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ANSGAR

Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Scandinavian
Pronounced: AHNS-gahr (German) [key]
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and gar "spear". Saint Ansgar was a
missionary who tried to convert the Danes and Norwegians.
BALDER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norse Mythology
Means "prince" from Old Norse.
CONRAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German
Pronounced: KAHN-rad (English), KAWN-raht (German) [key]
Derived from the Germanic elements kuon "bold" and rad "counsel". This was the name
of a famous 10th-century bishop from Switzerland. It was also borne by several kings of
Germany. In the English-speaking world it has been common only since the 19th century.
DIETER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: DEE-ter [key]
Means "warrior of the people", derived from the Germanic elements eud "people" and
heri "army".
DIETFRIED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: DEET-freet [key]
Means "peace of the people" from the Germanic elements eud "people" and frid "peace,
protection".
DIETHELM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: DEET-helm [key]
Derived from the Germanic elements eud "people" and helm "helmet, protection".
ECKHARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Derived from the Germanic elements eg "edge" and hard "brave, hardy".
EGON

Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Medieval German name derived from the Germanic element eg, which means "edge of a
sword".
ERMINTRUDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and ru "strength".
ERNEST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: UR-nest (English) [key]
Derived from Germanic eornost meaning "seriousness". The American author and
adventurer Ernest Hemingway was a famous bearer of this name. Also, this name was
used by Oscar Wilde in his comedy 'The Importance of Being Earnest'.

FRIEDHOLD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Means "peaceful ruler", derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and wald
"rule".
GNTHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Germanic Mythology
Pronounced: GUWN-ter [key]
Derived from the Germanic elements gund "war" and heri "army, warrior". In the
Germanic legend the 'Nibelungenlied', Gnther was a Burgundian king and the husband
of the Icelandic queen Brunhild.

GUNTRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This
was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
HKON
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian
Modern Norwegian form of the Old Norse name Hkon, which meant "high son" from h
"high" and konr "son". This was the name of seven kings of Norway.
HARTMUT
Gender: Masculine

Usage: German
Means "brave mind", derived from the Germanic elements hart "brave, hardy" and muot
"mind, spirit".
HERBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Pronounced: HUR-burt (English), er-BER (French), HER-bert (Polish) [key]
Derived from the Germanic elements heri "army" and beraht "bright". This name was
introduced to Britain by the Normans.
HILDEGARD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Scandinavian
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard
was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and
poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HORST
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: HAWRST [key]
Means "wood, thicket" in German. Alternatively it could be a blend of the names of
HORSA and HENGIST.
HULDA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scandinavian, German
Derived from archaic Swedish huld meaning "sweet, lovable".

JUTTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
German form of JUDITH. It could also derive from the Germanic name Eutha meaning
"mankind, child, descendent".
KUNIGUNDE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German
Pronounced: koo-nee-GUWN-du [key]
Derived from the Germanic element kuoni "brave" combined with gund "war". Saint
Kunigunde was the wife of Holy Roman Emperor Henry II.
KORBINIAN
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German

Pronounced: kawr-BEE-nee-ahn [key]


Derived from Latin corvus meaning "raven". This was the name of a 8th-century
Frankish saint who was sent by Pope Gregory II to evangelize in Bavaria. His real name
may have been Hraban (see RABAN).
CRESCENTIUS
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen which derives from Latin crescere "to grow".
LAMBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, German, Dutch
Pronounced: LAM-burt (English), lam-BER (French), LAHM-bert (German), LAHMburt (Dutch) [key]
Derived from the Germanic elements land "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of
Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for
adultery.
LOTHAR
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: LO-tahr [key]
Means "famous army" from the Germanic elements hlud "fame" and heri "army". This
was a 9th-century Frankish king, the son of Louis I, who ruled the region called Lorraine.
Also, rulers of the Holy Roman Empire have had this name.
LUITGER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Derived from the Germanic elements liut "people" and ger "spear".
MANFRED
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Polish
Pronounced: MAHN-fret (German, Polish), MAHN-frut (Dutch) [key]
Derived from the Germanic elements magin "strength" and frid "peace". This is the name
of the main character in Byron's drama 'Manfred'. This name was also borne by Manfred
von Richthofen, the German pilot in World War I who was known as the Red Baron.
MEINRAD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Derived from the Germanic elements magin "strength, might" and rad "counsel". Saint
Meinrad was a 9th-century hermit who founded the Benedictine abbey at Einsiedeln in
Switzerland.

NORBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, English, Dutch, Hungarian, Polish
Pronounced: NAWR-bert (German, Polish), NOR-burt (English), NAWR-burt (Dutch)
[key]
Derived from the Germanic elements nord "north" and beraht "bright". This was the
name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
OLAF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Pronounced: O-lahf (German, Dutch), O-laf (English) [key]
From the Old Norse name leifr meaning "ancestor's descendent", derived from the
elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendent". This was the name of five kings of
Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
RADULF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Derived from the Germanic elements rad meaning "counsel" and wulf meaning "wolf".
REYNARD
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RE-nard, RAY-nard [key]
From the Germanic name Reginhard, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hard
"brave, hardy". This name was borne by Reynard the fox, a sly character in medieval
fables.
RUDOLF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Scandinavian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene
Pronounced: ROO-dawlf (German), RUW-dawlf (Polish), ROO-dahlf (English) [key]
From the Germanic name Hrodwulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame"
and wulf "wolf". This was the name of rulers of the Burgundy, the Holy Roman Empire,
and Austria. A lake in Africa also bears this name.
ULRICH
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, French
Pronounced: UWL-rikh (German) [key]
Means "prosperity and power" from Germanic uodal "prosperity" combined with ric
"power". This was the name of two German saints. Another famous bearer was Ulrich
Zwingli, leader of the Reformation in Switzerland.

WERTHER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Derived from the Germanic elements wert "worthy" and heri "army". This name was
used by Goethe in his novel 'The Sorrows of Young Werther'.
WOLFRAM
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn "raven".

ADOLF
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German
Pronounced: AH-dawlf (German), AD-ahlf (English), AY-dahlf (English) [key]
Modern form of the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the
Germanic elements adal meaning "noble" and wulf. Association with Adolf Hitler has
lessened the use of this name. He was the leader of the fascist Nazi party in Germany
during World War II.

ALBERT
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, French, Slovene, Polish, Russian, Dutch
Other Scripts: (Russian)
Pronounced: AL-burt (English), al-BER (French), AHL-bert (Polish) [key]
From the Germanic name Adalbrecht which meant "bright nobility", composed of the
elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". It was introduced by the Normans to England,
where it replaced the Old English cognate elbeorht.
This name, in its various forms, has belonged to kings of Belgium and Germany, as well
as others among European royalty. Other famous bearers include the physicist Albert
Einstein, creator of the theory of relativity, and Albert Camus, a French-Algerian writer
and philosopher.

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