic activity will suffer.  
As explained in Q2, some monetary instruments are used merely as collectible items. Some persons 
may also use monetary instruments as ornaments and for other non‐economic uses. These other 
uses do not demonetize a monetary instrument. That can only happen if a monetary instrument 
seizes to be a promise and that is up to the issuer to decide. 

Q12: CAN ANYBODY CREATE A MONETARY INSTRUMENT? 
Yes, as long as one does not counterfeit existing monetary instruments, one can do so.7 One should 
then have a monopoly over the issuance of such an instrument. Good luck getting it accepted! 
 

232 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 

Summary of Major Points 
1‐  A  commodity  cannot  be  a  monetary  instrument  by  itself,  it  needs  additional  financial 
characteristics fitted onto it.  
2‐ In order to detect a monetary instrument one must study the financial characteristics of what is
said to be a financial instrument. The fact that something is a legal tender, a medium of exchange,
or circulates at a stable price does not tell us much about the monetary nature of that thing. 
3‐  A  proper  monetary  analysis  involves  dissecting  the  financial  characteristics  of  a  monetary 
instrument  and  determining  if  the  means  are  available  to  make  these  financial  characteristics  a 
reality.  In  doing  so,  one  must  study  the  reflux  mechanism  and  the  issuer’s  ability  to  fulfill  the 
promises made in a financial instrument. 
4‐ A monetary instrument is accepted by bearers for the same reasons that a stock or a bond is
accepted by bearers: they trust the issuer’s ability to fulfill the promise embedded in the financial
instruments.  While  on  a  daily  basis  bearers  trade  stock,  bonds,  cash  and  other  monetary
instruments without thinking about how creditworthy the issuer is, if the latter announces a default 
that has an immediate impact on the fair price. 
5‐ Gold coins are not monetary instruments because they are made of gold. Gold is just a collateral
embedded in the coin. 
6‐  Inflation  and  deflation  do  not  reflect  a  change  in  credit  risk  for  the  issuer  of  monetary 
instruments. 
 
Keywords 
fair price, face value, legal tender laws, debasement, crying down/up the coinage, term to maturity,
collateral, free coinage, full‐bodied coin, redeeming clause, convertible, redeemable,  
 
Review Questions 
Q1: Explain why bitcoins and pretend‐play notes are not monetary instruments? 
Q2: Why may a legal tender not be a monetary instrument? 
Q3:  If  the  issuer  of  a  monetary  instrument  defaults,  what  happens  to  the  fair  price  of  that
instrument? What does it mean for day to day transactions of that instrument? 
Q4: Who determines that something is a monetary instrument?  
Q5: Why is a gold nugget not a monetary instrument? 
Q6:  What  was  the  problem  with  free  coinage?  Full‐bodied  coins?  The  absence  of  a  redeeming 
clause? 
 
                                                            
1

 See  section  on  salt  currency  at  the  Encyclopedia  of  Money  blog:  http://encyclopedia‐of‐
money.blogspot.com/2011/10/salt‐currency.html 
2 Kiyotaki, N. and Moore, J. (1997) “Credit Cycles,” Journal of Political Economy 105 (2): 211‐248. 
3 See http://www.theguardian.com/money/2016/may/14/zimbabwe‐trillion‐dollar‐note‐hyerinflation‐investment 
4
 Listen  to  “Penny  Hoarders  Hope  For  The  Day  The  Penny  Dies”  by  Zoe  Chase  at 
http://www.npr.org/2014/05/21/314607045/penny‐hoarders‐hope‐for‐the‐day‐the‐penny‐dies 
5 See Ilana E. Strauss’s “The Myth of the Barter Economy” http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/02/barter‐
society‐myth/471051/ 
6 See Eric Tymoigne’s “Fair price of bitzoing is zero” at http://neweconomicperspectives.org/2013/12/fair‐price‐bitcoin‐
zero.html 

233 
 

CHAPTER 16: FAQs ABOUT MONETARY SYSTEMS 
                                                                                                                                                                                    
7 For example of pround counterfeiters who take their art very seriously, see “'Counterfeiting is an art': Peruvian gang of 

master fabricators churns out $100 bills” at http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/mar/31/counterfeiting‐peruvian‐
gang‐fabricating‐fake‐100‐bills 

234 
 

 

CHAPTER 17: 
After reading this Chapter you should be able to understand: 
What some of the problems have been in setting up a monetary system 
How a functional approach to monetary systems can mislead an inquirer into 
the existence of a monetary instrument. 
Why medieval times were dark times for monetary systems 
 

CHAPTER 17: HISTORY OF MONETARY SYSTEMS 
The goal of this chapter does not to present a complete history of monetary systems but rather to 
illustrate the points and framework presented in the two previous chapters. The goal of this chapter 
is to show how to study the history of monetary system by taking a few examples. The financial 
mechanics at play are emphasized and linked to the socio‐politico‐economic context. 

MASSACHUSETTS  BAY  COLONIES:  ANCHORING  OF 
EXPECTATIONS AND INAPPROPRIATE REFLUX MECHANISM 
Massachusetts Bay colonies responded to the lack of currency by issuing bills of credit that “shall 
be accordingly accepted by the treasurer and receivers subordinate to him, in all publick payments, 
and for any stock at any time in the treasury” (Davis 1900, 10). The government spent by issuing 
the bills and levied a tax to allow bearers to redeem them. Initially, trust in the bill was low because 
of the political and financial risks: 
When the government first offered these bills to creditors in place of coin, they 
were received with distrust. […] their circulating value was at first impaired from 
twenty to thirty per cent. […] Many people being afraid that the government would 
in half a year be so overturned as to  convert their  bills of credit altogether into 
waste  paper,  […].  When,  however,  the  complete  recognition  of  the  bills  was 
effected by the new government and it was realized that no effort was being made 
to circulate more of them than was required to meet the immediate necessities of 
the situation, and further, that no attempt was made to postpone the period when 
they  should  be  called  in,  they  were  accepted  with  confidence  by  the  entire 
community […] [and] they continued to circulate at par. (Davis 1900, 10, 15, 18, 20) 
The population was unsure that the government would be willing or able to fulfill the promise to 
take back the bills at any times at par in tax payment. This lack of trust was compounded by the 
fact that, while the promise stipulated that bills could be returned at any time, in practice the tax 
levied to redeem the bills was initially implemented only once a year. Thus, when bills were issued 
initially, d was positive and bearers’ expectations about the term to maturity (E(N)) compounded 
the discount applied to the bills. 
1

 
The government asked for the help of Boston merchants who agreed to take the bills at a small 
discount  in  payments  from  the  government.  Ultimately,  the  bills  circulated  at  par  as  the 
government retired the bills as expected in a timely fashion.  
However, as explained in Chapter 15, tying the issuance of bills of credits to a specific tax created a 
dilemma. The private sector wanted to accumulate the bills but taxes prevent the accumulation of 
the desired dollar amount of bills. At the same time, taxes were at the foundation of the monetary 
system so they needed to be implemented as expected. Ultimately, the provincial government was 
unsure about how to proceed. One drastic method was to breach the promised term to maturity 
by postponing the implementation of the tax levy for several years. This was an effective default 
relative to the terms of the bills and a sure means to decrease the confidence in the bills and so 
their  fair  value  (ibid.,  108);  “this  fact  alone  would  have  caused  them  to  depreciate,  even  if  the 
amount then in circulation had been properly proportioned to the needs of the community” (Ibid., 
236 
 

CHAPTER 17: HISTORY OF MONETARY SYSTEMS 
20). The discount rate became positive again which lowered the purchasing power of bills given 
output  prices.  Later  on,  the  provincial  government  found  a  more  appropriate  solution  to  the 
dilemma by broadening the types of dues that could be paid with the bills.  
From  this  example,  one  can  learn  several  useful  lessons.  First,  trust  in  the  issuer  of  a  monetary 
instrument  requires  some  work  to  be  earned  but  is  central  for  the  ability  of  that  instrument  to 
circulate at par. Second, if the reflux mechanisms in place are inconsistent with the promise made, 
there will be problems to fulfill the promise made. Colonial governments promised redemption at 
the will of bearers but payments owed to the government were only implemented occasionally and 
narrowly. Third, once one has made a promise, one had better keep up with it; otherwise, bearers 
lose confidence quite quickly. 

MEDIEVAL GOLD COINS: FRAUD, DEBASEMENT, CRYING OUT, 
AND MARKET VALUE OF PRECIOUS METAL 
The most complex historical case regarding the fair value of monetary instruments concerns the 
medieval coins made of precious metal. There are three broad problems in this case. One relates 
to the face value of the coins, another relates to the intrinsic/bullion value of the coins (i.e., the 
market value of the precious‐metal content), and a third one relates to the interaction between the 
first two problems. 
Up until recently, the face value was not stamped so it “was carried out by royal proclamation in all 
the public squares, fairs, and markets, at the instigation of the ordinary provincial judges: bailiffs, 
seneschals, and lieutenants” (Boyer‐Xambeu et al. 1994, 47). This announcement declared at what 
nominal  value  the  King  would  take  each  of  his  specific  coins  in  payments  due  to  him,  thereby 
establishing  their  face  value.  Frequent  changes  in  face  value  led  to  confusion  among  bearers, 
especially so given that the spread of information was slow and inadequate. 
Coins made of precious metals were a way to partly deal with the uncertainty surrounding the face 
value of coins. Coins with high precious metal content would be demanded from sovereigns that 
could not be trusted, either because they cried down too much, or refused some of their coins in 
payments too often, or were weak politically. The higher the content of precious metal relative to 
the face value, the more limited the capacity of Kings to cry down the coinage because coins would 
disappear if the face value fell below the market value of the precious‐metal content. Coins would 
be melted (or exported as bullions) to extract the precious metal, because more units of a unit of 
account could be obtained per coin by selling the precious metal instead of handing over coins to 
the King. Finally, others (e.g., mercenaries) demanded payments in such a form because they did 
not expect to be debtors to the King or to meet someone in debt to the King, or to meet someone 
who would expect to make transactions with someone else indebted to the King.  
While the issuance of such coins was warranted given the poor political and financial stability of the 
time, they created several issues related to their intrinsic value and its impact on the fair value. If 
circumstances in the precious metal market pushed the value of the precious metal higher than the 
prevailing  face  value,  mint  masters  and  money  changers  would  melt  or  illegally  debase  (e.g., 
clipping and sweating) the coinage even if the creditworthiness of a King was excellent. In theory, 
illegal debasements would occur until the intrinsic value was brought back to the face value but it 
became such a habit that it continued even when the value differential was nil. Expectations about 
future increases in the price of the precious metal (or future crying down) also encouraged illegal 
237 
 

CHAPTER 17: HISTORY OF MONETARY SYSTEMS 
debasements,  even  if  no  profit  could  be  made  right  now.  Fraud  was  further  encouraged  by  the 
imperfect  production  methods.  Coins  with  the  same  denomination  and  date  of  issuance  had 
different weight and fineness even under the best circumstances. Coins also had uneven edges that 
made clipping difficult to notice, if done moderately.  
Fraud was problematic because it disturbed the uniformity and order that Kings wanted to establish 
to give confidence in their coinage; the stamp was a certificate of authenticity of the weight and 
fineness of the collateral embedded in coins. The King’s reputation was at stake. If allowed to go 
on,  the  country  would  be  left  with  a  coinage  of  an  insufficient  quantity  and  quality  to  promote 
smooth economic operations, and clumsy and deformed coinage encouraged forgery. In order to 
prevent this from happening, Kings actively fought any fraudulent alteration of the intrinsic value 
of coins. They did so through several means. One was to punish severely fraudsters:  
The  coins  were  rude  and  clumsy  and  forgery  was  easy,  and  the  laws  show  how 
common it was in spite of penalties of death, or the loss of the right hand. Every 
local  borough  could  have  its  local  mint  and  the  moneyers  were  often  guilty  of 
issuing coins of debased metal or short weight to make an extra profit. […] [Henry 
I]  decided  that  something  must  be  done  and  he  ordered  a  round‐up  of  all  the 
moneyers in 1125. A chronicle records that almost all were found guilty of fraud 
and had their right hands struck off. (Quigguin 1965, 57‐58)  
Another means was to weigh the coins that were brought to pay dues, and to refuse in payments 
all coins that had a lower weight than at issuance. Finally, two other ways were either to debase 
(decrease the quantity of previous metal to decrease the intrinsic value) or to cry up the coinage 
(increase the face value): 
debasements were only necessary alterations in the quantity of silver in the coins, 
in order to keep pace with the rise in the price of silver bullion in the market; […] It 
has always been necessary to regulate the quantity of metal in the coins, because, 
if too much was put in, they would immediately be withdrawn from circulation and 
sold for bullion, […]; if too little was put, they might be imitated. (Smith 1832, 34)  
In this case, debasement was not a means to increase the financing capacity of the King. It was a 
legitimate  means  to  preserve  the  stability  of  a  monetary  system  in  which  the  value  of  precious 
metal played a role as collateral. However, debasement was a limited solution to offset the rising 
price of precious metals because the risk of forgery grew with further debasement. Debasement 
also negatively impacted the King’s creditworthiness even though he may have had nothing to do 
with the problem and was trying to promote a stable monetary system.  
Crying up the coins was not constrained by the risk of forgery, but it created another problem, as 
potential inflationary pressures emerged when the money supply was raised unilaterally overnight 
in nominal terms. Price pressures in the precious metal markets could creep into the market for 
goods and services, and, once again, the King would be blamed. Finally, frequent crying up created 
further confusion among the public about the face value of coins; thereby, it reinforced distrust 
and demands for coins with a high content of precious metal. 
If one combines changes in face value, changes in intrinsic value, as well as their interactions, the 
determination of the fair value of medieval coins becomes complicated. On the one hand, abusing 
crying down led to two types of speculation; one regarding the occurrence of a future crying down; 
another concerning the face value of the coins relative to the intrinsic value. On the other hand, 

238 
 

CHAPTER 17: HISTORY OF MONETARY SYSTEMS 
developments in the precious metal markets affected expectations about future debasements or 
crying up of coins. 
What can we learn from this part of monetary history? First, an issuer should have some control 
over  when  a  collateral  can  be  seized  by  bearers.  If  the  collateral  is  embedded  in  the  monetary 
instruments, a rise in the value of the collateral above face value may lead bearers to seize it even 
if the issuer has not defaulted. Second, if a monetary instrument is made from precious metal, the 
intrinsic  value  of  the  coins  should  be  lower  than  the  face  value  by  a  margin  large  enough  to 
accommodate significant increases in the market value of the precious metal. Third, anchoring the 
expectations of bearers about the face value is important for a well‐functioning monetary system. 

TOBACCO  LEAFS  IN  THE  AMERICAN  COLONIES:  LEGAL 
TENDER LAWS AND SCARCITY OF MONETARY INSTRUMENTS 
The case of Virginia and other U.S. colonies in the 17th and 18th centuries is usually put forward to 
make the case that tobacco leaf was a monetary instrument: 
Tobacco was an accepted medium of exchange in the southern colonies. Quit rents 
and fines were payable in tobacco. Individuals missing church were fined a pound 
of tobacco. In 1618, the governor of Virginia issued an order that directed that “all 
goods should be sold at an advance of twenty‐five percent, and tobacco taken in 
payment at three shillings per pound, and not more or less, on the penalty of three 
years  of  servitude  to  the  Colony.”  […]  Virginia  was  using  “tobacco  notes”  as  a 
substitute for currency by 1713. These notes originated after tobacco farmers in 
Virginia began taking their tobacco crops to warehouses for weighing, testing, and 
storage […]. The inspectors at the rolling houses were allowed to issue notes or 
receipts  that  represented  the  amount  of  tobacco  being  held  in  storage  for  the 
planter.  These  notes  were  renewable  and  could  be  used  in  lieu  of  tobacco  for 
payment  of  debts.  […]Fines  in  Virginia  were  payable  in  tobacco.  For  example,  a 
master caught harboring a slave that he did not own was subject to a fine of 150 
pounds  of  tobacco.  The  Maryland  Tobacco  Inspection  Act  of  1747  was  modeled 
after the Virginia statute. The Maryland statute required tobacco to be inspected 
and certified before export in order to stop trash from being put in the tobacco. 
[…] Inspection notes were given for the tobacco that was inspected. Those notes 
were passed as money in Maryland. The use of warehouse receipts for tobacco and 
other commodities would spread to Kentucky as settlers began to cultivate  that 
region. (Markham 2002, 44‐45)  
Hence,  tobacco  leafs  served  as  media  of  exchange  and  so,  following  the  narrow  functional 
approach, were a monetary instrument. However, what the preceding description actually shows 
is  that  the  colonies  of  Virginia  and  Maryland  were  at  the  center  of  a  trading  system  of  tobacco 
which was central to the economy of these states. By accepting tax payments, or any other dues, 
in  tobacco  at  a  relatively  high  fixed  price,  governments  could  influence  tobacco  output,  could 
centralize output collection and redistribution, and make it easier for farmers—who usually did not 
have enough monetary instruments because of their scarcity—to pay their taxes. This, however, 
does not qualify payments in tobacco leafs as a monetary payment, but rather as a payment in kind 
at a price that was administered. Like in feudal times, taxes could be paid in kind.  
239 
 

CHAPTER 17: HISTORY OF MONETARY SYSTEMS 
However, the previous quote gives us some clues about the monetary system that existed. First, 
whereas tobacco was not a financial instrument, tobacco notes were a financial instrument of the 
government warehouses worth a certain number of pounds and collateralized by the value of the 
weight of tobacco that each note represented. Thus, tobacco notes may have become monetary 
instruments; nothing clear is said about that. Second, the provision of credit through bookkeeping 
was a common way to avoid the problems of barter: 
One method for financing private transactions in the colonies was through records 
of account kept by tradesmen and planters. Credits and debits were transferred 
among other merchants and traders. This was a form of “bookkeeping barter” in 
which goods were exchanged for other goods, and excess credits were carried on 
account. The barter economy that prevailed in the colonies required “voluminous 
record‐keeping … to carry over old accounts for many years.” This practice would 
continue through the eighteenth century […]. (Ibid., 46) 
The  bookkeeping  system  was  actually  more  complicated  because  credits  on  an  account  were 
sometimes transferable at par. Thus, a monetary system based initially on a unit of account named 
“pound” was present in the colonies, even though its functioning was not very smooth given the 
excessively high scarcity of top monetary instruments and the localized emergence of bookkeeping 
transfers. Tobacco leafs were not part of this monetary system. 

SOMALIAN  SHILLING:  THE  DOWNFALL  OF  THE  ISSUER  AND 
CONTINUED CIRCULATION OF ITS MONETARY INSTRUMENT 
In 1991, the Somalian government collapsed but its monetary instruments continued to circulate.1 
One can explain why by noting that: 
1. The state was central in establishing the trust about the currency prior to 1991. This is what 
anchored the expectations about the face value of the Somalian shilling. 
2. Given the confusion at the time the state collapsed, citizens just relied on habits, anchoring 
induced by the inertia provided by historical acceptance created by the state. 
3. If citizens believe that the collapse of the state is only temporary and the shilling will be 
reissued later then there is an incentive to continue using it. This is very different from the 
case of the transfer to the Eurozone when states spent years educating and informing their 
population about the demonetization of their currency, and gave a clear date about when 
demonetization would occur. In Somalia, everybody was left in the dark. 
4. The belief that shilling would be again the national currency was reinforced by two aspects: 
a)  local  governments  did  accept  them  for  tax  payments  at  least  temporarily  b)  armed 
militia, that substituted for government, started to forge some shilling notes to fill up the 
void left by the collapse of the official government, and, in addition, may have allowed dues 
to be paid in that currency.  
All this is similar to shares that continue to trade even as a company goes through liquidation and 
reorganization. Bearers are hopeful that the company will come back and be great again. 

240 
 

CHAPTER 17: HISTORY OF MONETARY SYSTEMS 

Summary of Major Points 
1‐  The  use  of  tax  liability  and  tax  enforcement  as  means  to  create  a  demand  for  government 
monetary instruments has been a common practice of government for hundreds of years. 
2‐  A  monetary  system  based  on  gold  or  other  precious  metal  is  very  inelastic  and  subject  to
monetary instability if gold is given too much importance. 
3‐  While  an  issuer  of  a  financial  instrument  may  default,  it  does  not  mean  that  its  financial
instrument  will  disappear  if  there  is  an  expectation  that  the  issuer  will  be  able  to  restore  its
creditworthiness in the future.  
4‐ Tobacco leafs were not monetary instruments in the US because nobody issued them, i.e. nobody 
made promises embedded in the tobacco leafs; they had no issuer. 
 
Keywords 
Debasement, legal tender laws, fraud, reflux mechanism 
 
Review Questions 
Q1: How did the inclusion of tobacco leafs in legal tender laws help the payment system?  
Q2: Why is crying down the coinage problematic? How did the existence of coins made of precious
metal limit the ability to cry down the currency? 
Q3: Was debasement mostly about improving the finances of the king by being able to issue more 
coins with the same amount of precious metal? 
Q4: How did the issuance of precious metal coins help to deal with the uncertainty of the time but
also created some instability. 
 
Suggested readings 
Bell, S.A.(2001) “The role of the state and the hierarchy of money” Cambridge Journal of Economics
25 (2): 149‐163. 
Boyer‐Xambeu, M.T., Deleplace, G. and Gillard, L. (1994) Private Money and Public Currencies. New 
York: M.E. Sharpe. 
Forstater,  M.  (2005)  “Taxation  and  primitive  accumulation:  The  Case  of  Colonial  Africa.”  In  The 
Capitalist State and Its Economy: Democracy in Socialism, Research in Political Economy, Volume 
22, 51‐65. 
Henry, J. F. 2004. “The social origins of money: The case of egypt.” in Wray, L. R. (ed.) Credit and 
State Theories of Money. Northampton: Edward Elgar. 
Hudson, M. and Wunsch, C. (2004) Creating Economic Order. Bethesda: CDL Press. 
Ingham, G. (2000) “Babylonian madness: On the historical and sociological origins of money,” in
Smithin, J. (ed.) What Is Money? New York: Routledge. 
Littleton, A.C. (1956) Studies in the History of Accounting. Homewood: Richard D. Irwin 
 
                                                            
1  For  a  summary  of  the  topic  see  David  Andolfatto’s  “Fiat  money  in  theory  and  in  Somalia”  at 
http://andolfatto.blogspot.ca/2011/08/fiat‐money‐in‐theory‐and‐in‐somalia.html 

241 
 

 

GLOSSARY 
Bearer:  A  person  who  holds  a 
financial claim on the issuer. In most 
cases, the bearer can sue the issuer 
if  the  promise  embedded  in  the 
claim in not fulfilled. 

Collateral:  Assets  held  by  debtors 
that  can  be  taken  by  creditors  in 
case  of  default.  Assets  are  usually 
sold  to  try  to  recover  some  of  the 
funds owed.  

Board  of  Governors:  The  head 
institution  of  the  Federal  Reserve 
System.  It  is  composed  of  at  most 
seven governors. 

Commercial  paper  (CP):  A  security 
issued by private companies with a 
short term to maturity (one year or 
less). 

Asset: Anything that is owned by an 
economic unit. 

Bond:  A  security  with  a  relatively 
long  term  to  maturity.  It  pays  a 
coupon periodically. 

Asset‐based  credit  (also  collateral‐
based  credit):  A  promissory  note 
underwritten  with  the  expectation 
that income of the issuer will never 
be enough to service the debt. 

Borrowed  reserves:  Reserves 
obtained  by  going  through  the 
Discount 
Window 
(reserves 
“borrowed” from the Fed). 

Conforming  mortgage: A  mortgage 
that  has  financial  characteristics 
that  conform  to  criteria  set  by 
Fannie  Mae,  Freddie  Mac,  and 
Ginnie Mae.  


Advance:  Quantity  of  funds 
provided by a bank to a customer in 
exchange  of  the  customer’s 
promissory note. 
Applied  vault  cash:  The  dollar 
amount  of  Federal  Reserve  notes 
that banks choose to use to comply 
with reserve requirements. 

Asymmetry  of  information:  A 
situation in which an economic unit 
knows  less  than  another  economic 
unit  at  the  time  of  a  contractual 
negotiation. 
Automatic  stabilizers:  Changes  in 
the  level  and  growth  rate  of 
government spending and of taxing 
that  occur  because  of  change  in 
economic activity, and not because 
government  decided  to  change  its 
spending  or  taxing  habits.  For 
example,  unemployment  insurance 
goes up automatically in a recession 
and goes down automatically during 
an  expansion.  Similarly,  tax 
revenues  fall  (rise)  automatically 
during  a  recession  (an  expansion) 
because  less  (more)  income  is 
earned by the private sector. 

Borrowing:  Temporarily  using  the 
assets of someone else. 

CAMELS  rating:  A  rating  that 
measures the soundness of a bank.  
Capital: See net worth. 
Capital  requirement:  Quantity  of 
capital  that  a  financial  institution 
must  keep  relative  to  the  size  and 
quality  of  its  assets  in  order  to 
protect  its  balance  sheet  against 
unexpected losses. 
Cash  flow:  Inflow  or  outflow  of 
monetary instruments. 
Cash  management:  A  deliberate 
management  of  the  level  and 
structure  of  monetary  balances  to 
reach a specific goal. 

Balance  sheet:  An  accounting 
document  that  shows  what  is 
owned  and  owed  by  an  economic 
unit. 

Certificate  of  deposit  (CD):  A 
promissory  note  issued  by  banks 
with a term to maturity varying from 
short to medium term. It is similar to 
a  savings  account,  except  that  it  is 
illiquid until maturity. 

Basis  point:  A  one‐hundredth  of  a 
percentage point, 0.01%. 

Clipping  coins:  The  act  of  cutting 
bits out of coins. 

242 
 

Consolidation:  The  act  of  merging 
two  or  more  balance  sheets  into 
one. 
Consumption 
(also 
final 
consumption): The use of goods and 
service for personal enjoyment.  
Contingent  liability:  A  claim  that  is 
due when a specific event occurs. 
Conventional  mortgage:  Any 
mortgage 
issued 
by 
non‐
government  financial  institutions. 
Unconventional  mortgages  are 
those  insured  by  government 
agencies  (such  as  the  Federal 
Housing  Administration)  and  that 
have unconventional characteristics 
that  accommodate  the  needs  of 
economic units with a higher chance 
of defaulting (e.g., low interest rate 
even though creditworthiness is not 
very good). 
Convertible:  The  ability  to  hand 
back  to  the  issuer  its  promissory 
note  and  to  get  something  else  in 
exchange. 
Coupon: The income received from 
a bond and other similar securities. 
It  is  an  interest  income,  that  is,  its 
payment  is  due  periodically  and 
represents a proportion of the face 
value of a bond. Bonds used to be in 

GLOSSARY 
paper  form  with  small  coupons 
attached to them that needed to be 
detached and handed backed to the 
bond  issuer  to  receive  the  interest 
payment due.  
Credit‐card  receivable:  Amount  of 
debt outstanding on a credit card.  
Credit  risk:  The  probability  that  an 
economic  will  default  on  its 
promise. 
Credit  standards:  Criteria  used  by 
bankers  to  determine  how 
creditworthy an economic unit is. 
Creditworthiness:  Expected  ability 
of  an  economic  unit  to  service  its 
debts on time in full.  
Currency in circulation: Officially, it 
is  mostly  the  value  of  Federal 
Reserve  notes  in  the  hands  of 
economic  units  others  that  the 
Federal  Reserve  banks,  the  U.S. 
Treasury,  and  banks.  Theoretically, 
coins  held  by  others  than  the 
previously cited economic units are 
also included in the definition. 

Debt  management:  The  deliberate 
change in the level and structure of 
outstanding debt to reach a specific 
goal. 
Debtization:  The  growing  use  of 
debt in daily economic activities. It is 
the 
counterpart 
of 
the 
financialization of the economy. 
Default: The action of declaring the 
inability  or  unwillingness  to  service 
debts,  either  at  all  or  according  to 
the previously‐agreed time table. 
Deficit:  A  budgetary  situation  for 
which spending exceeds income. 
Demand liability: A claim that is due 
at the will of the bearer. 
Discount trading: The market price 
of a security is below fair price. 
Discount Window: A means for the 
Federal  Reserve  System  to  provide 
collateralized advances to banks. 

Discount  Window  operation:  An 
advance of reserves to bank. Banks 
sign  a  promissory  note  and  in 
exchange  get  reserves.  All 
promissory  notes  must  be 
collateralized so if banks default, the 
Fed  takes  the  assets  banks  put  as 
collateral. 

Dated liability: A claim that requires 
payments  at  specific  periods  of 
time. 

Dividend: The income received from 
a stock. Its payment is a proportion 
of the profit of a company. 

Debasement:  A  legal  or  illegal 
decrease in the quantity of precious 
metal included in a coin. 

Crying  up/down  the  coinage:  The 
act  of  increasing/decreasing  the 
face value of coins by decree. 

Debt  deflation:  An  economic 
situation in which overindebtedness 
and  prices  interact  in  such  a  way 
that it results in deflation, defaults, 
and  a  general  decline  in  economic 
activity. 
Debt  liquidation:  The  act  of 
reducing 
the 
quantity 
of 
outstanding  debts  either  by 
repaying  them  or  by  writing  them 
off. 

243 
 

Economic unit: An economic entity 
that,  depending  on  the  level  of 
analysis, can be a household, a firm, 
a  government,  a  country,  or  other 
entity that makes decisions. 
Elastic currency: A currency that can 
be  injected  and  ejected  from  the 
economic system as needed. 
Excess  reserves:  Quantity  of 
reserves  that  is  kept  by  banks 
beyond what the Fed requires them 
to hold. 


Face  value:  The  price  at  which  the 
issuer  promises  to  take  back  its 
financial 
instrument. 
The 
outstanding  principal  due  by  the 
issuer. 
Fair price (also fair value): The price 
at which a security ought to trade. It 
may  or  may  not  be  the  price  at 
which a security actually trade (the 
market price). 
Fannie  Mae:  A  government‐
sponsored  enterprise  that  buys 
conventional  and  government‐
insured  mortgages  from  banks  as 
long  as  they  conform  to  a  set  of 
standards it sets. It does so in order 
to encourage them to acquire more 
mortgages at more affordable rates. 
It  buys  mortgages  by  issuing 
mortgage‐backed securities. 
Federal  funds:  The  dollar  value  of 
the accounts at the Federal Reserve 
banks. 
Federal  funds  market:  A  market  in 
which participants borrow and lend 
federal funds. 
Federal funds rate: The interest rate 
that  is  paid  (received)  by  an  entity 
that borrows (lends) federal funds in 
the federal funds market. 
Federal  funds  rate  target:  The 
federal  funds  rate  that  the  central 
bank wants to see in the market. 
Federal  Open  Market  Committee 
(FOMC): A committee of the Federal 
Reserve  System  composed  on  the 
board  of  governors  and  the 
presidents  of  the  Federal  Reserve 
banks.  It  formulates  monetary 
policy by meeting every six weeks or 
so  and  voting  on  the  course  of 
action in terms of the federal funds 
rate  target.  Presidents  (except  the 
president  of  the  New  York  Federal 
Reserve  bank)  rotate  their  voting 

GLOSSARY 
power  and  only  five  out  of  the  12 
can vote at any time. 
Federal  Reserve  Bank:  One  of  the 
twelve  banks  part  of  the  Federal 
Reserve System. 
Federal  Reserve  System  (Fed):  A 
government  agency  created  to 
provide the currency of the nation, 
to facilitate interbank payments, to 
regulate member banks, to promote 
an elastic currency, and to manage 
economic  activity.  While  it  is 
structured  with  some  for‐profit 
features, its activities and goals are 
oriented toward fulfilling the public 
purpose  expressed  in  its  functions. 
Also  the  Fed  can  operate  without 
making any profit. 
Financial asset: A claim held against 
someone  that  involves  contractual 
monetary payments. 
Financialization:  The  growing 
importance that the financial sector 
plays in daily economic activity. 
Financing  phase:  A  phase  of 
economic  activity  in  which  bank 
credit is needed to start production 
Fine‐tuning  the  economy:  Policy 
strategy  used  by  the  central  bank 
and the U.S. Treasury to ensure that 
an  economy  stays  close  to  full 
employment  with  stable  prices.  It 
involves  nudging  incentives  in  the 
private  sector  and  the  use  of 
automatic  stabilizers  to  move  the 
economy in a specific direction and 
to  ensure  it  is  neither  too  hot 
(inflation  pressures)  nor  too  cold 
(high unemployment). 
Fiscal deficit: See deficit. It results in 
the issuance of new Treasuries. 
Fiscal surplus: See surplus. It results 
in  the  repayment  of  existing 
Treasuries. 
Forward  guidance:  A  monetary 
policy  that  involves  influencing 
expectations  of  the  future  path  of 

244 
 

federal funds rate target through a 
specific  wording  of  current 
monetary‐policy decisions. 
Fraud: The act of gaining the trust of 
a  person  and  then  abusing  that 
trust.  It  is  the  act  of  deceiving  for 
personal benefit. 
Freddie  Mac:  A  government‐
sponsored enterprise that competes 
with Fannie Mae. 
Free  reserves:  Non‐borrowed 
reserves  held  beyond  what  is 
required. 
Funding  phase:  A  phase  of  the 
economic  process  in  which  finance 
plays  a  role  for  the  acquisition  of 
what has been produced. 
Funds:  An  outstanding  quantity  of 
monetary instruments.  

Ginnie  Mae:  A  government‐owned 
company that guarantees the timely 
payment of principal and interest on 
mortgage‐backed 
securities 
collateralized by federally insured or 
guaranteed  mortgages.  These 
mortgages are issued mostly by low‐
to‐moderate  income  households 
and  by  veterans.  By  doing  this, 
Ginnie  Mae  encourages  banks  to 
fund  homeownership  for  veterans 
and the poorer section of American 
households. 
Government‐sponsored  enterprise 
(GSE):  A  for‐profit  firm  created  by 
Congress to fulfill a public purpose. 
Such enterprises have been created 
to  promote  homeownership, 
education, the electrification of the 
country,  among  other  goals  that 
have been deemed relevant to fulfill 
the  public  purpose.  They  do  so  by 
encouraging  banks  to  lower  the 
interest  rate  and  underwriting 
requirements  on  promissory  notes 
issued  to  fulfill  the  activities  that 
comply  with  the  public  purpose. 

That  is  done  by  buying  those 
promissory notes from banks or by 
insuring  banks  against  defaults  on 
the promissory notes. 

Hedge finance: A financial situation 
in  which  an  economic  unit  is  able 
now and in the future to service its 
debts with its income.  
Household:  A  person  of  group  of 
persons living in the same dwelling. 

Illiquidity:  Temporary  inability  to 
pay creditors. 
Income‐based  credit: A  promissory 
note  underwritten  with  the 
expectation that the income of the 
issuer  will  be  sufficient  to  service 
the  debt,  if  not  now  at  least 
sometime in the future. 
Income 
distribution: 
The 
distribution  of  national  income 
among,  wage  earners  and  profit 
earners.  
Inconvertible:  A  promissory  note 
that is not convertible. 
Inflation  risk:  The  probability  of  a 
substantial  fall  in  the  purchasing 
power  of  future  cash  flows  and 
outstanding financial assets  
Interest  on  reserves:  Interest  rate 
paid on reserve balances. 
Intrinsic value: The market value of 
material (paper for banknotes, gold 
for gold coins, etc.) used to make a 
monetary instrument.  
Insolvency:  Permanent  inability  to 
pay creditors. 
Investment: The purchase of goods 
and  services  for  the  purpose  of 
producing goods and services. 
Irrational  behavior:  Behavior  that 
deviates  from  the  standard 
neoclassical  hypothesis  about 

GLOSSARY 
behaviors  (maximization 
preference ranking). 

and 

Issuer:  An  economic  unit  that 
created a promissory note and gave 
it  to  others.  That  economic  unit 
must  now  fulfill  the  promise 
embedded in the note. 

Job  guarantee  program:  An 
economic  policy  that  provides  the 
opportunities to work for all persons 
willing and able to do so. This helps 
make  a  person  more  employable, 
use  her  skills  for  more  social 
purpose  while  unemployed,  and 
provide some training experience. 

Lease: The loan of an asset with the 
option  to  buy  it  after  a  period  of 
time. 
Legal tender laws: Laws that dictate 
what  is/are  the  ultimate  means  of 
payment.  A  creditor  cannot  pursue 
further  legal  actions  against  its 
debtors if it refuses payment in legal 
tender. 
Lending:  Temporarily  parting  with 
an asset. 
Level‐1  valuation:  Financial  assets 
are  valued  based  on  their  market 
price. 
Level‐2  valuation:  Financial  assets 
are valued based on a proxy market. 
Maybe  because  there  is  no  readily 
available  organized  market  for  the 
assets held. 
Level‐3  valuation:  Financial  assets 
are  valued  according  to  a  model 
created  by  the  economic  unit  that 
holds them. 
Leverage:  A  measure  of  the 
indebtedness of an economic unit. 
Liability:  Anything  that  is  owed  by 
an economic unit. 

245 
 

Liquid  asset:  An  asset  that  can  be 
traded  quickly  without  incurring 
large losses of capital. An asset with 
a  relatively  stable  fair  price.  A 
perfectly  liquid  asset  has  a  stable 
nominal value. 
Liquidity  risk:  The  probability  that 
the  price  of  an  asset  will  fall 
substantially when its owner tries to 
sell it quickly. 

Monetary aggregates: Measures of 
the  money  supply.  M1  is  the 
narrowest indicator. 
Monetary  base:  The  sum  of 
reserves and cash in circulation. 
Monetary  instrument:  A  security 
with specific financial characteristics 
such that its fair price is parity. 
Money supply: The sum of currency 
in  circulation  and  other  monetary 
instruments held by the public. 
Moral  hazard:  An  increase  in  the 
risk taking of an economic unit once 
it  knows  it  is  protected  against 
specific  adverse  events.  The 
increase in risk taking increases the 
probability  that  such  specific 
adverse events will occur. 
Mortgage:  A  promissory  note 
backed  by  a  residential  or  a 
commercial property. 
Mortgage‐backed security (MBS): A 
bond  that  is  backed  by  mortgages. 
The  cash  flow  for  the  interest  and 
principal  payments  for  the  bond 
comes  from  the  servicing  of 
mortgages. 

Natural  growth  rate:  The  growth 
rate  of  productive  capacities 
induced by a given set of allocation, 
preference  and  technique  of 
production. 

Net  acquisition:  Acquisition  minus 
reduction  in  the  quantity  of  assets 
or liabilities. 
Net borrowing: The opposite of net 
lending. 
Net capital gain: Capital gains minus 
capital losses. 
Net  cash  flow:  Cash  inflow  minus 
cash outflow. 
Net  clearing  of  debt:  The  act  of 
acknowledging what two (or more) 
economic  units  owe  to  each  other 
and to calculate the net amount due 
by one of the economic unit. X owes 
$10 to Y, Y owes $3 to X, then X owes 
$7  to  Y.  Net  clearing  allows  to 
simplify  the  settling  of  debts  by 
reducing  the  number  of  transfers 
between debtors and creditors. 
Net financial accumulation: See net 
lending. 
Net  lending:  A  positive  difference 
between the change in the quantity 
financial  assets  and  the  change  in 
the  quantity  of  financial  liabilities. 
Over a period of time, an economic 
unit acquires more claims on others 
than  others  acquire  claims  on  that 
economic unit.  
Net  income: 
expenses. 

Income 

minus 

Net saving: See net lending. 
Net  worth  (also  net  wealth):  The 
difference  between  the  value  of 
assets and the value of liabilities. 
Nominalism: A legal view that states 
that  changes  in  the  purchasing 
power  ought  not  to  impact  the 
amount of principal owed. 
Non‐borrowed  reserves:  Reserves 
obtained  through  open‐market 
operations  with  the  Fed  or 
borrowed from other banks. 
Non‐financial  asset:  Something 
owned  by  an  economic  unit  that 
does  not  involved  contractual 

GLOSSARY 
monetary  payments  to  its  owner. 
That  includes  machines,  software, 
and goodwill, among others.  
Normalization:  A  monetary‐policy 
strategy  that  aims  at  bringing  the 
FFR back to more normal levels in an 
environment of an abnormally large 
quantity  of  excess  reserves.  The 
strategy also aims at removing most 
of excess reserves in the long run. 

Open‐market  operations:  The  sale 
or  purchases  of  securities  by  the 
central  bank,  on  a  permanent  or 
temporary  basis,  respectively  to 
remove  or  add  reserves.  The 
frequency 
of 
this 
market 
intervention  varies  depending  on 
the  central  bank,  with  the  Federal 
Reserve  intervening  daily  while  the 
European  Central  Bank  intervening 
weekly. 
Originate  and  hold  model:  Banks 
acquire  promissory  notes  and  hold 
them to maturity.  
Originate  and  distribute  model: 
Banks acquire promissory notes and 
sell them almost immediately. 
Output  gap:  The  difference 
between  the  growth  rate  of 
aggregate  demand  and  the  growth 
rate of aggregate supply. 
Outright  purchase:  The  action  of 
permanently  buying  a  financial 
asset, i.e. buying with the intention 
of holding it. This is done when the 
Fed  expects  that  some  of  the 
reserves  available  will  not  be 
needed  for  an  extended  period  of 
time. 
Overdraft:  A  negative  balance  in  a 
bank account.  
Overnight  interbank  market:  The 
market  in  which  banks  lend  and 
borrow  reserves  to  each  other  for 
the night. 

246 
 


Par value: See face value. 
Parity: See par value. 
Ponzi  finance:  A  financial  situation 
in  which  an  economic  unit  is  not 
able now and in the future to service 
its  debts  with  its  income.  It  must 
refinance  or  must  sell  assets  to 
service  the  interest  and  principal 
due, at least for a period of time. 
Portfolio: The set of assets held on a 
balance sheet. 
Position:  The  dollar  value  of  a 
specific  asset  held  on  the  balance 
sheet. This position can be long (one 
owns  the  specific  assets)  or  short 
(one borrowed the specific asset). 
Premium trading: The market price 
of a security is above its face value. 
Principal:  Outstanding  amount  of 
debt left to be repaid. 
Promissory  note:  A  contractual 
agreement  to  make  one  or  several 
monetary payment(s) in the future.  
Public  debt:  The  face  value  of 
outstanding  Treasury  securities.  It 
goes  up  with  a  fiscal  deficit  and  it 
goes  down  when  Treasuries  are 
repaid. 

Rate  of  return:  A  measure  of 
monetary gains in percentage rather 
than  dollar  amount.  The  amount 
earned relative to the cost of getting 
access to that earning. 
Real Bill Doctrine: A view according 
to which the financial assets of the 
Fed  should  only  be  composed  of 
self‐liquidating 
assets, 
i.e. 
promissory  notes  that  are  issued 
and  destroyed  in  relation  to 
economic  activity.  Firms  issue 
commercial  papers  to  finance 
production  and  take  back  the 
papers when they make a profit. 

Recourse: The ability of creditors to 
ask  for  more  funds  from  debtors  if 
the  sale  of  collateral  has  not  been 
sufficient  to  recover  the  funds 
expected. 
Redemption: When the issuer takes 
back  its  promissory  note  from  the 
bearer(s). 
Redeemable:  A  security  can  be 
returned to its issuer at some point 
in  time  through  some  reflux 
mechanisms. 
Reflux  mechanisms:  The  means 
available to the bearers to give back 
a financial instrument to its issuers. 
Refinance:  The  act  of  repaying  an 
old debt by issuing a new debt. 
Repurchase  agreement:  When  a 
party  agrees  to  sell/to  buy 
something today and to buy/to sell 
it back in the future. 
Required  reserves:  Quantity  of 
reserves that a bank must have. 
Reserves: See total reserves. 
Reserve  balances:  Accounts  of 
banks at the Federal Reserve. 
Reserve  requirements  ratio: 
Proportion  of  total  reserves  that  a 
bank  must  have  in  relation  to  its 
transaction accounts. 
Return  on  asset:  The  value  of 
monetary gains relative to the value 
of assets. 
Return  on  equity:  The  value  of 
monetary gains relative to the value 
of net worth. 
Risk  management:  Means  used  to 
protect  a  balance  sheet  against 
expected  and  unexpected  adverse 
shocks. 

Saving: Depending on the context, it 
can  be  the  unconsumed  monetary 
income or the change in net worth.  

GLOSSARY 
Scarcity:  An  economic  situation  in 
which there are limited resources to 
fulfill unlimited preferences. 
Secured:  Backed  by  a  piece  of 
collateral. 
Security:  A  promissory  note  that  is 
tradable. Depending on its financial 
characteristics, a security can take a 
different name such as stock, bond, 
or commercial paper. 
Settlement  of  debts:  The  act  of 
paying debts. 
Speculative  finance:  A  financial 
situation in which an economic unit 
is not able now and in the future to 
service  its  debts  with  its  income.  It 
must refinance the principal due at 
least for a period of time or must sell 
assets to do so.  
Speculation:  The  act  of  buying  an 
asset with the view of reselling it to 
make a capital gain. 
Stock  (also  equity  or  share): 
Security  that  represents  a  share  of 
the  company.  The  bearer  is  the 
owner  of  the  company.  Common 
stocks allow the bearers to vote on 
the major strategic decisions of the 
company.  Preferred  stocks  do  not 
give a voting right but guarantee the 
payment of a dividend. 
Surplus: The opposite of deficit. 
Surplus vault cash: Federal Reserve 
notes  that  banks  have  in  excess  of 
what  they  use  to  meet  reserve 
requirements. 
Sweating  coins:  The  act  of  shaking 
coins in a bag to remove tiny bits of 
precious  metal.  A  less  easily 
detectable  means  of  debasement 
than clipping. 

Tax  receivable  (or  payable):  Taxes 
that  recorded  as  due  but  not  yet 
paid.  

247 
 

T‐bill:  A  security  issued  by  the  U.S. 
Treasury with a term to maturity of 
at most one‐year and that does not 
provide a coupon payment. 
T‐bond: A security issued by the U.S. 
Treasury with a term to maturity of 
more than ten years. More loosely, 
the  term  is  used  to  mean  any 
treasuries  with  a  term  to  maturity 
greater than one year. 
Term to maturity: Time left before 
the principal on a security is due. 
Total  reserves:  The  sum  of  reserve 
balances and applied vault cash. 
Treasury’s  general  account  (TGA): 
Account  of  the  Treasury  at  the 
Federal  Reserve  that  Treasury  uses 
to spend. 
Treasury securities: See Treasuries. 
Treasury’s  tax  and  loan  account: 
Account  of  the  Treasury  at  private 
banks  that  Treasury  uses  to  collect 
funds  received  from  taxes  and  the 
issuance of Treasuries. 
Treasuries: Securities issued by the 
U.S. Department of the Treasury. 
Triffin dilemma: If a currency is both 
convertible  and  in  high  demand  by 
the  rest  of  the  world,  the  issuer  of 
that  currency  must  supply  enough 
but as it supplies more the promise 
of convertibility becomes harder to 
fulfill.  

Underwriting: 
The 
act 
of 
determining the creditworthiness of 
an economic unit. 
Unit  labor  cost:  The  ratio  of  wage 
over the productivity of labor. 
Unsecured:  Financial  claims  that  is 
not  backed  by  any  collateral  (e.g., 
credit receivables). They may still be 
some recourses for bearers. 

Vault  cash:  The  Federal  Reserve 
notes in the vault of banks. 
Valorism:  A  legal  view  that  argues 
that  the  principal  owed  should  be 
adjusted to maintain its purchasing 
power constant. 
Volcker  experiment:  A  change  in 
monetary policy operations toward 
a  looser  targeting  of  the  federal 
funds rate and a focus on targeting 
monetary aggregates.  

Yield: See rate of return. 
Yield  to  maturity:  The  yield 
obtained if a security is held until it 
matures. 

Zero‐coupon  security:  A  security 
that does not pay any coupon. 
 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 
Eric Tymoigne is an Associate Professor of Economics at Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon; and 
Research Associate at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. His areas of teaching and research 
include  macroeconomics,  money  and  banking,  and  monetary  economics.  His  current  research  agenda 
includes the nature, history, and theory of money; the detection of aggregate financial fragility and its 
implications  for  central  banking;  the  coordination  of  fiscal  and  monetary  policies;  and  the  theoretical 
analysis of monetary production economies. He has published in numerous academic journals and edited 
volumes. His most recent book, coauthored with L. Randall Wray, is The Rise and Fall of Money Manager 
Capitalism: Minsky’s Half Century from World War Two to the Great Recession. Tymoigne holds an MA in 
economic  theory  and  policy  from  the  Université  Paris–Dauphine  and  a  Ph.D.  in  economics  from  the 
University of Missouri–Kansas City. 
 

248 
 

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.