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United States History

August 25, 2016


Fall 2016

Mr. Jopowicz
kirk.jopowicz@sths.org

Page 1

United States History


August 25, 2016
Fall 2016

Mr. Jopowicz
kirk.jopowicz@sths.org

Page 2

Overview:
The course begins with an analysis of the complex trade relationship between
England and its American colonies known as mercantilism. By the late seventeenth
century, Enlightenment ideals had spread throughout the American colonies and
were a driving force behind the growing discontent with British imperial policies.
Following the conclusion of the French and Indian War in 1763 the British began to
reassert their control over their colonies and this led to increased dissent and
shared nationalism experiences among colonial leaders, which culminated in a
formal separation from the mother country and drafting a new republican form of
government to implement the ideals and promises of the Declaration of
Independence.
We will explore the reasons behind the British reassertion of control over their North
American colonies and the resulting resistance against the perceived imposition of
taxation and control by the American colonists. Gradually, resistance to various
acts of British taxation and control result in widespread calls for independence,
which results in war in the spring of 1775 and a formal Declaration of Independence
in 1776. This LAP concludes with an analysis of how the American Revolution
affected various groups of colonial citizens.

Learning Objectives:
1.
2.
3.
4.

5.
6.

Discuss the centrality of mercantilism to early British colonies, as well as,


the results of this particular economic strategy.
Understand the significance of the Albany Conference to include Benjamin
Franklins ideas on colonial inter-workings.
Understand the significance of the Treaty of Paris and how it laid the
foundation for unrest in the colonies.
Examine each Act of Parliament pertaining to the colonies to include why
the Act was issued; the reaction in the colonies to the Act; and,
Parliaments response to American action.
Understand how the Enlightenment influenced revolutionary thought in
America.
Discuss the role of the Great Awakening on the American Revolution.

United States History


August 25, 2016
Fall 2016
7.
8.

Mr. Jopowicz
kirk.jopowicz@sths.org

Page 3

Identify the intellectual underpinnings of the Revolution as provided by


Thomas Paine in Common Sense.
Analyze the content of the Declaration of Independence and its historical
significance.

Significant Terms and Individuals to Define:


Mercantilism, Navigation Acts, Glorious Revolution, English Bill of Rights, Toleration
Act, John Locke, natural rights, The Enlightenment, Voltaire, Baron de Montesquieu,
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, rationalism, Great Awakening, Jonathan Edwards, George
Whitefield, French and Indian War (Seven Years War), George Washington, Benjamin
Franklin, Albany Plan of Union, William Pitt, Pontiacs Rebellion, Proclamation Line of
1763, George Grenville, Sugar Act, Currency Act, Stamp Act, Declatory Act,
Quartering Act, Townshend Duties, James Otis, British East India Company, Tea Act,
Lord North, King George III, Boston Massacre, Boston Tea Party, Committee of
Correspondence, John Adams, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, John Hancock, John
Dickinson, minutemen, militia, Thomas Paine, Common Sense, The Boston
Gazette, The Gaspee Affair, Coercive Acts (Intolerable Acts), Quebec Act, First
Continental Congress, Redcoats, Continental Army, Lexington and Concord, Olive
Branch Petition, Bunker Hill, Loyalists, Patriots, Second Continental Congress,
Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence, republic, John Trumbull.

Daily Schedule and Assignments:

Class 1: Wednesday, August 10

[Special Schedule 12:30 Dismissal]

In Class:

Introductions, seating chart.

Read Online:

(1) Course Policies and Procedures, (2) Theme I: American


Foundation and Character, (3) LAP 1: Causes of the American
Revolution and the Declaration of Independence.
When reading from StudentPlus online, it is not necessary to print
these materials unless the teacher specifically instructs you to do so.
Most students will read StudentPlus materials from their tablet,
smartphone, or home computer. However, students may benefit by
keeping an organized binder full of printed readings along with their
notes, PowerPoints, and so forth, but this is not a requirement for the
course.

Read Text:

Be sure you have a copy of The American Vision by Appleby, et al.


Become acquainted with your textbook (i.e. read the titles of the units
and chapters, flip through the various appendixes and resources, and
review the chapter formatting and structure). In this course your

United States History


August 25, 2016
Fall 2016

Mr. Jopowicz
kirk.jopowicz@sths.org

Page 4

textbook will be your #1 reference source for significant events in


American History (not Google or Wikipedia!!). We will not read it start
to finish in a chronological fashion like in World History. Rather, we will
skip around depending on the theme and/or topic of the day. Do not
wait until the last night before the test to read all of the assigned text
pages from the LAP. Instead, access the LAP daily to ensure you are
reading the correct sections or pages of the text BEFORE we analyze
them in class and spread your reading out over the entirety of the LAP
duration. You will also likely find it necessary to re-read certain
sections of the text prior to quizzes and tests for optimal results. It is
also a good idea to outline, highlight, or taking notes while reading.

Class 2: Thursday, August 11


In Class:

(1) Review classroom policies, including grades, note-taking, and tips


for success, (2) overview of the Thematic Approach to U.S. History and
how this course will be very different than World History, (3) overview
of Theme I: American Foundation and Character, (4) overview of LAP 1:
Causes of the American Revolution and the Declaration of
Independence.

Read Text:

Ch. 3, Sec. 3 The Imperial System

Class 3: Friday, August 12


In Class:

Discussion and analysis: (a) What did it mean to be an Englishman (in


North America) in the eighteenth century? Were colonists different
than those on the home island? (b) What is mercantilism? What was its
effect on the relationship between the colonies and England?

Read Text:

Ch. 3, Sec. 4, p. 108 The Enlightenment and the Great Awakening

Class 4: Monday, August 15

[Schedule #5 Opening School Mass]

In Class:

(1) Discussion and analysis: (a) What was the Glorious Revolution in
Great Britain? How did it affect the colonies? How did the
Enlightenment and the Great Awakening movements influence colonial
society? How were they the same? How were they different? (b)
Imagine you were attending a sermon by Jonathan Edwards in 1745.
How would you feel? How would you respond? (2) Read and discuss
John Lockes Second Treatise on Government, p. 1064.

Read Text:

Ch. 4, Sec. 1 The Colonies Fight for Their Rights (p. 116 The French
and Indian War and p. 119 The Colonies Grow Discontented

United States History


August 25, 2016
Fall 2016

Mr. Jopowicz
kirk.jopowicz@sths.org

Page 5

Class 5: Tuesday, August 16


In Class:

(1) Discussion and analysis: (a) What was the significance of the
Albany Plan of Union? Why was it not adopted? (b) What role did
George Washington play in the French and Indian War? What was the
significance of George Washington to the colonies during this time
period? (c) What were the provisions of the 1763 Treaty of Paris? How
did the treaty affect the colonies? (d) Why did England begin to assert
more control over its colonies in order to extract additional revenue?
Were they justified? (2) Read online, Pontiac Rallies His Warriors, and
discuss: (a) What was Pontiacs Rebellion? How did the British
respond? (b) What was the Royal Proclamation of 1763? How did the
colonists respond? (c) Did the British break any previous promises to
the colonists? (d) What were the Navigation Acts? Were they easily
enforced? (3) Summarize events that fueled colonial discontent. Were
all colonists alike in their discontent?

Read Text:

Ch. 4, Sec. 1 The Colonies Fight for Their Rights (p. 120 The Stamp
Act Crisis and p. 122 The Townshend Acts)

Class 6: Wednesday, August 17


In Class:

(1) Discussion and analysis: (a) How did the Sugar Act, Stamp Act,
Declatory Act, and Townshend Duties affect the relationship between
Britain and the colonies? (b) How did groups such as the Sons of
Liberty respond? Were they justified?

Write:

Create a timeline of events from 1763 to 1767 showing significant


events and/or acts by the British Parliament to reassert their control
over the American colonists AND the reaction taken by colonists. Be
specific and detailed. Submit in class Tuesday for a homework grade.

Class 7: Thursday, August 18


In Class:

(1) Turn in homework timeline, (2) Discussion and analysis: (a) What
was the nature of colonial rebellion, including refusal to obey British
legislation, local street riots, propaganda publications, and violent
resistance in the form of the Boston Massacre? Were the colonists
justified in this rebellion? (b) Who were the Patriots? Who were the
Loyalists? (3) Begin watching Episode 1 of the HBO mini-series, John
Adams, Part 1: Join or Die.

Study:

Quiz #1 over ch. 3, sec. 3-4, ch. 4 sec. 1, and all material covered thus
far (5 multiple choice, 5 matching)

United States History


August 25, 2016
Fall 2016

Mr. Jopowicz
kirk.jopowicz@sths.org

Page 6

Class 8: Friday, August 19


In Class:

(1) Take Quiz #1 and review, (2) Continue watching HBOs John
Adams, Episode 1: Join or Die.

Read Text:

Ch. 4, Sec. 2 The Revolution Begins

Class 9: Monday, August 22


In Class:

(1) Discussion and analysis: (a) How did the Tea Act, Quartering Act,
Coercive Act, and Quebec Act affect the relationship between Britain
and the colonies? (b) What was the significance of the Boston Tea
Party? Was this an appropriate colonial response? (c) What was the
significance of the Gaspee Affair? (2) Finish John Adams, Episode 1.

Read Text:

Ch. 4, Sec. 2 The Revolution Begins

Class 10: Tuesday, August 23


In Class:

(1) Discussion and analysis: (a) What were the goals of the First
Continental Congress? Were the delegates united in their concerns
and proposals? (b) How did the fighting at Lexington and Concord
affect the colonists? (c) What were the goals of the Second Continental
Congress? (d) Why did some colonial leaders of the Second
Continental Congress want to extend the Olive Branch Petition to
George III? (e) What was the nature of the debate over using the militia
versus forming a Continental Army in regards to fighting the British?
(2) Read Thomas Paines Common Sense and discuss: What was the
significance of Paines Common Sense? What made this tract so
unique and popular?

Read Text:

(1) Ch. 4, Sec. 4 The War Changes American Society, (2) The
Declaration of Independence, p. 134-137

Class 11: Wednesday, August 24


In Class:

(1) Explore website: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/ (2)


Discussion and analysis: (a) Who wrote the Declaration of
Independence? Was this a collaborative effort? (b) Is the Declaration
of Independence a radical document? Explain. (c) What issues did the
Declaration of Independence fail to resolve regarding equality?
Regarding the newly established government? Was there a reason it
did so? (d) What overall impact has the Declaration of Independence

United States History


August 25, 2016
Fall 2016

Mr. Jopowicz
kirk.jopowicz@sths.org

Page 7

had on our nation? On the nations of the world? (2) Discussion and
analysis: (a) How did the revolution affect various groups of colonists?
Were all colonists patriots? Did everyone now think of themselves as
Americans? (b) Did the revolution change the societal position of
women and African Americans in the new political system? (c) Trace
the development of American Culture. What were some of its early
characteristics?
Read Ellis:

Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation, Preface: The


Generation pp. 3-19, and prepare for a 10 question multiple choice
reading quiz (open note and open book).

Class 12: Thursday, August 25


In Class:

(1) Reading quiz over Founding Brothers, preface pp. 3-19 (10 multiple
choice, open note and open book), (2) Discussion of Founding Brothers,
preface pp. 3-19. Questions: (a) Why were the major accomplishments
of the Founding Brothers during the Revolution unprecedented? (3
reasons) (b) What were the assets and liabilities of the men in New
York in 1789 as they began to govern under the new Constitution? (c)
What distinguishes the American Revolution from most, if not all
subsequent revolutions? (Explain) (d) According to Ellis, why were the
Founding Brothers successful? (He offers 4 reasons.) (e) Why does Ellis
refer to the individuals as Founding Brothers NOT Founding Fathers?

Study:

Begin preparing for Test #1 over all materials, readings, and text pages
from LAP 1.

Class 13: Friday, August 26


In Class:

(1) Overview of test, (2) Strategies for essay-writing in history class.

Study:

Test #1 over all materials, readings, and text pages from LAP 1 (25
multiple choice, 10 matching, 1 essay)

Class 14: Monday, August 29


In Class:

Test #1

Read Online: LAP 2: Creating a Constitution


Read Text:

Ch. 5, Sec. 1 The Confederation

Web Resources of Further Interest:

United States History


August 25, 2016
Fall 2016

Mr. Jopowicz
kirk.jopowicz@sths.org

Page 8

National Archives: the place to go for founding documents and related information:
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/
The History Channel: videos, illustrations, and other resources on the American
Revolution: http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution
The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, The Founding Era: podcasts and
other useful resources: http://www.gilderlehrman.org/institute/era_founding.php
PBS.org Chronicles of the Revolution: stories of key events during the Revolution
with imbedded links: http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty/chronicle.html
Patrick Henrys Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death speech:
http://theamericanrevolution.org/DocumentDetail.aspx?document=18
American.revolution.org: lots of great information and links on this site:
http://americanrevolution.org/
HBOs John Adams Homepage: lots of information to accompany the series we have
been watching in class: http://www.hbo.com/john-adams/index.html
Here are two great lectures by Professor Joanne Freeman as part of Yale's Online
Lecture Series on the American Revolution that deal with 18th century England:
(1) Being a British American https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9xzYVDWO0o
(2) Being a British Colonist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_ltTMQ6Gsg

Extra Credit Opportunity: (Up to 10 points on Test #1)


Tuesday, August 30

Due Date:

Choose a significant figure from this LAP who had a significant impact on American
history (e.g. John Locke, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, John Adams,
Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, etc.) and write a 2page biographical sketch of your person and his/her influence on American history.
Include at least one picture obtained online or photocopied from a book. You will
need to conduct research on your historical figure using either resources in the LRC
or online.
You must type the biographical sketch (double-spaced, 12 point font) and include all
bibliographical information (i.e. citation of information and images used) in the
format from your Students Guide to History. Use proper Chicago-Style formatting
for your bibliographical citation or you will not receive full credit.